US20120073225A1 - Planks and/or boards - Google Patents

Planks and/or boards Download PDF

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US20120073225A1
US20120073225A1 US13295896 US201113295896A US2012073225A1 US 20120073225 A1 US20120073225 A1 US 20120073225A1 US 13295896 US13295896 US 13295896 US 201113295896 A US201113295896 A US 201113295896A US 2012073225 A1 US2012073225 A1 US 2012073225A1
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layer
board
board according
further
primarily
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James Edward Douglass
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James Edward Douglass
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C3/00Structural elongated elements designed for load-supporting
    • E04C3/02Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces
    • E04C3/29Joists; Girders, trusses, or trusslike structures, e.g. prefabricated; Lintels; Transoms; Braces built-up from parts of different material, i.e. composite structures
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F13/00Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings
    • E04F13/07Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor
    • E04F13/08Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements
    • E04F13/0875Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements having a basic insulating layer and at least one covering layer
    • E04F13/0878Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements having a basic insulating layer and at least one covering layer the basic insulating layer comprising mutual alignment or interlocking means
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F13/00Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings
    • E04F13/07Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor
    • E04F13/08Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements
    • E04F13/18Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements of organic plastics with or without reinforcements or filling materials or with an outer layer of organic plastics with or without reinforcements or filling materials; plastic tiles
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • E04F15/10Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements of other materials, e.g. fibrous or chipped materials, organic plastics, magnesite tiles, hardboard, or with a top layer of other materials
    • E04F15/105Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements of other materials, e.g. fibrous or chipped materials, organic plastics, magnesite tiles, hardboard, or with a top layer of other materials of organic plastics with or without reinforcements or filling materials
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F15/00Flooring
    • E04F15/02Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements
    • E04F15/10Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements of other materials, e.g. fibrous or chipped materials, organic plastics, magnesite tiles, hardboard, or with a top layer of other materials
    • E04F15/107Flooring or floor layers composed of a number of similar elements of other materials, e.g. fibrous or chipped materials, organic plastics, magnesite tiles, hardboard, or with a top layer of other materials composed of several layers, e.g. sandwich panels
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2201/00Joining sheets or plates or panels
    • E04F2201/05Separate connectors or inserts, e.g. pegs, pins, keys or strips
    • E04F2201/0505Pegs or pins
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F2203/00Specially structured or shaped covering, lining or flooring elements not otherwise provided for
    • E04F2203/04Specially structured or shaped covering, lining or flooring elements not otherwise provided for comprising a plurality of internal elongated cavities arranged in substantially parallel rows

Abstract

A board comprises a front, a back, a first longitudinal side; and a second longitudinal side; at least one of said longitudinal sides comprising a groove to facilitate the junction to another such board; wherein said board incorporates a backing layer of primarily rigid plastics material and a further layer located over said backing layer on said front being primarily of an elastomer; said elastomer extending only over said front.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. application Ser. No. 12/094,106, filed May 16, 2008, which is a nationalization of PCT Application No. PCT/GB2006/004250, filed Nov. 15, 2006, which claims priority to United Kingdom Application Nos. 0523912.4, filed Nov. 24, 2005 and 0606030.5, filed Mar. 25, 2006, and also claims priority to United Kingdom Application Nos. 111994.8, filed Jul. 13, 2011 and 116785.5, filed Sep. 29, 2011, all of the foregoing being incorporated herein by specific reference.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The invention relates to decking planks and/or boards.
  • 2. Background to the Invention and Prior Art Known to the Applicant
  • The following prior art documents are acknowledged: JP10193962; JP09100615; GB1423146; EP1104830; GB2382598; JP04228767; U.S. Pat. No. 6,427,395; U.S. Pat. No. 6,044,598; WO98/26140; U.S. Pat. No. 5,713,165; U.S. Pat. No. 5,660,016; and CA2370583.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In a broad independent aspect, the invention provides a board comprising a front, a back, a first longitudinal side; and second longitudinal side; at least one of said longitudinal sides comprising a groove to facilitate the junction to another such board; wherein said board incorporates a backing layer of primarily rigid plastics material and a further layer located over said backing layer on said front being primarily of an elastomer; said elastomer extending only over said front.
  • In a further broad independent aspect, the invention provides a cladding board comprising a side with a tongue and a side with a groove or cut-out portion to facilitate the attachment of the cladding board to another such cladding board; wherein said board incorporates a backing layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material; and a further layer located over said backing layer being primarily of an elastomer or polyurea; said groove being of exposed rigid foamed plastics material without any elastomer or polyurea covering being provided in said groove or cut-out portion.
  • The provision of the rigid foamed plastics material layer provides enhanced insulation for buildings or other structures which are clad by this board. This would assist in retaining the heat in a building during the colder months whilst retaining the coolth during the warmer months. The provision of the foamed rigid layer may also increase the rigidity of a building. The provision of the elastomer located over the backing layer improves the weather resistance. If the rigid foamed plastics material layer were simply left exposed, the weather would erode the surface. It also allows the layer which is most exposed to the weather conditions to withstand cycles of expansion and contraction which might arise even though they would arise at a much lower level than a prior art wood-based cladding board. This configuration is also particularly advantageous in terms of the inter-connection between adjacent cladding boards.
  • In a subsidiary aspect, said layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material has a shore D hardness of 35 to 75. In this range, the cladding board rigidity achieves optimal constructional strength. It can for example be used as a conventional wood-based cladding board, i.e., it can be cut or trimmed using carpenter's tools.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said further layer is an inherently flexible layer. In a further subsidiary aspect, said further layer has a cushioning effect. In a further subsidiary aspect, the inherent flexibility of said further layer is higher than that of the rigid backing layer. This aspect particularly improves its weather resistance properties due to for example the impact of hail stones.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said further layer has a shore A hardness of 35 to 90. This allows the layer to absorb impacts and to weather in an improved manner. The likelihood of the outer layer peeling back due to several cycles of differing weather conditions is substantially reduced.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material is primarily polyurethane. This material is particularly suited for retaining its configuration and has improved thermal properties. Furthermore, it allows the use of a variety of fillers.
  • The cladding board may be further improved if the layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material incorporates 20% to 50% fillers by weight. This reduces the percentage of plastics material used whilst by selecting the appropriate filler improvements with regards to the board's fire retarding properties, structural strength and weather resistance are improved.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said fillers comprise one or more from the group consisting of: ground glass, ground limestone, mineral filler, flour, pulverised fuel ash (PFA), and fibres. The provision of fibres is particularly advantageous in terms of providing improved structural strength and since the further layer may be provided without the use of any fibres, the risk of an operator accidentally interacting with a fibre is almost entirely done away with.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material incorporates glass fibres. These substantially improve the rigidity of the cladding board whilst an operator can still cut or trim the board using carpenter's tools.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, the layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material incorporates a rice-based fibre. The use of a natural product of this kind provides a product which is not only of improved strength but with reduced negative environmental impact.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material incorporates 30% to 60% air by volume. This allows the cladding board to appear relatively bulky whilst being of sufficient strength. It also substantially improves the thermal insulation properties of the board.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said further layer is primarily of a polyurethane elastomer. This is particularly advantageous in order to create a chemical bond between the backing layer and the further layer. This does away with any requirement for employing adhesives between the several layers.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said polyurethane elastomer incorporates no air bubbles. This allows the elastomeric layer to cope with weather fluctuations whilst a relatively smooth finish can be obtained. Alternatively, the polyurethane elastomer layer can incorporate in certain embodiments a relief in order for the cladding board to take the shape and configuration of a wood-based board, plastics, and/or stone.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said polyurethane elastomer incorporates one or more fillers selected from the group comprising ground glass, water scavengers, liquid fire retardants, recycled rubber, minerals and pulverised fuel ash (PFA).
  • The provision of liquid and powder fire retardants is particularly beneficial in terms of preventing the spread of a fire within a structure which has been clad by the cladding board. It also prevents an external fire from spreading into an enclosure which has been protected.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, the cladding board further comprises a coating provided over said further layer, said coating being at least in part an aliphatic isocyanate. This is particularly beneficial for improving the aesthetic appeal of the board but as well providing an extra protective layer.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said backing layer and said further layer are chemically cross-linked; thereby no separate adhesive links one layer to the other. This allows the cladding board to appear as a single unitary composition despite the various layers fulfilling different functions.
  • In a further broad independent aspect, the invention provides a moulding process of producing a cladding board, comprising the steps of selecting a mould for forming a cladding board with a side with a tongue and a side with a groove to facilitate the attachment of the cladding board to another such cladding board; forming a layer which is primarily of an elastomer; forming a backing layer which is primarily of rigid foamed plastics material; and preventing said groove from being covered by said elastomer.
  • The advantages achieved in the context of the cladding board which have already been detailed above are in part due to the manufacturing process adopted. Furthermore, it allows the configuration of the board to not only achieve the improvements mentioned above but it allows the board to be made to more closely resemble wood-based cladding products.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, the method comprises the step of starting the moulding process with an in-mould coating of aliphatic isocyanate based medium.
  • In a further broad independent aspect, the invention provides a decking plank comprising a core which acts as a support beam; one or more layers bonded to said core without the use of releasable attachment means and one or the layer being an outer slip resistant covering layer with a relief; characterised in that at least one of said layers is relatively soft compared to said core which is relatively hard; whereby the core acts as a support beam and said at least one layer has a cushioning effect.
  • This configuration reverses conventional thinking in the field of decking planks as expressed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,660,016 where a relatively hard outer shell protects a relatively soft inner portion. This configuration is particularly advantageous because it allows splinter free decking to be produced which may also be made to resemble real wood or natural stone while simultaneously being both slip resistant and cushioned in order to be particularly comfortable and risk free to stand on. It will also have fewer tendencies of fungi growing on the deck particularly when the layers are of plastics material. The covering may also achieve fire resistance when compared to conventional decking which is often coated with a flammable varnish. The slip resistance of the plank will be particularly advantageous when the surface is wet. Whilst the decking plank may resemble real wood it is also particularly advantageous because it may be configured to resemble natural stone or clay tiles or the like.
  • In a subsidiary aspect, the or each layer is (or are) homogeneous. This configuration is particularly advantageous because it avoids the surface being abrasive or uncomfortable at least underneath the foot of the user as would be the case for the prior art non-homogeneous mixtures for example, where a mixture of resin and glass solid spheres were suggested. It also allows the relief to have natural-looking and soft-feeling depressions and projections.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, the core of the plank is reinforced by fibres. This would allow the core to be strengthened to act as the main support for the decking plank to allow it to undergo the necessary bending moments when supported between two joists.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said core is a support beam. This would allow the layers to be cast over a pre-existing support beam. This would avoid for example using particularly weather resistant support beams since the layers would protect the support beam against weathering.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said supporting beam is of extruded plastics with tunnels through the beam. This would allow for example electrics to be placed through the beam in predetermined positions. It would also render the decking plank relatively light compared to entirely filled planks.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said plank has at least a top surface and a side surface which is covered by said one or more layers. This configuration is particularly advantageous because it protects not only the top surface but the side surface and therefore further minimises any risk of slippage on the edges or of splinters when handling the plank.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said core is entirely encapsulated in a layer with cushioning effect. This provides the advantage of further increasing the versatility of the plank, its ease of handling and its properties irrespective of which side a deck installer chooses to install the plank.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, the decking plank further comprises a plurality of layers; wherein one covering layer is of so-called “filled elastomer” and an outermost layer is of greater wear resistance with less filler than said layer or no filler at all. This configuration is particularly advantageous because it maximises the wear resistance of the plank, improves its cushioning effect whilst simultaneously reducing the costs of the material for production purposes.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said plurality of layers are melded together without the use of adhesives. This configuration is particularly advantageous because it allows the layers to act as their own adhesives without the use of separate adhesives as the layers set together during the manufacturing process.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, one or more layers are of a resilient foam material. This optional feature assists in achieving a cushioned feel to the decking plank as well as retaining the advantages discussed above in connection with the previous aspects.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said core is a wood-based support beam which has been treated against damp induced rot. This is advantageous because it allows the plank to be used for prolonged periods in a humid environment such as a garden.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, the plank further comprises multiple lateral projections on at least one side of the plank and recesses on at least one opposite side of the plank for mating engagement with the lateral projections of another plank. This optional configuration is particularly advantageous because it not only allows neighbouring planks to be secured to one another but it also allows them to be secured in predetermined relative positions so that no horizontal adjustment is required.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said plank further comprises heating means. This configuration is particularly advantageous because it allows decking planks which are suitable for use outdoors (or indoors) to thaw any ice or snow accumulating on the deck. It also allows the deck to be used in cold temperatures so that users in the vicinity of the deck may be warmed by the deck itself. Such decks may become complimentary to gas fired patio warmers or even render these redundant.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said supporting core is a beam whose underside incorporates open troughs separated by substantially vertical (in use) webs. This configuration is particularly advantageous because it reduces the overall weight of the decking plank whilst maintaining its strength. The exposed troughs also allow electrical wiring to be fitted and effectively hidden by the plank even after the planks have been installed.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, one or more of the plank's sides incorporates or incorporate grooves. This would be particularly advantageous because it would accommodate hidden fixing.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, the invention provides a decking plank comprising a support beam, characterised in that said decking plank further comprises heating means. This combination of features is particularly advantageous because it allows decking planks which are suitable for use outdoors (or indoors) to thaw any ice or snow accumulating on the deck. It also allows the decking to be used in cold temperatures so that users in the vicinity of the deck may be warmed by the deck itself.
  • In a subsidiary aspect, in accordance with the invention's second broad independent aspect, said support beam incorporates grooves in which said heating means are placed so would allow the heating means to be accurately located within the plank.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, the top portion of the plank is covered by a layer which is relatively soft compared to the support beam. This feature is particularly advantageous because it allows the decking plank to feel softer to a user which will further increase his/her comfort as well as avoiding the risk of injury from accidentally rubbing against a hard top or receiving splinters from a wooden decking plank.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said encapsulating layer acts as a cushion. This would also be particularly advantageous in terms of comfort for a user and would further reduce any risk of user accidents.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said heating means are electrical heating means and the plank incorporates either recessed or projecting or both recessed and projecting electrical contacts to allow the location of neighbouring planks and electrical contact between neighbouring planks.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, the plank comprises a covering layer and the top surface of the plank incorporates recessed portions in a covering layer indicating suitable locations for the insertion of one or more screws or the like.
  • This avoids a user inadvertently severing the heating means during installation of the deck. It also avoids any requirement of having to use warning stickers indicating where it would not be suitable to insert screws. Alternatively, a template may be provided.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said decking plank incorporates a covering layer and lighting means embedded into said covering layer. The covering layer can, for example, serve as a waterproof barrier to prevent the corrosion of the lighting means. This configuration can also limit breakage of the lighting means.
  • In a further subsidiary aspect, said decking plank incorporates a covering layer and alarm components embedded into said covering layer. This would allow the alarm components to be protected from corrosion and from breakage whilst adding a potential invisible extra safety component to a decking plank.
  • In a further broad independent aspect, the invention provides a method of producing a decking plank, comprising the steps of:
  • selecting a support beam and an electrical component;
  • placing said support beam and electrical component in a mould;
  • filling said mould in order to cover said electrical component; and
  • removing said cast decking plank from said mould.
  • This method is particularly advantageous because it allows as many electrical components as necessary to be placed and secured in close proximity to a support beam of a decking plank. It provides protection for electrical components against corrosion and accidental damage. It also prevents accidental harm occurring to users of the deck.
  • In a further broad independent aspect, the invention provides a decking plank comprising a support beam, one or more electrical components secured to said decking plank, a covering layer cast onto said support beam and one or more electrical components; whereby said covering layer secures said electrical components in position. This configuration also allows a wide variety of electrical components being placed in a wide variety of locations. It also allows the electrical components to be protected whilst avoiding them causing damage to the users of the deck.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • Various embodiments of the present invention will now be discussed with reference to the appended drawings. It is appreciated that these drawings depict only typical embodiments of the invention and are therefore not to be considered limiting of its scope.
  • FIGS. 1 a to 1 f show four separate embodiments of a decking plank in cross-section;
  • FIG. 2 shows a cross-sectional view of a further embodiment of a decking plank;
  • FIG. 3 shows a cross-sectional view of a further decking plank;
  • FIG. 4 shows a cross-sectional view of a further decking plank;
  • FIG. 5 shows a cross-sectional view of a further decking plank;
  • FIG. 6 shows a cross-sectional view of a further decking plank;
  • FIG. 7 shows a part cross-sectional view of an arrangement of decking planks on a joist with an electrical contact projection and an electrical contact recess to permit location and electrical contact between neighbouring planks. The planks of FIG. 7 are in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 8 shows an arrangement of neighbouring decking planks in part cross-sectional view with an exposed cable connector between neighbouring planks. The decking planks of FIG. 8 are in accordance with the seventh embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 9 shows a decking plank in cross-sectional view in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 10 shows a further cross-sectional view of a decking plank in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 11 shows a cross-sectional view of a decking plank in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIGS. 12 a, b and c show a schematic plan view of decking planks equipped with heating wires. The decking planks of FIGS. 12 a, b and c respectively show further embodiments of the invention;
  • FIG. 13 shows a cross-sectional view of a decking plank in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 14 shows a cross-sectional view of a decking plank in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 15 shows a cross-sectional view of a decking plank in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 16 shows a cross-sectional view of a decking plank in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 17 shows a cross-sectional view of a decking plank in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 18 show a cross-sectional view of a decking plank in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 19 shows a perspective view of two decking planks joined together by a T-junction member;
  • FIG. 20 shows a cross-sectional view of a decking board with channels for allowing the circulation of water/air;
  • FIG. 21 show two cross-sectional views of a decking plank with pipes;
  • FIG. 22 shows first embodiment of a junction mechanism for water/air flow decking boards;
  • FIG. 23 shows a side elevation view of a threaded collar used in the junction mechanism of FIG. 22;
  • FIG. 24 shows a second embodiment of a junction mechanism;
  • FIG. 25 shows a third embodiment of a junction mechanism;
  • FIG. 26 shows a fourth embodiment of a junction mechanism;
  • FIG. 27 shows a fifth embodiment of a junction mechanism;
  • FIG. 28 shows a cross-sectional view of a cladding board;
  • FIG. 29 shows a perspective view of the end of a cladding board;
  • FIG. 30 shows a perspective view of the end of a cladding board in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention;
  • FIG. 31 shows a perspective view of the end of a cladding board in accordance with a further embodiment; and
  • FIG. 32 shows a cladding board according to a further embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • FIG. 1 a shows a decking plank 1 in cross-section. This decking plank has a substantially rectangular cross-section with a substantially rigid support beam 2, encapsulated in a covering layer 3. On top of the covering layer 3, a further covering layer 4 is provided which extends only across the top surface of the plank. The embodiment shown in FIG. 13 shows the further covering layer of the embodiment of FIG. 1 a extending at least partially down the sides and/or ends of the plank. Alternatively, the further covering layer may extend all down the sides and/or ends of the plank. The support beam forms a strong hard core to support foot fall. The support beam may be of timber, plywood or an extruded material such as an extruded beam made out of plastics. FIG. 1 a shows a support beam without a hollow core in order to allow the screwing and retention of a screw into the covering layers and support beam. Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 14, a hard core may be hollow with a number of tunnels such as tunnel 201. Layer 202 encapsulates the hard core as in previous embodiments and an upper layer 203 with a softer walking surface is provided.
  • Returning to the description of FIG. 1 a, layer 3 may be a “filled elastomer”. The elastomer may preferably be of polyurethane. The filler is for example, pulverised fuel ash. It may also for example include calcium carbonate.
  • The upper layer 4 may be of a purer polyurethane material so as to have a greater resistance to wear. The upper layer of the decking material may incorporate an array of troughs and peaks which may also take the shape of the grains of an antique piece of wood or a natural stone, clay tiles or the like. The shape of the plastics material of the covering layers may be achieved by using appropriate moulds into which the plastics material is injected around the plank of timber for example, and once set, is removed to reveal the relief of the top surface. The relief of the softer top surface will also assist in the non-slip properties of the covering layers. The “filled polyurethane” may be blown.
  • As an alternative to the embodiment of FIG. 1 a, FIG. 1 b shows a decking plank 5, with a support beam 6 entirely encapsulated within a single layer of homogeneous covering material 7, which may be of the “blown” type with “filled polyurethane”. The support beam may be of blown “filled polyurethane”; whereby the density of the support beam is much lower than the density of the covering layer.
  • Side portions 8 and 9 of the plank are covered by the plastics material. The invention envisages embodiments where only the top surface of the supporting beam and side portions 8 and 9 are covered by the protective material.
  • In a further embodiment, FIG. 1 c shows a support beam 10 and an upper top surface only covering layer 11 which together form a decking plank 12. The upper layer 11 may be cast on top of the support beam or alternatively glued onto the support beam.
  • FIG. 1 d shows a support beam 13 which may be of a laminate timber kind covered by a covering layer 14 entirely encapsulating the support beam. In this embodiment, the upper surface may be a soft surface when compared to traditional timber. It will nevertheless retain the looks of real wood and will be classified as slip-resistant particularly due to the relief. The plastics material used may be selected to have fire-resistant/fire retardant properties.
  • FIG. 1E shows a decking plank comprising a support beam 15 and a covering layer 16 of cushion material applied to the top, sides, and end portion of the beam only. This configuration is particularly advantageous to firstly reduce cost of the overall item by reducing the amount of covering material used, and secondly to allow a resilient, and perhaps decorative and non-slip layer to be used on exposed parts, whilst providing a non-resilient surface (the “bottom”) to allow firm fixing to a sub-structure.
  • FIG. 1F illustrates a decking plank wherein the structural support beam 17 is itself comprised of a filled elastomer, such as polyurethane, i.e. without a wooden core. One or more surfaces of the plank have a covering layer, 18, as above.
  • The plastics material used may be selected to have fire-resistant/fire retardant properties.
  • FIG. 15 shows a decking plank generally referenced 204 with a hard core 205 which may be an extruded plastics beam with on its lower portion a number of longitudinal troughs 206. Over the top and side surfaces of the hard core, there is provided a softer walking surface 206. The harder core may be cast into the softer “face”.
  • As can be seen in FIG. 16, trough 206 is closed towards the ends such as end 208. FIG. 16 also shows that top layer 207 also covers the end as well as the sides in this embodiment.
  • The invention also envisages a retro-fittable sheet shaped and configured to fit over the top surface of a decking plank and its side surfaces which may be glued or stapled to a support beam.
  • It is also envisaged that an outer colour resistant layer is provided.
  • Furthermore, the invention envisages the incorporation of both heating and lighting in the same decking board plus optionally an alarm in the same decking board.
  • FIG. 17 shows a further decking plank generally referenced 209 with side grooves 210 and 211. The grooves may be located in one or both sides to accommodate hidden fixing.
  • The decking plank of the invention does not necessarily need to have a separate wooden or metallic support beam. It may be sufficient for layer 202 for example, to be strong enough on its own. In other words, the filled “encapsulating resin” may be strengthened by, for example, the use of fibres or any other appropriate strengthening material.
  • Furthermore, the covering of the decking plank may preferably have a Shore factor (A) within the range of around 20 to around 90 Shore (A).
  • FIG. 2 shows a decking plank generally referenced 101 with a support beam 102 and a covering layer 103. The covering layer 103 may be a “filled elastomer”. The elastomer may be of polyurethane. The filler is for example, pulverised fuel ash. It may, for example, include or be of calcium carbonate. The upper layer 104 which covers only the top portion of the decking plank may be of a purer polyurethane material so as to have greater resistance to wear and to achieve a cushioning feeling when compared to a layer which would not be of such purity of polyurethane.
  • The upper layer of decking material may incorporate an array of troughs and peaks that may also take the shape of the grains of an antique piece of wood, or natural stone, or clay tile. The array of troughs may be designed to avoid the electrical heating wires 105 and 106 so that the user when given instructions to insert screws only into pre-recessed portions of the decking plank would avoid any damage occurring to the electrical heating wires. Whilst electrical heating wires have been illustrated, other forms of heat exchangers are envisaged such as an arrangement of pipes for transmitting heat from a circulating fluid. In the summer such a heating arrangement may also be used as a solar panel.
  • The support beam 102 may be devoid of any chemicals which are typical in decking planks to allow them to be preserved in the outside environment. This is because the elastomer itself can act as a barrier and protect the decking plank.
  • FIG. 3 shows a decking plank 107 with a support beam 108, and two electrical wires 109 and 110. The wires 109 and 110 may be a single wire which loops around the top surface of the support beam. The covering layer may be a hard plastic layer. The electrical components are shown on the top half only of the decking plank in this embodiment.
  • FIG. 4 shows a decking plank 112 with a support beam 113 and an encapsulating covering layer 114 in which a light source 115 is embedded. The light source is in fact partially within the layer and partially outside the layer.
  • FIG. 5 shows a decking plank 116 with a support beam 117 with a number of grooves such as grooves 118 and 119 in which are provided recessed electrical components 120 and 121. A covering layer 122 entirely encapsulates the support beam in order to provide an environmental barrier between the support beam and the outside environment. The covering layer also entirely masks the presence of the electrical components.
  • FIG. 6 shows a decking plank 123 with a support beam 124 and a number of wire portions 125, set within an encapsulating layer 126. The layer incorporates a number of outer recess portions 127 and 128 which mark the location for the insertion for the screws 129 and 130.
  • When the screws 129 and 130 are inserted at these locations, they avoid accidentally severing the electrical components 125 in FIG. 7. Two side portions 131 and 132 of neighbouring decking planks are illustrated which respectively incorporate a projecting member 133 and a recess 134. Electrical contact means are also envisaged at appropriate locations of the recess 134 and projection 133 to allow electrical currents to pass across the junction between neighbouring planks. The projection and recess arrangements shown also allow neighbouring planks to be securely fitted onto each other. It is also envisaged to support the planks on joists such as joist 135.
  • FIG. 8 shows neighbouring decking plank portions 136 and 137 supported on joists 138 and 139. Exiting from the underneath regions of the decking plank portions are wires 140 and 141 allowing an electrical contact to be achieved across neighbouring planks. A releasable external connector 142 is provided at the end of wires 140 and 141.
  • FIG. 9 shows the decking plank 143 with a support beam 144 and a covering layer 145 which is of translucent plastics material. The lighting sources 146, 147 and 148 are each entirely located within the covering layer 145.
  • FIG. 10 shows a decking plank 149 with an arrangement of sensors 150, 151 and 152 located on the top surface of the support beam 153. The sensors may be suitable to arrange the triggering of an alarm 154 when, for example, they sense that a certain weight is placed on the decking plank. This might have a particularly useful application when the decking plank forms part of a deck located in the vicinity of the house which would activate an alarm when would-be intruders stand on the deck.
  • FIG. 11 shows a deck 155 with a supporting beam 156 and a covering layer 157. Within the covering layer there is provided a radio receiver 158 and a loudspeaker 159.
  • The process of manufacture of the previous decking planks may involve first the selection of an appropriate support beam such as an untreated wooden plank of decking following this first step, any appropriate electrical component may be placed onto the support beam prior to placing into a mould for casting material onto the support beam to achieve the dual protection of the support beam and electrical components. The mould may be provided with appropriate shapes to mimic antique wood, stone or terracotta tiles and to indicate the locations for inserting screws. Other suitable mould configurations may be envisaged.
  • FIGS. 12 a, 12 b and 12 c show the support beams 160, 161 and 162 respectively on which heating wires 163, 164 and 165 are respectively placed. The wires may incorporate any number of undulations of, for example as in FIG. 12 a, approximately ten undulations per metre. FIG. 12 b shows two separate wires 164 a and 164 b extending in a straight line along the length of a relatively wide support beam. In FIG. 12 c the electrical heating means 165 forms a C-shape. The heating means of FIG. 12 c is provided in a parallel electrical configuration whilst the heating means of FIGS. 12 a and 12 b are provided in a series of electrical configurations.
  • It is also envisaged that a conduit such as a hollow tube may be cast in with the layers of plastics covering to allow heating cables to be slid through after the decking plank is formed.
  • FIGS. 18 a and 18 b show two portions of two decking planks where the projections of decking plank 212 such as projections 213 and 214, are sized and shaped to fit into corresponding recesses 215 and 216, located on the side of decking plank 217. Projections such as projection 213 incorporate lateral wings 218 and 219, which allow the projection to be locked in place when forced into a recess such as recess 216 where corresponding side cut-outs such as cut-out 220 are provided. In this embodiment, plank 217 incorporates a covering layer 221 of polyurethane of a thickness selected within the range 2 to 7 mm.
  • FIG. 19 shows two planks of the kind shown in FIG. 18 a and a T-shaped member for insertion into apertures in the sides of the planks in order to secure them together in a so-called invisible manner.
  • Whilst the previous embodiments envisage in particular the use of resistance heating, it is also envisaged to use fluid heated decking such as water heated decking or hot air heated decking. It is envisaged that the decking boards incorporate pipes or an extruded hollow support that can not only support the board but act as a water/air manifold.
  • FIG. 20 shows a board 301 with an extruded core region 302 with a number of tunnels to commit the flow of liquid or air so that the board can act as a heat exchanger. The core region is encapsulated in resin in region 303 and incorporates a relatively soft top layer 304.
  • FIGS. 21 a and b show two further embodiments of a heated decking board where pipes are cast into resin. The board of FIG. 21 a shows round pipes 305 whereas the board of FIG. 21 b incorporates square pipes 306.
  • A wide variety of junction mechanisms are envisaged between neighbouring pipes or boards. For example, FIG. 22 shows two boards 307 and 308 supported on a joist at a junction region where a threaded collar 309 is incorporated. The threaded collar incorporates a flange 310 as shown in FIG. 23. It also incorporates threads on either side of the flange 310. Said threads on each side of the flange are envisaged to meet with hollow cores of two neighbouring boards at the same time. The flange may be faceted in order to allow screwing in with ease by the use of a spanner.
  • FIG. 24 shows a further embodiment of the junction mechanism between two neighbouring boards 311 and 312. Each board incorporates a cast in connector 313 and 314 which permit a water tight attachment to a short tube which is slotted between the connectors.
  • FIG. 25 shows a further junction mechanism where encapsulated pipes or a hollow extruded support is envisaged and the connector is in the form of a tube 315 with an arrangement of O-rings such as O-ring 316 which are sized and shaped to provide a water tight attachment between the two decking boards.
  • FIG. 26 shows two neighbouring boards 317 and 318 and a tube 319 which is simply glued into the channels provided in each decking board.
  • FIG. 27 shows the ends of manifold pipes with greater diameters at their connecting extremities in order to locate a pipe 320 which may be glued into position.
  • It is envisaged that the connector pipes may or may not be flexible.
  • The invention also envisages that the fluid flowing in the decking boards may either be heated or cooled in order to act either as a heater or as a cooler. The invention envisages that optionally the decking may be located around a swimming pool in the summer and a pump may be positioned between the decking boards and the water of the swimming pool so that the decking boards may be cooled and simultaneously the water of the swimming pool may be heated by the arrangement.
  • Plastic pipes (possibly 2) cast in the covering layer acts as both a support beam as well as a fluid conduit.
  • FIG. 28 shows a section 401 of a typical board which may be used for cladding according to the invention. It incorporates a backing layer 402, a further layer 403 and a coating 404. The backing layer 402 is of filled polyurethane rigid foam. This layer may itself have a thickness of between 10 mm and 30 mm. It has a relatively large proportion of air bubbles such as air bubble 405 distributed randomly throughout the layer. The air bubbles or closed cells of gas are of greater size in the centre of the backing layer whilst they are compressed in the outer portions of the backing layer. This allows the material to be denser in the outer portions compared to the core of the backing layer where the cells occupy a greater volume. The content of air in this layer may be between 30% and 70% in volume. In addition to the air bubbles a number of fibres such as fibres 406 are provided throughout the layer in order to increase its rigidity. The fibres may be of chopped glass fibre strands or other appropriate man-made fibrous material. Alternatively, a natural fibre such as that obtained from rice husks might be employed to provide the necessary increased rigidity. In addition to the fibres, other fillers are envisaged. In this layer of the cladding board 20% to 50% fillers by weight is envisaged. The fillers may be mineral fillers coupled with ground glass or pulverised fuel ash (PFA). In addition, the backing layer which could also be referred to as a core layer may employ fire retardants.
  • Layer 403 is provided to cover the backing layer with regards to at least its top face. Layer 403 may be either an unfilled or a filled polyurethane elastomer. This elastomer may be pigmented. It may also contain fire retardants in either liquid or powder form along with other fillers such as water scavengers, recycled rubber, further elastomers, or even minerals. The shore A of the layer 403 may be selected between 35 and 90.
  • Alternatively, layer 403 may be of or incorporate polyurea.
  • The further layer may alternatively have a much higher inherent flexibility. The shore level may be selected to offer a cushioning effect. The inherent flexibility of the further layer may be higher than that of the rigid backing layer. This aspect particularly improves its weather resistance properties due to for example the impact of hail stones.
  • Due to the selection of materials for both layer 402 and layer 403 chemical cross-linking arises which creates excellent adhesion between the core and its topping without any requirement for a separate adhesive.
  • Optionally, a further top layer is provided such as top layer 404 which provides an improved finish. This top layer may be based on aliphatic isocyanate. Other materials of a similar category may be employed in this context. This selection of material however is particularly suited for cross-linking with layer 403 in order to provide a layer-wise construction which holds together as an integral unit without the use of adhesives. The thickness of layer 404 may be much less than a millimetre and typically of the order of the thickness of a typical paint. Layer 403 however is preferably of 1 mm to 5 mm in thickness.
  • The process which is preferred in the production of the cladding board is a moulding process. The first step in the process is to place an in-mould coating consisting of an aliphatic isocyanate based medium applied in one or more full or partial layers (each layer having a thickness similar to that of paint). Layer 403 which might be a hybrid polyurethane is applied to cross-link with the coating 404 to form a hard or alternatively a resilient backing to the coating. Once this is applied, another form of polyurethane is applied. This polyurethane is that of layer 402 and would contain a wide spectrum of fillers. This layer would also readily cross-link with the previous layer 403 during the curing process. In order to control the expansion of the foam polyurethane an encapsulating mould box is employed which constrains the expansion within the mould itself. The cladding board lends itself to being cut or trimmed using carpenter's tools.
  • FIG. 29 shows a cladding board 407 with a filled polyurethane rigid foam layer 408 in which are formed a tongue 409 and a groove 410 in its respective upper and lower side. The groove 410 may either be formed during the moulding process or cut out as a separate step in the manufacturing process. Directly over the outer face of layer 408, there is provided a polyurethane elastomer 411 which protects and seals the closed or open cell portions of layer 408. In this configuration layer 411 covers the outside portion 412 of tongue 409. This configuration may facilitate an improved attachment of the tongue into the groove of a corresponding cladding board.
  • FIG. 30 shows a further cladding board generally referenced 413 with a polyurethane elastomer provided on both the outer and inner surfaces of tongue 414.
  • In a further embodiment, as shown in FIG. 31, both the tongue and the groove can be entirely free of any polyurethane elastomer. Elastomer 415 of cladding board 416 is limited to the outer most surface of the board.
  • FIG. 32 shows a cladding board with a front face 418 of polyurethane elastomer 418 and a backing layer 419 of closed-cell foamed polyurethane. Closed-cell foamed polyurethane is potentially an inventive option for any of the preceding embodiments. The rear face 420 of the backing layer is sloped. In a lower portion of the board, a cut-out portion 421 is provided. A tongue 422 is provided on one side of the lower portion whilst said cut-out portion 421 fulfils the function of a groove.

Claims (27)

  1. 1. A board comprising:
    a front, a back, a first longitudinal side; and
    a second longitudinal side; at least one of said longitudinal sides comprising a groove to facilitate the junction to another such board;
    wherein said board incorporates a backing layer of primarily rigid plastics material and a further layer located over said backing layer on said front being primarily of an elastomer;
    said elastomer extending only over said front.
  2. 2. A board according to claim 1, wherein said rigid plastics material of said backing material is a rigid foam.
  3. 3. A board according to claim 1, wherein said groove exposes rigid foamed plastics material.
  4. 4. A board according to claim 2, wherein said layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material has a shore D hardness of 35 to 75.
  5. 5. A board according to claim 1, wherein said further layer has a shore A hardness of 20 to 90.
  6. 6. A board according to claim 1, wherein said further layer has a shore A hardness of more than 35 and less than 90.
  7. 7. A board according to claim 1, wherein said further layer is an inherently flexible layer.
  8. 8. A board according to claim 2, wherein said layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material is primarily polyurethane.
  9. 9. A board according to claim 8, wherein said layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material incorporates 20 to 50% fillers by weight.
  10. 10. A board according to claim 9, wherein said fillers comprise one or more from the group consisting of: ground glass, pulverised fuel ash (PFA), and fibres.
  11. 11. A board according to claim 2, wherein said layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material incorporates reinforcing fibres.
  12. 12. A board according to claim 11, wherein said layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material incorporates glass reinforcing fibres.
  13. 13. A board according to claim 11, wherein said layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material incorporates a rice based fibre.
  14. 14. A board according to claim 2, wherein said layer of primarily rigid foamed plastics material incorporates 30 to 60% air by volume.
  15. 15. A board according to claim 1, wherein said further layer is primarily of polyurethane elastomer.
  16. 16. A board according to claim 1, where said further layer is primarily of polyurea.
  17. 17. A board according to claim 15, wherein said polyurethane elastomer incorporates no air bubbles.
  18. 18. A board according to claim 15, wherein said polyurethane elastomer incorporates at least one filler selected from the group comprising ground glass, water scavengers, liquid fire retardants, powder fire retardants, recycled rubber, minerals and pulverised fuel ash (PFA).
  19. 19. A board according to claim 1, further comprising a coating provided over said further layer; said coating being at least in part an aliphatic isocyanate.
  20. 20. A board according to claim 1, wherein said backing layer and said further layer are chemically cross-linked; thereby no separate adhesive links one layer to the other.
  21. 21. A board according to claim 19, wherein said coating and said further layer are chemically cross-linked; thereby no separate adhesive links one layer to the other.
  22. 22. A board according to claim 1, wherein at least said further layer is homogeneous.
  23. 23. A board according to claim 1, wherein said backing layer and said further layer act as an adhesive to one another.
  24. 24. A board according to claim 1, further comprising multiple lateral projections on at least one longitudinal side of the board and recesses on at least one opposite longitudinal side of the board for mating engagement with the lateral projections of another board.
  25. 25. A board according to claim 1, wherein said board is a cladding board.
  26. 26. A moulding process of producing a board, comprising the steps of selecting a mould for forming a board with a side with a groove to facilitate the attachment of the board to another such board;
    forming a layer which is primarily of an elastomer;
    forming a backing layer which is primarily of rigid foamed plastics material; and
    preventing said groove from being covered by said elastomer.
  27. 27. A method according to claim 26, comprising the step of starting the moulding process with an in-mould coating of aliphatic isocyanate based medium.
US13295896 2005-11-24 2011-11-14 Planks and/or boards Abandoned US20120073225A1 (en)

Priority Applications (11)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB0523912.4 2005-11-24
GB0523912A GB0523912D0 (en) 2005-11-24 2005-11-24 Decking plank
GB0606030A GB0606030D0 (en) 2006-03-25 2006-03-25 Improved decking plank
GB0606030.5 2006-03-25
PCT/GB2006/004250 WO2007060392A1 (en) 2005-11-24 2006-11-15 Decking plank
US9410608 true 2008-05-16 2008-05-16
GB1111994.8 2011-07-13
GB201111994A GB201111994D0 (en) 2011-07-13 2011-07-13 Cladding boards
GB201116785A GB201116785D0 (en) 2011-07-13 2011-09-29 Cladding boards
GB1116785.5 2011-09-29
US13295896 US20120073225A1 (en) 2005-11-24 2011-11-14 Planks and/or boards

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13295896 US20120073225A1 (en) 2005-11-24 2011-11-14 Planks and/or boards

Related Parent Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/GB2006/004250 Continuation-In-Part WO2007060392A1 (en) 2005-11-24 2006-11-15 Decking plank
US9410608 Continuation-In-Part 2008-05-16 2008-05-16

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20120073225A1 true true US20120073225A1 (en) 2012-03-29

Family

ID=45869222

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13295896 Abandoned US20120073225A1 (en) 2005-11-24 2011-11-14 Planks and/or boards

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US (1) US20120073225A1 (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120247042A1 (en) * 2011-03-28 2012-10-04 Owens Corning Intellectual Capital Llc Board with pre-applied sealing material
GB2512100A (en) * 2013-03-20 2014-09-24 Syntek Ltd Improvements in and relating to a synthetic surface covering
US20150176290A1 (en) * 2013-12-19 2015-06-25 National Nail Corp. Reinforced composite decking and related method of manufacture
CN105804350A (en) * 2016-03-14 2016-07-27 金螳螂精装科技(苏州)有限公司 Insertion groove type installation structure of wood facing

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120247042A1 (en) * 2011-03-28 2012-10-04 Owens Corning Intellectual Capital Llc Board with pre-applied sealing material
US9476202B2 (en) * 2011-03-28 2016-10-25 Owens Corning Intellectual Capital Llc Foam board with pre-applied sealing material
US10017941B2 (en) 2011-03-28 2018-07-10 Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, Llc Board with pre-applied sealing material
GB2512100A (en) * 2013-03-20 2014-09-24 Syntek Ltd Improvements in and relating to a synthetic surface covering
US20150176290A1 (en) * 2013-12-19 2015-06-25 National Nail Corp. Reinforced composite decking and related method of manufacture
US9222269B2 (en) * 2013-12-19 2015-12-29 National Nail Corp. Reinforced composite decking and related method of manufacture
CN105804350A (en) * 2016-03-14 2016-07-27 金螳螂精装科技(苏州)有限公司 Insertion groove type installation structure of wood facing

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