US20120222953A1 - Systems and Methods for Producing Pressurized Gases from Polar Molecular Liquids at Depth - Google Patents

Systems and Methods for Producing Pressurized Gases from Polar Molecular Liquids at Depth Download PDF

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US20120222953A1
US20120222953A1 US13038979 US201113038979A US2012222953A1 US 20120222953 A1 US20120222953 A1 US 20120222953A1 US 13038979 US13038979 US 13038979 US 201113038979 A US201113038979 A US 201113038979A US 2012222953 A1 US2012222953 A1 US 2012222953A1
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gas
assembly
collection
system
positioned
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Kenneth W. Anderson
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Anderson Kenneth W
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C25ELECTROLYTIC OR ELECTROPHORETIC PROCESSES; APPARATUS THEREFOR
    • C25BELECTROLYTIC OR ELECTROPHORETIC PROCESSES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF COMPOUNDS OR NON-METALS; APPARATUS THEREFOR
    • C25B1/00Electrolytic production of inorganic compounds or non-metals
    • C25B1/02Electrolytic production of inorganic compounds or non-metals of hydrogen or oxygen
    • C25B1/04Electrolytic production of inorganic compounds or non-metals of hydrogen or oxygen by electrolysis of water
    • C25B1/12Electrolytic production of inorganic compounds or non-metals of hydrogen or oxygen by electrolysis of water in pressure cells
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C25ELECTROLYTIC OR ELECTROPHORETIC PROCESSES; APPARATUS THEREFOR
    • C25BELECTROLYTIC OR ELECTROPHORETIC PROCESSES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF COMPOUNDS OR NON-METALS; APPARATUS THEREFOR
    • C25B15/00Operating or servicing of cells
    • C25B15/02Process control or regulation
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C25ELECTROLYTIC OR ELECTROPHORETIC PROCESSES; APPARATUS THEREFOR
    • C25BELECTROLYTIC OR ELECTROPHORETIC PROCESSES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF COMPOUNDS OR NON-METALS; APPARATUS THEREFOR
    • C25B9/00Cells or assemblies of cells; Constructional parts of cells; Assemblies of constructional parts, e.g. electrode-diaphragm assemblies
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E60/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02E60/30Hydrogen technology
    • Y02E60/36Hydrogen production from non-carbon containing sources
    • Y02E60/366Hydrogen production from non-carbon containing sources by electrolysis of water

Abstract

A system for producing pressurized gas(es) from polar molecular liquids without the need to compress the gas(es) through outside mechanical forces or through the use of electrical energy or otherwise. The system incorporates an electrolysis cell positioned at depth (greater than 16 feet) within the liquid. The electrolysis cell includes a bell shaped enclosure defining a gas generating assembly that is positioned at depth within a fluid such as water. The gas generating assembly includes first and second electrodes positioned in spaced relationship and a bell shaped collection vessel arranged above the electrodes. At least one collection vessel includes at least one gas port configured to connect to gas conduits to carry the pressurized gas(es) to the point of use or storage. At least one electrical conductor extends from a power source to at least one of two electrodes positioned within the gas generating assembly. At least one gas collection and storage tank is preferably positioned at the surface to receive and store the produced pressurized gas. Positioning the gas generating assembly at depth immerses the electrodes within the polar molecular fluid, and operation of the electrical power supply establishes an electrical potential between the electrodes resulting in an electrolytic breakdown of the polar molecular fluid into its constituent components. The gas thus collected at the surface may be stored or used immediately in a number of different applications.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates generally to systems for producing one or more gases from a liquid compound by way of electrolysis. The present invention relates more specifically to a system for generating pressurized gases from polar molecular liquids. The system anticipates its preferred use in conjunction with liquid water, although other polar molecular liquids may be used to produce other gases based upon the same principles.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Electrolysis involving water is the decomposition of water ( ) into oxygen gas ( ) and hydrogen gas ( ) as the result of the establishment of an electric potential that results in the flow of an electric current through the water. The principle behind electrolysis involves reactions that occur on two electrodes placed within the water. In the basic arrangement, an electrical power source is connected to the two electrodes, or two plates (typically made from some inert metal, such as platinum or stainless steel) which are placed in the water. Hydrogen gas ( ) bubbles will appear at the cathode (the negatively charged electrode where electrons enter the water) and oxygen gas ( ) bubbles will appear at the anode (the positively charged electrode). The amount of hydrogen gas generated is typically twice that of the amount of oxygen gas and both are proportional to the total electrical charge conducted by the solution.
  • Electrolysis of pure water requires excess energy to overcome various activation barriers. Without the excess energy, the electrolysis of pure water occurs very slowly or not at all. This is in part due to the limited self-ionization of water. Pure water has an electrical conductivity of about one millionth of that of sea water. Many electrolytic cells may also lack the requisite electrocatalyst. The efficiency of electrolysis is increased through the natural presence or the addition of an electrolyte (such as salt, an acid, or a base) and the use of an electrocatalyst. The present invention takes advantage of the greater concentration of naturally occurring electrolytes in deeper water.
  • In water, at the negatively charged cathode, a reduction reaction takes place with electrons from the cathode being given to hydrogen cations to form hydrogen gas. At the positively charged anode, an oxidation reaction occurs generating oxygen gas and giving electrons to the anode to complete the circuit. The overall reaction involves the decomposition of water into oxygen and hydrogen according to the following equation [=+]. The number of hydrogen molecules produced is therefore (on average) twice the number of oxygen molecules. Assuming equal temperature and pressure for both gases, the produced hydrogen gas therefore has twice the volume of the produced oxygen gas. The number of electrons pushed through the water is twice the number of generated hydrogen molecules and four times the number of generated oxygen molecules.
  • It would be desirable to utilize the above described principle of electrolysis to generate one or more gases from a liquid and to do so in a manner that produces the gases at an elevated pressure. It would be desirable if the ability to produce gases at an elevated pressure did not require the addition of significant amounts of energy to compress the gases once they have been produced. It would be useful to have a system that generated pressurized gas or gases in a manner that allowed for the storage of the gas or gases, or the immediate use of the gas or gases to release energy associated with either the pressure (through mechanical means) or with the chemical compounds (through chemical reaction means).
  • Efforts to produce usable gases through electrolysis, especially at elevated pressures, have generally met with little success. Most such systems require the use of complex and expensive equipment to pressurize the gas once it is produced. This process of compressing the gas once produced is energy intensive and generally makes the production of gases from the electrolysis of a liquid highly impractical. It would be desirable to have a system that made the production of pressurized gases from electrolysis a practical alternative to other known means for producing such gases.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention therefore provides systems for generating and producing pressurized gases from polar molecular liquids without the need to compress the gases through the addition of outside mechanical force driven through the use of electrical energy or otherwise. The system of the present invention incorporates an electrolysis cell positioned at depth (16 feet or greater). The electrolysis cell includes a bell shaped enclosure defining a gas generating assembly that is positioned at depth within the polar molecular fluid, such as water. The gas generating assembly includes first and second electrodes positioned in spaced relationship and the bell shaped collection vessel arranged above the electrodes. The collection vessel or vessels include at least one gas port configured on an upward oriented closed end of the vessel from which may extend one or more gas conduits to carry the generated pressurized gas to the surface. At least one electrical conductor extends from a power source (a voltage potential source) at the surface down to the electrodes positioned within the gas generating assembly. Positioned at the surface are the necessary structural assemblies for deploying, supporting, and retracting a gas conduit bundle assembly and the attached gas generating assembly. In the preferred embodiment, at least one gas collection and storage tank is positioned at the surface to receive and store the produced pressurized gas. Positioning the gas generating assembly at depth immerses the electrodes within the polar molecular fluid, and operation of the electrical power supply effects an electrical potential between the electrodes resulting in an electrolytic breakdown of the polar molecular fluid into its constituent components. The gas components generated at a pressure above atmospheric pressure (dependent upon the depth) are then conducted up toward the surface and used below the water surface (bubbler, water pump) or brought to the surface and collected in one or more gas collection and storage tanks. The pressurized gas thus collected at the surface may be stored and used in a number of different applications at a later date or may be immediately used.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a cross sectional view of the electrode bell pressurized gas generator apparatus of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic block diagram of the overall system for generating pressurized gas of the present invention.
  • FIG. 3 is a partially schematic elevational view of a first implementation (first preferred embodiment) of the overall system of the pressurized gas generating system of the present invention (open water).
  • FIG. 4 is a partially schematic side plan view of the surface level components of the pressurized gas generating system of the present invention.
  • FIG. 5 is a detailed cross sectional view of the gas collection hose bundle of the first preferred embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Reference is made first to FIG. 1 for a detailed description of a partially schematic cross-sectional diagram of the basic apparatus of the present invention. The diagram shown in FIG. 1 is intended to describe the functionality of the system as well as its basic geometry and structure. Deep water electrolysis system 10 comprises a long outer tube 12 concentrically surrounding a long inner tube 14. At the upper end of the electrolysis system 10, outer tube 12 and inner tube 14 are terminated and partially closed by way of cap 16. At the opposite end of outer tube 12 and inner tube 14 is positioned collection bell 18. In a preferred embodiment, each of these components might be constructed of stainless steel pipe, PVC pipe, aluminum pipe, or the like.
  • Positioned within collection bell 18 are two dome-shaped wire mesh electrodes 20 and 22. Electrode 20 comprises a dome-shaped screen having a central aperture 24 positioned at the peak of the dome. Electrode 22 comprises a dome-shaped screen smaller in diameter than electrode 20 and forming a complete dome or pyramid-shaped shell. Each of electrodes 20 and 22 includes a conductive ring 26 and 28 respectively, to which are electrically attached conductive wires 30 and 32. These conductive wires 30 and 32 extend to the surface to a DC power source (not shown) oriented in the manner indicated in the figure. This configuration preferably establishes electrode 20 as the cathode (negatively charged electrode) on which are formed hydrogen molecules. Electrode 22 is thereby established as the anode (positive electrode) on which are formed the oxygen molecules.
  • As oxygen molecules are formed on the anode (electrode 22) the bubbles of oxygen gas collect below the screen (as far from the opposing electrode as possible) and migrate to the dome of the screen electrode where they pass through the screen, through central aperture 24 of electrode 20, and are collected at the opening of inner tube 14. Oxygen gas bubbles 36 then pass up through inner tube 14 to a point where the gas collects inside inner tube 14 at volume 40. Oxygen gases may then be controllably conducted through valve 44 to the surface where the oxygen gas may be stored.
  • In a similar manner, hydrogen gas is generated on the cathode (negative electrode 20) where the bubbles pass over the screen of the electrode and are collected on the inside surface of bell 18 where they pass up into the circumferential structure of outer tube 12. Hydrogen gas 38 then bubbles up through outer tube 12 into the enclosed volume 42. Hydrogen gases then may be drawn out of the system through valve 46 as shown.
  • Because the electrolysis in the present system occurs at great depths in salt water (in the example shown), the efficiency of the reaction is higher than that as might occur at the surface. The gases thus generated also maintain the higher pressure established at depth in the salt water and will therefore arrive at the surface in either a greater volume or under higher pressure.
  • Reference is next made to FIG. 2 which is a schematic block diagram of the overall system of the present invention designed to generate pressurized gas for storage and use. The diagram in FIG. 2 is intended to represent the functional connections between the various components in the system and not the specific geometry or even arrangement of these components.
  • The entire system is preferably operated and controlled by data acquisition and control systems 50 which include various microprocessors, displays, and other analog and digital controllers that operate the electrical and gas flow components of the system. Data acquisition and control systems 50 are connected to the various other components within the system through electrical conductors and gas flow conduits. The vertically oriented components of the system are generally supported and maintained in position by support structure 52. Below, or in conjunction with support structure 52, are the necessary lifting and lowering mechanisms 58. These various support structures are generally positioned at or near the surface of the water, or at a position of approximately one atmospheric pressure.
  • Also included at or near the surface are gas conditioning systems 62 described in more detail below, as well as the gas storage tanks, here indicated as gas tanks 54 and gas tanks 56. Finally at the surface, power supply 60 is preferably positioned to direct the necessary voltage potential down to the electrolysis cell. It is possible, however, that the power supply necessary to generate the electrical potential across the electrodes in the electrolytical cell could also be positioned at depth. In general, however, it is more efficient and easier to simply direct electrical conductors down with the gas conduits to provide the necessary voltage potential across the electrodes.
  • The balance of the system shown in FIG. 2 is supported below the surface of the liquid (water) in a vertical column generally as indicated in an environment in excess of one atmosphere. The lifting/lowering mechanism 58 supports one or more gas conduits 66 as well as additional intermediate components that facilitate the transport of the pressurized gas to the surface. These intermediate components are generally identified as pressurized gas surge tank 64, whose function is described in more detail below, as well as further gas conditioning systems 65.
  • The gas conduits 66 extend to the surface from a pressurized gas column 68 which is positioned above, and in association with, the electrode bell enclosure 70. Electrode bell enclosure 70 incorporates the two electrodes necessary to carry out the electrolytic reaction of the liquid compound. Power supply 60 is therefore electrically connected to electrode bell enclosure 70 as shown. A further optional component, inlet filtration system 72 may be positioned below electrode bell enclosure 70 so as to mediate the intrusion of debris and other material that might jeopardize the efficiency of the operation of the electrolytic cell.
  • Reference is next made to FIG. 3 for a broader view of a first implementation of the system of the present invention as might be made in conjunction with operation of the system in open water (an ocean, for example) at some significant depth. FIG. 3 is a partially schematic elevational view of a first implementation (first preferred embodiment) of the overall system of the pressurized gas generating components of the present invention. In this view, watercraft 80 is shown positioned at the surface of the water wherein the support collection and storage components of the system would be retained. Also positioned on watercraft 80 is deployment/take-up reel 82. Extending from deployment/take-up reel 82 is one or more variations on a combination gas tube, wireline bundle, and support cable 84. Positioned at an intermediate spot along combination gas tube and wireline bundle 84 is pressurized gas surge tank 86. The function of this surge tank is also described in more detail below. The electrolysis gas generator 90 is positioned at the terminal of combination gas tube and wireline bundle 84 and may be held in place by one or more deployment anchors/weights 92.
  • Those skilled in the art will recognize that operation of the system of the present invention involves the balancing of pressures between the gas generating assembly at depth and the surface level assemblies. To achieve the transport of a quantity of pressurized gas(es) to the surface there must be a flow of the gas(es), at least initially from a volume at higher pressure (at depth) to a volume at lower pressure (at the surface). In the initial phases of the process it may be necessary to establish a buffer or surge tank (such as surge tanks 86 in FIGS. 3 and 64 in FIG. 2) to help prevent the movement of liquid with the flow of gas up the gas conduits. Other methods for regulating the rate at which the gases are generated could also contribute to the mitigation of entrained fluids within the gas flows, especially on startup when the pressure differentials between the gas generating assembly at depth and the surface are greatest.
  • FIG. 3 is not intended to be drawn to scale, and the actual depth at which the electrolysis gas generator 90 would be positioned would more typically be on the order of 160′ to 320′ to over 5,000′. Operation of the system at such depths achieves the desired gas pressurization and yet does not incur material costs that exceed the benefits associated with collecting and storing the pressurized gases. It is preferable that electrolysis gas generator 90 not be positioned in close proximity to the ocean or lake bottom so as to avoid the induction of silt and debris into the system. Those skilled in the art will recognize that the “depth” referred to in the present invention is primarily a pressure differential established by a quantity of atmosphere and a quantity of water positioned above the gas generator assembly. This differential “depth” is determined by the distance between the gas generator assembly and the point of use and/or storage.
  • Reference is next made to FIG. 4 which is a partially schematic side plan view of the surface level components of the gas generating system of the present invention. In this view, various components are shown schematically placed and positioned around the movable gas collection hose bundle 128 that extends up from the gas generating cell described and shown above. The surface components are shown to include an array of surface level control and collection assemblies 100. Centrally located among these components is control and data display instrumentation 102 which is connected to various other components within the system through control and data signal wires 136. Also positioned at the surface is electric power supply 104 which, in the preferred embodiment, may simply be a rechargeable DC battery. Various alternate arrangements of the power supply system may include the use of an electrical ground located at depth.
  • Also included at the surface level are active first gas collection tank 106 and active second gas collection tank 108. In addition to these active gas collection tanks, there are preferably reserve first gas storage tank(s) 110 and reserve second gas storage tank(s) 112. Various tank valve and pressure gauge assemblies 114 are positioned on each of these tanks. In addition, a first gas flow dryer (entrained fluid removal) device 116 is associated with active first gas collection tank 106 and a second gas flow dryer (entrained fluid removal) 120 is associated with active second gas collection tank 108. There is also a gas venting valve 118 associated with each side of the gas collection and storage system shown.
  • Extending from a collection manifold centrally positioned within the assembly of components at the surface is fixed gas collection hose bundle 122. This length of multi conduit hose extends from the central manifold to a non-rotating axial position on hose bundle reel support and drive 126. The reel support and drive 126 holds gas collection hose bundle 124 which is used to deploy and alternately to retract moveable gas collection hose bundle 128.
  • Also positioned and utilized at the surface are grounded support platforms 130 and 132. As indicated, the necessary control and data signal wires 136 extend from control and data display instrumentation 102 down into movable gas collection hose bundle 128 in a manner described in more detail below. Also incorporated into hose bundle 128 are electrical power supply wires 134 (shown as 30 and 32 in FIG. 1). Variations on the actual structure of the hose bundle are anticipated.
  • Additional and optional components represented by 138 and 140, may be positioned at or near the water surface and may include bubble distribution systems, a combustion chamber with ancillary fuel supply, rapid compression or decompression chambers, or the like. These components may be connected through conduits 137 and 139 to active first gas collection tank 106 and active second gas collection tank 108 in a manner that allows for the immediate use of each or both the collected gases for purposes such as generating energy from combustion or otherwise operating systems that benefit from the pressurized condition of the gases, such as therapeutic uses of oxygen gases in pressure chambers or bubbling waters. Rapid decompression of the pressurized gases may be used in thermal exchange systems as well.
  • FIG. 5 is a detailed cross-sectional view of the gas collection hose bundle of the first preferred embodiment of the present invention shown generally as 128 in FIG. 4 and as 84 in FIG. 3. A wide variety of different configurations for this hose bundle are anticipated and the components shown in FIG. 5 are intended to be inclusive of such components even though a more practical implementation may omit one or more of the components shown. Gas collection hose bundle 128 primarily incorporates first gas conduit lumen 150 and second gas conduit lumen 152. In some applications of the present system, it may only be necessary to utilize a single gas conduit lumen collecting only one gas, and venting the other, or collecting both gases for immediate use when there is no concern for reverse electrolysis occurring. In the preferred embodiment, however, one where two gases are being generated and utilized separately at the surface, gas collection hose bundle 128 should incorporate at least two gas conduit lumens.
  • Also incorporated into hose bundle 128 is integrated support cable 154 which, in the preferred embodiment, may simply be a bundled wire cable that extends the length of hose bundle 128 and is utilized to relieve any weight forces on the gas conduit lumens. Further included in hose bundle 128 are electrical power supply wires 134 a and 134 b. In the preferred embodiment, these represent the DC positive and negative conductors that establish the electrical potential between the two electrodes associated with the electrolysis cell positioned at depth. Once again, however, an alternate embodiment wherein the ground electrical potential may be established at depth, a single conductor may provide the necessary positive potential (with respect to a negative ground) to one of the two electrodes while the remaining electrode is connected to ground.
  • Finally contained within the preferred embodiment of gas collection hose bundle 128 are control and data signal wire bundle 136. In the preferred embodiment, this would be a coaxial signal cable that would allow for the multiplexing of data and/or the transmission of signal control data from the surface to the gas generating cell located at depth. Various mechanisms that might be incorporated into the electrolysis cell collection enclosure may be directed and controlled by way of this signal cable. In a like manner, various sensors that might be positioned at depth may direct signal data up to the surface for use in the control and data display instrumentation described above.
  • Although the present invention has been described in terms of the foregoing preferred embodiments, this description has been provided by way of explanation only, and is not intended to be construed as a limitation of the invention. Those skilled in the art will recognize modifications in the present invention that might accommodate specific “liquid at depth” environments. Such modifications as to structure, method, and even the specific arrangement of components, where such modifications are coincidental to the environment or the specific type of liquid compound being utilized, do not necessarily depart from the spirit and scope of the invention. Although the invention has been described in conjunction with what is essentially an “open water” environment, the principles involved may be just as easily applied to a “confined well” environment, where the depth is achieved by lowing the gas generating assembly to depth within a drilled well or the like. The same surface structural components may be utilized and the same basic “downhole” components would be utilized. In a like manner, the same hose bundle structures and geometries may be used.

Claims (23)

  1. 1. A system for producing pressurized gas from a polar molecular fluid, the system comprising:
    (a) a gas generating assembly positioned at depth within the polar molecular fluid, the gas generating assembly comprising:
    (1) a first electrode;
    (2) a second electrode positioned in a spaced relationship to the first electrode;
    (3) at least one collection vessel positioned above at least one of the first and second electrodes, the at least one collection vessel having a generally downward oriented open end and a generally upward oriented closed end; and
    (4) at least one port configured through the generally upward oriented closed end of the at least one collection vessel; and
    (b) a gas conduit bundle assembly connected at a first end thereof to the gas generating assembly and extending from the gas generating assembly positioned at depth to a second end thereof at or near a surface level position, the gas conduit bundle assembly comprising:
    (1) at least one gas conduit; and
    (2) at least one electrical conductor; and
    (c) a means for generating an electrical potential between the first and second electrodes of the gas generating assembly;
    wherein positioning the gas generating assembly at depth immerses the first and second electrodes within the polar molecular fluid at depth, and wherein an electrical potential generated between the first and second electrodes results in an electrolytic breakdown of the polar molecular fluid into its constituent gas components, the gas components generated at a pressure above atmospheric pressure dependent upon the depth.
  2. 2. The system of claim 1 further comprising:
    (d) a gas collection and storage assembly positioned at the surface level connected to the second end of the gas conduit bundle assembly, the gas collection and storage assembly comprising:
    (1) a support and deployment assembly for deploying, supporting, and retracting the gas conduit bundle assembly and the gas generating assembly; and
    (2) at least one gas collection and storage tank in gas flow communication with the at least one gas conduit of the gas conduit bundle assembly.
  3. 3. The system of claim 1 further comprising:
    (d) a gas collection and utilization assembly positioned at the surface level connected to the second end of the gas conduit bundle assembly, the gas collection and utilization assembly comprising:
    (1) a support and deployment assembly for deploying, supporting, and retracting the gas conduit bundle assembly and the gas generating assembly;
    (2) at least one gas collection tank in gas flow communication with the at least one gas conduit of the gas conduit bundle assembly; and
    (3) at least one means for converting the chemical and/or potential energy stored within the collected pressurized gas into power.
  4. 4. The system of claim 1 wherein the at least one collection vessel of the gas generating assembly comprises first and second collection vessels, the first collection vessel positioned above the first electrode and the second collection vessel positioned above the second electrode, and a gas diversion member positioned between the electrodes and the collection vessels to direct gas bubbles generated from the first electrode into the first collection vessel and gas bubbles generated from the second electrode into the second collection vessel.
  5. 5. The system of claim 4 wherein:
    the first and second electrodes each comprise a dome shaped wire mesh, the first electrode positioned coaxially above the second electrode, the first electrode defining an axial opening at a peak of the dome shaped wire mesh;
    the first and second collection vessels each comprise coaxially positioned cylindrically walled enclosures, the first collection vessel coaxially surrounding the second collection vessel; and
    the gas diversion member comprises a downwardly oriented funnel positioned above the axial opening at the peak of the first electrode;
    wherein gas bubbles generated from the second electrode are captured by the gas diversion member and are conducted into the second collection vessel and gas bubbles generated from the first electrode are excluded from entering the second collection vessel.
  6. 6. The system of claim 1 wherein the at least one gas conduit of the gas conduit assembly comprises first and second gas conduits.
  7. 7. The system of claim 1 wherein the at least one electrical conductor of the gas conduit bundle assembly comprises first and second electrical conductors.
  8. 8. The system of claim 1 wherein the gas conduit bundle assembly further comprises a structural support cable mechanically coupled to, and extending between, the gas generating assembly and the support and deployment assembly of the gas collection and storage assembly.
  9. 9. The system of claim 2 wherein the at least one gas collection and storage tank of the gas collection and storage assembly comprises first and second gas collection and storage tanks.
  10. 10. The system of claim 9 wherein the first and second gas collection and storage tanks may each be closed and disconnected from the gas collection and storage assembly when full and may be replaced by empty gas collection and storage tanks.
  11. 11. The system of claim 1 wherein the means for generating an electrical potential comprises a DC power supply.
  12. 12. The system of claim 1 wherein the polar molecular fluid comprises water and the gas collection and storage assembly comprises a movable watercraft operable on a surface of the water.
  13. 13. The system of claim 1 wherein the polar molecular fluid comprises water and the gas collection and storage assembly comprises a tethered or affixed manmade structure on or extending from a shoreline into a body of water.
  14. 14. The system of claim 1 wherein the polar molecular fluid comprises water within a terrestrial well borehole and the gas collection and storage assembly comprises a fixed platform at ground level.
  15. 15. The system of claim 1 wherein the gas generating assembly further comprises a bell housing connected at an upper end thereof to the downward oriented open end of the at least one collection vessel, the bell housing having an open base and serving to position and partially enclose the first and second electrodes below the at least one collection vessel.
  16. 16. The system of claim 15 wherein the bell housing of the gas generating assembly further comprises a solids filtration screen extending over the open base of the bell housing.
  17. 17. The system of claim 1 wherein the gas collection and storage assembly further comprises operational status and control instrumentation, the operational status and control instrumentation comprising:
    (a) at least one gas pressure monitoring device;
    (b) at least one gas flow control valve;
    (c) at least one depth measurement device;
    (d) at least one electrical current measurement device; and
    (e) a means for varying the electrical potential between the first and second electrodes.
  18. 18. The system of claim 17 wherein the gas conduit bundle assembly further comprises at least one electronic signal conductor.
  19. 19. The system of claim 1 further comprising a remotely adjustable electrode separation system wherein the separation distance between the first and second electrodes may be adjusted.
  20. 20. The system of claim 1 wherein:
    the gas conduit bundle assembly further comprises a bundled length of flexible hoses and wires; and
    the support and deployment assembly of the gas collection and storage assembly further comprises a rotatable spool connected to the gas conduit bundle assembly;
    wherein the rotatable spool holds a rolled up length of the gas conduit bundle assembly and serves to deploy the gas conduit bundle assembly by unrolling the same, and serves to retract the gas conduit bundle assembly by rolling-up the same.
  21. 21. The system of claim 3 wherein the at least one means for converting the chemical and/or potential energy stored within the collected pressurized gas into power comprises a combustion chamber wherein at least a portion of the generated pressurized gas combusts or facilitates combustion.
  22. 22. The system of claim 1 wherein the gas conduit bundle assembly further comprises at least one intermediate pressurized gas surge tank, the at least one intermediate pressurized surge tank serving to inhibit movement of liquid up from the gas generating assembly positioned at depth.
  23. 23. The system of claim 1 further comprising:
    (d) a gas collection and utilization assembly positioned at the surface level connected to the second end of the gas conduit bundle assembly, the gas collection and utilization assembly comprising:
    (1) a support and deployment assembly for deploying, supporting, and retracting the gas conduit bundle assembly and the gas generating assembly;
    (2) at least one gas collection tank in gas flow communication with the at least one gas conduit of the gas conduit bundle assembly; and
    (3) at least one means for converting and concentrating the chemical and/or potential energy stored within the collected pressurized gas using decompression to change the state of matter.
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20130341182A1 (en) * 2012-03-02 2013-12-26 Kenneth W. Anderson Modular Systems for Producing Pressurized Gases from Polar Molecular Liquids at Depth or Under Pressure
US20160010220A1 (en) * 2014-04-21 2016-01-14 Joseph P. Bower System and method for the manufacture, storage and transportation of hydrogen and oxygen gas

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US20160010220A1 (en) * 2014-04-21 2016-01-14 Joseph P. Bower System and method for the manufacture, storage and transportation of hydrogen and oxygen gas
US9273402B2 (en) * 2014-04-21 2016-03-01 Joseph P. Bower System and method for the manufacture, storage and transportation of hydrogen and oxygen gas

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