US20120227281A1 - Shoe-slipper combination - Google Patents

Shoe-slipper combination Download PDF

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Publication number
US20120227281A1
US20120227281A1 US13220669 US201113220669A US2012227281A1 US 20120227281 A1 US20120227281 A1 US 20120227281A1 US 13220669 US13220669 US 13220669 US 201113220669 A US201113220669 A US 201113220669A US 2012227281 A1 US2012227281 A1 US 2012227281A1
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Prior art keywords
shoe
slipper
combination
heel
includes
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Abandoned
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US13220669
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Sheena Young
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Sheena Young
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B19/00Shoe-shaped inserts; Inserts covering the instep
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/10Low shoes; Slippers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/24Collapsible or convertible footwear

Abstract

One example embodiment includes a shoe-slipper combination. The shoe-slipper combination includes a shoe, wherein the shoe is configured to be worn by a wearer. The shoe-slipper combination also includes a slipper. The slipper is configured to fit on the foot of the wearer and fit at least partially within the shoe.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/452,136 filed on Mar. 13, 2011 which application is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Shoes are routinely worn by many people around the world. The shoe worn at a particular time and in a particular place by a particular wearer can depend on a number of factors. For example, the wearer can factor in comfort, design, social setting and even status when picking the appropriate shoe.
  • In many instances shoes that would be appropriate for one setting would be inappropriate for another setting. For example, dance shoes would be appropriate during a dance recital but may not be appropriate for a more formal setting, such as a reception or dinner. This means that if the wearer is going from one social setting to a different social setting without returning home or to where his/her shoes are otherwise located he/she may be required to bring multiple pairs of shoes.
  • This can lead to a multitude of problems. For example, the wearer must change his/her shoes which may draw attention to the inappropriate shoes. Further, the wearer must find a place to store the extra shoes. This may not always be a problem, but can be significant if the wearer does not wish to carry his/her belongings to each location. Additionally, storing the shoes means that there is potential for the wearer to forget one or more pairs of shoes.
  • In addition, one or more of the pairs of shoes may be uncomfortable for the wearer. For example, high heeled women's shoes tend to lack significant amounts of padding. This can lead to blisters or other sores on the foot of the wearer, especially if worn for long periods of time. I.e., the wearer may have a comfortable pair of shoes close at hand but may not be able to wear them because of social restrictions.
  • Accordingly, there is a need in the art for a shoe that can accommodate other shoes within the shoe cavity. In addition, there is a need in the art for the inner shoe to be concealed. Further, there is a need in the art for the inner shoe to provide padding for the outer shoe.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF SOME EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS
  • This Summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This Summary is not intended to identify key features or essential characteristics of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.
  • One example embodiment includes a shoe-slipper combination. The shoe-slipper combination includes a shoe, wherein the shoe is configured to be worn by a wearer. The shoe-slipper combination also includes a slipper. The slipper is configured to fit on the foot of the wearer and fit at least partially within the shoe.
  • Another example embodiment includes a shoe-slipper combination. The shoe-slipper combination includes a shoe. The shoe includes an outsole, an insole and an upper. The shoe-slipper combination also includes a slipper. The slipper includes an outsole, an insole and an upper. The slipper is configured to fit on the foot of the wearer and fit within the shoe. The outsole of the slipper rests on the insole of the shoe and the upper of the slipper is at least partially concealed by the upper of the shoe.
  • Another example embodiment includes a shoe-ballet shoe combination. The shoe-ballet shoe combination includes a shoe. The shoe includes an outsole, a heel attached to the outsole, an insole and an upper. The shoe-ballet shoe combination also includes a ballet shoe. The ballet shoe includes an outsole, an insole and an upper. The ballet shoe is configured to fit on the foot of the wearer and fit within the shoe. The outsole of the ballet shoe rests on the insole of the shoe and the upper of the ballet shoe is at least partially concealed by the upper of the shoe.
  • These and other objects and features of the present invention will become more fully apparent from the following description and appended claims, or may be learned by the practice of the invention as set forth hereinafter.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • To further clarify various aspects of some example embodiments of the present invention, a more particular description of the invention will be rendered by reference to specific embodiments thereof which are illustrated in the appended drawings. It is appreciated that these drawings depict only illustrated embodiments of the invention and are therefore not to be considered limiting of its scope. The invention will be described and explained with additional specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying drawings in which:
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an example of a shoe-slipper combination;
  • FIG. 2A illustrates a side view of a shoe;
  • FIG. 2B illustrates a top view of the shoe;
  • FIG. 3A illustrates a side view of a slipper; and
  • FIG. 3B illustrates a top view of the slipper.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF SOME EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS
  • Reference will now be made to the figures wherein like structures will be provided with like reference designations. It is understood that the figures are diagrammatic and schematic representations of some embodiments of the invention, and are not limiting of the present invention, nor are they necessarily drawn to scale.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an example of a shoe-slipper combination 100. In at least one implementation, the combination 100 can allow a user to wear a first shoe inside of a second shoe. I.e., the user can insert his/her foot within the first shoe into a second shoe without removing the first shoe. The inner shoe can provide padding for the outer shoe. Additionally or alternatively, the outer shoe can conceal the inner shoe.
  • FIG. 1 shows that the shoe-slipper combination 100 can include a shoe 12. In at least one implementation, the shoe 12 can include footwear intended to protect and comfort the human foot while doing various activities. Additionally or alternatively, the shoe 12 can be used as an item of decoration. The shoe 12 can include any desired material. For example, the shoe 12 can include leather, wood or canvas, rubber, plastics, and other materials. The foot contains more bones than any other single part of the body. Though it has evolved over hundreds of thousands of years in relation to vastly varied terrain and climate conditions, the foot is still vulnerable to environmental hazards such as sharp rocks and hot ground, which shoes can protect against.
  • FIG. 1 also shows that the shoe 12 can include an outsole 2. In at least one implementation, the outsole 2 can include the layer in direct contact with the ground. The outsole 2 can include any desired material. For example, the outsole 2 can include leather, resin rubber, natural rubber or a synthetic material like Polyurethane. The outsole may comprise a single piece, or may be an assembly of separate pieces of different materials. E.g., the heel of the outsole 2 can include a rubber plate for durability and traction, while the front is leather for style. Specialized shoes will often have modifications on this design: athletic or so called cleated shoes like soccer, rugby, baseball and golf shoes have spikes embedded in the outsole 2 to grip the ground.
  • FIG. 1 further shows that the shoe 12 can include an upper 5. In at least one implementation, the upper 5 (also called a vamp) can include the upper portion of the shoe 12 that helps hold the shoe onto the foot. In the simplest cases, such as sandals or flip-flops, this may be nothing more than a few straps for holding the sole in place. Closed footwear, such as boots, trainers and most men's shoes, will have a more complex upper. This part is often decorated or is made in a certain style to look attractive. The upper 5 may include laces, hook and loop fasteners, straps or other devices for securing the upper 5 around the foot of the user.
  • FIG. 1 additionally shows that the shoe 12 can include a heel 1. In at least one implementation, the heel 1 can include the bottom rear part of the shoe 12. The heel 1 can support the heel of the foot. The heel 1 can be virtually flat or can include thicker or larger structures intended to elevate the user or make the user look taller. The heel 1 can include embellishments for fashion sake, such as in high heel shoes.
  • FIG. 1 also shows that the shoe 12 can include an insole 6. In at least one implementation, the insole 6 is the interior bottom of a shoe, which sits directly beneath the foot under the footbed (also known as sock liner). I.e., the insole 6 is located above the outsole 2. The insole 6 can protect the foot of the user from harder material used to produce the outsole 2. The insole 6 can include cellulosic paper board or synthetic non-woven insole board. Extra material can be added to the insole 6 for comfort, to control the shape, moisture, or smell of the shoe, to help deal with defects in the natural shape of the foot, or position the foot during standing or walking.
  • FIG. 1 further shows that the shoe-slipper combination 100 can include a slipper 13. In at least one implementation, the slipper 13 can be configured to fit into the shoe 12. I.e., the slipper 13 can fit above the outsole 2 and within the upper 5 of the shoe 12. The slipper 13 can be lightweight compared to the shoe 12. The wearer can remove the shoe 12 while continuing to wear the slipper 13 or insert his/her foot into the shoe 12 without removing the slipper 13. I.e., the wearer can wear both the slipper 13 and the shoe 12 if desired or either slipper 13 or the shoe 12 separately. For example, the wearer can wear both the slipper 13 and the shoe 12 to a location then remove the shoe 12 while continuing to wear the slipper 13.
  • In at least one implementation, the slipper 13 can include any flexible shoe. In particular, the slipper 13 can include any shoe that is capable of being inserted into the shoe 12. For example, the slipper 13 can include canvas or cloth shoes that can bend and flex while being inserted into or removed from the shoe 12. The slipper 13 can include a heel, or can be a flat shoe as desired by the user.
  • In at least one implementation, the slipper 13 can include a ballet shoe. Ballet shoes, or ballet slippers, are lightweight shoes designed specifically for ballet dancing. They may be made from soft leather, canvas, or satin, and have flexible, thin soles. In general, ballet shoes fit very closely to the wearer's foot, for safety and to retain maximum flexibility. For example, the slipper 13 can include a pointe shoe. A pointe shoe is a ballet shoe with a box within the front end of the shoe that encases and supports the dancer's toes and a shank, which is a piece of rigid material that serves to stiffen the sole so as to provide support for the arch of the en pointe foot.
  • When the slipper 13 is removably inserted into the shoe 12, the outsole 9 of the slipper 13 forms an insole 6 of the shoe 12. Alternatively, the outsole 9 may form a sockliner or midsole if the shoe 12 already includes an insole 6. Thus, the shoe 12 is constructed and arranged to receive the slipper 13, and to accommodate the outsole 9 of the slipper within the shoe 12.
  • One of skill in the art will appreciate that the slipper 13 can be nearly the same size and shape as the inner cavity of the shoe 12. I.e., the slipper 13 can include an outsole 9, insole 11, and an upper 10 which are mostly or completely hidden by the shoe 12 when both the slipper 13 and the shoe 12 are worn by the user. For example, when inserted into the shoe 12, the periphery of the slipper 13 fits snugly within the shoe 12. Further, the upper 5 is sized and designed to accommodate a user's foot within the shoe 12 while the slipper 13 is disposed within the shoe.
  • FIG. 1 additionally shows that the slipper 13 can be sized to be inserted in the shoe 12. In particular, the cavity created by the upper 5 of the shoe 12 is large enough to accommodate the slipper 13. In particular, the cavity created by the upper 5 of the shoe 12 is of approximately the same size and shape as the external shape and size of the slipper 13. I.e., the slipper 13 will be lowered into the cavity created by the upper 5 of the shoe 12 with the outsole 9 of the slipper 13 touching the insole 6 of the shoe 12 and the heel 8 of the slipper 13 touching the heel 1 of the shoe 12.
  • In at least one implementation, the slipper 12 can be attached to the shoe 13 using a fastener. The fastener can include any device which is configured to keep the slipper 12 within the shoe 12. For example, the fastener can include snaps, buttons, zippers, hook and loop fasteners, or any other fastener. The fastener can be located such that it does not rub the wearer's foot, preventing blistering or other discomfort. The fastener can be located such that it does not show or otherwise protrude from the cavity of the shoe 12. Locating the fastener within the cavity of the shoe 12 can ensure that when the outsole 9 of the slipper 13 is used as the midsole of the shoe 12 the fastener does not interfere with foot placement inside the shoe 12.
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B illustrate an example of a shoe 12. FIG. 2A illustrates a side view of the shoe 12; and FIG. 2B illustrates a top view of the shoe 12. In at least one implementation, the shoe 12 can be configured to be worn with a slipper 13. I.e., the shoe 12 can allow the user to wear a slipper within the shoe 12, as described above.
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B show that the shoe 12 can include an outsole 2. In at least one implementation, the outsole 2 of the shoe 12 is composed of stiff and resilient material, such as polyurethane, dual density SSR rubber, vulcanized rubber or ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA), and may include a plurality of different materials in different locations to provide varying amounts of support to different parts of the foot. I.e., the outsole 2 can protect and support the foot of the wearer.
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B also show that the shoe 13 can include an insole 6. In at least one implementation, the insole 6 can include materials that are antibacterial, antimicrobial, antiviral, and/or antifungal substances. In particular, the substances can prevent any bacterial, microbial, viral or fungal growth in the shoe 12. I.e., the substances can kill any bacteria, microbes, viruses or fungi before the bacteria, microbes, viruses or fungi are able to infect the user. For example, the substances can include bamboo charcoal or some other substance. One of skill in the art will appreciate that the substances can serve multiple purposes. For example, bamboo charcoal is a desiccant in addition to its antibacterial, antimicrobial, antiviral, and antifungal properties.
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B further show that the shoe 12 can include a heel 1. In at least one implementation, the heel 1 is configured to support the heel of the wearer. I.e., the heel of the wearer rests on the heel 1 of the shoe 12. The heel 1 is preferably composed of plastic, synthetic material or any other desired material. The heel 1 can be of varying lengths. For example, the bottom of the heel 1 can be level with the bottom of the outsole 2. Additionally or alternatively, the heel 1 can raise the back of the outsole 2, such as in high heel shoes.
  • The heel 1 can include any desired heel design. For example, the heel 1 can include a high heel, or a heel which raises the heel of the wearer above the wearer's toes. In contrast, a heel 1 which places the heel 1 of the wearer on the same level as the wearer's toes comprises a platform shoe. For example, the high heel can include any desired heel, such as a kitten heel, a stiletto heel, a spool heel or a wedge heel. A kitten heel includes a short, slender heel that can include a slight curve setting the heel in from the edge of the shoe. A stiletto heel includes a long, thin, high heel. A spool heel includes a heel that is wide at the top and bottom and narrower in the middle. I.e. a spool heel includes a heel that is thicker at both ends and thinner in the middle. A wedge heel includes a sole in the form of a wedge so that one piece of material, normally rubber, serves as both the sole and the heel. I.e., the sole is thicker at the back than the front.
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B additionally show that the shoe 12 can include an upper 5. In at least one implementation, the upper 5 can include any desired design. For example, the upper 5 can include straps or other partial coverings, such as in sandals and flip-flops. Additionally or alternatively, the upper 5 can cover either all or a portion of the top of the wearer's foot. For example, the shoe 12 can include pumps or other shoes which are designed to cover the wearer's toes, but not other portion of the wearer's foot. In contrast the shoe 12 can include an upper 5 which covers the entire top of the wearer's foot, such as boots.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B illustrate an example of a slipper 13. FIG. 3A illustrates a side view of the slipper 13; and FIG. 3B illustrates a top view of the slipper 13. In at least one implementation, the slipper 13 can be worn independently. Additionally or alternatively, the slipper 13 can be worn in conjunction with a shoe, as described above.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B show that the sole of the slipper 13, comprising the outsole 9 and the insole 11, can be configured to match the profile of the plantar surface of the human foot. The outsole 9 can be fabricated from stiff and resilient material, such as polyurethane, dual density SSR rubber, vulcanized rubber or ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA), and may include a plurality of different materials in different locations to provide varying amounts of support to different parts of the foot. Further, the insole 11 may be provided with an anti-microbial protectant.
  • In at least one implementation, the insole 11 can include materials that are antibacterial, antimicrobial, antiviral, and/or antifungal substances. In particular, the substances can prevent any bacterial, microbial, viral or fungal growth in the slipper 13. I.e., the substances can kill any bacteria, microbes, viruses or fungi before the bacteria, microbes, viruses or fungi are able to infect the user. For example, the substances can include bamboo charcoal or some other substance. One of skill in the art will appreciate that the substances can serve multiple purposes. For example, bamboo charcoal is a desiccant in addition to its antibacterial, antimicrobial, antiviral, and antifungal properties.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B also show that the upper 10 can include a flexible and elastic material. In at least one implementation, the upper 10 can be flexible to allow easy insertion of the slipper 13 into a shoe. I.e., the upper 10 can conform to both the foot of the wearer and the inner portion of the shoe.
  • In at least one implementation, the slipper 13 can include a mechanism for removing the slipper from the shoe. In particular, the mechanism can include something for the user to grab when removing the slipper 13. For example, the mechanism can include a hook; or a tab that the user can pull in order to remove the slipper 13. For example, the hook or tab can be near the rear of the shoe or near the top of the upper 10 where the user can grab the hook or tab if desired.
  • The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from its spirit or essential characteristics. The described embodiments are to be considered in all respects only as illustrative and not restrictive. The scope of the invention is, therefore, indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description. All changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are to be embraced within their scope.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A shoe-slipper combination, the shoe-slipper combination comprising:
    a shoe, wherein the shoe is configured to be worn by a wearer; and
    a slipper, wherein the slipper is configured to:
    fit on the foot of the wearer; and
    fit at least partially within the shoe.
  2. 2. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 1, wherein the slipper includes a flexible shoe.
  3. 3. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 1, wherein the inner portion of the shoe is approximately the same size and shape as the outer portion of the slipper.
  4. 4. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 1, wherein the slipper includes a flexible material.
  5. 5. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 1, wherein the slipper fits completely within the shoe.
  6. 6. A shoe-slipper combination, the shoe-slipper combination comprising:
    a shoe, wherein the shoe includes:
    an outsole;
    an insole; and
    an upper; and
    a slipper, wherein the slipper includes:
    an outsole;
    an insole; and
    an upper
    wherein the slipper is configured to:
    fit on the foot of the wearer; and
    fit within the shoe, wherein:
    the outsole of the slipper rests on the insole of the shoe; and
    the upper of the slipper is at least partially concealed by the upper of the shoe.
  7. 7. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 6, further comprising a fastener, wherein the fastener is configured to attach the slipper to the shoe.
  8. 8. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 7, wherein the fastener includes a snap.
  9. 9. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 7, wherein the fastener includes a hook and loop fastener.
  10. 10. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 7, wherein the fastener is completely concealed by the shoe
  11. 11. A shoe-slipper combination, the shoe-slipper combination comprising:
    a shoe, wherein the shoe includes:
    an outsole;
    a heel attached to the outsole;
    an insole; and
    an upper; and
    a slipper, wherein the slipper includes:
    an outsole;
    an insole; and
    an upper
    wherein the slipper is configured to:
    fit on the foot of the wearer; and
    fit within the shoe, wherein:
    the outsole of the slipper rests on the insole of the shoe; and
    the upper of the slipper is at least partially concealed by the upper of the shoe.
  12. 12. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 11, wherein the slipper includes a mechanism for removing the slipper from the shoe.
  13. 13. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 12, wherein mechanism for removing the slipper from the shoe includes one of:
    a hook; or
    a tab.
  14. 14. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 11, wherein the heel is substantially parallel to the outsole.
  15. 15. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 11, wherein the heel extends from the outsole.
  16. 16. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 15, wherein the heel includes a high heel.
  17. 17. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 15, wherein the heel includes one of:
    a stiletto heel; or
    a kitten heel.
  18. 18. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 15, wherein the heel includes one of:
    a wedge heel; or
    a spool heel.
  19. 19. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 11, wherein the shoe includes one of:
    a sandal; or
    a pump.
  20. 20. The shoe-slipper combination of claim 11, wherein the shoe includes one of:
    a boot; or
    a bootie.
US13220669 2011-03-13 2011-08-29 Shoe-slipper combination Abandoned US20120227281A1 (en)

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US201161452136 true 2011-03-13 2011-03-13
US13220669 US20120227281A1 (en) 2011-03-13 2011-08-29 Shoe-slipper combination

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US13220669 US20120227281A1 (en) 2011-03-13 2011-08-29 Shoe-slipper combination
US14712132 US20150245688A1 (en) 2011-03-13 2015-05-14 Double shoe combination footwear with a concealed inner shoe

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WO2014055531A2 (en) 2012-10-02 2014-04-10 Jca Investment Holdings Inc. Adhesive, washable, antimicrobial insert liner for shoes and method of manufacturing the same
US20140352172A1 (en) * 2013-05-30 2014-12-04 Shene Serletic Combination shoe insert and flat for a heeled shoe and method therefor
US20150033582A1 (en) * 2013-08-02 2015-02-05 Arthur J. Colpack Polymer shoe
US20150040427A1 (en) * 2013-08-07 2015-02-12 Kenneth B. Sanders Sock covering
US20160227872A1 (en) * 2015-02-06 2016-08-11 The Floor Show, Llc Shoe cover
US20160295954A1 (en) * 2015-04-07 2016-10-13 Bichloan Tran Shoe Insert
US9635900B1 (en) * 2013-12-06 2017-05-02 Gwendolyn Rolle Shoe glove
US20170127760A1 (en) * 2012-10-02 2017-05-11 Jca Investment Holdings Inc. Insert liner for footwear and method of manufacturing the same

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WO2014055531A2 (en) 2012-10-02 2014-04-10 Jca Investment Holdings Inc. Adhesive, washable, antimicrobial insert liner for shoes and method of manufacturing the same
US20170127760A1 (en) * 2012-10-02 2017-05-11 Jca Investment Holdings Inc. Insert liner for footwear and method of manufacturing the same
EP2903471A4 (en) * 2012-10-02 2016-06-29 Jca Invest Holdings Inc Adhesive, washable, antimicrobial insert liner for shoes and method of manufacturing the same
US9839259B2 (en) 2012-10-02 2017-12-12 Jca Investment Holdings, Inc. Adhesive, washable, antimicrobial insert liner for shoes and method of manufacturing the same
US20140352172A1 (en) * 2013-05-30 2014-12-04 Shene Serletic Combination shoe insert and flat for a heeled shoe and method therefor
US9655401B2 (en) * 2013-08-02 2017-05-23 Arthur Joseph for Surell, LLC. Polymer shoe
US20150033582A1 (en) * 2013-08-02 2015-02-05 Arthur J. Colpack Polymer shoe
US20150040427A1 (en) * 2013-08-07 2015-02-12 Kenneth B. Sanders Sock covering
CN103692595A (en) * 2013-12-06 2014-04-02 重庆强步鞋业有限公司 Shoemaking process
US9635900B1 (en) * 2013-12-06 2017-05-02 Gwendolyn Rolle Shoe glove
US20160227872A1 (en) * 2015-02-06 2016-08-11 The Floor Show, Llc Shoe cover
US20160295954A1 (en) * 2015-04-07 2016-10-13 Bichloan Tran Shoe Insert

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