US20120030988A1 - Rotary-ring firearm scope - Google Patents

Rotary-ring firearm scope Download PDF

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Publication number
US20120030988A1
US20120030988A1 US13/180,430 US201113180430A US2012030988A1 US 20120030988 A1 US20120030988 A1 US 20120030988A1 US 201113180430 A US201113180430 A US 201113180430A US 2012030988 A1 US2012030988 A1 US 2012030988A1
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optical
adjustment
sighting system
adjustment member
axis
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Abandoned
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US13/180,430
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Bernard T. Windauer
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Windauer Bernard T
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Windauer Bernard T
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Priority to US13/180,430 priority patent/US20120030988A1/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41GWEAPON SIGHTS; AIMING
    • F41G1/00Sighting devices
    • F41G1/38Telescopic sights specially adapted for smallarms or ordnance; Supports or mountings therefor

Abstract

An optical sighting system comprises an adjustable optical system and an adjustment member. The adjustable optical system comprises at least one optical adjustment, and an optical pathway that extends along a longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system. The adjustment member is coupled to the at least one optical adjustment, such that the adjustment member comprises an axis of rotation about which the adjustment member rotates to actuate the at least one optical adjustment. The axis of rotation about which the adjustment member rotates is substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system. The at least one optical adjustment comprises a vertical optical adjustment and/or a horizontal optical adjustment, and depending on the embodiment, the axis of rotation about which the adjustment member rotates substantially coincides with the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system or is different from the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED PATENT APPLICATION
  • The present patent application is related to and claims priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/362,897, filed Jul. 9, 2010, entitled “Rotary Ring Firearm Scope Adjustment,” and invented by Bernard T. Windauer, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Military and tactical operations require the utmost in accuracy and diligence on the part of an operator (or shooter or marksman) to remain focused on their task. Focusing on the task at hand requires concentration on a target that is in view through a rifle scope. Accordingly, a minimal amount of movement is necessary (i.e., to adjust sight settings) while in a shooting position (i.e., prone, sitting, kneeling, or standing) in order to remain looking through the rifle scope at the target. The ability to make sight adjustments with the hand/arm that is not being used to fire the rifle, that is, the hand/arm that is not on the trigger (i.e., the non-shooting hand), is extremely advantageous. The subject matter disclosed herein allows an operator (shooter/marksman) to make major sight adjustments (windage and elevation adjustment) and minor adjustment (parallax adjustment) with the non-shooting hand independent of whether the shooter is right or left handed. Additionally, the repeatability of a rifle scope is dependent on the number, quality, and close machining tolerances of the internal parts. Therefore, the fewer number of parts used by the subject matter disclosed herein equates to tighter overall tolerances of the total assembly, greater repeatability, and overall lower cost of the total scope.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The subject matter disclosed herein is illustrated by way of example and not by limitation in the accompanying figures in which like reference numerals indicate similar elements and in which:
  • FIG. 1A depicts a left side view of a first exemplary embodiment of a Rotary-Ring Scope (RRS) according to the subject matter disclosed herein;
  • FIG. 1B depicts a cross-sectional view taken along line A-A in FIG. 1A of the first exemplary embodiment of an RRS according to the subject matter disclosed herein;
  • FIG. 2 depicts a perspective view of the first exemplary embodiment of an RRS according to the subject matter disclosed herein;
  • FIG. 3 depicts an exploded perspective view of the first exemplary embodiment of an RRS according to the subject matter disclosed herein;
  • FIGS. 4A-4E depict different views of an exemplary embodiment of a rotary ring according to the subject matter disclosed herein;
  • FIGS. 5A-5D depict different views of another exemplary embodiment of Rotary-Ring Scope according to the subject matter disclosed herein;
  • FIGS. 6A-6C depict different views of yet another exemplary embodiment of Rotary-Ring Scope according to the subject matter disclosed herein;
  • FIG. 7 depicts a first exemplary reticle view through an optical firearms scope with adjustable optical marker scales to indicate erector tube assembly movements according to the subject matter disclosed herein; and
  • FIG. 8 depicts a second exemplary reticle view through an optical firearms scope with electronic/digital markers to indicate erector tube assembly movements according to the subject matter disclosed herein.
  • It should be understood that the word “exemplary,” as used herein, means “serving as an example, instance, or illustration.” Any embodiment described herein as “exemplary” is not to be construed as necessarily preferred or advantageous over other embodiments. Additionally, it will be appreciated that for simplicity and/or clarity of illustration, elements illustrated in the figures have not necessarily been drawn to scale. For example, the dimensions of some of the elements may be exaggerated relative to other elements for clarity. Further, in some figures only one or two of a plurality of similar components or items may be indicated by reference characters for clarity of the figure.
  • FIGS. 1A and 2 respectively depict a left side view and a perspective view of a first exemplary embodiment of a Rotary-Ring Scope (RRS) 100 according to the subject matter disclosed herein. FIG. 1B depicts a cross-sectional view taken along line A-A in FIG. 1A of the first exemplary embodiment of RRS 100. FIG. 3 depicts an exploded perspective view of the first exemplary embodiment of RRS 100.
  • RRS 100 comprises a scope body 201, an elevation adjustment ring 202, an elevation adjustment plunger 203, a windage adjustment ring 204, a windage adjustment plunger 205, and an ocular-lens end 215. The interior construction of RRS 100 (FIGS. 1B and 3) is essentially conventional with the presence of an erector tube assembly 206 (shown in FIGS. 1B and 3, but not shown in FIGS. 1A and 2) and an erector tube reaction spring(s) (not shown), and an optical pathway that extends along a longitudinal axis 210, as depicted in FIG. 1B.
  • The front 207 of erector tube assembly 206 (into which the aiming point (dot or cross hair, not shown) is mounted) is physically moved vertically (i.e., the elevation adjustment) and horizontally (i.e., windage adjustment) to provide adjustment of the internal aiming point of RRS 100. Erector tube assembly 206 is positioned in a vertical direction by pivoting around spherically shaped rear-end section 208 based on movement of elevation adjustment plunger 203 and spring-pressure counter force via erector tube reaction spring(s) (not shown) in opposition to movement of elevation adjustment plunger 203. That is, as elevation adjustment ring 202 is rotated around an axis of rotation that is substantially coincident with longitudinal axis 210, elevation adjustment plunger 203 is extended (or retracted) based on contact of its rounded end within a variable-depth groove 402 (FIGS. 4A-4E). Erector tube assembly 206 is selectably positioned in a vertical direction as elevation adjustment ring 202 is rotated around its axis of rotation, thereby shifting the internal aiming point upward or downward. It should be understood that the exact mechanical configuration of the elevation adjustment plunger 203 and the variable depth groove 402 (FIG. 4A-4E) machined on the interior circumference of the elevation adjustment ring 202 can be any of a number of well-known mechanical configurations.
  • Erector tube assembly 206 is positioned in a horizontal direction by pivoting around spherically shaped rear end section 208 based on movement of windage adjustment plunger 205 and spring-pressure counter force in opposition to movement of windage adjustment plunger 205. That is, as windage adjustment ring 204 is rotated around an axis of rotation that is substantially coincident with longitudinal axis 210, windage adjustment plunger 205 is extended (or retracted) based on contact of its rounded end within a variable-depth groove. Erector tube assembly 206 is selectably positioned in a horizontal direction as horizontal adjustment ring 204 is rotated around its axis of rotation, thereby shifting the internal aiming point to the left or right. It should be understood that the exact mechanical configuration of windage adjustment plunger 205 and variable-depth groove 402 (FIG. 4A-4E) machined on the interior circumference of windage adjustment ring 204 could be any of a number of well-known mechanical configurations. It should also be understood that more than one variable depth groove 402 could be used, in which case a corresponding number of plungers (i.e., plungers 203 and 205) would be used. It should also be understood that a spiral path variable-depth groove 402 could be used for finer adjustment or longitudinal movement of internal mechanisms as in the case of parallax adjustment with the rotary-ring concept disclosed herein.
  • FIGS. 4A-4E depict different views of an exemplary embodiment of a rotary ring 400 according to the subject matter disclosed herein. In particular, FIG. 4A is a left-side view of rotary ring 400, FIG. 4B is a front view of rotary ring 400, and FIG. 4C is a right-side view of rotary ring 400. FIG. 4D is a perspective view of rotary ring 400, and FIG. 4E is a cross-sectional view of rotary ring 400 taken along line B-B in FIG. 4B. In one exemplary embodiment, rotary ring 400 comprises elevation adjustment ring 202. In another exemplary embodiment, rotary ring 400 comprises windage adjustment ring 204. As depicted in FIGS. 4A-4E, rotary ring 400 comprises a body member 401, and an internally positioned variable-depth groove 402. The depth of variable-depth groove 402 varies as groove 402 traverses the interior surface 403 of rotary ring 400. In one exemplary embodiment, the variation of the depth of groove 402 is constant or linear for at least a portion of the length of groove 402. In another exemplary embodiment, the variation of the depth of groove 402 is not constant or is nonlinear for at least a portion of the length of groove 402. In still another exemplary embodiment, groove 402 can include protuberances along the length of the groove that provide a tactic feel as the rotary ring is rotated. In still another exemplary embodiment, groove 402 can be configured as a spiral so that the length of groove 402 around the internal surface 403 of rotary ring 400 can be selectably varied depending on the application.
  • It should be understood that the rotary-ring configurations for the various adjustments for the exemplary embodiment of the RRS 100 depicted in the Figures could be adapted for use with an optical adjustment mechanism for an automatic optical sighting system, such as that disclosed in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2009/0266892 A1 to Windauer et al., Ser. No. 11/720,426, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,806,331 B2 to Windauer et al. Moreover, while the exemplary embodiments of a RRS depicted in the Figures comprise an optical pathway that extends along a single longitudinal axis, it should be understood that an exemplary embodiment of an RRS could comprise an optical pathway that extends along one or more axes, such as that disclosed in U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2009/0266892 A1 to Windauer et al., Ser. No. 11/720,426, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,806,331 B2 to Windauer et al., the disclosure of which being incorporated by reference herein.
  • FIGS. 5A-5D depict different views of another exemplary embodiment of Rotary-Ring Rifle Scope (RRS) 500 according to the subject matter disclosed herein. In particular, FIGS. 5A and 5B respectively depict top and side views of RRS 500. FIG. 5C depicts a cross-sectional view taken along line C-C in FIG. 5B of RRS 500. FIG. 5D depicts an ocular-lens end view of RRS 500. RRS 500 comprises a scope body 501, an elevation adjustment actuator 502, an elevation adjustment plunger (not shown), a windage adjustment actuator 504, a windage adjustment plunger 505, and an ocular-lens end 515. The interior construction of RRS 500 is essentially conventional with the presence of an erector tube assembly 506 and an erector tube reaction spring(s) (not shown), and an optical pathway that extends along a longitudinal axis 510, as depicted in FIG. 5C.
  • The front 507 of erector tube assembly 506 (into which the aiming point (dot or cross hair, not shown) is mounted) is physically moved vertically (i.e., the elevation adjustment) and horizontally (i.e., windage adjustment) to provide adjustment of the internal aiming point of RRS 500. Erector tube assembly 506 is positioned in a horizontal direction by pivoting around spherically shaped rear-end section 508 based on movement of windage adjustment plunger 505 and spring-pressure counter force via erector tube reaction spring(s) (not shown) in opposition to movement of windage adjustment plunger 505. That is, as windage adjustment actuator 504 is rotated around an axis of rotation 513 (FIG. 5C) that is substantially parallel to longitudinal axis 510, windage adjustment plunger 505 is extended (or retracted) based on contact of its rounded end within a variable-depth groove 511 formed on the exterior surface 512 of windage adjustment actuator 504. Erector tube assembly 506 is selectably positioned in a horizontal direction as windage adjustment actuator 504 is rotated around its axis of rotation, thereby shifting the internal aiming point upward or downward. It should be understood that the exact mechanical configuration of the windage adjustment plunger 505 and the variable depth groove 511 machined on the exterior circumference of the windage adjustment actuator 504 can be any of a number of well-known mechanical configurations. Further, it should be understood that the elevation adjustment for the exemplary embodiment of RRS 500 depicted in FIGS. 5A-5D operates in a manner similar to the horizontal adjustment.
  • FIGS. 6A-6C depict different views of yet another exemplary embodiment of Rotary-Ring Rifle Scope (RRS) 600 according to the subject matter disclosed herein. In particular, FIGS. 6A and 6B respectively depict top and side views of RRS 600. FIG. 6C depicts a cross-sectional view taken along line D-D in FIG. 6B of RRS 600. RRS 600 comprises a scope body 601, an elevation adjustment actuator 602, an elevation plunger screw 603, an elevation plunger gear 623, a windage adjustment actuator 604, a windage plunger screw 605, a windage adjustment gear 624, and an ocular-lens end 615. The interior construction of RRS 600 is essentially conventional with the presence of an erector tube assembly 606 and an erector tube reaction spring(s) (not shown), and an optical pathway that extends along a longitudinal axis 610, as depicted in FIG. 6C.
  • As depicted in FIGS. 6A-6C, elevation adjustment actuator 602 and windage adjustment actuator 604 respectively comprise gear teeth 621 and 622 on an interior surface of the actuator. Gear teeth 621 and 622 respectively engage with gear teeth on elevation adjustment gear 623 and windage adjustment gear 624 on the respective plunger screws 603 and 605 to provide either elevation or windage adjustment. Plunger screw gears 623 and 624 comprises screw threads on its interior bore (not shown) that engage with the threads of a mating plunger screw. A plunger screw gear is restrained from radial movement (movement perpendicular to the longitudinal axis) by the housing, and the plunger screw is restrained from rotation by the scope body. When an adjustment actuator (elevation adjustment actuator 602 or windage adjustment actuator 604) is rotated the gear teeth on the internal surface of the actuator cause the corresponding plunger gear screw to rotate and the gear threads cause the plunger to either enter or retract from the hole in the scope body 601. The end of the plunger that is within the scope body is touching erector tube 606 and causes movement of the erector tube 606 either vertically for elevation or horizontally for windage as the rear end of the erector tube pivots about its spherical surface 608. All movements of the front end (or back end if the design is reversed) are counteracted by a spring body (leaf or coil spring) (not shown) to maintain contact of the erector tube 606 with the windage or elevation adjustment mechanisms.
  • Parallax adjustment and illuminated-reticle control can be accomplished by the addition of a third and fourth (respectively) ring (not shown) or with knobs in a well-known manner.
  • It is common practice in the firearms optics industry to have index/calibration marks on the elevation and windage adjustments and a fixed index mark on the scope body to give the user a point of reference for rotational adjustment movements. It is also normal practice for the user to “zero” the scope prior to normal use. To “zero” a scope, the user chooses a distance where the bullet point of impact will coincide with the point of aim. This practice is accomplished by shooting the firearm at the chosen distance and measuring the distance of separation of both points. The scope aiming point adjustment mechanisms (windage and/or elevation) are adjusted a specific amount to make both points coincide. The firearm is again fired to verify that the adjustment of the scope aiming point adjustments was adequate to have both points coincide. The physical contact surfaces of the adjustments are then loosened from the internal mechanical assembly to align the “zero” index mark on the rotating adjustment surfaces with the fixed index mark on the scope body. Based on the aligning of the two marks, the scope can be adjusted during use and returned to the “zero” or base setting where the point of aim and point of bullet impact are aligned with one another. Separation of the physical contact surfaces of the rotary adjustment rings from the internal ring (housing the variable depth groove) of the RRS can be accomplished using nested rings (not shown) and set screws or spring-loaded pins in a well-known manner. Datum (bottom stop) positions can also be provided in a well-known manner (not shown) to allow alignment of the “zero” digit of the index scale to the fixed “datum” mark on the RRS.
  • There are times during use when the index marks on the outside of the scope are not readily visible, for example, at night. There are other times when the operator (or shooter or marksman) does not want to lose sight of the target through the scope by looking at the index marks. The subject matter disclosed herein provides an internal adjustable scale that can be aligned with the “cross hair,” “dot,” or another type of reticle to give the “zeroed” position of the reticle without having to check the index marks on the outside of the scope. The subject matter disclosed herein provides an operator an advantage of making or verifying sight changes without dismounting the rifle to look at the external index marks on the rotating knob and fixed index mark. In one exemplary embodiment, separate adjustable optical markers are added to indicate the correct sight settings or direct movement of the erector tube assembly 206 for specific user designated distances. In a second exemplary embodiment the rotational movement of the adjustment rings or the direct movement of the erector tube assembly 206 is indicated by electronic or digital numerals in the field of view within the optical firearms scope.
  • FIG. 7 depicts a reticle view 700 through an optical firearms scope with adjustable optical internal scales/markers to indicate movements of erector tube assembly 206 (FIG. 3) according to the subject matter disclosed herein. An adjustable elevation scale 701 is shown towards the left of the reticle view shown. An adjustable windage scale 702 is shown towards the bottom of the reticle view shown. Scales 701 and 702 include calibration markings that are not clearly shown (due to the relatively small scale of the drawing) in FIG. 7. The center mark 703 represents the aiming point. The elevation setting for a user adjusted sight setting can be read at 704.
  • FIG. 8 depicts a reticle view 800 through an optical firearms scope with electronic/digital markers to indicate erector tube assembly 206 (FIG. 3) movements according to the subject matter disclosed herein. An adjustable numeric marker 801 for elevation position of the internal point of aim is shown towards the left of the reticle view shown. An adjustable numeric marker 802 for lateral movement (windage) of the internal point of aim is shown towards the bottom of the reticle view shown. Markers 801 and 802 can be “zeroed” at any point of adjustment knob rotational position or erector tube assembly elevation of windage position.
  • It should be understood that one exemplary embodiment of the reticle with internal adjustment readings provides variable illumination in a well-known manner. Additionally, it should be understood that the internal adjustment reading reticles depicted in FIGS. 7 and 8 could be used in an optical rifle scope that uses separate knobs for adjusting elevation and windage, or an optical rifle scope that uses a multi-function turret knob, such as that disclosed in PCT/US2009/067215, entitled “Multi-Function Turret Knob,” and invented by Bernard T. Windauer, now U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/133,454. Further still, it should be understood that the particular scales shown as an internal adjustment reading could be different depending on the application. It should also be understood that the internal scales to indicate adjustment settings can be numerically indicated with liquid crystal displays (LCD) or light emitting diodes (LED) or other electronically controlled methods.
  • Although the foregoing disclosed subject matter has been described in some detail for purposes of clarity of understanding, it will be apparent that certain changes and modifications may be practiced that are within the scope of the appended claims. Accordingly, the present embodiments are to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive, and the subject matter disclosed herein is not to be limited to the details given herein, but may be modified within the scope and equivalents of the appended claims.

Claims (20)

1. An optical sighting system, comprising:
an adjustable optical system comprising at least one optical adjustment, the adjustable optical system comprising an optical pathway extending along a longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system; and
an adjustment member coupled to at least one optical adjustment, the adjustment member comprising an axis of rotation about which the adjustment member rotates to actuate at least one optical adjustment, the axis of rotation about which the adjustment member rotates being substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system.
2. The optical sighting system according to claim 1, wherein at least one optical adjustment comprises a vertical optical adjustment or a horizontal optical adjustment.
3. The optical sighting system according to claim 2, wherein the axis of rotation about which the adjustment member rotates substantially coincides with the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system.
4. The optical sighting system according to claim 2, wherein the axis of rotation about which the adjustment member rotates is different from the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system.
5. The optical sighting system according to claim 1, further comprising:
at least one second optical adjustment; and
a second adjustment member coupled to at least one second optical adjustment, the second adjustment member comprising an axis of rotation about which the second adjustment member rotates to actuate at least one second optical adjustment, the axis of rotation about which the second adjustment member rotates being substantially parallel the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system.
6. The optical sighting system according to claim 5, wherein one optical adjustment of at least one optical adjustment and at least one second optical adjustment comprises a vertical optical adjustment or a horizontal optical adjustment.
7. The optical sighting system according to claim 6, wherein the axis of rotation about which the adjustment member rotates substantially coincides with the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system.
8. The optical sighting system according to claim 6, wherein the axis of rotation about which the adjustment member rotates is different from the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system.
9. The optical sighting system according to claim 5, wherein at least one adjustment member comprises a groove comprising a variable depth, the depth at a selected location along the groove corresponding to a selected optical adjustment of the optical adjustment.
10. The optical sighting system according to claim 9, wherein the groove comprises a length, and
wherein the depth of the groove varies linearly along at least a portion of the length of the groove.
11. The optical sighting system according to claim 9, wherein the groove comprises a length, and
wherein the depth of the groove varies nonlinearly along at least a portion of the length of the groove.
12. The optical sighting system according to claim 1, wherein the adjustment member comprises a groove comprising a variable depth, the depth at a selected location along the groove corresponding to a selected optical adjustment of the optical adjustment.
13. The optical sighting system according to claim 12, wherein the groove comprises a length, and
wherein the depth of the groove varies linearly along at least a portion of the length of the groove.
14. The optical sighting system according to claim 12, wherein the groove comprises a length, and
wherein the depth of the groove varies nonlinearly along at least a portion of the length of the groove.
15. The optical sighting system according to claim 12, wherein the groove is located on an internal surface of the adjustment member.
16. The optical sighting system according to claim 12, wherein the groove is located on an external surface of the adjustment member.
17. An optical sighting system, comprising:
an adjustable optical system comprising a first optical adjustment and a second optical adjustment, the adjustable optical system comprising an optical pathway extending along a longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system;
a first adjustment member coupled to the first optical adjustment, the first adjustment member comprising an axis of rotation about which the adjustment member rotates to actuate the first optical adjustment, the axis of rotation about which the first adjustment member rotates being substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system; and
a second adjustment member coupled to the second optical adjustment, the second adjustment member comprising an axis of rotation about which the second adjustment member rotates to actuate the second optical adjustment, the axis of rotation about which the second adjustment member rotates being substantially parallel the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system.
18. The optical sighting system according to claim 17, wherein the at least one of the first and second optical adjustments comprises a vertical optical adjustment or a horizontal optical adjustment.
19. The optical sighting system according to claim 18, wherein the axis of rotation about which at least one adjustment member rotates substantially coincides with the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system.
20. The optical sighting system according to claim 18, wherein the axis of rotation about which at least one adjustment member rotates is different from the longitudinal axis of the optical sighting system.
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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120216653A1 (en) * 2004-11-30 2012-08-30 Windauer Bernard T Locking turret knob
US9068799B1 (en) * 2014-06-02 2015-06-30 John Wu Reticle
US20160169620A1 (en) * 2014-12-15 2016-06-16 The Government of the United States of America, as Represented by the Secretary, Department of Homel Reticle Providing Maximized Danger Space
US20170268850A1 (en) * 2012-01-10 2017-09-21 Hvrt Corp. Apparatus and method for calculating aiming point information
US10254082B2 (en) 2013-01-11 2019-04-09 Hvrt Corp. Apparatus and method for calculating aiming point information

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US4393595A (en) * 1981-07-20 1983-07-19 Leupold & Stevens, Inc. Tube adjustment gasket and rifle scope employing same
US4395096A (en) * 1981-10-13 1983-07-26 Leupold & Stevens, Inc. Variable magnification telescopic sight having reticle centering mount
US5276554A (en) * 1992-09-28 1994-01-04 Nassivera Theodore S Magnification adjustment system for a variable power rifle scope
US20060101700A1 (en) * 2001-10-03 2006-05-18 Long-Shot Products, Ltd. Tilt indicator for firearms
US20060107579A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2006-05-25 Thomas Mark A Zoom scope with continuous main body
US8314994B1 (en) * 2009-07-29 2012-11-20 Yt Products, Llc Scope having a zoom slider

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4393595A (en) * 1981-07-20 1983-07-19 Leupold & Stevens, Inc. Tube adjustment gasket and rifle scope employing same
US4395096A (en) * 1981-10-13 1983-07-26 Leupold & Stevens, Inc. Variable magnification telescopic sight having reticle centering mount
US5276554A (en) * 1992-09-28 1994-01-04 Nassivera Theodore S Magnification adjustment system for a variable power rifle scope
US20060101700A1 (en) * 2001-10-03 2006-05-18 Long-Shot Products, Ltd. Tilt indicator for firearms
US20060107579A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2006-05-25 Thomas Mark A Zoom scope with continuous main body
US8314994B1 (en) * 2009-07-29 2012-11-20 Yt Products, Llc Scope having a zoom slider

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120216653A1 (en) * 2004-11-30 2012-08-30 Windauer Bernard T Locking turret knob
US8516736B2 (en) * 2004-11-30 2013-08-27 Leupold & Stevens, Inc. Locking adjustment knob for a sighting device
US9292034B2 (en) 2004-11-30 2016-03-22 Leupold & Stevens, Inc. Locking adjustment knob
US20160274619A1 (en) * 2004-11-30 2016-09-22 Leupold & Stevens, Inc. Locking adjustment knob
US9665120B2 (en) * 2004-11-30 2017-05-30 Leupold & Stevens, Inc. Locking adjustment knob
US20170268850A1 (en) * 2012-01-10 2017-09-21 Hvrt Corp. Apparatus and method for calculating aiming point information
US10254082B2 (en) 2013-01-11 2019-04-09 Hvrt Corp. Apparatus and method for calculating aiming point information
US9068799B1 (en) * 2014-06-02 2015-06-30 John Wu Reticle
US20160169620A1 (en) * 2014-12-15 2016-06-16 The Government of the United States of America, as Represented by the Secretary, Department of Homel Reticle Providing Maximized Danger Space
US9696115B2 (en) * 2014-12-15 2017-07-04 The United States of America, as Represented by the Secretary of Homeland Security Reticle providing maximized danger space

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