New! View global litigation for patent families

US20120255534A1 - Paintball marker with integrated bolt engine - Google Patents

Paintball marker with integrated bolt engine Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20120255534A1
US20120255534A1 US13429605 US201213429605A US2012255534A1 US 20120255534 A1 US20120255534 A1 US 20120255534A1 US 13429605 US13429605 US 13429605 US 201213429605 A US201213429605 A US 201213429605A US 2012255534 A1 US2012255534 A1 US 2012255534A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
pressure
bolt
chamber
paintball
gas
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13429605
Inventor
Christopher Cole
Original Assignee
Christopher Cole
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41BWEAPONS FOR PROJECTING MISSILES WITHOUT USE OF EXPLOSIVE OR COMBUSTIBLE PROPELLANT CHARGE; WEAPONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F41B11/00Compressed-gas guns, e.g. air guns; Steam guns
    • F41B11/50Magazines for compressed-gas guns; Arrangements for feeding or loading projectiles from magazines
    • F41B11/52Magazines for compressed-gas guns; Arrangements for feeding or loading projectiles from magazines the projectiles being loosely held in a magazine above the gun housing, e.g. in a hopper
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41BWEAPONS FOR PROJECTING MISSILES WITHOUT USE OF EXPLOSIVE OR COMBUSTIBLE PROPELLANT CHARGE; WEAPONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F41B11/00Compressed-gas guns, e.g. air guns; Steam guns
    • F41B11/70Details not provided for in F41B11/50 or F41B11/60
    • F41B11/72Valves; Arrangement of valves
    • F41B11/721Valves; Arrangement of valves for controlling gas pressure for both firing the projectile and for loading or feeding
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41BWEAPONS FOR PROJECTING MISSILES WITHOUT USE OF EXPLOSIVE OR COMBUSTIBLE PROPELLANT CHARGE; WEAPONS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F41B11/00Compressed-gas guns, e.g. air guns; Steam guns
    • F41B11/70Details not provided for in F41B11/50 or F41B11/60
    • F41B11/72Valves; Arrangement of valves
    • F41B11/724Valves; Arrangement of valves for gas pressure reduction

Abstract

A paintball marker having a more efficient and reliable bolt engine assembly comprising a hollow bolt resident in the chamber of the gun body and sidable therein, a stationary valve piston inserted within the bolt for sealing said chamber, and a low pressure regulator (LPR) integral to the valve piston for providing a source of low-pressure compressed gas (approx. 90-250 psi) for moving the bolt within the chamber, e.g., between a loading position and a ready-to-fire position. The bolt is the only moving component within the chamber, and its design allows both the high-pressure (300-400 psi) propellant charge and the low pressure (90-250 psi) charge used to reciprocate the bolt to enter perpendicularly through a port or opening in the side of the bolt.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION(S)
  • [0001]
    The present application derives priority from U.S. provisional application Ser. No. 61/467,098 filed 24 Mar. 2011.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    (1) Field of the Invention
  • [0003]
    The present invention relates to paintball guns and, more particularly, to a paintball marker with a more efficient and reliable pneumatic bolt firing mechanism.
  • [0004]
    (2) Description of the Background
  • [0005]
    Paintball has become an extremely popular hobby and, for some, a profession. The guns used to fire the paintballs are referred to as “markers”. Paintball markers are pneumatic projectile launchers that fire encapsulated paintballs by releasing a burst of gas (typically CO2 or compressed air)
  • [0006]
    Current paintball markers are very sophisticated devices comprising a reservoir of compressed gas connected to a regulator, and a trigger mechanism for actuating the regulator to discharge the gas, ejecting paintballs from the chamber through a barrel at between 280 and 300 feet per second. The barrel has a closed breech end leading to an open muzzle. A magazine of paintballs is typically mounted above the breech of the paintball marker, and the paintballs are fed into the firing position automatically. Such paintball markers typically utilize a reciprocating bolt that moves between a loading position that permits a paintball to drop into the breech, and a firing position in which the bolt moves toward the muzzle of the marker, covering the magazine outlet. Once in the firing position the bolt re-directs a charge of: compressed gas that propels the paintball out the muzzle.
  • [0007]
    There are a number of design factors that go into a well-designed firing mechanism. Efficiency is important since the capacity of the gas cylinders is limited. Thus, it is desirable to maximize the number of shots possible from a single cylinder. This in turn requires conservation of the gas used for each shot, plus efficient energy transfer from the released gas to the paintball projectile.
  • [0008]
    Conventional markers reduce the high pressure from the cylinder into a low-pressure charge for operating the bolt. Thus, the high pressure gas from the regulator is branched, one branch being reduced through a low pressure regulator (LPR). The low pressure conduit is used for operating the bolt, while the high pressure conduit ejects the paintball. Typically, the trigger is electronic and sends signals to one or more solenoids which in turn control application of the low pressure and/or high pressure to the bolt. A first signal to the solenoid(s) delivers the low pressure charge to the bolt for moving it from loading to firing position, and a second delivers a high pressure charge to the bolt, electing paintballs from the chamber through a barrel at between 280 and 300 feet per second.
  • [0009]
    The bolt typically comprises a hollow tubular member resident in the chamber of the gun body and slidable along a stationary valve piston. The bolt is the only moving component within the chamber, and slides between loading and firing position upon application of the low pressure (90-250 psi) charge. In conventional markers this low pressure charge is fed from the compressed gas cylinder through a low pressure regulator (LPR) proximate the cylinder, and from there to the rear of the bolt. This prolonged flow path is inefficient. Moreover, the high-pressure (300 psi) propellant charge enters the bolt generally perpendicular to its axis through a port or opening in the side of the bolt. This abrupt right-angle junction creates turbulence in the flow stream and deprives it of efficiency.
  • [0010]
    There have been efforts to improve the bolt configuration. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,474,326 discloses a bolt with flared angular ports that eliminate the “corner” formed at the intersection of the prior art perpendicular flow passages. The flared ports reduce turbulence in the propellant charge and minimize energy loss.
  • [0011]
    Other examples of paintball marker guns used in the field include Anderson, U.S. Pat. No. 5,515,838 (paintball gun with a passage for porting pressurized gas to a ball projectile); Lukas et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,613,483 (a gas powered gun with a piston and cylinder assembly for ejecting projectiles from the gun) and Lotuaco, III, U.S. Pat. No. 6,065,460 (gas-powered paintball gun with two pressure regulators; one for supplying lower pressure for loading paintballs and one for high pressure for expelling the paintball from the barrel.)
  • [0012]
    There remains a need for an integrated bolt engine for a paintball gun that integrates the low pressure regulator (LPR) directly into the bolt, eliminating the inefficient low pressure flow path, conserving parts and improving reliability.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0013]
    It is, therefore, a primary object of the present invention to provide a high-efficiency paintball marker with pneumatic firing mechanism comprising an integrated bolt engine including a hollow reciprocating bolt resident in the chamber of the gun body and slidable therein, a stationary valve piston inserted within the bolt for sealing said chamber, and a low pressure regulator (LPR) for reciprocating the bolt integrated directly into the bolt engine, and particularly into the valve piston.
  • [0014]
    It is another object to provide a marker capable of emptying a hopper full of paintballs with a standard (68 cubic inch) air tank and a standard (e.g., 4000 psi) fill to the tank, by minimizing both high and low pressure flow paths between cylinder and bolt as described above.
  • [0015]
    It is another object to admit both the high-pressure (300-400 psi) propellant charge and low pressure (90-250 psi) bolt-action charge radially in through multiple ports or openings in the side of the bolt to avoid perpendicular flow paths.
  • [0016]
    In accordance with the foregoing objects, a high-efficiency paintball marker is provided with a pneumatic firing mechanism comprising an integrated bolt engine with a hollow bolt and a stationary valve piston inserted within the bolt. A low pressure regulator (LPR) is integrated directly into the stationery valve piston for reducing the high pressure charge in order to move the bolt rapidly forwardly from a loading position towards its front shooting position, at which point the trigger causes high pressure gas to be released into the barrel through a high pressure gas passageway running through the center of the bolt.
  • [0017]
    The improved bolt engine employs fewer parts, is much simpler to manufacture, less prone to wear, and more reliable in operation. The net result is a high-efficiency tournament grade paintball marker that makes more efficient use of compressed gas, thereby allowing firing of more rounds per charge, and which is nevertheless simple in construction and easier to manufacture.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0018]
    Other objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments and certain modifications thereof when taken together with the accompanying drawings in which:
  • [0019]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the paintball marker 2 incorporating an integrated bolt engine according to the present invention.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 2 is a side view of the integrated bolt engine removed from main body 10 (with the chamber in which it is inserted shown above in dotted lines).
  • [0021]
    FIG. 3 is a side cross-section of the valve piston 30 inclusive of the low pressure regulator (LPR) at left, and FIG. 4 is a perspective view.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 5 is a composite photo of the individual components of the bolt 20 FIG. 2.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 6 is a composite photo of the individual components of the LPR of FIG. 2.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT(S)
  • [0024]
    The present invention is an improved paintball marker with a high-efficiency and reliable pneumatic bolt firing mechanism. The paintball marker uses a high-pressure pneumatic charge from a conventional air tank. (3000-4000 psi) and a conventional high-pressure regulator (HPR) set to regulate to 300-400 psi for firing the paintball. A pneumatic bolt engine resident in the chamber reciprocates from a loading position in which a paintball is admitted from an external hopper into the chamber and a firing position. Reciprocation of the pneumatic bolt engine is driven by a low-pressure charge (90-120 psi). To get this from the HPR, the pneumatic bolt engine employs an integral low pressure regulator which internally regulates the higher-pressure (300-400 psi) charge into a low-pressure charge (90-120 psi) for self-actuation and loading. Once a paintball is loaded, manual or electronic trigger-actuation admits the high-pressure (300-400 psi) pneumatic charge into the bolt to expel the paintball.
  • [0025]
    The improved pneumatic bolt engine generally comprises a stationary valve piston affixed in the chamber, and a tubular bolt slidably mounted on the valve piston and movable for reciprocation within the chamber. In accordance with the present invention the low pressure regulator (LPR) is integrated directly into the valve piston, helping to minimize air flow paths. The tubular bolt is the only moving component within the chamber, and reciprocates between rear loading and forward firing positions upon application of the low pressure charge from the integral LPR. Once in the firing position the high pressure (300-400 psi) charge to the bolt ejects the paintball from the chamber through a barrel at between 280 and 300 feet per second. The valve piston does not move, but both charges are fed radially in through multiple ports opening in the side of the valve piston. This radial-flow design simplifies chamber 13 manufacturing and makes more efficient use of: compressed gas, thereby allowing firing of more rounds per charge.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a paintball marker 2 according to an embodiment of the present invention. The paintball marker 2 includes a main body 10 with a pistol-handle grip 54 and pivoting trigger 56 attached to the handle grip 54. The main body 10 includes a cylindrical interior chamber 13 screw-threaded at the leading end for attachment of a tubular muzzle 92. A barrel assembly 94 is attached to the muzzle 92, and paint balls are discharged from internal to the chamber 13 through the muzzle 92 and barrel assembly 94. A conventional compressed gas cylinder 55 is attached to the bottom of the handle grip 54 through a regulated gas inlet 52, in a known manner, for introduction of compressed gas from cylinder 55 into the chamber 13 of main body 10. The compressed gas cylinder 55 is a conventional gas cylinder or storage tank coupled to the gas inlet 52 as a source of pressurized gas (air or CO2). The regulated gas inlet 52 incorporates any of a variety of commercial regulator assemblies suitable for decreasing the pressure of air from compressed gas cylinder 55 from between 3000-4000 psi to between 300-400 psi (firing pressure). Regulated gas inlet 52 feeds the gas into handle 54 for powering the paint ball marker. A suitable regulated gas inlet 52 may comprise a conventional ASA (Air Source Adapter) Regulator with safety-vented air source connector, preferably using standardized bottle threading. The SEM Company produces a line of suitable ASA adapters. The preferred gas inlet regulator should be adjustable to provide an approximate 300-400 PSI output. Regulator adjustment may be accomplished by turning a setscrew located on the bottom of the regulator, and a variety of commercially-available paintball regulators are well-suited for these specifications (such as the Bulldog™ 0-900 psi adjustable regulator).
  • [0027]
    Internally, the compressed gas is fed through the body 10 as will be described to the integrated bolt engine of the present invention, which is seated in the chamber 13. The integrated bolt engine in combination with the trigger serves as a firing mechanism to both load and expel the paintballs. The integrated bolt engine incorporates its own integral LPR (as will be described) to provide the low pressure gas charge (approx. 90-250 psi) for reciprocating the bolt between its loading and firing positions. When in the loading position, a paintball is fed from hopper 65 into the chamber 13 through a port 12. Hopper 65 may be any conventional paintball feeder or hopper. With a paintball loaded the bolt is moved to the firing position, and the integrated bolt engine (under trigger control supplies the high pressure (300-400 psi) charge to expel the paintball through muzzle 92 and barrel assembly 94.
  • [0028]
    The integrated bolt engine enclosed in chamber 13 extends coaxially with barrel 90 and is offset from the compressed gas cylinder 55 attached to the distal end of the handle 54. In the illustrated embodiment the compressed gas cylinder 55 runs parallel to the barrel 90, though alternatively it may extend downwardly. The regulated high pressure airflow supplying both the high-pressure gas charge and low-pressure gas charge passes directly upward through a conduit in the handle 54 and is selectively ported radially to the integrated bolt engine.
  • [0029]
    The trigger 56 is pivotally attached to the handle grip 54 behind a conventional trigger guard, and a forward stabilizing handle 57 protrudes downward in advance of the trigger guard.
  • [0030]
    The pivoting trigger 56 may activate a manual valve or a programmable electronic controller circuit. Preferably, a commercially-available electronic controller circuit is used. Such circuits may be pre-programmed to output one or a sequence of firing control signals that range from single-shot (semi-automatic) mode, to fully-automatic burst modes for firing a user-selectable number of paintballs machine-gun style.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 2 is a side view of the integrated bolt engine removed from main body 10 with the chamber 13 in which it is inserted shown above in dotted lines. The chamber 13 is a cylindrical bore with a screw-threaded exit at the rear of the body 10. A fluid passage 60 approaches the chamber 13 perpendicularly from the bottom of the handle 54 and flares out beneath the chamber 13, entering the chamber at two spaced ports 61, 63. An electronic solenoid valve 64 resides in the fluid passage 60 between ports 61, 63 for selectively permitting flow to port 63. Where a manual trigger is employed, electronic solenoid valve 64 may be replaced with a mechanical valve. The electronic solenoid valve 64 is electrically connected to the electronic controller and is thereby controlled by the control signals in accordance with the trigger 56 action.
  • [0032]
    The bolt engine includes a stationary valve piston 30 affixed in the chamber 13, a tubular bolt 20 slidably mounted on the valve piston 30 and movable within the chamber 13, and a low pressure regulator (LPR) 66 integrated directly into the valve piston 30. The bolt 20 is the only moving component, sliding between rear loading position (shown) and forward firing position under solenoid valve 64 control.
  • [0033]
    Solenoid 64 selectively switches open closed to admit a charge of high pressure compressed gas through port 63 directly through the bolt 20 and into the chamber to fire a paintball. The same high pressure compressed gas is always applied through port 61 to the back of the valve piston 30, but this flow path is regulated (as described below) down to a low-pressure charge of approx. 90-250 psi. If high pressure compressed gas is applied through port 63 it overcomes the low pressure charge and the bolt remains stationery. However, after the high pressure charge from port 63 is dispersed, the low-pressure charge actuates the internal bolt engine, thereby moving bolt 20 from the loading position shown (in which a paintball is gravity fed into the chamber in advance of the bolt engine) to a ready-to-fire position in which the paintball is moved into the breech of chamber 13, immediately and automatically followed by another high-pressure gas charge released through the bolt 20 and into the barrel assembly 90 of the gun. Thus, the high-pressure charge counterbalances the low pressure charge. Each pull of the trigger 56 expels the paintball and switches off the solenoid 64 and the high-pressure gas feed. The high-pressure charge dissipates leaving the low-pressure charge to move the bolt 20 back to its loading position (shown) in which another paintball is gravity fed into the chamber 13. As soon as the bolt 20 regains its home position the control signal causes the solenoid 64 to selectively admit high pressure compressed gas to the internal bolt engine, re-pressurizing the bolt engine.
  • [0034]
    Pulling the trigger 56 immediately switches off the high-pressure as feed, allowing the low pressure gas feed to thereby move bolt 20 from the loading position shown to the ready-to-fire position in which the paintball is moved into the breech, and followed by release of the accumulated high-pressure gas charge through the bolt and into the barrel assembly 90 of the gun.
  • [0035]
    To accomplish the foregoing in accordance with the present invention, the bolt engine includes a low pressure regulator (LPR) 66 integrated directly into the valve piston 30. The fluid passage 60 enters the chamber at two spaced ports 61, 63, and each port preferably comprises a radial array of four porting holes equally angularly spaced to provide vents into chamber 13. Port 61 provides the gas supply to the LPR 66, while port 63 selectively provides the high pressure gas supply. The LPR 66 provides a source of low-pressure compressed gas (approx. 90-250 psi) for moving the bolt 20 within the chamber 13, from the loading to ready-to-fire positions in accordance with the firing cycle described above.
  • [0036]
    The stationery valve piston 30 is threaded into the chamber 13 of the marker body by screw-threads 32 and resides substantially within the chamber 13. A threaded distal neck protrudes, and a cap 40 is secured by screw-threads 33 to the threaded distal neck. The cap 40 is part of the LPR 66 and allows adjustment of the pressure of the low-pressure compressed gas.
  • [0037]
    When the slidable bolt 20 resides against the rear of the chamber 13 as shown, it seals against an annular collar 31. In this configuration the firing mechanism is considered a “closed bolt” which allows a paintball to drop into the chamber 13 just in advance of the bolt 20. The high pressure charge remains applied through fluid passage 60 to both ports 61, 63 when the slidable bolt 20 is closed and the trigger 56 is not pulled, thereby pressurizing the bolt 20.
  • [0038]
    When the trigger 56 is pulled it switches solenoid 64 off, which cuts off the high pressure charge through port 63 and effectively switches to the low pressure charge (90-750 psi) of compressed gas from LPR 66 up through an annular array of low pressure ports 38, which vent to the chamber 13 through ports 36. Thus, upon squeezing trigger 56, this low-pressure charge drives the bolt 20 forward, feeding the ball into the breech of chamber 13. Immediately upon reaching its full extension to the ready-to-fire position, the high pressure charge (300-400 psi) of: compressed gas is expelled through an annular array of distal lets 81 at the end of bolt 20. The paintball fires. The entire process repeats itself when the trigger 56 is depressed again manually or automatically if the controller circuit is set to a burst firing mode. A key improvement in the foregoing is the integration of the LPR 66 into the valve piston 30 leaving just a single moving component (bolt 20) that slides within chamber 13.
  • [0039]
    The structural configuration necessary for operation of the bolt 20 and valve piston 30 will now be described. The slidable bolt 20 and valve piston 30 are fitted together end to end to form a contiguous in-line assembly, the valve piston 30 remaining stationery and stoppering the rear of chamber 13.
  • [0040]
    FIG. 3 is a side cross-section of the valve piston 30, inclusive of LPR 66, and FIG. 4 is a perspective view of just the valve piston 30.
  • [0041]
    The valve piston 30 includes a central passage 34 in communication with front ports 36, 38 and 39. The passage 34 ends but the piston 30 continues along a reduced diameter neck 35 to a plug 37. The plug 37 is encircled by an O-ring 43 and forms a seal that seats against and seals chamber 13. When seated, the plug 34 prevents the release of high-pressure compressed gas from the chamber 13. The pressure of the compressed gas on the plug 34 keeps the valve piston 30 in a closed position, with the plug 34 securely seated. Three additional O-ring seals 43 are disposed along the rear length of valve piston 30 to seal against the interior of the chamber 13. These include O-ring seals 43 on opposing sides of front port 39 that seal off compressed gas and force it into front port 39 of valve piston 30 and into central passage 34, thereby allowing it to escape through port 36 into the bolt 20. The surface of the piston 30 around the port 36 is slightly concave about an annular trough 47 to allow free flow of the escaping air. The LPR 66 is inserted into the open rearward end of valve piston 30 and is contained therein by adjustable cap 40. The LPR 66 provides a source of low-pressure the compressed gas(approx. 90-250 psi) for moving the bolt 20 within the chamber 13, from the ready-to-fire position through the firing cycle described above. The LPR 66 is essentially a spring-loaded variable-pressure valve assembly for which cap 40 provides the adjustable-pressure bias to set the valve pressure, as described below.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 5 is a composite photo of the individual components of the bolt 20 of FIG. 2. The bolt 20 is preferably of two piece tubular construction, comprising a vented forward portion (FIG. 5B) screw-threaded into a main cylindrical body 24 as seen in FIG. 5A, threaded to a jet nozzle tip 22 as seen in FIG. 5B. The jet nozzle tip 22 screws into the main body 24 directing let nozzles 81 forward toward the breech/paintball. The main cylindrical body 4 is defined by two annular channels containing O-rings 43 as shown, for sealing against the walls of chamber 13.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 6 is a composite photo of the individual components of the LPR 66 spring-loaded variable-pressure valve assembly of FIG. 2 which is inserted into the valve piston 30. The LPR 66 includes a Shrader-type spring-loaded valve core 78 inserted and affixed in position inside the stationery valve piston 30 within its internal cavity. Increasing bias on the distally-protruding stem of valve core 78 increasingly opens it. A piston 72 embraces the distally-protruding stem of valve 78 and is depressable there against to open valve 78. Piston 72 is likewise defined as an annular member having an internal cavity and external flange defined by a channel for seating an O-ring 75. The piston 72 is spring pre-biased into the stem of valve 78 by a spring 73 mounted behind the adjustment cap 40, and bearing there against on a washer 76. Tightening the cap 40 compresses the spring 73 and piston 72 against the valve 78 and decreases the valve opening pressure (and vice versa), thereby adjusting the low pressure supply to bolt 20 to within a range of from 90-220 psi.
  • [0044]
    The foregoing configuration is simple and easy to manufacture, and yet highly efficient. Whereas conventional paintball markers may yield 300-400 shots per canister of compressed gas, the foregoing configuration has been shown to yield 1300-1400 shots. This is a critical statistic in tournament play where it is desirable to minimize the need for carrying and changing air canisters.
  • [0045]
    Having now fully set forth the preferred embodiment and certain modifications of the concept underlying the present invention, various other embodiments as well as certain variations and modifications of the embodiments herein shown and described will obviously occur to those skilled in the art upon becoming familiar with said underlying concept. It is to be understood, therefore, that the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically set forth in the appended claims.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A paintball marker, comprising:
    a marker body having pistol-handle grip and pivoting trigger attached to the handle grip, said marker body defining an internal cylindrical chamber and an air passage running through said handle grip into said chamber;
    a coupling attached to said marker body for attachment of a paintball hopper, said coupling being in communication with said chamber for loading paintballs therein;
    a tubular muzzle attached to said marker body in communication with said chamber;
    a barrel attached to said muzzle in communication with said chamber;
    an adapter at a distal end of said handle grip for attachment of a compressed gas cylinder to the air passage running through said handle;
    a first regulator between said compressed gas cylinder and air passage for regulating gas pressure introduced from said compressed gas cylinder into said air passage to within a first pressure range;
    a pneumatic bolt assembly resident in said chamber for loading paintballs through said coupling and for shooting paintballs through said muzzle and barrel, said pneumatic bolt assembly further comprising,
    a valve piston inserted within the chamber of said paintball marker and fixedly attached to said housing, said valve piston having a central passage, a plurality of annular O-ring seals, and a plurality of ports entering said central passage between said O-ring seals,
    a tubular bolt inserted onto said piston for reciprocation thereon within said chamber, and
    a second regulator inserted inside said valve piston and fixedly attached therein for regulating gas pressure introduced from said air passage into the central passage of said valve piston to within a second pressure range, the second pressure range being lower than the first pressure range for reciprocation of said bolt;
    whereby said tubular bolt reciprocates on said valve piston from a ready-to-fire position in which a paintball may be gravity fed from a hopper through said coupling into said chamber, to a firing position in which a high pressure charge of gas within said first pressure range is released into the chamber thereby accelerating said paintball down and out from the muzzle and barrel.
  2. 2. The paintball marker according to claim 1, wherein the air passage in said marker body branches into a first inlet to said chamber for actuation of said bolt, and a second inlet to said chamber for firing said paintball.
  3. 3. The paintball marker according to claim 2, further comprising a solenoid valve interrupting the second inlet to said chamber.
  4. 4. The paintball marker according to claim 3, wherein said solenoid valve is controlled by said trigger.
  5. 5. The paintball marker according to claim 3, wherein said solenoid valve is electronically-controlled by said trigger.
  6. 6. The paintball marker according to claim 4, wherein the trigger turns the solenoid on to selectively admit a high-pressure charge within said first pressure range into said chamber for firing said paintball.
  7. 7. The paintball marker according to claim 6, wherein pressure remains applied through the first inlet to said chamber for actuation of said bolt throughout a firing cycle.
  8. 8. The paintball marker according to claim 7, wherein the pressure that remains applied through the first inlet is regulated by the second regulator to a low pressure charge within said second pressure range.
  9. 9. The paintball marker according to claim 8, wherein when the solenoid is on the high-pressure charge overcompensates the low pressure charge to cause said bolt to remain stationery.
  10. 10. The paintball marker according to claim 9, wherein when the solenoid is off and the high-pressure charge is expelled the low pressure charge actuates said bolt to reciprocate to a loading position.
  11. 11. In a paintball marker having a marker body with a pistol-handle grip and pivoting trigger attached to the handle grip, said marker body defining a chamber and having an air passage running through said handle grip into said chamber, a feed port for feeding paintballs into said chamber from an attached paintball hopper, a barrel attached in communication with said chamber, an adapter at a distal end of said handle grip for attachment of a compressed gas cylinder to the air passage running through said handle, and a first regulator between said compressed gas cylinder and air passage for regulating gas pressure introduced from said compressed gas cylinder into said air passage to within a first pressure range, a pneumatic bolt assembly resident in said chamber for loading paintballs through said feed port and for shooting said paintballs through said barrel, said pneumatic bolt assembly comprising:
    a valve piston inserted within the chamber of said paintball marker and fixedly attached to said housing, said valve piston having a central passage, a plurality of annular O-ring seals, and a plurality of ports entering said central passage between said O-ring seals;
    a tubular bolt inserted onto said piston for reciprocation thereon within said chamber; and
    a second regulator inserted inside said valve piston and fixedly attached therein for regulating gas pressure introduced from said air passage into the central passage of said valve piston to within a second pressure range, the second pressure range being lower than the first pressure range for actuation reciprocation of said bolt;
    whereby said tubular bolt reciprocates on said valve piston from a ready-to-fire position in which a paintball may be gravity fed from a hopper through said coupling into said chamber, to a firing position in which a high pressure charge of gas within said first pressure range is released into the chamber thereby accelerating said paintball down and out from the muzzle and barrel.
  12. 12. The pneumatic bolt assembly for a paintball marker according to claim 11, wherein the air passage in said marker body branches into a first inlet to said chamber for actuation of said bolt, and a second inlet to said chamber for firing said paintball.
  13. 13. The pneumatic bolt assembly for a paintball marker according to claim 12, further comprising a solenoid valve interrupting the second inlet to said chamber.
  14. 14. The pneumatic bolt assembly for a paintball marker according to claim 13, wherein said solenoid valve is controlled by said trigger.
  15. 15. The pneumatic bolt assembly for a paintball marker according to claim 13, wherein said solenoid valve is electronically-controlled by said trigger.
  16. 16. The pneumatic bolt assembly for a paintball marker according to claim 14, wherein the trigger turns the solenoid on to selectively admit a high-pressure charge within said first pressure range into said chamber for firing said paintball.
  17. 17. The pneumatic bolt assembly for a paintball marker according to claim 16, wherein pressure remains applied through the first inlet to said chamber for actuation of said bolt throughout a firing cycle.
  18. 18. The pneumatic bolt assembly for a paintball marker according to claim 17, wherein the pressure that remains applied through the first inlet is regulated by the second regulator to a low pressure charge within said second pressure range.
  19. 19. The pneumatic bolt assembly for a paintball marker according to clam 18, wherein when the solenoid is on the high-pressure charge overcompensates the low pressure charge to cause said bolt to remain stationery.
  20. 20. The pneumatic bolt assembly for a paintball marker according to claim 19, wherein when the solenoid is off and the high-pressure charge is expelled the low pressure charge actuates said bolt to reciprocate to a loading position.
US13429605 2011-03-24 2012-03-26 Paintball marker with integrated bolt engine Abandoned US20120255534A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201161467098 true 2011-03-24 2011-03-24
US13429605 US20120255534A1 (en) 2011-03-24 2012-03-26 Paintball marker with integrated bolt engine

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13429605 US20120255534A1 (en) 2011-03-24 2012-03-26 Paintball marker with integrated bolt engine

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20120255534A1 true true US20120255534A1 (en) 2012-10-11

Family

ID=46965120

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13429605 Abandoned US20120255534A1 (en) 2011-03-24 2012-03-26 Paintball marker with integrated bolt engine

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20120255534A1 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160209159A1 (en) * 2013-07-11 2016-07-21 United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Projectile Launcher with a Permanent High-Low Pressure System
US20170045328A1 (en) * 2014-11-24 2017-02-16 William S. Nachefski Efficient high-velocity compressed gas-powered gun

Citations (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4770153A (en) * 1984-09-20 1988-09-13 Edelman Alexander S Pneumatic weapon with pressure reduction valves
US5265582A (en) * 1992-02-10 1993-11-30 Mohan Bhogal Controlling the velocity of projectiles from gas-powered guns
US5572982A (en) * 1994-03-17 1996-11-12 Williams; Robert A. Paint ball gun with crack valve
US5878736A (en) * 1997-06-27 1999-03-09 Brass Eagle, Inc. Dual-pressure electronic paintball gun
US6024077A (en) * 1997-10-21 2000-02-15 Kotsiopoulos; Thomas G. Pressure regulating system for compressed gas powered weapons or the like
US6286497B1 (en) * 1998-06-16 2001-09-11 Sergey Levkov Air valve and regulator
US6516791B2 (en) * 2000-11-20 2003-02-11 Zap Paintball Inc. Electrically operated paintball gun
US20050121014A1 (en) * 2002-07-24 2005-06-09 Monks Steven J. Method of firing a paintball marker
US20050217655A1 (en) * 2001-07-03 2005-10-06 Smart Parts, Inc. Paintball gun having an in-line penumatic assembly
US20060005823A1 (en) * 2004-06-10 2006-01-12 National Paintball Supply, Inc. Valve assembly for a compressed gas gun
US20060107939A1 (en) * 1999-03-19 2006-05-25 National Paintball Supply, Inc. Adjustable volume chamber and low pressure regulator for a compressed gas gun
US20060169265A1 (en) * 2005-02-03 2006-08-03 Lai Bao S Shooting structure of a paint bullet gun
US20070209650A1 (en) * 2006-03-08 2007-09-13 Smart Parts, Inc. Bolt for pneumatic paintball gun
US20090095271A1 (en) * 2007-10-12 2009-04-16 Smart Parts, Inc. Paintball gun with rearwardly removable pneumatic assembly
US7565911B2 (en) * 2004-07-06 2009-07-28 Absolute Air, Inc. Two stage regulator method and apparatus
US20090229591A1 (en) * 2008-02-15 2009-09-17 Tippmann Sports, Llc Pressure Regulator for Non-Lethal Projectile Launcher
US7686006B1 (en) * 2003-04-02 2010-03-30 Jt Sports, Llc Air system attachment on paintball marker
US7712463B2 (en) * 2006-05-25 2010-05-11 Kee Action Sports I Llc Self-regulating valve assembly
US7770572B2 (en) * 2008-05-16 2010-08-10 Yao-Gwo Gan Paint ball gun
US7861704B2 (en) * 2009-05-07 2011-01-04 Sunworld Industrial Co., Ltd. Paintball gun having internal pressure regulator
US7931018B1 (en) * 2009-11-30 2011-04-26 Bao-Shyan Lai Structure of paintball gun
US8186338B2 (en) * 2004-05-25 2012-05-29 Dye Precision, Inc. Pneumatic paintball marker

Patent Citations (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4770153A (en) * 1984-09-20 1988-09-13 Edelman Alexander S Pneumatic weapon with pressure reduction valves
US5265582A (en) * 1992-02-10 1993-11-30 Mohan Bhogal Controlling the velocity of projectiles from gas-powered guns
US5572982A (en) * 1994-03-17 1996-11-12 Williams; Robert A. Paint ball gun with crack valve
US5878736A (en) * 1997-06-27 1999-03-09 Brass Eagle, Inc. Dual-pressure electronic paintball gun
US6024077A (en) * 1997-10-21 2000-02-15 Kotsiopoulos; Thomas G. Pressure regulating system for compressed gas powered weapons or the like
US6286497B1 (en) * 1998-06-16 2001-09-11 Sergey Levkov Air valve and regulator
US20060107939A1 (en) * 1999-03-19 2006-05-25 National Paintball Supply, Inc. Adjustable volume chamber and low pressure regulator for a compressed gas gun
US6516791B2 (en) * 2000-11-20 2003-02-11 Zap Paintball Inc. Electrically operated paintball gun
US20050217655A1 (en) * 2001-07-03 2005-10-06 Smart Parts, Inc. Paintball gun having an in-line penumatic assembly
US20050121014A1 (en) * 2002-07-24 2005-06-09 Monks Steven J. Method of firing a paintball marker
US7686006B1 (en) * 2003-04-02 2010-03-30 Jt Sports, Llc Air system attachment on paintball marker
US8186338B2 (en) * 2004-05-25 2012-05-29 Dye Precision, Inc. Pneumatic paintball marker
US20060005823A1 (en) * 2004-06-10 2006-01-12 National Paintball Supply, Inc. Valve assembly for a compressed gas gun
US7565911B2 (en) * 2004-07-06 2009-07-28 Absolute Air, Inc. Two stage regulator method and apparatus
US20060169265A1 (en) * 2005-02-03 2006-08-03 Lai Bao S Shooting structure of a paint bullet gun
US20070209650A1 (en) * 2006-03-08 2007-09-13 Smart Parts, Inc. Bolt for pneumatic paintball gun
US7712463B2 (en) * 2006-05-25 2010-05-11 Kee Action Sports I Llc Self-regulating valve assembly
US20090095271A1 (en) * 2007-10-12 2009-04-16 Smart Parts, Inc. Paintball gun with rearwardly removable pneumatic assembly
US20090229591A1 (en) * 2008-02-15 2009-09-17 Tippmann Sports, Llc Pressure Regulator for Non-Lethal Projectile Launcher
US7770572B2 (en) * 2008-05-16 2010-08-10 Yao-Gwo Gan Paint ball gun
US7861704B2 (en) * 2009-05-07 2011-01-04 Sunworld Industrial Co., Ltd. Paintball gun having internal pressure regulator
US7931018B1 (en) * 2009-11-30 2011-04-26 Bao-Shyan Lai Structure of paintball gun

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160209159A1 (en) * 2013-07-11 2016-07-21 United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Projectile Launcher with a Permanent High-Low Pressure System
US9448033B2 (en) * 2013-07-11 2016-09-20 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Projectile launcher with a permanent high-low pressure system
US20170045328A1 (en) * 2014-11-24 2017-02-16 William S. Nachefski Efficient high-velocity compressed gas-powered gun
US9739564B2 (en) * 2014-11-24 2017-08-22 William S. Nachefski Efficient high-velocity compressed gas-powered gun

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3572310A (en) Compressed gas gun and valve therefor
US4147152A (en) Projectile propulsion and control in a gas-powered gun
US5542406A (en) Retractable bolt assembly for compressed gas powered gun
US5363834A (en) Gun powered by either compressed gas cartridge or hand-pumped air
US6766795B1 (en) Paintball gun having a hinged receiver and method for making same
US6189809B1 (en) Multi-feed spray gun
US20030047175A1 (en) Pneumatic gun
US5377656A (en) Toy gun
US5450839A (en) Pneumatic launcher
US2293957A (en) Air pistol
US4819609A (en) Automatic feed marking pellet gun
US5878734A (en) Multiple barrel compressed air gun
US4616622A (en) Pressure-regulated gas gun
US20020170551A1 (en) Electronically actuated trigger mechanism for compressed gas powered weapons or the like
US5890479A (en) Trigger assist system
US2881752A (en) Gas actuated guns
US6273080B1 (en) Paint ball gun barrel with multiple compression zones
US2839862A (en) Spear gun
US6925997B2 (en) Paintgun with pneumatic feeding and discharging process
US4304213A (en) Air gun and pressure relief valve therefor
US5515837A (en) Safety nozzle for multi-shot projectile shooting air gun
US5529050A (en) Safety nozzle for projectile shooting air gun
US5778868A (en) Pneumatic gun
US5280778A (en) Semi-automatic firing compressed gas gun
US5341790A (en) Gun powered by pressurized gas and/or pressurized air