US20120082812A1 - Threat-Resistant Glass Block Panel - Google Patents

Threat-Resistant Glass Block Panel Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20120082812A1
US20120082812A1 US13/223,108 US201113223108A US2012082812A1 US 20120082812 A1 US20120082812 A1 US 20120082812A1 US 201113223108 A US201113223108 A US 201113223108A US 2012082812 A1 US2012082812 A1 US 2012082812A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
glass block
block assembly
interior
solid
cells
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13/223,108
Inventor
Peter Rist Atherton
Nicholas Theodore Loomis
Larell Harris
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Pittsburgh Corning Corp
Original Assignee
Pittsburgh Corning Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US37844610P priority Critical
Application filed by Pittsburgh Corning Corp filed Critical Pittsburgh Corning Corp
Priority to US13/223,108 priority patent/US20120082812A1/en
Assigned to PITTSBURGH CORNING CORPORATION reassignment PITTSBURGH CORNING CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ATHERTON, PETER RIST, HARRIS, LARELL, LOOMIS, NICHOLAS THEODORE
Assigned to PITTSBURGH CORNING CORPORATION reassignment PITTSBURGH CORNING CORPORATION CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT THE TO REMOVE AN INCORRECT APPLICATION NUMBER 12/223,108 PREVIOUSLY RECORDED ON REEL 026912 FRAME 0335. ASSIGNOR(S) HEREBY CONFIRMS THE ASSIGNMENT OF ENTIRE INTEREST. Assignors: LOOMIS, NICHOLAS THEODORE, ATHERTON, PETER RIST, HARRIS, LARELL
Assigned to PITTSBURGH CORNING CORPORATION reassignment PITTSBURGH CORNING CORPORATION ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ATHERTON, PETER RIST, HARRIS, LARELL, LOOMIS, NICHOLAS THEODORE
Publication of US20120082812A1 publication Critical patent/US20120082812A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41HARMOUR; ARMOURED TURRETS; ARMOURED OR ARMED VEHICLES; MEANS OF ATTACK OR DEFENCE, e.g. CAMOUFLAGE, IN GENERAL
    • F41H5/00Armour; Armour plates
    • F41H5/02Plate construction
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B17/00Layered products essentially comprising sheet glass, or glass, slag, or like fibres
    • B32B17/06Layered products essentially comprising sheet glass, or glass, slag, or like fibres comprising glass as the main or only constituent of a layer, next to another layer of a specific material
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B17/00Layered products essentially comprising sheet glass, or glass, slag, or like fibres
    • B32B17/06Layered products essentially comprising sheet glass, or glass, slag, or like fibres comprising glass as the main or only constituent of a layer, next to another layer of a specific material
    • B32B17/064Layered products essentially comprising sheet glass, or glass, slag, or like fibres comprising glass as the main or only constituent of a layer, next to another layer of a specific material synthetic resin
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C1/00Building elements of block or other shape for the construction of parts of buildings
    • E04C1/42Building elements of block or other shape for the construction of parts of buildings of glass or other transparent material
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C2/00Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels
    • E04C2/54Slab-like translucent elements
    • E04C2/546Slab-like translucent elements made of glass bricks
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H9/00Buildings, or groups of buildings, or shelters adapted to withstand or provide protection against abnormal external influences, e.g. war-like action, earthquake, extreme climate
    • E04H9/04Buildings, or groups of buildings, or shelters adapted to withstand or provide protection against abnormal external influences, e.g. war-like action, earthquake, extreme climate against air-raid or other warlike actions
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04HBUILDINGS OR LIKE STRUCTURES FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES; SWIMMING OR SPLASH BATHS OR POOLS; MASTS; FENCING; TENTS OR CANOPIES, IN GENERAL
    • E04H9/00Buildings, or groups of buildings, or shelters adapted to withstand or provide protection against abnormal external influences, e.g. war-like action, earthquake, extreme climate
    • E04H9/14Buildings, or groups of buildings, or shelters adapted to withstand or provide protection against abnormal external influences, e.g. war-like action, earthquake, extreme climate against other dangerous influences, e.g. tornadoes, floods
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2307/00Properties of the layers or laminate
    • B32B2307/40Properties of the layers or laminate having particular optical properties
    • B32B2307/412Transparent
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2419/00Buildings or parts thereof
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2571/00Protective equipment
    • B32B2571/02Protective equipment defensive, e.g. armour plates, anti-ballistic clothing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/4998Combined manufacture including applying or shaping of fluent material

Abstract

A glass block panel assembled, framed and attached to a substrate such that it resists threats from forced entry, prisoner escape, bullets from guns, bomb blasts, and tornados.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of the earlier filing date of U.S. Provisional Applications Ser. No. 61/378,446 filed on Aug. 31, 2010.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates to architectural glass block panels and windows (“panels”) and methods of making such panels. More particularly, the invention relates to a new level of threat resistance achieved by these panels that far exceeds the current state-of-the-art in glass block systems with novel resistance to threats from forced entry, prisoner escape, fire arms, bomb blasts, and tornados.
  • 2. Background of the Invention
  • Glass blocks are often employed instead of plate glass or other fenestration materials in the construction of walls and partitions. Aside from the aesthetic advantages that the glass blocks may provide over other glass materials, the glass blocks may be preferable to solid walls because they are transparent and allow light to filter through, thereby permitting viewing through the wall or creating a brighter room or office space.
  • Historically, most glass block installations are implemented using masonry. For small window applications, mortared panels are prefabricated, but overall size of the installation is limited due to the heavy weight and the potential for mortar to crack during transport and handling of the glass block panels. With the emergence of improved silicone sealants, larger glass block panels are now feasible and frames have been developed for partitions and windows. Such panels are sufficient for basic residential and commercial window applications, but far higher levels of performance are required to meet to the more stringent standards of threat resistance that are being established by government agencies.
  • To put the threat resistant performance requirements in context, commercial and residential windows require a cyclic air pressure tests that range from 35 pounds per square foot to 60 pounds per square foot. The Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) tornado standards require windows to withstand air pressures of over 300 pounds per square foot. Government and military standards for blast resistance require resistance to pressures ranging from 576 pounds per square foot to over 1700 pounds per square foot. Commercial and residential glass block windows have no requirement for ballistic resistance, but Underwriters Laboratories (UL) has established a standard for jails and other secure buildings that requires the glass block to resist five shots from a 0.44 Magnum or three shots from a 30 caliber or 7.62 mm rifle. This far exceeds the capability of existing residential or commercial glass block panels or windows. Security installations like prisons require various levels of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard forced entry (or escape) resistance which may include dozens of hits by hammers, chisels, sledge hammers and battering rams as well as attacks using ripping bars, fire extinguishers and propane torches. Previous state-of-the art glass block panels or windows intended for residential and commercial window applications are not designed for those types of assaults and cannot even begin to resist such challenges.
  • The present invention addresses these long-standing problems in the industry by disclosing an improved glass block window system that achieves threat resistance much greater than the prior art. Unlike relatively flimsy frames used in residential and commercial windows, the framework provided herein is a very strong and rigid unitized structure made of steel or other rigid material that is designed to resist very large cyclic and impulsive pressure forces as well as powerful localized point impacts. Unlike the traditional hollow glass blocks, the glass blocks used in the threat resistant structure are solid laminated glass blocks (U.S. application Ser. No. 12/732,727, which is hereby incorporated by reference) specially designed to withstand very high impact from both blunt and sharp instruments and projectiles. The sealant used to hold the glass blocks (e.g., modified urethane) is formulated for very high performance flat glass configurations. These characteristics along with other aspects of the present innovative design result in a very high-performance glass block window system possessing a dramatically improved threat resistance.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The inventive nature of the glass block panel described herein is based on a very strong rigid unitized framework made of steel or other rigid material that can resist the very powerful shock waves, very high air pressure changes, and very strong impacts from blunt and sharp instruments including bullets. The rigidity and strength of the unitized structure disclosed herein enables it to encapsulate each laminated glass block so that each can behave as an independent unit. The performance of each block is largely independent of neighboring blocks, thus, if an individual block unit can withstand the challenge, the whole glass block assembly will as well. This allows the system to be scaled up to fit larger openings and be used in a diversity of circumstances and geometries.
  • The encapsulated glass block unit of the present invention preferably includes very high-performance laminated glass block (for example, as shown in U.S. application Ser. No. 12/732,727) that is isolated from the unitized frame by a shock-absorbing material such as SANTOPRENE and sealed into place by a very high-performance self-leveling sealant such as modified urethane having appropriate viscosity and other physical chemical properties. To add mechanical strength to secure the block into the cavity, a channel is molded into the side of the glass block into the lamination layer. To add mechanical strength to grip the solid surrounding solid structure, holes are drilled into the material of the solid frame(e.g., steel). While the sealant has excellent adhesion characteristics, the mechanical grip enhancements significantly enhance the overall assembly once the sealant is cured. The shock-absorbing material reduces contact between the solid frame and the glass block and helps absorb the shock forces created by any ballistic, blast, tornado, and forced entry threats.
  • This is the first known glass block window and panel system that is resistant to threats as described in government standards for ballistic resistance (UL), forced entry (ASTM), forced entry (Department of State), blast (General Services Administration; GSA) and blast (Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) military), and tornado (FEMA). While there are laminated flat glass systems that resist many of these threats, there is no prior art for glass block panels or windows that are resistant to any one, much less all, of these threats.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • For the present invention to be clearly understood and readily practiced, the present invention will be described in conjunction with the following figures, wherein like reference characters designate the same or similar elements, which figures are incorporated into and constitute a part of the specification, wherein:
  • FIG. 1 shows a glass block assembly of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 displays a front view of a glass block assembly of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 provides a side view of a glass block assembly of the present invention with the frame attached to the wall opening surfaces of the structure surrounding the glass block assembly;
  • FIG. 4 provides a close-up side view of a glass block assembly of the present invention with the frame attached to the wall opening surfaces of the structure surrounding the glass block assembly;
  • FIG. 5 shows a side view of the glass block assembly of the present invention with the frame attached to the outside wall surfaces of the structure surrounding the glass block assembly;
  • FIG. 6 displays a close-up view of a side view of the glass block assembly of the present invention with the frame attached to the outside wall surfaces of the structure surrounding the glass block assembly;
  • FIG. 7 illustrates the structure that encompasses the glass block assembly of the present invention;
  • FIG. 8 illustrates the structure that encompasses the glass block assembly of the present invention with the location of tab welds used to unitize the steel structure as described in the preferred embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 9 is a schematic of an exemplary glass block that may be used within the context of the present invention;
  • FIG. 10 depicts the shock-absorbing material that may be placed around the glass blocks used within the context of the present invention;
  • FIG. 11 is a cut-away view of an installed glass block assembly of the present invention as seen from a building interior;
  • FIG. 12 is another cut-away view of an installed glass block assembly of the present invention as seen from a building exterior;
  • FIG. 13 displays a method of fabricating the unitized frame of the glass block assemblies of the present invention; and
  • FIG. 14 displays a method of fabricating the unitized frame of the glass block assemblies of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION
  • It is to be understood that the figures and descriptions of the present invention have been simplified to illustrate elements that are relevant for a clear understanding of the invention, while eliminated for purposes of clarity, other elements that may be well known. The detailed description will be provided hereinbelow with reference to the attached drawings.
  • The glass block assemblies of the present invention possess properties that are capable of satisfying rigorous testing and the building requirements. Specifically, those tests include:
      • Threats from guns and rifles—UL 752;
      • Bomb blast threats for military and government buildings—UFC 04-010-01, GSA-TS001;
      • Tornado threats for commercial and residential buildings—FEMA 361 and 320, ICC/NSSA 500, AAMA 512-11; and
      • Forced entry threats for embassies, buildings and prisons—SD-STD-01.01, ASTM F1233, ASTM F 1915.
  • The capability to withstand these threats far exceeds the capabilities disclosed in prior art glass block panels. To accomplish these levels of threat resistance, the invention described herein preferably utilizes several components of a robust panel: unitized solid frame structure, laminated glass blocks, form-fitting shock-absorbing materials, self-leveling high-performance sealant, and high performance anchor bolts.
  • The glass block panels of the present invention may be implemented using a wide variety of materials. In some presently preferred embodiments, the solid frame structure is fabricated from stainless steel, while the shock-absorbing material that form a border around the glass block may be fabricated from SANTOPRENE. The self-leveling sealant may be a modified urethane. Those of skill in the art will recognize that other materials may be used instead of those presently preferred listed above. For example, the solid frame material may also be fabricated from other metals (e.g., carbon steel, aluminum), composite materials (e.g., glass-reinforced composites), and the like. While depicted in the figures as a square, the solid frame may take any geometry desired to satisfy the specifications of the construction project at hand.
  • The drawings in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 illustrate the assembled threat-resistant glass block panel 1 of the present invention from isometric and plan views. FIG. 3 illustrates a cross-section view and FIG. 4 a close-up view of that cross-section indicating the rigid unitized frame structure 2, the laminated glass block 3, the shock-absorbing border that surrounds the glass block 4, the very tough assembly sealant 5, the edge sealant 6, and the anchor bolt 7 that attaches the window panel to the building opening through the opening side wall. FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate a similar configuration enabling anchors bolt to attach the panel to the interior or exterior faces of a wall surrounding a window opening.
  • The rigid unitized structure 2 is illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8. As described above, manufacturing methods are selected to ensure the rigidity and strength of the structure needed to resist the very powerful threats described. FIG. 7 illustrates one such process referred to as tab welding 8 where a tab from one component is inserted into the slot of another. The tab and slot material is heated to a molten state such that the material (e.g., steel) becomes one unitized component as it cools and hardens. The surface is then ground to a smooth and continuous finish as illustrated in FIG. 8. The preferred embodiment will be fabricated from stainless steel to provide long term durability and aesthetic value.
  • An exemplary laminated glass block 3 of the present invention is illustrated in FIG. 9. As described in patent application Ser. No. 12/732,727, the block preferably includes two solid pieces of annealed glass 9 with a modified laminate (e.g., urethane) 10 therebetween. In addition to adding a very tough material layer between the glass portions of the block, the laminate material may also achieve significant blockade of harmful UV radiation. FIG. 10 illustrates the shock-absorbing border (e.g., rubber or SANTOPRENE) 4 that surrounds the glass block. The shock-absorbing material is specifically designed to provide a custom fit between the laminated glass block and the unitized solid frame structure. The shock-absorbing border may be considered a collar or sleeve into which the glass block is placed. Not only does the shock-absorbing border isolate the glass block from the unitized solid frame, it also allows the glass block to withstand far greater challenges than it would normally be capable of.
  • FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate interior and exterior cut-away views of the manner in which the threat resistant glass block panel 1 may be installed into a structurally sound concrete wall 11.
  • In some presently preferred embodiments, the frame structure is a stainless steel. As noted, other metals and solid materials may also be used, such as carbon steel or fiber-reinforced composites. So long as the material possesses properties that allows it to be formed into a rigid and solid frame in which the glass block may reside, it may be effectively used within the context of the present invention. In some presently preferred embodiments, the frame element that is on the exterior faces of the frame is ¼″ thick. The thickness of material that is employed for the unitized frame may be adjusted to accommodate any specifications set by the construction project at hand.
  • In some presently preferred embodiments, fabrication of the individual cells of the frame into which the glass block is to be placed is performed using ¼″ plate steel, as show in FIG. 13. As shown, the steel plate is approximately in the form of a “+” where the center of the plus is the approximate size of the glass block assembly and each arm of the plus is approximately 6″ in length. The center of the plus will form the outer face of the glass block assembly. Each of the arms is then bent away from the face at 90 degrees to form a box having once face solid (the future outer face of the glass block assembly) and the opposite face open. The box that is formed is sized to accommodate a plurality of shock-absorbing borders and glass block. The corners of the steel that forms the sides of the box may then be welded or melted to unitize the structure. The outer face of the box is then cut with a laser or water jet cutter to create openings that define the future location of the glass block that are part of the glass block assembly. In alternative methods of the present invention, the openings that define the future location of the glass block may be cut into the face prior to forming the sides of the box from the arms. Interior walls may then be added to the outside frame of the glass block assembly. The interior walls define individual cells into which a shock-absorbing border and a solid glass block will be placed.
  • In other embodiments, the box that is formed is sized to accommodate a shock-absorbing border and a glass block. The corners of the steel that forms the sides of the box may then be welded or melted to unitize the structure. The outer face of the box are then cut with a laser or water jet cutter to create openings resulting in individual cells able to accommodate the shock-absorbing border and glass block. Multiple cells may be welded or melted together to form the overall structure of the unitized frame used to achieve the performance criteria listed above illustrated in FIG. 7.
  • In other embodiments of the present invention, a unitized outer frame is constructed sized for the specific opening of the construction project at hand. At this point in the fabrication process, the outer frame is defined only by a vertical wall around the outside of the frame, as shown in FIG. 14. The outer face, which has had openings cut in it cut with a laser or water jet cutter to define the future location of the glass block, may then be welded or melted to the outer frame to form the unitized frame of the glass block assembly of the present invention.
  • While the present example has been described for 8″-square cells, the geometry of each cell may be altered to accommodate glass block having various geometries as desired or required by the construction project at hand.
  • The preferred embodiment will utilize a tab welding technique illustrated in FIG. 8. The method involves laser or water jet cutting slots and tabs of adjoining elements, then inserting the tab into the slot and welding the joint. This creates an extremely robust unitized solid frame and lattice structure having interior cavities for receiving the shock-absorbing border and glass block. As noted, the unitized frame may take any geometric configuration that is appropriate for the construction project at hand.
  • Into each cavity or cell of the lattice structure of the unitized frame a shock-absorbing border is inserted, and a laminated glass block is then inserted into the shock-absorbing border. The shock-absorbing border that is illustrated in FIG. 10 is molded to a geometric shape that will fit snuggly into each lattice compartment and will tightly grip the laminated glass block. In some presently preferred embodiments, the shock-absorbing border is made with SANTOPRENE in order to provide the desired elasticity for ease of assembly, to provide mechanical shock absorbing characteristics for threat resistance, to provide durability in the temperature and UV radiation expected, and to offer the colors options expected to be needed in particular construction implementations.
  • In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the laminated glass block is two 8″×8″×1.5″ pieces of annealed glass assembled with a very high-performance modified urethane laminate in between. A more encompassing description of laminated glass blocks can be found in U.S. application Ser. No. 12/732,727, which is hereby incorporated by reference. As described therein, the glass block is formed from two solid halves of a glass block are secured together using a laminate. The two halves of the glass block are placed into a containment material prior to introducing the laminate. In this embodiment, the glass is annealed for several hours for strength and resistance to breaking. The laminate may be a liquid modified urethane that fills any gaps between the two pieces of glass. Any laminate that possesses a viscosity and other physical properties that allow it to adhere to glass, shock-absorbing border, and unitized frame may be used. Preferably, the laminate is formulated to grip aggressively to glass and to be extremely durable such that in combination with the glass it will stop a direct hit from a bullet or a large object hurled at tornado-level wind speeds. When used, the modified urethane used in some presently preferred embodiments also preferably has superior properties of almost no shrinkage and blocks over 99% of harmful UV radiation. In some presently preferred embodiments, each glass block includes a groove around its exterior perimeter where the laminate material is exposed as illustrated in FIG. 9. The groove may be formed in the laminate layer as seen in 10 at the time the laminated glass block is fabricated by indenting the containment material (e.g., tape) used to retain the laminate material when it is poured in its liquid state between two halves of the glass block. After the laminate is cured, the containment material will be removed, leaving the groove.
  • The glass block is inserted into the shock-absorbing border which is in turn inserted into the unitized solid frame. This combination of materials provides a cushion for the glass block to help absorb shock and minimize glass fracturing while containing any threats to the unitized frame structure.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the unitized frame having the glass blocks and shock-absorbing borders inserted is laid face-down, and a self-leveling sealant is poured in between the blocks to hold the structure together. The self-leveling sealant will flow between the blocks, frame, and shock-absorbing borders to secure them into place. As noted above, the sealant also is able to flow through the holes that have been formed in the unitized frame and the groove in the glass block to stabilize the entire glass block assembly more securely. The preferred self-leveling sealant is the same modified urethane material used to laminate the glass blocks. As a sealant, it possesses the same physical properties as the laminate in that it grips very aggressively to glass and the solid material from which the unitized frame is fabricated. The sealant also preferably is very structurally sound, does not shrink during or after curing, and stands up well to weather and sunlight conditions.
  • A preferred embodiment also allows the structure to be attached to building substrates approved for threat resistant applications including steel, reinforced concrete, concrete masonry units, and wood. As with any construction project, installation of the glass block assemblies of the present invention will be secured using proper anchor bolts with the appropriate spacing, offset and shim requirements in order to provide the desired threat resistance and geometric configuration.
  • Ultimately, the glass block assemblies of the present invention allow light and visibility through the structure while protecting inhabitants from major threats to life and injury.
  • Nothing in the above description is meant to limit the present invention to any specific materials, geometry, or orientation of elements. Many substitutions are contemplated within the scope of the present invention and will be apparent to those skilled in the art. The embodiments described herein were presented by way of example only and should not be used to limit the scope of the invention.

Claims (19)

1. A glass block assembly, comprising:
at least one solid glass block;
a unitized frame, wherein said solid frame has exterior walls that define a perimeter and a depth that is greater than the depth of said at least one solid glass block, further wherein said solid frame includes interior dividers that are spaced to form interior cells wherein said interior dividers are formed from walls of said interior cells, said interior cells having an interior perimeter for receiving a shock-absorbing border into which one of said at least one solid glass block fits, wherein said shock-absorbing border surrounds the exterior of each of said solid glass block.
2. The glass block assembly of claim 1, further including a high performance sealant that surrounds each of said solid glass blocks.
3. The glass block assembly of claim 2, wherein said unitized frame has grooves in the exterior walls and interior dividers adapted to received said sealant.
4. The glass block assembly of claim 1, wherein said walls of said interior cells include at least one hole.
5. The glass block assembly of claim 1, wherein said unitized frame is fabricated from stainless steel.
6. The glass block assembly of claim 1, wherein said shock-absorbing border is fabricated from a rubber-like material.
7. The glass block assembly of claim 6, wherein said rubber-like material is SANTOPRENE.
8. The glass block assembly of claim 2, wherein said high performance sealant is a modified urethane.
9. The glass block assembly of claim 1 that is capable of withstanding physical challenges from forced entry, prisoner escape, guns, bomb blasts and tornados and retain structural integrity.
10. The glass block assembly of claim 1, further comprising anchor bolts, wherein said anchor bolts are adapted to secure said unitized frame to a building substrate.
11. The glass block assembly of claim 1, wherein said solid glass block includes a groove on a side of the glass block.
12. A method of fabricating a glass block assembly, comprising the steps of:
forming a matrix of cells accommodated to accept a plurality of solid glass block, comprising the steps of:
obtaining a plate of solid material, wherein said plate has four arms and a center area, said center area being approximately the size of overall glass block assembly, wherein said arms have a length that is less than a depth of said solid glass block;
bending each of said arms orthogonally to center area to form a box having an exterior face comprised of said center area, an interior face opposite said exterior face, and four sides comprised of said arms forming an exterior wall of said glass block assembly;
welding or melting each of said arms to an adjacent arm to form an exterior of said glass block assembly;
cutting said center area to form a plurality of openings in said exterior face to form a lattice of said plate, said lattice having an exterior face and an interior face;
forming a matrix of cells by welding or melting a plurality of interior walls to the interior face of said lattice, said interior walls being oriented perpendicular to said interior face;
welding or melting each of said interior walls to an adjacent interior wall or an adjacent portion of said exterior wall of said glass block assembly to form a matrix of cells comprising a unitized structure;
placing a shock-absorbing border around each of said plurality of solid glass block;
placing each of said shock-absorbing border and glass block into one of said plurality of cells;
introducing a high-performance sealant between each of said shock-absorbing borders, said glass block, and said sides of said cells; and
curing said laminate to form said glass block assembly.
13. The method of claim 12, further comprising drilling holes in said sides of said cells prior to forming said matrix.
14. The method of claim 12, wherein prior to introducing said laminate, said unitized structure is placed face down such that the exterior face of said lattice is on a solid surface.
15. The method of claim 12, wherein said cells and said external frame are stainless steel.
16. The method of claim 12, wherein said cutting step is achieved by a laser or water jet cutter.
17. The method of claim 12, wherein said shock-absorbing border is fabricated from a rubber-like material.
18. The method of claim 12, wherein high-performance sealant is a modified urethane.
19. The method of claim 12, wherein glass block assembly is capable of withstanding physical challenges from forced entry, prisoner escape, guns, bomb blasts and tornados and retain structural integrity.
US13/223,108 2010-08-31 2011-08-31 Threat-Resistant Glass Block Panel Abandoned US20120082812A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US37844610P true 2010-08-31 2010-08-31
US13/223,108 US20120082812A1 (en) 2010-08-31 2011-08-31 Threat-Resistant Glass Block Panel

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/223,108 US20120082812A1 (en) 2010-08-31 2011-08-31 Threat-Resistant Glass Block Panel
US14/919,781 US9874424B1 (en) 2010-08-31 2015-10-22 Threat-resistant glass block panel

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/919,781 Continuation US9874424B1 (en) 2010-08-31 2015-10-22 Threat-resistant glass block panel

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20120082812A1 true US20120082812A1 (en) 2012-04-05

Family

ID=45773258

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/223,108 Abandoned US20120082812A1 (en) 2010-08-31 2011-08-31 Threat-Resistant Glass Block Panel
US14/919,781 Active US9874424B1 (en) 2010-08-31 2015-10-22 Threat-resistant glass block panel

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/919,781 Active US9874424B1 (en) 2010-08-31 2015-10-22 Threat-resistant glass block panel

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (2) US20120082812A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2611981A4 (en)
CA (1) CA2809998C (en)
WO (1) WO2012031013A1 (en)

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4698249A (en) * 1982-06-24 1987-10-06 Brown John G Modular-accessible-tiles providing accessibility to conductors and piping with improved sound isolation
US4986048A (en) * 1990-01-11 1991-01-22 Pittsburgh Corning Corporation Method and apparatus for erecting a glass block wall
US5042210A (en) * 1988-08-25 1991-08-27 Innovative Building Products, Inc. Glass-block panels and method of fabrication thereof
US5430985A (en) * 1990-09-14 1995-07-11 Coleman; William J. Building block wall connector strip and method of assembling a block wall utilizing such strip
US5448864A (en) * 1993-06-22 1995-09-12 Rosamond; John E. Multi-light glass block panel assembly and method
US5485702A (en) * 1994-03-25 1996-01-23 Glenn Sholton Mortarless glass block assembly
US5845443A (en) * 1994-08-25 1998-12-08 Wirkus; Randolf Andrew Glass block fire wall
US5992111A (en) * 1997-01-15 1999-11-30 Round Top Window Products Inc. Glass block construction kit
US20040163759A1 (en) * 2003-02-26 2004-08-26 Wilkinson Thomas C. Decorative glass block
US7877947B2 (en) * 2003-03-20 2011-02-01 Quicktech Systems Ab System for building with glass blocks

Family Cites Families (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1893101A (en) * 1930-07-22 1933-01-03 Julius J Ohlis Shield for skylight, floor light and vault light structures
US2572580A (en) * 1948-02-13 1951-10-23 Almroth Thomas Kirk Method for prefabricating glass block panels
US4139973A (en) * 1976-03-18 1979-02-20 Nippon Sheet Glass Co., Inc. Assembly of a glass sheet and a sash
US4999964A (en) * 1989-05-04 1991-03-19 Innovative Building Products, Inc. Floor grid system
US5983585A (en) * 1997-02-04 1999-11-16 Spakousky; John Building block with insulating center portion
US7690862B2 (en) * 2000-07-03 2010-04-06 Astra Capital Incorporated Quick connect transit boarding platform panel
US6802162B1 (en) * 2001-11-28 2004-10-12 Myles A. Fisher Construction block and method
US7144937B2 (en) * 2002-05-09 2006-12-05 Cph Innovations Corp. Adhesion promoters for sealants
US7373763B2 (en) * 2003-03-13 2008-05-20 Extech/Exterior Technologies, Inc. Glass block assembly
US20090007510A1 (en) * 2004-06-29 2009-01-08 Mccoy John Internally colored block and process
WO2005017273A1 (en) * 2003-07-31 2005-02-24 John Mccoy Internally colored block and process
US7043885B2 (en) * 2003-09-12 2006-05-16 Lemert Steven G Glass block panel system and fabrication method of same
WO2008033948A2 (en) * 2006-09-12 2008-03-20 Pittsburgh Corning Corporation Architectural glass block with a formed slot and method of making same
WO2009126837A1 (en) * 2008-04-10 2009-10-15 Pittsburgh Corning Corporation Blast resistant glass block panel
US20100139191A1 (en) * 2008-12-05 2010-06-10 Atherton Peter R Cold seal glass block and energy-efficient panel
IT1400374B1 (en) * 2009-05-15 2013-05-31 Seves Spa A method for making a glass brick and brick obtained by said process

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4698249A (en) * 1982-06-24 1987-10-06 Brown John G Modular-accessible-tiles providing accessibility to conductors and piping with improved sound isolation
US5042210A (en) * 1988-08-25 1991-08-27 Innovative Building Products, Inc. Glass-block panels and method of fabrication thereof
US4986048A (en) * 1990-01-11 1991-01-22 Pittsburgh Corning Corporation Method and apparatus for erecting a glass block wall
US5430985A (en) * 1990-09-14 1995-07-11 Coleman; William J. Building block wall connector strip and method of assembling a block wall utilizing such strip
US5448864A (en) * 1993-06-22 1995-09-12 Rosamond; John E. Multi-light glass block panel assembly and method
US5485702A (en) * 1994-03-25 1996-01-23 Glenn Sholton Mortarless glass block assembly
US5845443A (en) * 1994-08-25 1998-12-08 Wirkus; Randolf Andrew Glass block fire wall
US5992111A (en) * 1997-01-15 1999-11-30 Round Top Window Products Inc. Glass block construction kit
US20040163759A1 (en) * 2003-02-26 2004-08-26 Wilkinson Thomas C. Decorative glass block
US7877947B2 (en) * 2003-03-20 2011-02-01 Quicktech Systems Ab System for building with glass blocks

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
EP2611981A4 (en) 2015-09-30
US9874424B1 (en) 2018-01-23
CA2809998C (en) 2018-07-31
EP2611981A1 (en) 2013-07-10
WO2012031013A1 (en) 2012-03-08
CA2809998A1 (en) 2012-03-08

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9400146B1 (en) Method for forming cylindrical armor elements
López-Puente et al. The effect of the thickness of the adhesive layer on the ballistic limit of ceramic/metal armours. An experimental and numerical study
US7144186B1 (en) Massive security barrier
EP1090264B1 (en) Flexible, impact-resistant materials
US6532857B1 (en) Ceramic array armor
DE60221849T2 (en) Ceramic armor systems with frontal splinter trap and cushioning layer
AU2009201728B2 (en) Improved Linear Shaped Charge System
CN101631920B (en) Construction block
US7520207B1 (en) Modular ballistic wall assembly
US7311965B2 (en) Strong, high density foam glass tile having a small pore size
US5747159A (en) Bullet-resistant transparent panel, and method and press for making same
US8407953B2 (en) Window framing system
US7926406B2 (en) Methods and apparatus for providing ballistic protection
EP0136064A2 (en) A Glass assembly
US7380379B2 (en) Explosion-absorbing panels and wall structures
US8857311B2 (en) Apparatus for providing protection from ballistic rounds, projectiles, fragments and explosives
US8215223B2 (en) Ceramic components, ceramic component systems, and ceramic armour systems
KR101294665B1 (en) Ballistic resistant laminated structure
US20040221526A1 (en) Glass laminates having improved structural integrity against severe stresses for use in stopless glazing applications
US7926407B1 (en) Armor shielding
US20100293868A1 (en) Modular and portable target range shelter
KR20090127285A (en) Armor system and method for defeating high energy projectiles that include metal jets
EP2087194B1 (en) Blast and impact resistant window pane systems
US20090090236A1 (en) Modular blast-resistant panel system for reinforcing existing structures
AU2011200399B2 (en) Outdoor enclosure for electronic equipment and method for providing an outdoor enclosure for electronic equipment

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: PITTSBURGH CORNING CORPORATION, PENNSYLVANIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ATHERTON, PETER RIST;LOOMIS, NICHOLAS THEODORE;HARRIS, LARELL;REEL/FRAME:026912/0335

Effective date: 20110915

AS Assignment

Owner name: PITTSBURGH CORNING CORPORATION, PENNSYLVANIA

Free format text: CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT THE TO REMOVE AN INCORRECT APPLICATION NUMBER 12/223,108 PREVIOUSLY RECORDED ON REEL 026912 FRAME 0335. ASSIGNOR(S) HEREBY CONFIRMS THE ASSIGNMENT OF ENTIRE INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ATHERTON, PETER RIST;LOOMIS, NICHOLAS THEODORE;HARRIS, LARELL;SIGNING DATES FROM 20110912 TO 20110915;REEL/FRAME:026930/0644

AS Assignment

Owner name: PITTSBURGH CORNING CORPORATION, PENNSYLVANIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ATHERTON, PETER RIST;LOOMIS, NICHOLAS THEODORE;HARRIS, LARELL;REEL/FRAME:027250/0227

Effective date: 20110915

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION