US20120149505A1 - Hockey Stick Having Longitudinal Reinforcing Channels - Google Patents

Hockey Stick Having Longitudinal Reinforcing Channels Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20120149505A1
US20120149505A1 US13323180 US201113323180A US2012149505A1 US 20120149505 A1 US20120149505 A1 US 20120149505A1 US 13323180 US13323180 US 13323180 US 201113323180 A US201113323180 A US 201113323180A US 2012149505 A1 US2012149505 A1 US 2012149505A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
hockey stick
handle
stick
percent
channels
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13323180
Inventor
Grant Phillips
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
BATTLEAX HOCKEY LLC
BattleAxe Hockey LLC
Original Assignee
BattleAxe Hockey LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/06Handles
    • A63B60/08Handles characterised by the material
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B59/00Bats, rackets or the like, not covered by groups A63B49/00 - A63B57/00
    • A63B59/70Bats, rackets or the like, not covered by groups A63B49/00 - A63B57/00 with bent or angled lower parts for hitting a ball on the ground, on an ice-covered surface, or in the air, e.g. for hockey or hurling
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/06Handles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/06Handles
    • A63B60/10Handles with means for indicating correct holding positions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/52Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like with slits
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2102/00Application of clubs, bats, rackets or the like to the sporting activity ; particular sports involving the use of balls and clubs, bats, rackets, or the like
    • A63B2102/22Field hockey
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2102/00Application of clubs, bats, rackets or the like to the sporting activity ; particular sports involving the use of balls and clubs, bats, rackets, or the like
    • A63B2102/24Ice hockey

Abstract

A hockey stick having one or more channels defined in the upper and lower minor longitudinal surfaces of the stick handle. The channels improve the strength and durability of the stick without requiring complex molding or fabrication equipment.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/421761, filed on Dec. 10, 2010.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates to sporting equipment and, more particularly, to a hockey stick having reinforcing channels extending longitudinally along a portion of the stick.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • A hockey stick is a piece of equipment used in field hockey, ice hockey or roller hockey to move the ball or puck. Sticks are approximately 1500-2000 millimeters long, composed of a long, slender shaft and a flat extension at one end called the blade. The curved part where the blade and the shaft meet is called a taper. The blade is the part of the stick used to contact the puck, and is typically 250 to 400 millimeters long.
  • Sticks have traditionally been made from wood, but in recent years, sticks made of more expensive materials such as aluminum, Aramid (kevlar), fiberglass, carbon fiber, and other composite materials have become common. In addition to weighing less, composite sticks can be manufactured with more consistent flexibility properties than their wooden counterparts. Composite sticks, despite their greater expense, are now commonplace at nearly all competitive levels of the sport, including youth ice hockey. Many professionals also use composite stick technology rather than the old wooden sticks. These new sticks are lighter, and provide a quicker release of the puck, resulting in a harder, better shot. However, composite sticks may be more susceptible to breaking and, due to the costs of materials and manufacturing, are costly to replace when they break.
  • Some conventional systems for improving the strength and durability of composite sticks involve combining composite materials and wood. Such systems are expensive to manufacture and thus produce costly sticks. Other designs involve the use of complicated stick shapes and cross-sections that require specialized tooling and manufacturing processes. Accordingly, there is a need in the art for a simple composite stick design that is easy and therefore less costly to manufacture while improving the strength and durability of the stick.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • It is therefore a principal object and advantage of the present invention to provide a stick design that has improved strength and resistance to breakage.
  • In accordance with the foregoing objects and advantages, the present invention provides a stick design comprising at least one channel defined in a minor longitudinal surface of the stick. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention comprises a pair of opposing channels formed in both the upper and lower minor longitudinal surfaces of the stick. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, multiple channels are formed in the upper and lower minor longitudinal surfaces of the stick.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING(S)
  • The present invention will be more fully understood and appreciated by reading the following Detailed Description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a top perspective view of a first embodiment of a hockey stick according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a bottom perspective view of a first embodiment of a hockey stick according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 3 is a partial perspective view of a first embodiment of a hockey stick according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-section taken along line A-A of FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 5 is a partial perspective view of a second embodiment of a hockey stick according to the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout, there is seen in FIG. 1 a hockey stick 10 according to the present invention. Stick 10 includes a handle 12 having a rectangular cross-section forming opposing major and minor opposing surfaces and a curved blade 14 extending from one end of handle 12. The minor opposing surfaces typically form a top 16 and bottom 18, while the major surfaces form a left side 20 and a right side 22. As seen in FIG. 1, top 16 of handle 12 includes a least one channel 24 formed therein and, as seen in FIG. 2, bottom 18 of handle 12 may include a second channel 26 formed therein.
  • Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, channel 24 comprises a groove 28 defined by opposing ridges 30 and 32 formed in top 16. Similarly, channel 26 comprises a groove 34 defined by opposing ridges 36 and 38. In a standard hockey stick 10, handle 12 is approximately 1190 millimeter in length, 30 millimeters in width, and 19.5 millimeters in depth. Preferably, grooves 28 and 34 of channels 24 and 26, respectively, are each about 726 millimeters in length, 8 millimeters in width, and 3 millimeters in depth. Thus, grooves 28 and 34 have a length that is about 60 percent of the handle length, a width that is about 25 percent of the handle width, and a depth that is about 15 percent of the handle depth. These percentages may be varied from zero to fifteen percent or so to adjust or tailor the performance of stick 10. The radius of curvature in opposing ridges 30 and 32 and angle of formation of groove may also be modified, e.g., groove may be designed to be trapezoidal in cross-section or to have a different geometric configuration.
  • There is seen in FIG. 5 an alternative embodiment of the present invention comprises a plurality of independent grooves 40 formed in the top and/or bottom minor surfaces of handle 12. Grooves 40 are configured as described above with respect to FIGS. 3 and 4, but are reduced in length so that two or more grooves may be formed in the minor surfaces of handle 12. For example, each groove 40 may have dimension of about 178 millimeters in length, 8 millimeters in width, and 3 millimeters in depth. Thus, each groove 40 has a length that is about 15 percent of the handle length, a width that is about 25 percent of the handle width, and a depth that is about 15 percent of the handle depth. As explained above, these percentages may be varied from zero to fifteen percent or so to adjust or tailor the performance of stick 10.
  • Stick 10 is preferably manufactured by bladder molding, but it should be recognized by those of skill in that art that other known processes may be used. The inclusion of channels 24 and 26 in a stick 10 manufactured in this manner has provided a measurable improvement in the strength of stick 10 and its resistance to impact, as measured by dropping a 20 lb weight from a height of 250 mm (increasing by 50 mm after five successful tests).

Claims (14)

  1. 1. A hockey stick, comprising:
    a handle having first and second ends and a rectangular cross-section forming a pair of major surfaces and a pair of minor surfaces;
    at least one channel formed in at least one of said minor surfaces; and
    a blade interconnected to one of said first and second ends of said handle.
  2. 2. The hockey stick of claim 1, wherein said channel has a length that is about 60 percent of the handle length.
  3. 3. The hockey stick of claim 2, wherein said channel has a width that is about 25 percent of the handle.
  4. 4. The hockey stick of claim 3, wherein said channel has a depth that is about 15 percent of the handle.
  5. 5. The hockey stick of claim 1, further comprising at least a second channel formed one of said minor surfaces.
  6. 6. The hockey stick of claim 5, wherein said second channel is formed in the opposite minor surface from said first channel.
  7. 7. The hockey stick of claim 6, wherein each of said channels has a length that is about 60 percent of the handle.
  8. 8. The hockey stick of claim 7, wherein each of said channels has a width that is about 25 percent of the handle.
  9. 9. The hockey stick of claim 8, wherein each of said channels has a depth that is about 15 percent of the handle.
  10. 10. The hockey stick of claim 1, further comprising a plurality of channels formed in at least one of said minor surfaces.
  11. 11. The hockey stick of claim 10, further comprising a plurality of channels formed in the other of said minor surfaces.
  12. 12. The hockey stick of claim 11, wherein each of said channels has a length that is about 15 percent of the handle.
  13. 13. The hockey stick of claim 12, wherein each of said channels has a width that is about 25 percent of the handle.
  14. 14. The hockey stick of claim 13, wherein each of said channels has a depth that is about 15 percent of the handle.
US13323180 2010-12-10 2011-12-12 Hockey Stick Having Longitudinal Reinforcing Channels Abandoned US20120149505A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US42176110 true 2010-12-10 2010-12-10
US13323180 US20120149505A1 (en) 2010-12-10 2011-12-12 Hockey Stick Having Longitudinal Reinforcing Channels

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13323180 US20120149505A1 (en) 2010-12-10 2011-12-12 Hockey Stick Having Longitudinal Reinforcing Channels

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20120149505A1 true true US20120149505A1 (en) 2012-06-14

Family

ID=46199930

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13323180 Abandoned US20120149505A1 (en) 2010-12-10 2011-12-12 Hockey Stick Having Longitudinal Reinforcing Channels

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20120149505A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140066234A1 (en) * 2011-11-30 2014-03-06 Stephen Robert Lowden Hockey stick shaft protector

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1535667A (en) * 1922-12-19 1925-04-28 Archibald B Horne Golf-club shaft or handle
US3972529A (en) * 1974-10-07 1976-08-03 Mcneil Walter F Reinforced tubular materials and process
US4159114A (en) * 1976-03-12 1979-06-26 La Corporation Inglasco Ltee Ice hockey stick
US5879250A (en) * 1996-07-11 1999-03-09 Khf Sports Oy Stick handle for an ice hockey stick or for a stick intended for a game of similar type
US20050215365A1 (en) * 2004-03-26 2005-09-29 2946-6380 Quebec Inc. A/S Production P.H. Enr. Rib-reinforced hockey stick shaft and method of fabrication
US20060194656A1 (en) * 2005-02-03 2006-08-31 Katelyn Bedwell Field hockey stick having an edge configured to minimize ball loft
US20070155548A1 (en) * 2005-11-16 2007-07-05 Easton Sports, Inc. Hockey stick
US20110053715A1 (en) * 2004-01-08 2011-03-03 Michael Rigoli Sports equipment stick with truss construction
US8047935B2 (en) * 2008-07-31 2011-11-01 Daiwa Seiko, Inc. Sporting pipe
US8052551B2 (en) * 2004-02-26 2011-11-08 Sport Maska Inc. Sports apparatus shaft and blade with added impact protection and method of making same

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1535667A (en) * 1922-12-19 1925-04-28 Archibald B Horne Golf-club shaft or handle
US3972529A (en) * 1974-10-07 1976-08-03 Mcneil Walter F Reinforced tubular materials and process
US4159114A (en) * 1976-03-12 1979-06-26 La Corporation Inglasco Ltee Ice hockey stick
US5879250A (en) * 1996-07-11 1999-03-09 Khf Sports Oy Stick handle for an ice hockey stick or for a stick intended for a game of similar type
US20110053715A1 (en) * 2004-01-08 2011-03-03 Michael Rigoli Sports equipment stick with truss construction
US8052551B2 (en) * 2004-02-26 2011-11-08 Sport Maska Inc. Sports apparatus shaft and blade with added impact protection and method of making same
US20050215365A1 (en) * 2004-03-26 2005-09-29 2946-6380 Quebec Inc. A/S Production P.H. Enr. Rib-reinforced hockey stick shaft and method of fabrication
US20060194656A1 (en) * 2005-02-03 2006-08-31 Katelyn Bedwell Field hockey stick having an edge configured to minimize ball loft
US20070155548A1 (en) * 2005-11-16 2007-07-05 Easton Sports, Inc. Hockey stick
US8047935B2 (en) * 2008-07-31 2011-11-01 Daiwa Seiko, Inc. Sporting pipe

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140066234A1 (en) * 2011-11-30 2014-03-06 Stephen Robert Lowden Hockey stick shaft protector
US8905873B2 (en) * 2011-11-30 2014-12-09 Stephen Robert Lowden Hockey stick shaft protector

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6062996A (en) Formable sports implement
US8235841B2 (en) Golf club head or other ball striking device having impact-influencing body features
US4664383A (en) Iron-type golf club head
US20100261546A1 (en) Golf Putter Apparatus With Floating Face Weighted Head
US20080058113A1 (en) Iron-type golf club heads with variable forward wall thickness dimensions
US5879250A (en) Stick handle for an ice hockey stick or for a stick intended for a game of similar type
US6629898B2 (en) Golf ball with an improved intermediate layer
US20040087387A1 (en) Golf club head having dual-drafted grooves
US6033328A (en) Hockey stick shaft
US20140274441A1 (en) Variable bounce height club heads and related methods
US20030134693A1 (en) Hollow golf club head
US6478693B2 (en) Golf club head
US7361098B2 (en) Golf club shaft
US20120142447A1 (en) Golf Club Heads or Other Ball Striking Devices Having Distributed Impact Response
US20070117648A1 (en) Golf club head
US4544157A (en) Goalkeeper's hockey stock with bent shaft
US6626775B2 (en) Method of manufacturing blade of hockey stick or the like, and blade of stick and blade core
US4177990A (en) Racket frame
US6105991A (en) Core for a gliding board
US5358249A (en) Golf club with plurality of inserts
US6709347B1 (en) Sporting rod member using solid road
US6179726B1 (en) Iron golf club set
US4200479A (en) Method of making a hockey stick
US1210182A (en) Golf-club.
US7674188B2 (en) Golf club head

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: BATTLEAX HOCKEY, LLC, NEW YORK

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PHILLIPS, GRANT;REEL/FRAME:027734/0251

Effective date: 20120128