US20120249874A1 - Audio Stream Management for Television Content - Google Patents

Audio Stream Management for Television Content Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20120249874A1
US20120249874A1 US13/493,864 US201213493864A US2012249874A1 US 20120249874 A1 US20120249874 A1 US 20120249874A1 US 201213493864 A US201213493864 A US 201213493864A US 2012249874 A1 US2012249874 A1 US 2012249874A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
audio
television content
computer
described
audio streams
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13/493,864
Inventor
Michael Victor Smith
Jeff Du
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Microsoft Technology Licensing LLC
Original Assignee
Microsoft Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US11/821,745 priority Critical patent/US8239767B2/en
Application filed by Microsoft Corp filed Critical Microsoft Corp
Priority to US13/493,864 priority patent/US20120249874A1/en
Publication of US20120249874A1 publication Critical patent/US20120249874A1/en
Assigned to MICROSOFT CORPORATION reassignment MICROSOFT CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: DU, JEFF, SMITH, MICHAEL V.
Assigned to MICROSOFT TECHNOLOGY LICENSING, LLC reassignment MICROSOFT TECHNOLOGY LICENSING, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: MICROSOFT CORPORATION
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N5/00Details of television systems
    • H04N5/44Receiver circuitry
    • H04N5/445Receiver circuitry for displaying additional information
    • H04N5/44513Receiver circuitry for displaying additional information for displaying or controlling a single function of one single apparatus, e.g. TV receiver or VCR
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television or video on demand [VOD]
    • H04N21/20Servers specifically adapted for the distribution of content, e.g. VOD servers; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/23Processing of content or additional data; Elementary server operations; Server middleware
    • H04N21/236Assembling of a multiplex stream, e.g. transport stream, by combining a video stream with other content or additional data, e.g. inserting a URL [Uniform Resource Locator] into a video stream, multiplexing software data into a video stream; Remultiplexing of multiplex streams; Insertion of stuffing bits into the multiplex stream, e.g. to obtain a constant bit-rate; Assembling of a packetised elementary stream
    • H04N21/2368Multiplexing of audio and video streams
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television or video on demand [VOD]
    • H04N21/40Client devices specifically adapted for the reception of or interaction with content, e.g. set-top-box [STB]; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/45Management operations performed by the client for facilitating the reception of or the interaction with the content or administrating data related to the end-user or to the client device itself, e.g. learning user preferences for recommending movies, resolving scheduling conflicts
    • H04N21/4508Management of client or end-user data
    • H04N21/4532Management of client or end-user data involving end-user characteristics, e.g. viewer profile, preferences
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television or video on demand [VOD]
    • H04N21/40Client devices specifically adapted for the reception of or interaction with content, e.g. set-top-box [STB]; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/47End-user applications
    • H04N21/485End-user interface for client configuration
    • H04N21/4856End-user interface for client configuration for language selection, e.g. for the menu or subtitles
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television or video on demand [VOD]
    • H04N21/80Generation or processing of content or additional data by content creator independently of the distribution process; Content per se
    • H04N21/81Monomedia components thereof
    • H04N21/8106Monomedia components thereof involving special audio data, e.g. different tracks for different languages

Abstract

Audio stream management techniques are described. In an implementation, a unique representation is generated by a client for each of a plurality of audio streams associated with television content received at the client. Each of the unique representations is displayed in a user interface at the client to be selectable by a user to cause output of a respective audio stream with the television content

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application is a continuation of, and claims priority to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/821,745, filed on Jun. 25, 2007, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Traditional television content was provided from a single source of audio and video. Therefore, to output this traditional television content a user simply tuned a television to a particular channel to output the video and audio that was made available via that particular channel. Although this technique was convenient, it was inflexible and required users to tune to different channels if different audio was desired. For instance, a user that desired to view the television program in a different language was forced to tune to another channel to output the television program in the different language, which may be difficult to locate and thus inconvenient.
  • Although techniques were developed to provide for two audio sources with a single television program, these techniques often required manual interaction on the part of the user each time different audio was desired. For example, a user may tune to a particular television program. To output desired audio, the user was forced to manually input a selection of different audio. Further, the user was generally given little if no information regarding the actual content included in the audio sources, and therefore was not able to make an informed decision as to what audio was being provided by respective audio sources and therefore was often forced to listen to the different sources to make a determination.
  • SUMMARY
  • Audio stream management techniques are described. In an implementation, a unique representation is generated by a client for each of a plurality of audio streams associated with television content received at the client. Each of the unique representations is displayed in a user interface at the client to be selectable by a user to cause output of a respective audio stream with the television content
  • In another implementation, one or more computer-readable media include executable instructions that are executable to configure data, which describes one or more attributes of a plurality of audio streams associated with television content, to specify a particular one of the audio streams to be used as a default. The configured data is included with the television content to be streamed to a client.
  • In a further implementation, a client includes one or more modules that are configured to determine which of a plurality of audio streams to output that are associated with television content when an input is received to tune to the television content. The determination is based at least in part on one or more locally-stored preferences. When the determination cannot be made based on the preferences, the determination is based at least in part on data associated with the television content indicating which of the audio streams is to be used as a default.
  • This Summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This Summary is not intended to identify key features or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The detailed description is described with reference to the accompanying figures. In the figures, the left-most digit(s) of a reference number identifies the figure in which the reference number first appears. The use of the same reference numbers in different instances in the description and the figures may indicate similar or identical items.
  • FIG. 1 is an illustration of an environment in an example implementation that is operable to employ techniques to manage audio streams.
  • FIG. 2 is an illustration of an example system showing a head end and a client 104 of FIG. 1 in greater detail as streaming television content associated with a plurality of audio streams over a network connection to the client.
  • FIG. 3 is an illustration of an example implementation of a user interface that outputs data that describes attributes of audio streams associated with television content.
  • FIG. 4 is an illustration of an example implementation of a user interface that outputs portions that are selectable by a user to choose from one of a plurality of audio streams to be output.
  • FIG. 5 is a flow diagram depicting a procedure in an example implementation in which data that describes attributes of audio streams associated with television content is configured to indicate a default audio stream.
  • FIG. 6 is a flow diagram depicting a procedure in an example implementation in which a user interface is output to specify user preferences that has unique representations of audio streams that are generated from data that describes the audio streams.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION Overview
  • Traditional television content was provided from a single source of audio and video. Although this technique was convenient, it was inflexible and required users to tune to different channels if different audio was desired. For instance, a user may initially tune to a television program broadcast on a particular channel with English audio. If the user desired to hear the television program in Spanish, the user was forced to locate and then tune to a different channel having the television program in Spanish. Although techniques were developed to provide for two audio sources of audio with a single television program, these techniques often required manual interaction on the part of the user each time different audio was desired, such as to manually tune to a different audio source each time a user tuned to a different channel.
  • Techniques are described to provide audio stream management. In an implementation, data that describes attributes of audio streams of television content, such as that data included in a program map table, is used to enumerate, rank and order audio streams for output in a user interface. A user may then specify preferences based on this information which may then be used to manage subsequent consumption of television content. For example, audio streams for a plurality of television channels may be automatically selected based on preferences specified by a user. In this way, the user is provided with seamless navigation designed to address the user's audio preferences.
  • In another implementation, a provider of the television content may configure this data that describes the attributes to specify one of the audio streams as a “default”. Continuing with the previous example, when the preferences of the user “cannot be met” as indicated by the data describing the attributes of the audio streams, the default stream specified by the provider may be output. A variety of techniques may be employed to specify a default audio stream, an example of which may be found in relation to the following figures.
  • In the following discussion, an example environment is first described that is operable to perform techniques to manage audio streams of television content. Example procedures are then described that may be employed in the example environment, as well as in other environments. Although these techniques are described as employed within a television environment in the following discussion, it should be readily apparent that these techniques may be incorporated within a variety of environments without departing from the spirit and scope thereof.
  • Example Environment
  • FIG. 1 is an illustration of an environment 100 in an example implementation that is operable to manage audio streams. The illustrated environment 100 includes a head end 102 of a network operator, a client 104 and a content provider 106 that are communicatively coupled, one to another, via network connections 108, 110. In the following discussion, the head end 102, the client 104 and the content provider 106 may be representative of one or more entities, and therefore reference may be made to a single entity (e.g., the client 104) or multiple entities (e.g., the clients 104, the plurality of clients 104, and so on). Additionally, although a plurality of network connections 108, 110 are shown separately, the network connections 108, 110 may be representative of network connections achieved using a single network or multiple networks. For example, network connection 108 may be representative of a broadcast network with back channel communication, an Internet Protocol (IP) network, and so on.
  • The client 104 may be configured in a variety of ways. For example, the client 104 may be configured as a computer that is capable of communicating over the network connection 110, such as a desktop computer, a mobile station, an entertainment appliance, a set-top box communicatively coupled to a display device as illustrated, a wireless phone, and so forth. For purposes of the following discussion, the client 104 may also relate to a person and/or entity that operate the client. In other words, client 104 may describe a logical client that includes a user, software and/or a machine.
  • The content provider 106 includes one or more items of television content 112(k), where “k” can be any integer from 1 to “K”. The television content 112(k) may include a variety of data, such as television programming, video-on-demand (VOD) files, and so on. The television content 112(k) is communicated over the network connection 108 to the head end 102. In the following discussion, television content may also be referred to simply as “content”.
  • Television content 112(k) communicated via the network connection 108 is received by the head end 102 and may be stored as one or more items of television content 114(n), where “n” can be any integer from “1” to “N”. The television content 114(n) may be the same as or different from the television content 112(k) received from the content provider 106. The television content 114(n), for instance, may include additional data for broadcast to the client 104, such as electronic program guide data, and so on.
  • The television content 114(n) is also illustrated as including a plurality of audio streams 116(1)-116(A). The audio streams 116(1)-116(A) may be configured in a variety of ways, such as in compliance with RTP Payload Format RFC-2250, Motion Picture Experts Group 2 (MPEG2) standard, and so on. For example, the plurality of audio streams 116(1)-116(A) may be encapsulated with the television content 114(n) in a transport stream that is communicated over the network connection 110 to the client 104.
  • The client 104, as previously stated, may be configured in a variety of ways to receive the television content 114(n) having the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) over the network connection 110. The client 104 typically includes hardware and software to transport and decrypt content 114(n) and audio streams 116(1)-116(A) received from the head end 102 for rendering by the illustrated display device and speakers.
  • The client 104 may also include digital video recorder (DVR) functionality. For instance, the client 104 may include memory 118 to record television content 114(n) and audio streams 116(1)-116(A) as television content 120(c) (where “c” can be any integer from one to “C”) having audio streams 122(1)-122(S) received via the network connection 110 for output to and rendering by the display device and speakers. The memory 118 may be configured in a variety of ways, such as a hard disk drive, a removable computer-readable medium (e.g., a writable digital video disc), semiconductor based memory, and so on. Thus, television content 120(c) that is stored in the memory 118 of the client 104 may be copies of the television content 114(n) that was streamed from the head end 102.
  • The client 104 includes a communication module 124 that is executable on the client 104 to control content playback on the client 104, such as through the use of one or more “command modes”, i.e., “trick modes”, to tune to a particular channel, order pay-per-view content, and so on. The command modes may provide non-linear playback of the content 120(c) (i.e., time shift the playback of the content 120(c)) such as pause, rewind, fast forward, slow motion playback, and the like.
  • The head end 102 is illustrated as including a content manager module 126. The content manager module 126 is representative of functionality to configure television content 114(n) and the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) for output (e.g., streaming) over the network connection 110 to the client 104. The content manager module 126, for instance, may configure content 112(k) received from the content provider 106 to be suitable for transmission over the network connection 108, such as to “packetize” the television content 114(n) and the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) into a plurality of streams that are encapsulated within a transport stream for distribution over the Internet, configuration for a particular broadcast channel, map the television content 112(k) to particular channels, and so on.
  • Thus, in the environment 100 of FIG. 1, the content provider 106 may broadcast the television content 112(k) over a network connection 108 to a multiplicity of network operators, an example of which is illustrated as head end 102. The head end 102 may then stream the television content 114(n) over a network connection 110 to a multitude of clients, an example of which is illustrated as client 104. The client 104 may then store the television content 114(n) in the memory 118 as television content 120(c) and/or render the television content 114(n) immediately for output as it is received, such as when the client 104 is configured to include digital video recorder (DVR) functionality.
  • The client 104, and more particularly the communication module 124, is illustrated as including an audio manager module 128 which is representative of functionality of the client 104 to manage audio streams 116(1)-116(A), 122(1)-122(S) associated with television content 114(n), 120(c), respectively. Although the following discussion will refer to management of audio streams 116(1)-116(A) by the audio manager module 128 of television content 114(n) received from the head end 102, it should be readily apparent that these techniques are equally applicable to management of other audio streams, such as the audio streams 122(1)-122(S) of the television content 120(c) stored locally at the client 104.
  • The audio manager module 128, for instance, may be configured to automatically determine which of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) to output automatically and without user intervention at the client 104. For example, the content manager module 126 may include an audio configuration module 130 that is representative of functionality to generate data that describes the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) and/or to package the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) with the television content 114(n) for streaming to the client 104. The audio configuration module 130 may set one of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) as a default. Therefore, when the audio manager module 128 receives the television content 114(n) with the plurality of audio streams 116(1)-116(A), the audio manager module 128 may output the default audio stream unless otherwise directed.
  • The audio manager module 128 may also be representative of functionality that takes into account user preferences when managing the audio streams 116(1)-116(A). The audio manager module 128, for instance, may output a user interface configured to accept user preferences. The user preferences may then be used when managing audio streams 116(1)-116(A), such as which of the streams meet the preferences input by the user. When the preferences cannot be met, the audio manager module 128 may then output the default audio stream as indicated by the audio configuration module 130 as described in the previous example, further discussion of which may be found in relation to the following figure.
  • It should be noted that one or more of the entities shown in FIG. 1 may be further divided (e.g., the head end 102 may be implemented by a plurality of servers in a distributed computing system), combined, and so on and thus the environment 100 of FIG. 1 is illustrative of one of a plurality of different environments that may employ the described techniques.
  • Generally, any of the functions described herein can be implemented using software, firmware, hardware (e.g., fixed-logic circuitry), manual processing, or a combination of these implementations. The terms “module”, “functionality”, “engine” and “logic” as used herein generally represent software, firmware, hardware, or a combination thereof. In the case of a software implementation, for instance, the module, functionality, or logic represents program code that performs specified tasks when executed on a processor (e.g., CPU or CPUs). The program code can be stored in one or more computer-readable memory devices, examples of which are shown in FIG. 2. The features of the techniques to manage audio streams are platform-independent, meaning that the techniques may be implemented on a variety of commercial computing platforms having a variety of processors.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates an example system 200 showing the head end 102 and the client 104 in greater detail as streaming television content 114(n) associated with a plurality of audio streams 116(1)-116(A) over a network connection 110 to the client 104. The head end 102 and the client 104 are illustrated in FIG. 2 as including respective processors 202, 204 and memory 206, 208, and thus the client 104 of FIG. 2 is illustrated as a client device.
  • Processors are not limited by the materials from which they are formed or the processing mechanisms employed therein. For example, processors may be comprised of semiconductor(s) and/or transistors (e.g., electronic integrated circuits (ICs)). In such a context, processor-executable instructions may be electronically-executable instructions. Alternatively, the mechanisms of or for processors, and thus of or for a computing device, may include, but are not limited to, quantum computing, optical computing, mechanical computing (e.g., using nanotechnology), and so forth. Additionally, although a single memory 206, 208 is shown, respectively, for the head end 102 and the client 104, a wide variety of types and combinations of memory may be employed, such as random access memory (RAM), hard disk memory, removable medium memory, and other types of computer-readable media.
  • The head end 102 is illustrated as executing the content manager module 126 having the audio configuration module 130 on the processor 202, which is also storable in memory 206. As previously described, the audio configuration module 130 is representative of functionality to configure the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) for communication with the television content 114(n) over the network connection 110. In an implementation, the audio configuration module 130 encapsulates each of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) with the television content 114(n) to be streamed over the network connection 110, although other implementations are also contemplated, such as streaming particular audio streams as requested by the client 104.
  • In at least one implementation, the audio configuration module 130 is also representative of functionality to generate data 210 that describes one or more attributes 212(t) (where “t” can be any integer from one to “T”) of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A). A variety of different attributes 212(t) may be described, such as through use of language codes 212(1) (e.g., English, Spanish, and so on), audio type 212(2) (e.g., format of the audio stream, such as in compliance with MPEG 2), quality 212(3) (e.g., standard or high definition audio), physical order in a program map table 212(4), a sequence number 212(5) as well as “other” 212(6) attributes such as a textual description. These attributes 212(t) described by the data 210 may be configured to provide a wide variety of functionality.
  • A convention, for instance, may be adopted where each audio stream 116(1)-116(A) is assigned a respective program identifier (PID). The PIDs may then be used to indicate a particular one of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) is to be used as a “default”, e.g., by using an audio stream having a “lowest” PID relative to other PIDs assigned to other audio streams, a “highest” PID, and so on. The PIDs may also be used to indicate a hierarchy of suggested audio stream consumption (e.g., from high to low) through sequential ordering of the PIDs. Therefore, the audio manager module 128 may take the “suggestions” of the head end 102 indicated through use of the PIDs to select a particular one of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) to be output. Further discussion of configuration of data 210 that describe attributes 212(t) may be found in relation to FIG. 4.
  • In at least one implementation, the data 210 and the attributes 212(t) may be used by the audio manager module 128 as a basis to define one or more preferences 214(p) (where “p” can be any integer from one to “P”) of a user to manage the audio streams 116(1)-116(A). The audio manager module 128, for instance, may output a user interface that includes the data 210 such that a user may specify desired attributes in audio streams 116(1)-116(A) to be output at the client 104, such as particular language, quality, and so on.
  • These preferences may then be used by the audio manager module 128 to select an audio stream 116(1)-116(A) to be output with the television content 114(n) automatically and without user intervention. For instance, the preferences 214(p) may be applied to a plurality of television channels thus enabling the user to navigate through the channels without manually selecting different audio streams. A variety of other examples are also contemplated, further discussion of which may be found in relation to the following example user interface.
  • Example User Interfaces
  • The following discussion describes example user interfaces that may be output by the previously described example environment 100 and system 200, as well as using other environments or systems. Thus, although portions of the following discussion refer to the environment 100 of FIG. 1 and the system 200 of FIG. 2, the following discussion should not necessarily be limited to that environment 100 or system 200.
  • FIG. 3 depicts an example implementation 300 of a user interface 302 that outputs data that describes attributes 212(t) of audio streams 116(1)-116(A) associated with television content 114(n). The user interface 302 includes a plurality of portions 304(1)-304(6) which incorporate the data 210 that describes the attributes 212(t) of the respective audio streams 116(1)-116(A).
  • A user, for instance, may select portions 304(1)-304(3) for a language selection, which are illustrated as “English”, “Spanish” and “Chinese”. A user may also select a level of quality based on another set of portions 306(1)-306(2), which are illustrated as “high definition” and “low definition”. A variety of other attributes may be exposed by a network operator, and thus the network operator may influence choices based on the attributes that are exposed to the client 104. A user may then select a “save” portion 308 to have these preferences stored by the client 104. A variety of other techniques are also contemplated.
  • Referring now to FIG. 4, an example implementation 400 of a user interface 402 is shown in which a user may select from a plurality of portions 404(1)-404(6) that represent respective audio streams. This user interface 402 may be output in a variety of different circumstances. For instance, a user may select a preferred one of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) by selecting data 210 which describes attributes 212(t) of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A). In the illustrated example, a user may select portion 404(3) which includes the data “Spanish 1 (High Definition)” which corresponds to a particular audio stream. The displayed attributes may then be stored as preferences 214(p) which are used by the audio manager module 128 to select audio streams 116(1)-116(A) for the television content that is associated with the described audio streams in the user interface 402 as well as subsequent television content.
  • For example, the user may change a channel after making the selection in the user interface 402 and have preferences 214(p) related to that selection stored in memory 208 of the client. The preferences 214(p) may then be used to choose an audio stream for television content on the new channel. A variety of other user interfaces and techniques are also contemplated to specify the preferences 214(p), such as by specifying particular attributes manually by the user as previously described in relation to FIG. 3, based on monitored interaction of the user with various audio streams and/or television content, and so on.
  • The user interface 402 may also be output to change a selection from one audio stream to another during output. For instance, a default audio stream may be output by the client 104, which is illustrated as the portion 404(1) having focus in the user interface 402. A user may then interact with the user interface 402 to change to another one of the audio streams (e.g., selecting portion 404(2) using a remote control) and have that selection stored for subsequent navigation, such as when the user navigates to another channel. A variety of other instances are also contemplated, such as to manually select streams without the use of pre-stored user preferences.
  • Example Procedures
  • The following discussion describes audio stream management techniques that may be implemented utilizing the previously described environment, systems and devices. Aspects of each of the procedures may be implemented in hardware, firmware, or software, or a combination thereof. The procedures are shown as a set of blocks that specify operations performed by one or more devices and are not necessarily limited to the orders shown for performing the operations by the respective blocks. In portions of the following discussion, reference will be made to the environment 100 of FIG. 1, the system of FIG. 2 and the embodiments 300, 400 of the example user interfaces 302, 402 of FIGS. 3 and 4, respectively.
  • FIG. 5 depicts a procedure 500 in an example implementation in which data that describes attributes of audio streams associated with television content is configured to indicate a default audio stream. Television content is obtained that is associated with a plurality of audio streams such that each of the streams is configured to be output in conjunction with the television content (block 502). For example, the head end 102 may receive television content 114(n) from the content provider 106 that includes the plurality of audio streams 116(1)-116(A). The audio streams 116(1)-116(A) may be configured in a variety of ways, such as audio for the television content 114(n) in different languages, having different audio types, having different levels of quality, and so on.
  • Data is generated that describes attributes of the plurality of audio streams (block 504). A technician at the head end 102, for instance, may interact with a user interface output by the audio configuration module 130 to specify attributes 212(t) of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A). The attributes 212(t) may describe the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) in a variety of ways, such as by describing a makeup of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) themselves (e.g., language code 212(1), audio type 212(2), quality 212(3), textual description), how the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) are provided and/or identified (e.g., a PID, physical order in a program map table 212(4), sequence number 212(5)), and so on. In another instance, the data 210 may be generated automatically by the audio configuration module 130 without user intervention. A variety of other instances are also contemplated.
  • One of the plurality of audio streams are set as a default using the generated data (block 506). As previously described, a convention may be adopted where each audio stream 116(1)-116(A) is assigned a respective program identifier (PID). The PIDs may then be used to indicate a particular one of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) is to be used as a “default”, e.g., by using an audio stream having a “lowest” or “highest” PID relative to other PIDs assigned to other audio streams. In this way, the audio configuration module 130 may specify which of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) is to be used as a default by providing that audio stream with “the lowest PID” or “the highest PID” depending on the convention used. A variety of other examples are also contemplated such as through use of a flag or other identifier in a program map table. The default audio stream may then be output when an audio stream is not available that meets preferences 214(p) specified at the client 104, further discussion of which may be found in relation to FIG. 6.
  • The data is streamed to a client (block 508). For example, the data 210 may be streamed with the television content and the plurality of audio streams from the head end 102 to the client 104. In another example, the data 210 may be provided separately from the television content 114(n). A variety of other examples are also contemplated.
  • FIG. 6 depicts a procedure 600 in an example implementation in which a user interface is output to specify user preferences which has unique representations of audio streams that are generated from data that describes the audio streams. An input is received to tune to television content (block 602). For example, the client 104 may include a remote control which is configured to provide inputs to tune to a particular channel, such as by using a “channel up” or “channel down” button, entering a channel number, selecting television content from an electronic program guide (EPG), and so on.
  • Data is obtained that describes one or more attributes of a plurality of audio streams that are associated with the television content (block 604). The audio manager module 128 of the client 104, for instance, may obtain a program map table that includes data 210 describing one or more attributes 212(t) as previously described in relation to FIG. 4.
  • A unique representation is generated of each of the audio streams (block 606). The representation may be generated in a variety of ways. For example, a language code 212(1) may be taken from a program map table and resolved to a corresponding language, such as English, Spanish, and so on. Additionally, an audio type 212(2) may be determined, such as a particular format or standard with which the audio stream complies. Quality 212(3) may also be used, such as whether the audio stream is considered “high definition”, “standard definition”, and so on. A variety of other examples are also contemplated such as physical order of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) in a program map table, a sequence number 212(5) which is added when each other attribute matches, and “other” 212(6) attributes 212(t), use of a textual description associated with the streams, and so on. In this way, the audio manager module 128 may traverse a naming convention until a unique representation is generated.
  • One or more of the unique representations is output in a user interface (block 608). For example, the unique representations that incorporate at least a portion of the data 210 that describes attributes 212(t) of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) may be output in a user interface, an example of which is shown in the user interface 402 of FIG. 4. In this way, each of the unique representations may be displayed in the user interface to be selectable to cause output of a respective audio stream with the television content (block 610)
  • In an implementation, the unique representations output in the user interface are prioritized. For example, the unique representations may be grouped based on language, with the most common languages being listed first. Unique representations within these groups may also be prioritized, such as based on quality of the audio (e.g., from relatively higher resolution to lower resolution). A variety of other examples are also contemplated to prioritize how the representations are ordered in a display, one to another.
  • In a further implementation, the unique representations may be output to preserve “legacy” conventions. For instance, the unique representations may include data 210 describing attributes such that a first one of the unique representation as a “primary” and another one of the unique representations as a “secondary” in accordance with RTP Payload Format RFC-2250. In another instance, a combination of RFC-2250 convention with an MPEG-2 convention may be utilized to describe a variety of audio streams that are available for output in an order greater than “primary” and “secondary”, e.g., a listing of three or more streams in a numerical order. A variety of other instances are also contemplated.
  • One or more inputs are stored that are received via the user interface that specify preferences for attributes of one or more of the audio streams (block 612). For example, the user may specify attributes when interacting with a user interface such as “Spanish” and “High Definition” as illustrated in the user interface 302 of FIG. 3. In another example, the user may select a particular audio stream having attributes which are then stored as the preferences, such as by selecting portion 404(3) of the user interface 402 of FIG. 4. A variety of other examples are also contemplated. One or more inputs received via the user interface that specify the preferences for attributes of one or more of the audio streams are then stored (block 614).
  • Output of subsequent television content is managed based at least in part on the preferences (block 616). For example, a determination may be made as to which of the audio streams are to be output based on the preferences (block 618), such as by matching attributes stored as part of the preferences 214(p) with attributes 212(t) of data 210 that describes the audio streams 116(1)-116(A).
  • When a determination cannot be made based on the preferences, a determination is made as to which of the plurality of audio streams is set as a default (block 620). Continuing with the example of FIG. 5, for instance, a particular one of the audio streams 116(1)-116(A) may be selected which has a PID that is lower than the PID of other audio streams that are associated with the television content 114(n). A variety of other examples are also contemplated, such as through use of a flag, physical order within a program map table, and so on.
  • An input may then be obtained which changes the default audio stream for another audio stream through interaction with the user interface (block 622). A user, for instance, may interact with the user interface 402 of FIG. 2 and note that the default audio stream is indicated by portion 404(1) through use of a focus applied to that portion 404(1), e.g., the border in the illustrated instance. The user may then select from the other portions 404(2)-404(6) to change to a respective audio stream based on the unique representations in the other portions 404(2)-404(6). In this way, the user is readily informed as to other choices that are available and the characteristics of those choices without having to cause output of the other choices. A variety of other instances are also contemplated.
  • CONCLUSION
  • Although the embodiments haven been described in language specific to structural features and/or methodological acts, it is to be understood that the embodiments defined in the appended claims is not necessarily limited to the specific features or acts described. Rather, the specific features and acts are disclosed as example forms of implementing the described embodiments.

Claims (20)

1. One or more computer-readable storage media embodying computer-executable instructions which, when executed, implement a method comprising:
generating a unique representation, based at least in part using data received with television content, by a client, that describes attributes other than language code for each of a plurality of audio streams associated with television content received at the client; and
displaying each said unique representation in a user interface at the client to be selectable by a user to cause output of a respective said audio stream with the television content.
2. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 1, wherein the generating is performed in response to receipt of an input to cause the client to tune to the television content.
3. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 1, wherein the generating is based at least in part using data received with the television content that describes attributes of the plurality of audio streams.
4. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 3, wherein the data is taken from a program map table associated with the television content.
5. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 3, wherein the data is selected from a group comprising:
a language code;
an audio type;
quality;
a textual description;
physical order of references to the plurality of audio streams in a program map table; and
a sequence number.
6. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 1, wherein the user interface is configured to change from a default said audio stream specified by a network operator to another said audio stream specified by the user.
7. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 1, wherein the instructions are further executable to implement a method comprising managing which of the plurality of audio streams is output for a plurality of television channels using one or more selections made using the user interface.
8. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 7, wherein the instructions are further executable to implement a method comprising prioritizing an order of how each said unique representation is displayed, on to another, in the user interface.
9. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 8, wherein the prioritizing is performed such that a first said unique representation identifies a first said audio stream as a primary and a second said unique representation identifies a second said audio stream as secondary.
10. A computer-implemented method comprising:
configuring data, which describes one or more attributes other than language code of a plurality of audio streams associated with television content, to specify a particular one of the audio streams to be used as a default; and
including the configured data with the television content to be streamed to a client.
11. The computer-implemented method as described in claim 10, wherein the configuring data is performed by specifying particular program identifiers to one or more of the plurality of audio streams.
12. The computer-implemented method as described in claim 11, wherein the program identifiers are configured to indicate a hierarchy of suggested audio consumption of the plurality of audio streams.
13. The computer-implemented method as described in claim 12, wherein the audio stream which has a lowest said program identifier in the hierarchy of suggested audio consumption is the default.
14. The computer-implemented method as described in claim 10, the method further comprising streaming the configured data with the television content and the plurality of streams over a network connection to the client.
15. One or more computer-readable storage media comprising computer-executable instructions which, when executed, implement a method comprising:
determining which of a plurality of audio streams, associated with television content, to output when an input is received to tune to the television content, wherein:
the determining is based at least in part on one or more locally-stored preferences, which describe one or more attributes, other than language code, associated with the plurality of audio streams, at least one attribute of the one or more attributes associated with an audio quality; and
when a determination cannot be made based on the preferences, the determining is based at least in part on data which describes one or more attributes other than language code, associated with the television content indicating which of the audio streams is a default.
16. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 15, wherein said determining is made automatically and without user intervention using the locally-stored preferences previously provided by a user.
17. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 15, wherein:
the determining based on the one or more locally-stored preferences is performed such that when a preferred said audio stream is not available, another said audio stream in a similar language is output; and
when the determining cannot be made based on the one or more locally-stored preferences to find the other said audio stream, the determining is based at least in part on the data associated with the television content indicating which of the audio streams is the default.
18. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 15, wherein the instructions are further executable to implement a method comprising outputting a user interface to specify the one or more user preferences.
19. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 15, the user interface further configured to display a prioritized list of one or more audio streams associated with the television content.
20. The one or more computer-readable storage media as described in claim 15, wherein the instructions are further executable to implement a method comprising:
tuning to television content; and
outputting the determined audio stream associated with the television content.
US13/493,864 2007-06-25 2012-06-11 Audio Stream Management for Television Content Abandoned US20120249874A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/821,745 US8239767B2 (en) 2007-06-25 2007-06-25 Audio stream management for television content
US13/493,864 US20120249874A1 (en) 2007-06-25 2012-06-11 Audio Stream Management for Television Content

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/493,864 US20120249874A1 (en) 2007-06-25 2012-06-11 Audio Stream Management for Television Content

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/821,745 Continuation US8239767B2 (en) 2007-06-25 2007-06-25 Audio stream management for television content

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20120249874A1 true US20120249874A1 (en) 2012-10-04

Family

ID=40137887

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/821,745 Active 2029-09-16 US8239767B2 (en) 2007-06-25 2007-06-25 Audio stream management for television content
US13/493,864 Abandoned US20120249874A1 (en) 2007-06-25 2012-06-11 Audio Stream Management for Television Content

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/821,745 Active 2029-09-16 US8239767B2 (en) 2007-06-25 2007-06-25 Audio stream management for television content

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (2) US8239767B2 (en)
WO (1) WO2009002712A1 (en)

Families Citing this family (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
KR101488729B1 (en) * 2008-05-13 2015-02-06 삼성전자주식회사 Digital broadcasting transmitter, digital broadcasting receiver, and methods thereof
US9185445B2 (en) * 2009-09-24 2015-11-10 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Transmitting a prioritized audio stream along with multimedia content
US8713602B2 (en) 2010-07-01 2014-04-29 Comcast Cable Communications, Llc Alternate source programming
EP2761867A1 (en) * 2011-09-27 2014-08-06 Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson (PUBL) Apparatus and method for use with a data stream
US9571870B1 (en) * 2014-07-15 2017-02-14 Netflix, Inc. Automatic detection of preferences for subtitles and dubbing

Citations (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5894320A (en) * 1996-05-29 1999-04-13 General Instrument Corporation Multi-channel television system with viewer-selectable video and audio
US5982448A (en) * 1997-10-30 1999-11-09 Reyes; Frances S. Multi-language closed captioning system
US6184937B1 (en) * 1996-04-29 2001-02-06 Princeton Video Image, Inc. Audio enhanced electronic insertion of indicia into video
US20030016630A1 (en) * 2001-06-14 2003-01-23 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for providing adaptive bandwidth control for real-time communication
US20030046075A1 (en) * 2001-08-30 2003-03-06 General Instrument Corporation Apparatus and methods for providing television speech in a selected language
US20030227569A1 (en) * 2002-06-11 2003-12-11 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Automatic control apparatus and method for adaptively optimizing television viewing conditions
US20040123327A1 (en) * 2002-12-19 2004-06-24 Tsang Fai Ma Method and system for managing multimedia settings
US6867820B2 (en) * 2000-03-08 2005-03-15 Lg Electronics Inc. Method for displaying audio settings menu of display apparatus
US20050162551A1 (en) * 2002-03-21 2005-07-28 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Multi-lingual closed-captioning
US7057669B2 (en) * 2000-10-14 2006-06-06 Lg Electronics Inc. Language displaying apparatus for digital TV and method for the same
US7085377B1 (en) * 1999-07-30 2006-08-01 Lucent Technologies Inc. Information delivery in a multi-stream digital broadcasting system
US20070211168A1 (en) * 2006-03-06 2007-09-13 Lg Electronics Inc. Method and apparatus for setting language in television receiver
US20070245373A1 (en) * 2006-03-31 2007-10-18 Sharp Laboratories Of America, Inc. Method for configuring media-playing sets
US20070288961A1 (en) * 2006-06-12 2007-12-13 Guldi Richard L Channel selection based on program content attributes
US20080201369A1 (en) * 2007-02-16 2008-08-21 At&T Knowledge Ventures, Lp System and method of modifying media content
US7447629B2 (en) * 2002-07-12 2008-11-04 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Audio coding
US20110231180A1 (en) * 2010-03-19 2011-09-22 Verizon Patent And Licensing Inc. Multi-language closed captioning
US8045054B2 (en) * 2006-09-13 2011-10-25 Nortel Networks Limited Closed captioning language translation
US8046792B2 (en) * 2002-03-20 2011-10-25 Tvworks, Llc Multi-channel audio enhancement for television
US8208646B2 (en) * 2006-11-22 2012-06-26 Verizon Patent And Licensing Inc. Audio filtration for content processing systems and methods

Family Cites Families (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5497241A (en) 1993-10-29 1996-03-05 Time Warner Entertainment Co., L.P. System and method for controlling display of motion picture subtitles in a selected language during play of a software carrier
US6345147B1 (en) 1995-11-24 2002-02-05 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Multi-language recording medium and reproducing device for the same
US6601103B1 (en) * 1996-08-22 2003-07-29 Intel Corporation Method and apparatus for providing personalized supplemental programming
US6637032B1 (en) * 1997-01-06 2003-10-21 Microsoft Corporation System and method for synchronizing enhancing content with a video program using closed captioning
US7051360B1 (en) 1998-11-30 2006-05-23 United Video Properties, Inc. Interactive television program guide with selectable languages
US6661466B1 (en) 2000-09-18 2003-12-09 Sony Corporation System and method for setting default audio and subtitling language preferences for a video tuner
EP2028856A3 (en) * 2001-02-21 2011-01-05 United Video Properties, Inc. Systems and Methods for Interactive Program Guides with Personal Video Recording features
JP3506177B2 (en) 2001-05-10 2004-03-15 船井電機株式会社 Language switching method and digital broadcasting receiver using the method
JP3525913B2 (en) 2001-05-10 2004-05-10 船井電機株式会社 Broadcast receiver having voice automatic selection function
US7054804B2 (en) 2002-05-20 2006-05-30 International Buisness Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for performing real-time subtitles translation
US20030219708A1 (en) 2002-05-23 2003-11-27 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Presentation synthesizer
KR100811167B1 (en) 2002-11-04 2008-03-07 삼성전자주식회사 Method of selecting audio language for Set-Top Box
KR100584551B1 (en) 2002-11-26 2006-05-30 삼성전자주식회사 DVD system for language study and method for processing audio stream
US20050149973A1 (en) 2004-01-06 2005-07-07 Fang Henry Y. Television with application/stream-specifiable language selection
JP2005197930A (en) * 2004-01-06 2005-07-21 Funai Electric Co Ltd Terrestrial wave digital broadcast receiver and digital broadcast receiver
KR20060004425A (en) 2004-07-09 2006-01-12 엘지전자 주식회사 Digital television and method for setting multi-voice order thereof
KR101061115B1 (en) 2004-08-13 2011-08-31 엘지전자 주식회사 Digital broadcasting receiver and subtitle data processing method
JP4438798B2 (en) * 2005-04-22 2010-03-24 ソニー株式会社 Recording apparatus and recording method, reproducing apparatus and reproducing method, program, and recording medium
KR100755839B1 (en) 2005-12-15 2007-09-07 엘지전자 주식회사 Broadcasting system and method for supporting sound multiplex

Patent Citations (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6184937B1 (en) * 1996-04-29 2001-02-06 Princeton Video Image, Inc. Audio enhanced electronic insertion of indicia into video
US5894320A (en) * 1996-05-29 1999-04-13 General Instrument Corporation Multi-channel television system with viewer-selectable video and audio
US5982448A (en) * 1997-10-30 1999-11-09 Reyes; Frances S. Multi-language closed captioning system
US7085377B1 (en) * 1999-07-30 2006-08-01 Lucent Technologies Inc. Information delivery in a multi-stream digital broadcasting system
US6867820B2 (en) * 2000-03-08 2005-03-15 Lg Electronics Inc. Method for displaying audio settings menu of display apparatus
US7057669B2 (en) * 2000-10-14 2006-06-06 Lg Electronics Inc. Language displaying apparatus for digital TV and method for the same
US20030016630A1 (en) * 2001-06-14 2003-01-23 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for providing adaptive bandwidth control for real-time communication
US20030046075A1 (en) * 2001-08-30 2003-03-06 General Instrument Corporation Apparatus and methods for providing television speech in a selected language
US8046792B2 (en) * 2002-03-20 2011-10-25 Tvworks, Llc Multi-channel audio enhancement for television
US20050162551A1 (en) * 2002-03-21 2005-07-28 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Multi-lingual closed-captioning
US20030227569A1 (en) * 2002-06-11 2003-12-11 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Automatic control apparatus and method for adaptively optimizing television viewing conditions
US7447629B2 (en) * 2002-07-12 2008-11-04 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Audio coding
US20040123327A1 (en) * 2002-12-19 2004-06-24 Tsang Fai Ma Method and system for managing multimedia settings
US20070211168A1 (en) * 2006-03-06 2007-09-13 Lg Electronics Inc. Method and apparatus for setting language in television receiver
US20070245373A1 (en) * 2006-03-31 2007-10-18 Sharp Laboratories Of America, Inc. Method for configuring media-playing sets
US20070288961A1 (en) * 2006-06-12 2007-12-13 Guldi Richard L Channel selection based on program content attributes
US8045054B2 (en) * 2006-09-13 2011-10-25 Nortel Networks Limited Closed captioning language translation
US8208646B2 (en) * 2006-11-22 2012-06-26 Verizon Patent And Licensing Inc. Audio filtration for content processing systems and methods
US20080201369A1 (en) * 2007-02-16 2008-08-21 At&T Knowledge Ventures, Lp System and method of modifying media content
US20110231180A1 (en) * 2010-03-19 2011-09-22 Verizon Patent And Licensing Inc. Multi-language closed captioning

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO2009002712A1 (en) 2008-12-31
US8239767B2 (en) 2012-08-07
US20080320525A1 (en) 2008-12-25

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8418206B2 (en) User defined rules for assigning destinations of content
US8141114B2 (en) Content ratings and recommendations
US7584497B2 (en) Strategies for scheduling bandwidth-consuming media events
US8225354B2 (en) Merging electronic program guide information
US7088910B2 (en) Optimizing use of storage space in a video data recording system
JP2008502230A (en) Client / server architecture and method for zoomable user interface
US20080141317A1 (en) Systems and methods for media source selection and toggling
US8132118B2 (en) Intelligent default selection in an on-screen keyboard
US9830321B2 (en) Systems and methods for searching for a media asset
US9084020B2 (en) Method and apparatus for providing and receiving user interface
CN1658661B (en) Virtual tuner combined using method and client
US8312376B2 (en) Bookmark interpretation service
US9179195B2 (en) Searching electronic program guide data
US20060150214A1 (en) Methods and systems for providing multi-source content in electronic program guides
US9998802B2 (en) Systems and methods for creating variable length clips from a media stream
US9170738B2 (en) Managing and editing stored media assets
US20130179783A1 (en) Systems and methods for gesture based navigation through related content on a mobile user device
EP2501123A2 (en) Systems and methods for mirroring and transcoding media content
US20070214480A1 (en) Method and apparatus for conducting media content search and management by integrating EPG and internet search systems
US7996483B2 (en) Adaptive caching in broadcast networks
JP5254969B2 (en) Multi DVR node communication
US9378772B2 (en) Systems and methods for visualizing storage availability of a DVR
KR20140053989A (en) Variable real time buffer and apparatus
US20100318357A1 (en) Voice control of multimedia content
US20060075429A1 (en) Voice control of television-related information

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: MICROSOFT CORPORATION, WASHINGTON

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:SMITH, MICHAEL V.;DU, JEFF;REEL/FRAME:033469/0975

Effective date: 20070823

AS Assignment

Owner name: MICROSOFT TECHNOLOGY LICENSING, LLC, WASHINGTON

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MICROSOFT CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:034544/0541

Effective date: 20141014

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION