US20120294963A1 - Apparatus and Method for Injection Molding at Low Constant Pressure - Google Patents

Apparatus and Method for Injection Molding at Low Constant Pressure Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20120294963A1
US20120294963A1 US13/476,045 US201213476045A US2012294963A1 US 20120294963 A1 US20120294963 A1 US 20120294963A1 US 201213476045 A US201213476045 A US 201213476045A US 2012294963 A1 US2012294963 A1 US 2012294963A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
mold
injection molding
molten plastic
molding apparatus
injection
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13/476,045
Inventor
Gene Michael Altonen
Ralph Edwin Neufarth
Gary Francis Schiller
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Imflux Inc
Original Assignee
Procter and Gamble Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201161488564P priority Critical
Application filed by Procter and Gamble Co filed Critical Procter and Gamble Co
Priority to US13/476,045 priority patent/US20120294963A1/en
Assigned to THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY reassignment THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ALTONEN, GENE MICHAEL, NEUFARTH, RALPH EDWIN, SCHILLER, Gary Francis
Priority claimed from CN201280073315.8A external-priority patent/CN104321182A/en
Priority claimed from US13/682,456 external-priority patent/US20130221575A1/en
Publication of US20120294963A1 publication Critical patent/US20120294963A1/en
Priority claimed from TW102102119A external-priority patent/TW201402302A/en
Assigned to IMFLUX INC reassignment IMFLUX INC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C45/00Injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C45/17Component parts, details or accessories; Auxiliary operations
    • B29C45/76Measuring, controlling or regulating
    • B29C45/77Measuring, controlling or regulating of velocity or pressure of moulding material
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C2945/00Indexing scheme relating to injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould
    • B29C2945/76Measuring, controlling or regulating
    • B29C2945/76494Controlled parameter
    • B29C2945/76498Pressure
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C2945/00Indexing scheme relating to injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould
    • B29C2945/76Measuring, controlling or regulating
    • B29C2945/76822Phase or stage of control
    • B29C2945/76859Injection
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29KINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES B29B, B29C OR B29D, RELATING TO MOULDING MATERIALS OR TO MATERIALS FOR MOULDS, REINFORCEMENTS, FILLERS OR PREFORMED PARTS, e.g. INSERTS
    • B29K2905/00Use of metals, their alloys or their compounds, as mould material
    • B29K2905/02Aluminium
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29KINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES B29B, B29C OR B29D, RELATING TO MOULDING MATERIALS OR TO MATERIALS FOR MOULDS, REINFORCEMENTS, FILLERS OR PREFORMED PARTS, e.g. INSERTS
    • B29K2995/00Properties of moulding materials, reinforcements, fillers, preformed parts or moulds
    • B29K2995/0012Properties of moulding materials, reinforcements, fillers, preformed parts or moulds having particular thermal properties
    • B29K2995/0013Conductive

Abstract

A low constant pressure injection molding machine forms molded parts by injecting molten thermoplastic material into a mold cavity at low substantially constant pressures of 6,000 psi and less. As a result, the low constant pressure injection molding machine includes a mold formed of easily machineable material that is less costly and faster to manufacture than typical injection molds.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/488,564, filed May 20, 2011.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention relates to apparatuses and methods for injection molding and, more particularly, to apparatuses and methods for producing injection molded parts at low constant pressure.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Injection molding is a technology commonly used for high-volume manufacturing of parts made of meltable material, most commonly of parts made of thermoplastic polymers. During a repetitive injection molding process, a plastic resin, most often in the form of small beads or pellets, is introduced to an injection molding machine that melts the resin beads under heat, pressure, and shear. The now molten resin is forcefully injected into a mold cavity having a particular cavity shape. The injected plastic is held under pressure in the mold cavity, cooled, and then removed as a solidified part having a shape that essentially duplicates the cavity shape of the mold. The mold itself may have a single cavity or multiple cavities. Each cavity may be connected to a flow channel by a gate, which directs the flow of the molten resin into the cavity. A molded part may have one or more gates. It is common for large parts to have two, three, or more gates to reduce the flow distance the polymer must travel to fill the molded part. The one or multiple gates per cavity may be located anywhere on the part geometry, and possess any cross-section shape such as being essentially circular or be shaped with an aspect ratio of 1.1 or greater. Thus, a typical injection molding procedure comprises four basic operations: (1) heating the plastic in the injection molding machine to allow it to flow under pressure; (2) injecting the melted plastic into a mold cavity or cavities defined between two mold halves that have been closed; (3) allowing the plastic to cool and harden in the cavity or cavities while under pressure; and (4) opening the mold halves to cause the part to be ejected from the mold.
  • The molten plastic resin is injected into the mold cavity and the plastic resin is forcibly pushed through the cavity by an injection element of the injection molding machine until the plastic resin reaches the location in the cavity furthest from the gate. The resulting length and wall thickness of the part is a result of the shape of the mold cavity.
  • While it may be desirous to reduce the wall thickness of injected molded parts to reduce the plastic content, and thus cost, of the final part; reducing wall thickness using a conventional injection molding process can be an expensive and a non-trivial task, particularly when designing for wall thicknesses less than 15, 10, 5, 3, or 1.0 millimeter. As a liquid plastic resin is introduced into an injection mold in a conventional injection molding process, the material adjacent to the walls of the cavity immediately begins to “freeze,” or solidify and cure. As the material flows through the mold, a boundary layer of material is formed against the sides of the mold. As the mold continues to fill, the boundary layer continues to thicken, eventually closing off the path of material flow and preventing additional material from flowing into the mold. The plastic resin freezing on the walls of the mold is exacerbated when the molds are cooled, a technique used to reduce the cycle time of each part and increase machine throughput.
  • There may also be a desire to design a part and the corresponding mold such that the liquid plastic resin flows from areas having the thickest wall thickness towards areas having the thinnest wall thickness. Increasing thickness in certain regions of the mold can ensure that sufficient material flows into areas where strength and thickness is needed. This “thick-to-thin” flow path requirement can make for inefficient use of plastic and result in higher part cost for injection molded part manufacturers because additional material must be molded into parts at locations where the material is unnecessary.
  • One method to decrease the wall thickness of a part is to increase the pressure of the liquid plastic resin as it is introduced into the mold. By increasing the pressure, the molding machine can continue to force liquid material into the mold before the flow path has closed off. Increasing the pressure, however, has both cost and performance downsides. As the pressure required to mold the component increases, the molding equipment must be strong enough to withstand the additional pressure, which generally equates to being more expensive. A manufacturer may have to purchase new equipment to accommodate these increased pressures. Thus, a decrease in the wall thickness of a given part can result in significant capital expenses to accomplish the manufacturing via conventional injection molding techniques.
  • Additionally, when the liquid plastic material flows into the injection mold and rapidly freezes, the polymer chains retain the high levels of stress that were present when the polymer was in liquid form. The frozen polymer molecules retain higher levels of flow induced orientation when molecular orientation is locked in the part, resulting in a frozen-in stressed state. These “molded-in” stresses can lead to parts that warp or sink following molding, have reduced mechanical properties, and have reduced resistance to chemical exposure. The reduced mechanical properties are particularly important to control and/or minimize for injection molded parts such as thinwall tubs, living hinge parts, and closures.
  • In an effort to avoid some of the drawbacks mentioned above, many conventional injection molding operations use shear-thinning plastic material to improve flow of the plastic material into the mold cavity. As the shear-thinning plastic material is injected into the mold cavity, shear forces generated between the plastic material and the mold cavity walls tend to reduce viscosity of the plastic material, thereby allowing the plastic material to flow more freely and easily into the mold cavity. As a result, it is possible to fill thinwall parts fast enough to avoid the material freezing off before the mold is completely filled.
  • Reduction in viscosity is directly related to the magnitude of shear forces generated between the plastic material and the feed system, and between the plastic material and the mold cavity wall. Thus, manufacturers of these shear-thinning materials and operators of injection molding systems have been driving injection molding pressures higher in an effort to increase shear, thus reducing viscosity. Typically, injection molding systems inject the plastic material in to the mold cavity at melt pressures of 15,000 psi or more. Manufacturers of shear-thinning plastic material teach injection molding operators to inject the plastic material into the mold cavities above a minimum melt pressure. For example, polypropylene resin is typically processed at pressures greater than 6,000 psi (the recommended range from the polypropylene resin manufacturers, is typically from greater than 6,000 psi to about 15,000 psi. Resin manufacturers recommend not to exceed the top end of the range. Press manufacturers and processing engineers typically recommend processing shear thinning polymers at the top end of the range, or significantly higher, to achieve maximum potential shear thinning, which is typically greater than 15,000 psi, to extract maximum thinning and better flow properties from the plastic material. Shear thinning thermoplastic polymers generally are processed in the range of over 6,000 psi to about 30,000 psi.
  • The molds used in injection molding machines must be capable of withstanding these high melt pressures. Moreover, the material forming the mold must have a fatigue limit that can withstand the maximum cyclic stress for the total number of cycles a mold is expected to run over the course of its lifetime. As a result, mold manufacturers typically form the mold from materials having high hardness, typically greater than 30 Rc, and more typically greater than 50 Rc. These high hardness materials are durable and equipped to withstand the high clamping pressures required to keep mold components pressed against one another during the plastic injection process. These high hardness materials are also better able to resist wear from the repeated contact between molding surfaces and polymer flow.
  • High production injection molding machines (i.e., class 101 and class 102 molding machines) that produce thinwalled consumer products exclusively use molds having a majority of the mold made from the high hardness materials. High production injection molding machines typically produce 500,000 cycles per year or more. Industrial quality production molds must be designed to withstand at least 500,000 cycles per year, preferably more than 1,000,000 cycles per year, more preferably more than 5,000,000 cycles per year, and even more preferably more than 10,000,000 cycles per year. These machines have multi cavity molds and complex cooling systems to increase production rates. The high hardness materials are more capable of withstanding the repeated high pressure clamping operations than lower hardness materials. However, high hardness materials, such as most tool steels, have relatively low thermal conductivities, generally less than 20 BTU/HR FT ° F., which leads to long cooling times as heat is transferred through from the molten plastic material through the high hardness material.
  • In an effort to reduce cycle times, typical high production injection molding machines having molds made of high hardness materials include relatively complex internal cooling systems that circulate cooling fluid within the mold. These cooling systems accelerate cooling of the molded parts, thus allowing the machine to complete more cycles in a given amount of time, which increases production rates and thus the total amount of molded parts produced. In some class 101, more than 1 or 2 million cycles per year may be run, these molds are sometimes referred to as “ultra high productivity molds” Class 101 molds that run in 400 ton or larger presses are sometimes referred to as “400 class” molds within the industry.
  • Another drawback to using high hardness materials for the molds is that high hardness materials, such as tool steels, generally are fairly difficult to machine. As a result, known high throughput injection molds require extensive machining time and expensive machining equipment to form, and expensive and time consuming post-machining steps to relieve stresses and optimize material hardness.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The embodiments set forth in the drawings are illustrative and exemplary in nature and not intended to limit the subject matter defined by the claims. The following detailed description of the illustrative embodiments can be understood when read in conjunction with the following drawings, where like structure is indicated with like reference numerals and in which:
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a schematic view of an injection molding machine constructed according to the disclosure;
  • FIG. 2 illustrates one embodiment of a thin-walled part formed in the injection molding machine of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 3 is a cavity pressure vs. time graph for the injection molding machine of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of a mold of the injection molding machine of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a feed system;
  • FIGS. 6A and 6B are top and front views of a naturally balanced feed system;
  • FIGS. 7A and 7B are top and front views of another naturally balanced feed system;
  • FIG. 8 is a top view of an artificially balanced feed system that may be used in the injection molding machine of FIG. 1; and
  • FIGS. 9A and 9B are top views of non-balanced feed systems that may be used in the injection molding machine of FIG. 1.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Embodiments of the present invention generally relate to systems, machines, products, and methods of producing products by injection molding and more specifically to systems, products, and methods of producing products by low constant pressure injection molding.
  • The term “low pressure” as used herein with respect to melt pressure of a thermoplastic material, means melt pressures in a vicinity of a nozzle of an injection molding machine of 6000 psi and lower.
  • The term “substantially constant pressure” as used herein with respect to a melt pressure of a thermoplastic material, means that deviations from a baseline melt pressure do not produce meaningful changes in physical properties of the thermoplastic material. For example, “substantially constant pressure” includes, but is not limited to, pressure variations for which viscosity of the melted thermoplastic material do not meaningfully change. The term “substantially constant” in this respect includes deviations of approximately 30% from a baseline melt pressure. For example, the term “a substantially constant pressure of approximately 4600 psi” includes pressure fluctuations within the range of about 6000 psi (30% above 4600 psi) to about 3200 psi (30% below 4600 psi). A melt pressure is considered substantially constant as long as the melt pressure fluctuates no more than 30% from the recited pressure.
  • Melt holder, as used herein, refers to the portion of an injection molding machine that contains molten plastic in fluid communication with the machine nozzle. The melt holder is heated, such that a polymer may be prepared and held at a desired temperature. The melt holder is connected to a power source, for example a hydraulic cylinder or electric servo motor, that is in communication with a central control unit, and can be controlled to advance a diaphragm to force molten plastic through the machine nozzle. The molten material then flows through the runner system in to the mold cavity. The melt holder may by cylindrical in cross section, or have alternative cross sections that will permit a diaphragm to force polymer under pressures that can range from as low as 100 psi to pressures 40,000 psi or higher through the machine nozzle. The diaphragm may optionally be integrally connected to a reciprocating screw with flights designed to plasticize polymer material prior to injection.
  • Referring to the figures in detail, FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary low constant pressure injection molding apparatus 10 for producing thin-walled parts in high volumes (e.g., a class 101 or 102 injection mold, or an “ultra high productivity mold”). The injection molding apparatus 10 generally includes an injection system 12 and a clamping system 14. A thermoplastic material may be introduced to the injection system 12 in the form of thermoplastic pellets 16. The thermoplastic pellets 16 may be placed into a hopper 18, which feeds the thermoplastic pellets 16 into a heated barrel 20 of the injection system 12. The thermoplastic pellets 16, after being fed into the heated barrel 20, may be driven to the end of the heated barrel 20 by a reciprocating screw 22. The heating of the heated barrel 20 and the compression of the thermoplastic pellets 16 by the reciprocating screw 22 causes the thermoplastic pellets 16 to melt, forming a molten thermoplastic material 24. The molten thermoplastic material is typically processed at a temperature of about 130° C. to about 410° C.
  • The reciprocating screw 22 forces the molten thermoplastic material 24, toward a nozzle 26 to form a shot comprising thermoplastic material, which will be injected into a mold cavity 32 of a mold 28. The molten thermoplastic material 24 may be injected through a gate 30, which directs the flow of the molten thermoplastic material 24 to the mold cavity 32. The mold cavity 32 is formed between first and second mold parts 25, 27 of the mold 28 and the first and second mold parts 25, 27 are held together under pressure by a press or clamping unit 34. The press or clamping unit 34 applies a clamping force in the range of approximately 1000 psi to approximately 6000 psi during the molding process to hold the first and second mold parts 25, 27 together while the molten thermoplastic material 24 is injected into the mold cavity 32. To support these clamping forces, the clamping system 14 may include a mold frame and a mold base, the mold frame and the mold base being formed from a material having a surface hardness of more than about 165 BHN and preferably less than 260 BHN, although materials having surface hardness BHN values of greater than 260 may be used as long as the material is easily machineable, as discussed further below.
  • The mold may comprise a single mold cavity or a plurality of mold cavities. The plurality of mold cavities may comprise similar cavities or dissimilar cavities which will yield dissimilar parts. The mold may also comprises grouped family of dissimilar cavities.
  • Once the shot comprising molten thermoplastic material 24 is injected into the mold cavity 32, the reciprocating screw 22 stops traveling forward. The molten thermoplastic material 24 takes the form of the mold cavity 32 and the molten thermoplastic material 24 cools inside the mold 28 until the thermoplastic material 24 solidifies. Once the thermoplastic material 24 has solidified, the press 34 releases the first and second mold parts 25, 27, the first and second mold parts 25, 27 are separated from one another, and the finished part may be ejected from the mold 28. The mold 28 may include a plurality of mold cavities 32 to increase overall production rates.
  • A controller 50 is communicatively connected with a sensor 52 and a screw control 36. The controller 50 may include a microprocessor, a memory, and one or more communication links. The controller 50 may be connected to the sensor 52 and the screw control 36 via wired connections 54, 56, respectively. In other embodiments, the controller 50 may be connected to the sensor 52 and screw control 56 via a wireless connection, a mechanical connection, a hydraulic connection, a pneumatic connection, or any other type of communication connection known to those having ordinary skill in the art that will allow the controller 50 to communicate with both the sensor 52 and the screw control 36. There may be intermediary operative units in the communications path between the sensor, the controller, and the screw control.
  • In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the sensor 52 is a pressure sensor that measures (directly or indirectly) melt pressure of the molten thermoplastic material 24 in the nozzle 26. The sensor 52 generates an electrical signal that is transmitted to the controller 50. The controller 50 then commands the screw control 36 to advance the screw 22 at a rate that maintains a substantially constant melt pressure of the molten thermoplastic material 24 in the nozzle 26. While the sensor 52 may directly measure the melt pressure, the sensor 52 may measure other characteristics of the molten thermoplastic material 24, such as temperature, viscosity, flow rate, etc, that are indicative of melt pressure. Likewise, the sensor 52 need not be located directly in the nozzle 26, but rather the sensor 52 may be located at any location within the injection system 12 or mold 28 that is fluidly connected with the nozzle 26. The sensor 52 need not be in direct contact with the injected fluid and may alternatively be in dynamic communication with the fluid and able to sense the pressure of the fluid and/or other fluid characteristics. If the sensor 52 is not located within the nozzle 26, appropriate correction factors may be applied to the measured characteristic to calculate the melt pressure in the nozzle 26. In yet other embodiments, the sensor 52 need not be disposed at a location which is fluidly connected with the nozzle. Rather, the sensor could measure clamping force generated by the clamping system 14 at a mold parting line between the first and second mold parts 25, 27. In one aspect the controller 50 may maintain the pressure according to the input from sensor 52.
  • A sensor may be located near the end of fill in the mold cavity. This sensor may provide an indication of when the mold front is approaching the end of fill in the cavity. The sensor may sense pressure, temperature, optically, or other means of identifying the presence of the polymer. When pressure is measured by the sensor, this measure can be used to communicate with the central control unit to provide a target “packing pressure” for the molded component. The signal generated by the sensor can be used to control the molding process, such that variations in material viscosity, mold temperatures, melt temperatures, and other variations influencing filling rate, can be adjusted for by the central control unit. These adjustments can be made immediately during the molding cycle, or corrections can be made in subsequent cycles. Furthermore, several readings can be averaged over a number of cycles then used to make adjustments to the molding process by the central control unit. In this way, the current injection cycle can be corrected based on measurements occurring during one or more cycles at an earlier point in time. In one embodiment, sensor readings can be averaged over many cycles so as to achieve process consistency.
  • Although an active, closed loop controller 50 is illustrated in FIG. 1, other pressure regulating devices may be used instead of the closed loop controller 50. For example, a pressure regulating valve (not shown) or a pressure relief valve (not shown) may replace the controller 50 to regulate the melt pressure of the molten thermoplastic material 24. More specifically, the pressure regulating valve and pressure relief valve can prevent overpressurization of the mold 28. Another alternative mechanism for preventing overpressurization of the mold 28 is an alarm that is activated when an overpressurization condition is detected.
  • Turning now to FIG. 2, an example molded part 100 is illustrated. The molded part 100 is a thin-walled part. Molded parts are generally considered to be thin-walled when a length of a flow channel L divided by a thickness of the flow channel T is greater than 100 (i.e., L/T>100). In some injection molding industries, thin-walled parts may be defined as parts having an L/T>200, or an L/T>250. The length of the flow channel L is measured from a gate 102 to a flow channel end 104. Thin-walled parts are especially prevalent in the consumer products industry.
  • Thin-walled parts present certain obstacles in injection molding. Molded parts are generally considered to be thin-walled when a length of a flow channel L divided by a thickness of the flow channel T is greater than 100 (i.e., L/T>100). For mold cavities having a more complicated geometry, the L/T ratio may be calculated by integrating the T dimension over the length of the mold cavity 32 from a gate 102 to the end of the mold cavity 32, and determining the longest length of flow from the gate 102 to the end of the mold cavity 32. The L/T ratio can then be determined by dividing the longest length of flow by the average part thickness.
  • For example, the thinness of the flow channel tends to cool the molten thermoplastic material before the material reaches the flow channel end 104. When this happens, the thermoplastic material freezes off and no longer flows, which results in an incomplete part. To overcome this problem, traditional injection molding machines inject the molten thermoplastic material at very high pressures, typically greater than 15,000 psi, so that the molten thermoplastic material rapidly fills the mold cavity before having a chance to cool and freeze off. This is one reason that manufacturers of the thermoplastic materials teach injecting at very high pressures. Another reason traditional injection molding machines inject at high pressures is the increased shear, which increases flow characteristics, as discussed above. These very high injection pressures require the use of very hard materials to form the mold 28 and the feed system.
  • Traditional injection molding machines use tool steels or other hard materials to make the mold. While these tool steels are robust enough to withstand the very high injection pressures, tool steels are relatively poor thermal conductors. As a result, very complex cooling systems are machined into the molds to enhance cooling times when the mold cavity is filled, which reduces cycle times and increases productivity of the mold. However, these very complex cooling systems add great time and expense to the mold making process.
  • The inventors have discovered that shear-thinning thermoplastics (even minimally shear-thinning thermoplastics) may be injected into the mold 28 at low, substantially constant, pressure without any significant adverse affects. Examples of these materials include but are not limited to polymers and copolymers comprised of, polypropylene, polyethylene, thermoplastic elastomers, polyester, polystyrene, polycarbonate, poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene), poly(latic acid), polyhydroxyalkanoate, polyamides, polyacetals, ethylene-alpha olefin rubbers, and styrene-butadiene-stryene block copolymers. In fact, parts molded at low, substantially constant, pressures exhibit some superior properties as compared to the same part molded at a conventional high pressure. This discovery directly contradicts conventional wisdom within the industry that teaches higher injection pressures are better. Without being bound by theory, it is believed that injecting the molten thermoplastic material into the mold 28 at low, substantially constant, pressures creates a continuous flow front of thermoplastic material that advances through the mold from a gate to a farthest part of the mold cavity. By maintaining a low level of shear, the thermoplastic material remains liquid and flowable at much lower temperatures and pressures than is otherwise believed to be possible in conventional high pressure injection molding systems.
  • Exemplary thermoplastic resins together with their recommended operating pressure ranges are provided in the following chart:
  • Injection Pressure Material Brand Material Full Name Range (PSI) Company Name PP Polypropylene 10000-15000 RTP RTP 100 series Imagineering Polypropylene Plastics Nylon 10000-18000 RTP RTP 200 series Imagineering Nylon Plastics ABS Acrylonitrile  8000-20000 Marplex Astalac ABS Butadiene Styrene PET Polyester  5800-14500 Asia AIE PET 401F International Acetal Co-  7000-17000 API Kolon Kocetal polymer PC Polycarbonate 10000-15000 RTP RTP 300 series Imagineering Polycarbonate Plastics PS Polystyrene 10000-15000 RTP RTP 400 series Imagineering Plastics SAN Styrene 10000-15000 RTP RTP 500 series Acrylonitrile Imagineering Plastics PE LDPE & 10000-15000 RTP RTP 700 Series HDPE Imagineering Plastics TPE Thermoplastic 10000-15000 RTP RTP 1500 Elastomer Imagineering series Plastics PVDF Polyvinylidene 10000-15000 RTP RTP 3300 Fluoride Imagineering series Plastics PTI Poly- 10000-15000 RTP RTP 4700 trimethylene Imagineering series Terephthalate Plastics PBT Polybutylene 10000-15000 RTP RTP 1000 Terephthalate Imagineering series Plastics PLA Polylactic Acid  8000-15000 RTP RTP 2099 Imagineering series Plastics
  • Turning now to FIG. 3, a typical pressure-time curve for a conventional high pressure injection molding process is illustrated by the dashed line 200. By contrast, a pressure-time curve for the disclosed low constant pressure injection molding machine is illustrated by the solid line 210.
  • In the conventional case, melt pressure is rapidly increased to well over 15,000 psi and then held at a relatively high pressure, more than 15,000 psi, for a first period of time 220. The first period of time 220 is the fill time in which molten plastic material flows into the mold cavity. Thereafter, the melt pressure is decreased and held at a lower, but still relatively high pressure, 10,000 psi or more, for a second period of time 230. The second period of time 230 is a packing time in which the melt pressure is maintained to ensure that all gaps in the mold cavity are back filled. The mold cavity in a conventional high pressure injection molding system is filled from the end of the flow channel back to towards the gate. As a result, plastic in various stages of solidification are packed upon one another, which may cause inconsistencies in the finished product, as discussed above. Moreover, the conventional packing of plastic in various stages of solidification results in some non-ideal material properties, for example, molded-in stresses, sink, and non-optimal optical properties.
  • The constant low pressure injection molding system, on the other hand, injects the molten plastic material into the mold cavity at a substantially constant low pressure for a single time period 240. The injection pressure is less than 6,000 psi. By using a substantially constant low pressure, the molten thermoplastic material maintains a continuous melt front that advances through the flow channel from the gate towards the end of the flow channel. Thus, the plastic material remains relatively uniform at any point along the flow channel, which results in a more uniform and consistent finished product. By filling the mold with a relatively uniform plastic material, the finished molded parts form crystalline structures that have better mechanical and optical properties than conventionally molded parts. Moreover, the skin layers of parts molded at low constant pressures exhibit different characteristics than skin layers of conventionally molded parts. As a result, the skin layers of parts molded under low constant pressure can have better optical properties than skin layers of conventionally molded parts.
  • By maintaining a substantially constant and low (e.g., less than 6000 psi) melt pressure within the nozzle, more machineable materials may be used to form the mold 28. For example, the mold 28 illustrated in FIG. 1 may be formed of a material having a milling machining index of greater than 100%, a drilling machining index of greater than 100%, a wire EDM machining index of greater than 100%, a graphite sinker EDM machining index of greater than 200%, or a copper sinker EDM machining index of greater than 150%. The machining indexes are based upon milling, drilling, wire EDM, and sinker EDM tests of various materials. The test methods for determining the machining indices are explained in more detail below. Examples of machining indexes for a sample of materials is compiled below in Table 1.
  • TABLE 1 Machining Technology Milling Drilling Sinker EDM- Sinker EDM- Spindle Spindle Wire EDM Graphite Copper Load Index % Load Index % time Index % time Index % time Index % Material 1117* 0.72 100% 0.32 100% 9:34 100% 0:14:48 100% 0:24:00 100% 6061 Al 0.50 144% 0.20 160% 4:46 201% 0:05:58 248% 0:15:36 154% 7075 Al 0.55 131% 0.24 133% 4:48 199% 0:05:20 278% 0:12:27 193% Alcoa QC-10 Al 0.56 129% 0.24 133% 4:47 200% 0:05:11 286% 0:12:21 194% 4140 0.92 78% 0.37 86% 9:28 101% 0:09:36 154% 0:19:20 124% 420 SS 1.36 53% 0.39 82% 8:30 113% 0:10:12 145% 0:23:20 103% A2 0.97 74% 0.45 71% 8:52 108% 0:08:00 185% 0:20:12 119% S7 1.20 60% 0.43 74% 9:03 106% 0:12:53 115% 0:20:58 114% P20 1.10 65% 0.38 84% 9:26 101% 0:11:47 126% 0:20:30 117% PX5 1.12 64% 0.37 86% 9:22 102% 0:12:37 117% 0:23:18 103% Moldmax HH 0.80 90% 0.36 89% 6:00 159% 6:59:35    4% 1 0:43:38   55% 3 Ampcoloy 944 0.62 116% 0.32 100% 6:53 139% 3:13:41    8% 2 0:30:21   79% 4 *1117 is the benchmark material for this test. Published data references 1212 carbon steel as the benchmark material. 1212 was not readily available. Of the published data, 1117 was the closest in composition and machining index percentage (91%). 1 Significant graphite electrode wear: ~20% 2 graphite electrode wear: ~15% 3 Cu electrode wear: ~15% 4 Cu electrode wear: ~3%
  • Using easily machineable materials to form the mold 28 results in greatly decreased manufacturing time and thus, a decrease in manufacturing costs. Moreover, these machineable materials generally have better thermal conductivity than tool steels, which increases cooling efficiency and decreases the need for complex cooling systems.
  • When forming the mold 28 of these easily machineable materials, it is also advantageous to select easily machineable materials having good thermal conductivity properties. Materials having thermal conductivities of more than 30 BTU/HR FT ° F. are particularly advantageous. For example easily machineable materials having good thermal conductivities include, but are not limited to, Alcoa QC-10, Alcan Duramold 500, and Hokotol (available from Aleris). Materials with good thermal conductivity more efficiently transmit heat from the thermoplastic material out of the mold. As a result, more simple cooling systems may be used. Additionally, non-naturally balanced feed systems are also possible for use in the constant low pressure injection molding machines described herein.
  • One example of a multi-cavity mold 28 is illustrated in FIG. 4. Multi-cavity molds generally include a feed manifold 60 that directs molten thermoplastic material from the nozzle 26 to the individual mold cavities 32. The feed manifold 60 includes a sprue 62, which directs the molten thermoplastic material into one or more runners or feed channels 64. Each runner may feed multiple mold cavities 32. In many high capacity injection molding machines, the runners are heated to enhance flowability of the molten thermoplastic material. Because viscosity of the molten thermoplastic material is very sensitive to shear and pressure variations at high pressures (e.g., above 10,000 psi), conventional feed manifolds are naturally balanced to maintain uniform viscosity. Naturally balanced feed manifolds are manifolds in which molten thermoplastic material travels an equal distance from the sprue to any mold cavity. Moreover, the cross-sectional shapes of each flow channel are identical, the number and type of turns are identical, and the temperatures of each flow channel are identical. Naturally balanced feed manifolds allow the mold cavities to be filled simultaneously so that each molded part has identical processing conditions and material properties. Naturally balanced feed manifolds are expensive to manufacture and limit mold designs somewhat.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates an example of a naturally balanced feed manifold 60. The naturally balanced feed manifold 60 includes a first flow path 70 from the sprue 62 to a first junction 72 where the first flow path 70 splits into second and third flow paths 74, 76, the second flow path terminating at a second gate 78 a and the third flow path 76 terminating at a third gate 78 b each gate serving an individual mold cavity (not shown in FIG. 5). Molten thermoplastic material flowing from the sprue 62 to either the second gate 78 a or the third gate 78 b travels the same distance, experiences the same temperatures, and is subjected to the same cross-sectional flow areas. As a result, each mold cavity is filled simultaneously with molten thermoplastic material having identical physical properties.
  • FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate the naturally balanced manifold 60 schematically. The naturally balanced manifold 60 of FIGS. 6A and 6B is a multi-tier manifold. Each flow path 74, 76 has identical characteristics at identical locations along the flow path. For example, after the junction 72, each flow path narrows at the same distance. Moreover, each flow path serves an identical number of mold cavities 32. Naturally balanced flow manifolds 60 are critical to high pressure injection molding machines to maintain identical plastic flow properties and to ensure uniform parts.
  • FIGS. 7A and 7B illustrate another naturally balanced manifold 60. The naturally balanced manifold 60 of FIGS. 7A and 7B is a single tier manifold.
  • By contrast, FIGS. 8, 9A, and 9B illustrate non-naturally balanced manifolds with FIG. 8 illustrating an artificially balanced manifold and FIGS. 9A and 9B illustrating non-balanced manifolds.
  • The low constant pressure injection molding machine disclosed herein allows artificially balanced manifolds, and even unbalanced manifolds, to be used because thermoplastic materials injected at low constant pressure are not as sensitive to pressure differences or shear differences due to flow channel characteristic differences. In other words, the thermoplastic materials injected at low constant pressure retain nearly identical material and flow properties regardless of differences in flow channel length, cross-sectional area, or temperature. As a result, mold cavities may be filed sequentially instead of simultaneously.
  • The artificially balanced manifold 160 of FIG. 8 includes a sprue 62, a first flow channel 174, and a second flow channel 176. The first flow channel 174 terminates at a first gate 178 a and the second flow channel 176 terminates at a second gate 178 b. The first flow channel 174 is shorter than the second flow channel 178 in this embodiment. The artificially balanced manifold 160 varies some other parameter of the flow channel (e.g., cross-sectional area or temperature) so that the material flowing through the manifold 160 provides balanced flow to each cavity, similar to a naturally balanced manifold. In other words, thermoplastic material flowing through the first flow channel 174 will have about equal melt pressure to thermoplastic material flowing through the second flow channel 176. Because artificially balanced, or unbalanced, feed manifolds can include flow channels of different lengths, an artificially balanced, or unbalanced, feed manifold can make much more efficient use of space. Moreover, the feed channels and corresponding heater band channels can be machined more efficiently. Furthermore, naturally balanced feed manifolds are limited to molds having distinct, even numbers of mold cavities (e.g., 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, etc.). Artificially balanced, and unbalanced, feed manifolds may be designed to deliver molten thermoplastic material to any number of mold cavities.
  • The artificially balanced feed manifold 160 may also be constructed of a material having high thermal conductivity to enhance heat transfer to the molten thermoplastic material in hot runners, thus enhancing flow of the thermoplastic material. More specifically, the artificially balanced feed manifold 160 may be constructed of the same material as the mold to further reduce material costs and enhance heat transfer within the entire system.
  • FIGS. 9A and 9B illustrate non-balanced manifolds 260. The non-balanced manifolds 260 may include an odd number of mold cavities 232, and/or flow channels having different cross-sectional shapes, different number and type of turns, and/or the different temperatures. Moreover, the non-balanced manifolds 260 may feed mold cavities having different sizes, and or shapes, as illustrated in FIG. 9B.
  • Drilling and Milling Machineability Index Test Methods
  • The drilling and milling machineability indices listed above in Table 1 were determined by testing the representative materials in carefully controlled test methods, which are described below.
  • The machineability index for each material was determined by measuring the spindle load needed to drill or mill a piece of the material with all other machine conditions (e.g., stock feed rate, spindle rpm, etc.) being held constant between the various materials. Spindle load is reported as a ratio of the measured spindle load to the maximum spindle torque load of 75 ft-lb at 1400 rpm for the drilling or milling device. The index percentage was calculated as a ratio between the spindle load for 1117 steel to the spindle load for the test material.
  • The test milling or drilling machine was a Hass VF-3 Machining Center.
  • Drilling Conditions
  • TABLE 2 Spot Drill 120 degree 0.5″ diameter, drilled to 0.0693″ depth Drill Bit 15/32″ diameter high speed steel uncoated jobber length bit Spindle Speed 1200 rpm Depth of Drill 0.5″ Drill Rate 3 in/min Other No chip break routine used
  • Milling Conditions
  • TABLE 3 Mill 0.5″ diameter 4 flute carbide flat bottom end mill, uncoated (SGS part # 36432 www.sgstool.com) Spindle Speed 1200 rpm Depth of Cut 0.5″ Stock Feed Rate 20 in/min
  • For all tests “flood blast” cooling was used. The coolant was Koolrite 2290.
  • EDM Machineability Index Test Methods
  • The graphite and copper sinker EDM machineability indices listed above in Table 1 were determined by testing the representative materials in a carefully controlled test method, which is described below.
  • The EDM machineability index for the various materials were determined by measuring the time to burn an area (specifics below) into the various test metals. The machineability index percentage was calculated as the ratio of the time to burn into 1117 steel to time required to burn the same area into the other test materials.
  • Wire EDM
  • TABLE 4 Equipment Fanuc OB Wire 0.25 mm diameter hard brass Cut 1″ thick × 1″ length (1 sq. ″) Parameters Used Fanuc on board artificial intelligence, override at 100%
  • Sinker EDM—Graphite
  • TABLE 5 Equipment Ingersoll Gantry 800 with Mitsubishi EX Controller Wire System 3R pre-mounted 25 mm diameter Poco EDM 3 graphite Cut 0.1″ Z axis plunge Parameters Used Mitsubishi CNC controls with FAP EX Series Technology
  • Sinker EDM—Copper
  • TABLE 6 Equipment Ingersoll Gantry 800 with Mitsubishi EX Controller Wire System 3R pre-mounted 25 mm diameter Tellurium Copper Cut 0.1″ Z axis plunge Parameters Used Mitsubishi CNC controls with FAP EX Series Technology
  • The disclosed low constant pressure injection molding machines advantageously employ molds constructed from easily machineable materials. As a result, the disclosed low constant pressure injection molding machines are less expensive and faster to produce. Additionally, the disclosed low constant pressure injection molding machines are capable of employing more flexible support structures and more adaptable delivery structures, such as wider platen widths, increased tie bar spacing, elimination of tie bars, lighter weight construction to facilitate faster movements, and non-naturally balanced feed systems. Thus, the disclosed low constant pressure injection molding machines may be modified to fit delivery needs and are more easily customizable for particular molded parts.
  • It is noted that the terms “substantially,” “about,” and “approximately,” unless otherwise specified, may be utilized herein to represent the inherent degree of uncertainty that may be attributed to any quantitative comparison, value, measurement, or other representation. These terms are also utilized herein to represent the degree by which a quantitative representation may vary from a stated reference without resulting in a change in the basic function of the subject matter at issue. Unless otherwise defined herein, the terms “substantially,” “about,” and “approximately” mean the quantitative comparison, value, measurement, or other representation may fall within 20% of the stated reference.
  • It should now be apparent that the various embodiments of the products illustrated and described herein may be produced by a low constant pressure injection molding process. While particular reference has been made herein to products for containing consumer goods or consumer goods products themselves, it should be apparent that the low constant pressure injection molding method discussed herein may be suitable for use in conjunction with products for use in the consumer goods industry, the food service industry, the transportation industry, the medical industry, the toy industry, and the like. Moreover, one skilled in the art will recognize the teachings disclosed herein may be used in the construction of stack molds, multiple material molds including rotational and core back molds, in combination with in-mold decoration, insert molding, in mold assembly, and the like. Moreover, one skilled in the art will recognize the teachings disclosed herein may be used in the construction of stack molds, multiple material molds including rotational and core back molds, in combination with in-mold decoration, insert molding, in mold assembly, and the like.
  • All documents cited in the Detailed Description of the Invention are, in relevant part, incorporated herein by reference; the citation of any document is not to be construed as an admission that it is prior art with respect to the present invention. To the extent that any meaning or definition of a term in this written document conflicts with any meaning or definition of the term in a document incorporated by reference, the meaning or definition assigned to the term in this written document shall govern.
  • While particular embodiments have been illustrated and described herein, it should be understood that various other changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the claimed subject matter. Moreover, although various aspects of the claimed subject matter have been described herein, such aspects need not be utilized in combination. It is therefore intended that the appended claims cover all such changes and modifications that are within the scope of the claimed subject matter.

Claims (20)

1. An injection molding apparatus comprising:
a melt holder for pressurizing molten plastic prior to injection into a mold having a plurality of mold cavities;
a sensor in dynamic communication with the melt holder for sensing a characteristic of the molten plastic; and
a controller in communication with the sensor, the controller receiving a signal from the sensor, the signal being indicative of a melt pressure of the molten plastic entering at least one mold cavity in the plurality of mold cavities, the controller further being in communication with an injection element, the injection element applying a force to the molten plastic to advance the molten plastic from the melt holder into the mold, wherein the controller controls the injection element to maintain a substantially constant melt pressure entering the at least one mold cavity of less than 6000 psi, and
the mold has an average thermal conductivity of more than 30 BTU/HR FT ° F. and the mold has at least one of
a milling machining index of greater than 100%,
a drilling machining index of greater than 100%, and
a wire EDM machining index of greater than 100%.
2. The injection molding apparatus of claim 1, wherein the at least one mold cavity in the plurality of mold cavities is a thin-walled mold cavity having an L/T>100.
3. The injection molding apparatus of claim 1, further comprising an artificially balanced molten plastic feed system.
4. The injection molding apparatus of claim 1, wherein sensor generates an electrical signal.
5. The injection molding apparatus of claim 1, wherein the sensor generates a mechanical signal.
6. The injection molding apparatus of claim 1, wherein the sensor generates a hydraulic signal.
7. The injection molding apparatus of claim 1, wherein the sensor generates a pneumatic signal.
8. The injection molding apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a mold frame and a mold base, wherein at least one of the mold frame and the mold base is made from a material having a surface hardness of greater than 165 BHN and less than 260 BHN.
9. The injection molding apparatus of claim 1, further comprising a hot runner feed system constructed of a material having a thermal conductivity that is substantially equal to the average thermal conductivity of the mold.
10. The injection molding apparatus of claim 9, wherein the hot runner feed system is directly connected to a gate that is fluidly connected with the at least one mold cavity.
11. The injection molding apparatus of claim 1, wherein the mold has a sinker EDM machining index of greater than 200%.
12. The injection molding apparatus of claim 11, wherein the mold has a sinker EDM machining index of between 200% and 1000%.
13. The injection molding apparatus of claim 1, wherein the mold comprises at least four mold cavities.
14. An injection molding apparatus comprising:
a mold having at least one mold cavity, the mold having
an average thermal conductivity more than 30 BTU/HR FT ° F., and
a sinker EDM machining index of greater than 200%;
a melt holder for pressurizing molten plastic prior to injection into the mold;
a sensor in communication with the melt holder for sensing a characteristic of the molten plastic; and
a controller in communication with the pressure sensor, the controller receiving a signal from the sensor, the signal being indicative of a melt pressure of the molten plastic entering the mold cavity, the controller further being in communication with an injection element, the injection element applying a force to the molten plastic to advance the molten plastic from the melt holder into the mold,
wherein the controller controls the injection element to maintain a melt pressure of the molten plastic entering the mold cavity of less than 6000 psi.
15. The injection molding apparatus of claim 14 wherein the controller controls the injection element to maintain a substantially constant melt pressure.
16. An injection molding apparatus comprising:
a mold having at least one mold cavity, the mold having an average thermal conductivity more than 30 BTU/HR FT ° F., and the mold having at least one of
a milling machining index of greater than 100%,
a drilling machining index of greater than 100%, and
a wire EDM machining index of greater than 100%;
a melt holder for pressurizing molten plastic prior to injection into the mold;
a sensor in communication with the melt holder for sensing a characteristic of the molten plastic indicative of a melt pressure of the molten plastic in a nozzle of the melt holder, just prior to entering the mold; and
a controller in communication with the sensor, the controller receiving a signal from the pressure sensor, the controller further being in communication with an injection element, the injection element applying a force to the molten plastic to advance the molten plastic from the melt holder into the mold,
wherein the controller controls the injection element to maintain a melt pressure of less than 6000 psi.
17. The injection molding apparatus of claim 16, wherein the controller controls the injection element to maintain a substantially constant melt pressure.
18. An injection molding apparatus comprising:
a mold having at least one mold cavity, the mold having an average thermal conductivity more than 30 BTU/HR FT ° F., and at least one of
a thin-walled mold cavity (e.g., L/T>100),
at least four mold cavities, and
an artificially balanced molten plastic feed system;
a melt holder for pressurizing molten plastic prior to injection into the mold;
a sensor in communication with the melt holder for sensing a characteristic of the molten plastic indicative of a melt pressure of the molten plastic in a nozzle of the melt holder just before entering the mold; and
a controller in communication with the sensor, the controller receiving a signal from the sensor, the controller further being in communication with an injection element, the injection element applying a force to the molten plastic to advance the molten plastic from the melt holder into the mold,
wherein the controller controls the injection element to maintain a melt pressure of less than 6000 psi.
19. The injection molding apparatus of claim 18, wherein the controller controls the injection element to maintain a substantially constant melt pressure.
20. An injection molding apparatus comprising:
a mold having at least one mold cavity, the mold being formed from a material having a surface hardness less than 30 Rc and the mold having an average thermal conductivity of more than 30 BTU/HR FT ° F.;
a melt holder for pressurizing molten plastic prior to injecting the molten plastic into the mold;
a guided ejection system; and
a controller that controls an injection element in the melt holder so that the injection element advances molten plastic into the at least one mold cavity at a melt pressure of less than 6000 psi.
US13/476,045 2011-05-20 2012-05-21 Apparatus and Method for Injection Molding at Low Constant Pressure Abandoned US20120294963A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201161488564P true 2011-05-20 2011-05-20
US13/476,045 US20120294963A1 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-05-21 Apparatus and Method for Injection Molding at Low Constant Pressure

Applications Claiming Priority (16)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/476,045 US20120294963A1 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-05-21 Apparatus and Method for Injection Molding at Low Constant Pressure
US13/601,307 US10076861B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-08-31 Apparatus for injection molding at low constant pressure
CN201280073315.8A CN104321182A (en) 2012-05-21 2012-11-20 Method for operating a high productivity injection molding machine
JP2015512617A JP2015520050A (en) 2011-05-20 2012-11-20 How to operate a high productivity injection molding machine
PCT/US2012/066095 WO2013176701A1 (en) 2012-05-21 2012-11-20 Method for operating a high productivity injection molding machine
BR112014028693A BR112014028693A2 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-11-20 method for operating a high production injection molding machine
EP12805488.9A EP2852484B1 (en) 2012-05-21 2012-11-20 Method for operating a high productivity injection molding machine
KR1020147031619A KR20140144299A (en) 2012-05-21 2012-11-20 Method for operating a high productivity injection molding machine
RU2014140421A RU2014140421A (en) 2012-05-21 2012-11-20 The method of operation of a high-performance device for injection molding
MX2014014157A MX365814B (en) 2012-05-21 2012-11-20 Method for operating a high productivity injection molding machine.
US13/682,456 US20130221575A1 (en) 2012-02-24 2012-11-20 Method for Operating a High Productivity Injection Molding Machine
CA2871847A CA2871847A1 (en) 2012-05-21 2012-11-20 Method for operating a high productivity injection molding machine
AU2012381045A AU2012381045A1 (en) 2012-05-21 2012-11-20 Method for operating a high productivity injection molding machine
TW102102119A TW201402302A (en) 2012-05-21 2013-01-18 Method for operating a high productivity injection molding machine
IN9328DEN2014 IN2014DN09328A (en) 2012-05-21 2014-11-06
PH12014502589A PH12014502589A1 (en) 2011-05-20 2014-11-20 Method for operating a high productivity injection molding machine

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/476,047 Continuation-In-Part US8757999B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-05-21 Alternative pressure control for a low constant pressure injection molding apparatus

Related Child Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/601,307 Division US10076861B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-08-31 Apparatus for injection molding at low constant pressure
US13/682,456 Continuation-In-Part US20130221575A1 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-11-20 Method for Operating a High Productivity Injection Molding Machine

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20120294963A1 true US20120294963A1 (en) 2012-11-22

Family

ID=46149755

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/476,045 Abandoned US20120294963A1 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-05-21 Apparatus and Method for Injection Molding at Low Constant Pressure
US13/601,307 Active US10076861B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-08-31 Apparatus for injection molding at low constant pressure

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/601,307 Active US10076861B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-08-31 Apparatus for injection molding at low constant pressure

Country Status (12)

Country Link
US (2) US20120294963A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2709813B1 (en)
JP (2) JP5824143B2 (en)
KR (1) KR20140001251A (en)
CN (1) CN103547430A (en)
AU (1) AU2012259036B2 (en)
BR (2) BR112013029695A2 (en)
CA (1) CA2836783C (en)
MX (1) MX2013013589A (en)
PH (1) PH12014502589A1 (en)
RU (1) RU2573483C2 (en)
WO (1) WO2012162218A1 (en)

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2013126723A1 (en) 2012-02-24 2013-08-29 The Procter & Gamble Company Injection mold having a simplified cooling system
WO2013126667A1 (en) 2012-02-24 2013-08-29 The Procter & Gamble Company High thermal conductivity co-injection molding system
WO2013166272A2 (en) 2012-05-02 2013-11-07 The Procter & Gamble Company Injection mold having a simplified evaporative cooling system or a simplified cooling system with exotic cooling fluids
US8757999B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2014-06-24 The Procter & Gamble Company Alternative pressure control for a low constant pressure injection molding apparatus
US8828291B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2014-09-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Method for substantially constant pressure injection molding of thinwall parts
US20140253152A1 (en) * 2013-03-05 2014-09-11 Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Zur Foerderung Der Angewandten Forschung E.V. Device for ascertaining the corrosiveness of a plastic melt
WO2014186086A1 (en) * 2013-05-13 2014-11-20 The Procter & Gamble Company Low constant pressure injection molding system with variable-position molding cavities
US8911228B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2014-12-16 Imflux, Inc. Non-naturally balanced feed system for an injection molding apparatus
WO2015017643A1 (en) 2013-08-01 2015-02-05 iMFLUX Inc. Injection molding machines and methods for accounting for changes in material properties during injection molding runs
WO2015017658A1 (en) 2013-08-01 2015-02-05 iMFLUX Inc. Injection molding machines and methods for accounting for changes in material properties during injection molding runs
US8980146B2 (en) 2013-08-01 2015-03-17 Imflux, Inc. Injection molding machines and methods for accounting for changes in material properties during injection molding runs
WO2015051218A1 (en) 2013-10-04 2015-04-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Process and apparatus for making tufted article
WO2015095666A1 (en) 2013-12-19 2015-06-25 The Procter & Gamble Company Process and apparatus for making multi-component hollow article and article made thereby
US9097565B2 (en) 2012-03-30 2015-08-04 Beaumont Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for material flow characterization
US20150258721A1 (en) * 2014-03-13 2015-09-17 iMFLUX Inc. Plastic Article Forming Apparatuses and Methods for Using the Same
WO2016106032A1 (en) 2014-12-22 2016-06-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Package for consumer care products
WO2016106031A1 (en) 2014-12-22 2016-06-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Package for consumer care products
WO2016106030A1 (en) 2014-12-22 2016-06-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Package for consumer care products
US20170001346A1 (en) * 2015-06-30 2017-01-05 iMFLUX Inc. Sequential coining
US9604398B2 (en) 2012-11-08 2017-03-28 Imflux Inc Injection mold with fail safe pressure mechanism
US9610721B2 (en) 2012-11-21 2017-04-04 Imflux Inc Reduced size runner for an injection mold system
US9707709B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2017-07-18 Imflux Inc Method for injection molding at low, substantially constant pressure
US9993066B2 (en) 2013-12-19 2018-06-12 The Gillette Company Llc Method to manufacture an injection molded component and injection molded component
US10076861B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2018-09-18 Imflux Inc Apparatus for injection molding at low constant pressure

Families Citing this family (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2959290B2 (en) * 1992-07-29 1999-10-06 日本電気株式会社 Superconducting laminated thin film and manufacturing method thereof
JP6169257B2 (en) * 2013-05-10 2017-07-26 アルカテル−ルーセント Method, apparatus and user equipment for network coverage free neighbor terminal discovery
WO2016033141A1 (en) 2014-08-27 2016-03-03 iMFLUX Inc. Separable feed system for an injection molding machine
EP3135454A1 (en) * 2015-08-27 2017-03-01 iMFLUX Inc. Feed system for an injection molding machine
EP3341178A1 (en) 2015-08-27 2018-07-04 iMFLUX Inc. Method for injection molding using reduced melt temperatures

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5407342A (en) * 1993-09-13 1995-04-18 Boucher; Paul Y. Apparatus for manufacturing a composite product
US5478520A (en) * 1989-10-27 1995-12-26 Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Process for injection molding and apparatus therefor
US6824379B2 (en) * 1998-04-21 2004-11-30 Synventive Molding Solutions, Inc. Apparatus for utilizing an actuator for flow control valve gates
US7156649B2 (en) * 2003-08-06 2007-01-02 Sumitomo Wiring Systems, Ltd. Mold for injection molding and a method of operating a mold

Family Cites Families (75)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2871516A (en) 1954-07-06 1959-02-03 Owens Illinois Glass Co Apparatus for feeding plasticized materials
US3025567A (en) 1957-08-19 1962-03-20 Owens Illinois Glass Co Method and apparatus for low pressure molding
DE2427969A1 (en) 1974-06-10 1976-01-02 Reinhard Colortronic Injection moulding with rapid pressure drop - using pressurised side chamber extension to nozzle
US4219322A (en) 1978-12-20 1980-08-26 Owens-Illinois, Inc. Apparatus for molding plastic articles
JPS5886326U (en) * 1981-12-07 1983-06-11
JPH0359811B2 (en) 1983-12-14 1991-09-11 Chitsuso Kk
GB8424357D0 (en) * 1984-09-26 1984-10-31 British Telecomm Injection moulding apparatus
JPS62117716A (en) * 1985-11-18 1987-05-29 Honda Motor Co Ltd Mold and temperature controlling thereof
US5700416A (en) * 1986-02-14 1997-12-23 Sumitomo Chemical Company, Limited Press molding of thermoplastic resins
JP2691581B2 (en) 1988-10-03 1997-12-17 東芝機械株式会社 Injection molding apparatus and injection molding method using the same
JPH0379317A (en) 1989-08-23 1991-04-04 Toshiba Corp Plastic molded product
JPH0751293B2 (en) * 1989-09-13 1995-06-05 三ツ星ベルト株式会社 Method for molding composite material containing solid filler
JPH04126214A (en) 1990-09-17 1992-04-27 Fuji Photo Film Co Ltd Mold
JPH056914A (en) 1991-06-27 1993-01-14 Fujitsu Ltd Method and apparatus for resin sealing of semiconductor device
JP3079317B2 (en) 1991-07-26 2000-08-21 大阪瓦斯株式会社 Molten carbonate fuel cell power generator
CA2079390C (en) * 1991-10-16 1996-08-27 Akira Nonomura Multi-cavity mold, method of fabricating same and molding control method using said mold
JP2513567B2 (en) * 1991-10-16 1996-07-03 花王株式会社 Multi-cavity molding die, its manufacturing method, and molding control method using the same die
US5266246A (en) 1991-11-19 1993-11-30 Casco Tool & Extrusions, Inc. Method of forming a molded plastic part
JPH0753405B2 (en) * 1991-11-28 1995-06-07 花王株式会社 Method and device for controlling variation of resin flow physical property in injection molding machine
JP2559651B2 (en) 1991-12-26 1996-12-04 花王株式会社 Injection molding control method and apparatus
JPH072359B2 (en) 1992-10-22 1995-01-18 大宝工業株式会社 Injection molding unit
JPH06198682A (en) * 1992-12-28 1994-07-19 Asahi Chem Ind Co Ltd Low pressure injection molding method
JP3343628B2 (en) * 1993-08-27 2002-11-11 日本ジーイープラスチックス株式会社 Thin-wall molding method
JPH07223242A (en) 1994-02-15 1995-08-22 Mitsubishi Materials Corp Plural piece molding die
JP4121163B2 (en) * 1994-04-20 2008-07-23 富士フイルム株式会社 Injection molding method and apparatus
US5566743A (en) 1994-05-02 1996-10-22 Guergov; Milko G. Method of injecting molten metal into a mold cavity
US5716561A (en) 1994-05-02 1998-02-10 Guergov; Milko G. Injection control system
US5441680B1 (en) 1994-05-02 1997-04-29 Milko G Guergov Method and apparatus for injection molding
JP3465388B2 (en) * 1994-12-22 2003-11-10 住友化学工業株式会社 Mold for forming multilayer molded article and method for producing multilayer molded article using the same
US5811494A (en) 1995-04-06 1998-09-22 The Dow Chemical Company Impact modified thinwall polymer compositions
US5902525A (en) 1995-06-19 1999-05-11 Hettinga; Siebolt Method of molding a plastic article including injecting based upon a pressure-dominated control algorithm after detecting an indicia of a decrease in the surface area of the melt front
DE69626447D1 (en) * 1995-06-19 2003-04-10 Siebolt Hettinga Low pressure process for injection molding a plastic object
JP3212237B2 (en) * 1995-06-27 2001-09-25 東芝機械株式会社 Automatic setting method of injection molding speed condition of injection molding machine
JPH1067032A (en) * 1996-08-28 1998-03-10 Mitsubishi Chem Corp Manufacture of hollow injection-molded product
US5863487A (en) 1997-01-14 1999-01-26 Guergov; Milko G. Molding of normally non-mixable materials
US6019918A (en) 1997-01-17 2000-02-01 Guergov; Milko G. Gas assisted injection molding with controlled internal melt pressure
US5997797A (en) 1997-06-24 1999-12-07 Jac Products, Inc. Injection mold internal pressure equalization system and method
CH692383A5 (en) * 1997-09-16 2002-05-31 Kk Holding Ag Method of controlling the hot runner heating of a multi-cavity injection mold.
JPH11105039A (en) * 1997-10-01 1999-04-20 Canon Inc Mold for injection molding and its manufacture
JP3378485B2 (en) * 1997-11-28 2003-02-17 住友化学工業株式会社 Methyl methacrylate resin injection molding
JP3973282B2 (en) * 1998-01-16 2007-09-12 旭化成ケミカルズ株式会社 Gas pressure injection molding method
JPH11262936A (en) 1998-03-18 1999-09-28 Sekisui Chem Co Ltd Injection molding of hard vinyl chloride resin
US6361300B1 (en) * 1998-04-21 2002-03-26 Synventive Molding Solutions, Inc. Manifold system having flow control
US6464909B1 (en) * 1998-04-21 2002-10-15 Synventive Molding Solutions, Inc. Manifold system having flow control
US6284162B1 (en) * 1999-03-25 2001-09-04 Sola International, Inc. Molding method for manufacturing thin thermoplastic lenses
JP4081201B2 (en) 1999-03-29 2008-04-23 本田技研工業株式会社 Tandem injection molding apparatus and method of manufacturing molded product using the same
US6372162B1 (en) * 1999-08-31 2002-04-16 The Gillette Company Injection molding of oral brush bodies
US6616871B1 (en) 1999-11-05 2003-09-09 Toshiba Kikai Kabushiki Kaisha Filling step control method of injection molding machine
JP3625166B2 (en) 1999-12-20 2005-03-02 矢崎総業株式会社 Molding temporary locking mold and molding temporary locking method
JP4126214B2 (en) 2002-09-24 2008-07-30 ブラザー工業株式会社 Label tape printer
JP2005215497A (en) 2004-01-30 2005-08-11 Nippon Zeon Co Ltd Light diffusion plate and its manufacturing method
US20080064805A1 (en) 2005-10-07 2008-03-13 Mitsui Chemicals, Inc. Process for producing injection molded product
JP4429304B2 (en) * 2006-12-19 2010-03-10 本田技研工業株式会社 Injection molding method and injection molding apparatus
JP4976888B2 (en) 2007-03-06 2012-07-18 ソニー株式会社 Injection control device
JP5238213B2 (en) 2007-10-18 2013-07-17 株式会社小糸製作所 Front cover of vehicle lamp
JP5056354B2 (en) * 2007-10-31 2012-10-24 三菱エンジニアリングプラスチックス株式会社 Method for producing antistatic polycarbonate resin molded product and molded product
KR20090114766A (en) 2008-04-30 2009-11-04 엘지디스플레이 주식회사 Injection molding and light guide panel fabricated using the same, liquid crystal display device having the light guide panel
JP2009286052A (en) * 2008-05-30 2009-12-10 Masayuki Umetsu Molding die
JP5092927B2 (en) 2008-06-20 2012-12-05 ソニー株式会社 Injection molding control method and injection molding control device
TWI370273B (en) 2008-10-17 2012-08-11 Coretronic Corp Light guide plate
CN101804682B (en) * 2009-02-13 2012-07-25 东莞亿东机器有限公司 Secondary mould pressing in-mould decorating injection forming method
EP2411464B1 (en) 2009-03-23 2013-05-08 Basell Poliolefine Italia S.r.l. Polyolefin masterbatch and composition suitable for injection molding
DE102009046835A1 (en) 2009-11-18 2011-05-19 Robert Bosch Gmbh Injection molding tool for use during manufacturing injection molded part, has manifold including adaptive structures, where cross-sectional area of manifold is changed during injection of sprayed materials into cavities
WO2012008561A1 (en) * 2010-07-13 2012-01-19 帝人株式会社 Carbon fiber bundle, method for producing same, and molded article produced from same
US20180015652A1 (en) * 2010-11-23 2018-01-18 Synventive Molding Solutions, Inc. Injection flow control apparatus and method
RU2567906C2 (en) 2011-05-20 2015-11-10 иМФЛАКС Инк., Injection moulding at low, in fact, constant pressure
EP2709815B1 (en) 2011-05-20 2017-08-23 iMFLUX, Inc. Alternative pressure control for a low constant pressure injection molding apparatus
WO2012162218A1 (en) 2011-05-20 2012-11-29 The Procter & Gamble Company Apparatus and method for injection molding at low constant pressure
MX2013013595A (en) 2011-05-20 2014-01-08 Procter & Gamble Method for injection molding at low, substantially constant pressure.
JP6035330B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2016-11-30 アイエムフラックス インコーポレイテッド Non-natural equilibrium supply system for injection molding equipment
JP5817077B2 (en) * 2011-11-17 2015-11-18 株式会社吉野工業所 Injection molding method
CN104144777A (en) 2012-02-24 2014-11-12 宝洁公司 Injection mold having a simplified cooling system
US20130295219A1 (en) 2012-05-02 2013-11-07 Ralph Edwin Neufarth Injection Mold Having a Simplified Evaporative Cooling System or a Simplified Cooling System with Exotic Cooling Fluids
CN105209236B (en) * 2013-03-14 2017-09-15 米拉克龙有限责任公司 Single-chamber flow control method and system for coinjection moulding
US20180022002A1 (en) * 2016-07-20 2018-01-25 Synventive Molding Solutions, Inc. Injection molding apparatus and method for automatic cycle to cycle cavity injection

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5478520A (en) * 1989-10-27 1995-12-26 Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Process for injection molding and apparatus therefor
US5407342A (en) * 1993-09-13 1995-04-18 Boucher; Paul Y. Apparatus for manufacturing a composite product
US6824379B2 (en) * 1998-04-21 2004-11-30 Synventive Molding Solutions, Inc. Apparatus for utilizing an actuator for flow control valve gates
US7156649B2 (en) * 2003-08-06 2007-01-02 Sumitomo Wiring Systems, Ltd. Mold for injection molding and a method of operating a mold

Non-Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Bayer Corporation, Engineering Polymers Part and Mold Design Thermoplastics A Design Guide, April 2000, pages 139-146,570 *
Mold Masters pamphlet entitled "Your Connection!...To Injection Molding Excellence: Modular Manifolds & Master Probe Nozzle Probes" , pages 11, 21-35, April 1986. *

Cited By (38)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9707709B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2017-07-18 Imflux Inc Method for injection molding at low, substantially constant pressure
US9815233B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2017-11-14 Imflux, Inc. Method and apparatus for substantially constant pressure injection molding of thinwall parts
US10076861B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2018-09-18 Imflux Inc Apparatus for injection molding at low constant pressure
US8757999B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2014-06-24 The Procter & Gamble Company Alternative pressure control for a low constant pressure injection molding apparatus
US8828291B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2014-09-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Method for substantially constant pressure injection molding of thinwall parts
US8911228B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2014-12-16 Imflux, Inc. Non-naturally balanced feed system for an injection molding apparatus
US9272452B2 (en) 2011-05-20 2016-03-01 Imflux, Inc. Method and apparatus for substantially constant pressure injection molding of thinwall parts
WO2013126667A1 (en) 2012-02-24 2013-08-29 The Procter & Gamble Company High thermal conductivity co-injection molding system
US9475211B2 (en) 2012-02-24 2016-10-25 Imflux Inc Injection mold having a simplified cooling system
US9089998B2 (en) 2012-02-24 2015-07-28 Imflux, Inc. Injection mold having a simplified cooling system
WO2013126723A1 (en) 2012-02-24 2013-08-29 The Procter & Gamble Company Injection mold having a simplified cooling system
US9097565B2 (en) 2012-03-30 2015-08-04 Beaumont Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for material flow characterization
US8591219B1 (en) 2012-05-02 2013-11-26 The Procter & Gamble Company Injection mold having a simplified evaporative cooling system
WO2013166272A2 (en) 2012-05-02 2013-11-07 The Procter & Gamble Company Injection mold having a simplified evaporative cooling system or a simplified cooling system with exotic cooling fluids
US9682505B2 (en) 2012-05-02 2017-06-20 Imflux Inc Injection mold having a simplified evaporative cooling system or a simplified cooling system with exotic cooling fluids
US9604398B2 (en) 2012-11-08 2017-03-28 Imflux Inc Injection mold with fail safe pressure mechanism
US9610721B2 (en) 2012-11-21 2017-04-04 Imflux Inc Reduced size runner for an injection mold system
US20140253152A1 (en) * 2013-03-05 2014-09-11 Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Zur Foerderung Der Angewandten Forschung E.V. Device for ascertaining the corrosiveness of a plastic melt
US9568446B2 (en) * 2013-03-05 2017-02-14 Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Zur Foerderung Der Angewandten Forschung E.V. Device for ascertaining the corrosiveness of a plastic melt
US9364977B2 (en) 2013-05-13 2016-06-14 Imflux, Inc. Low constant pressure injection molding system with variable-position molding cavities
CN105228804A (en) * 2013-05-13 2016-01-06 宝洁公司 There is the low constant voltage adapted to injection system of the mold cavity of position changeable
WO2014186086A1 (en) * 2013-05-13 2014-11-20 The Procter & Gamble Company Low constant pressure injection molding system with variable-position molding cavities
US8980146B2 (en) 2013-08-01 2015-03-17 Imflux, Inc. Injection molding machines and methods for accounting for changes in material properties during injection molding runs
WO2015017658A1 (en) 2013-08-01 2015-02-05 iMFLUX Inc. Injection molding machines and methods for accounting for changes in material properties during injection molding runs
US9643351B2 (en) 2013-08-01 2017-05-09 Imflux Inc Injection molding machines and methods for accounting for changes in material properties during injection molding runs
US9475226B2 (en) 2013-08-01 2016-10-25 Imflux Inc Injection molding machines and methods for accounting for changes in material properties during injection molding runs
WO2015017643A1 (en) 2013-08-01 2015-02-05 iMFLUX Inc. Injection molding machines and methods for accounting for changes in material properties during injection molding runs
US9481119B2 (en) 2013-08-01 2016-11-01 iMFLUX Inc. Injection molding machines and methods for accounting for changes in material properties during injection molding runs
US9321206B2 (en) 2013-08-01 2016-04-26 Imflux, Inc. Injection molding machines and methods for accounting for changes in material properties during injection molding runs
WO2015051218A1 (en) 2013-10-04 2015-04-09 The Procter & Gamble Company Process and apparatus for making tufted article
US9993066B2 (en) 2013-12-19 2018-06-12 The Gillette Company Llc Method to manufacture an injection molded component and injection molded component
US10513064B2 (en) 2013-12-19 2019-12-24 The Procter & Gamble Company Process and apparatus for making multi-component hollow article and article made thereby
WO2015095666A1 (en) 2013-12-19 2015-06-25 The Procter & Gamble Company Process and apparatus for making multi-component hollow article and article made thereby
US20150258721A1 (en) * 2014-03-13 2015-09-17 iMFLUX Inc. Plastic Article Forming Apparatuses and Methods for Using the Same
WO2016106032A1 (en) 2014-12-22 2016-06-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Package for consumer care products
WO2016106030A1 (en) 2014-12-22 2016-06-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Package for consumer care products
WO2016106031A1 (en) 2014-12-22 2016-06-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Package for consumer care products
US20170001346A1 (en) * 2015-06-30 2017-01-05 iMFLUX Inc. Sequential coining

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
RU2573483C2 (en) 2016-01-20
JP5824143B2 (en) 2015-11-25
EP2709813A1 (en) 2014-03-26
EP2709813B1 (en) 2018-10-03
WO2012162218A1 (en) 2012-11-29
JP2015520050A (en) 2015-07-16
CA2836783C (en) 2017-02-21
US20120328724A1 (en) 2012-12-27
AU2012259036A1 (en) 2013-12-19
KR20140001251A (en) 2014-01-06
CN103547430A (en) 2014-01-29
RU2013151838A (en) 2015-06-27
BR112013029695A2 (en) 2017-01-17
CA2836783A1 (en) 2012-11-29
JP2014517784A (en) 2014-07-24
BR112014028693A2 (en) 2017-06-27
US10076861B2 (en) 2018-09-18
MX2013013589A (en) 2014-01-08
PH12014502589A1 (en) 2015-01-12
AU2012259036B2 (en) 2016-04-14

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US10086550B2 (en) Molding machine and method of molding a part
US8114332B2 (en) Injection moulding method
Harper Handbook of plastic processes
Goodship ARBURG practical guide to injection moulding
RU2567906C2 (en) Injection moulding at low, in fact, constant pressure
KR20160075823A (en) Method for injection molding at low, substantially constant pressure
CN107000280A (en) Method and apparatus for the frangible hollow product of overmolding
EP2979837B1 (en) Injection molding method
US9517582B2 (en) Method of molding a part
US5074772A (en) Mold for injection molded parts made of plasticizable material
RU2573483C2 (en) Device and method for injection moulding at low constant pressure
JP6177953B2 (en) Injection mold with simplified cooling system
US20140242207A1 (en) Clamping device of injection molding machine
JP5848443B2 (en) Method for substantially constant pressure injection molding of thin-walled parts
KR101578276B1 (en) Non-naturally balanced feed system for an injection molding apparatus
JP6144840B2 (en) Injection molding machine and method considering changes in material properties during injection molding operation
CN105636757B (en) For the method for the technology characteristic for assessing injection mold
US7798806B2 (en) Two-piece bottom insert for a mold cavity
Ozcelik et al. Investigation the effects of obstacle geometries and injection molding parameters on weld line strength using experimental and finite element methods in plastic injection molding
US8708683B2 (en) Mold-runner system having independently controllable shooting-pot assemblies
US10444092B2 (en) Upstream nozzle sensor for injection molding apparatus and methods of use
CN105848849B (en) Pass through the method for injection-molding machine injection-moulded plastic part
JP5841246B2 (en) Alternative pressure control for low constant pressure injection molding equipment
JP6117393B2 (en) Method for molding thin-walled parts in a co-injection molding system
CN105008108A (en) Injection molding apparatus and injection molding method

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, OHIO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ALTONEN, GENE MICHAEL;NEUFARTH, RALPH EDWIN;SCHILLER, GARY FRANCIS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20110601 TO 20110725;REEL/FRAME:028245/0084

AS Assignment

Owner name: IMFLUX INC, OHIO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:032878/0514

Effective date: 20140402

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION