US20120028735A1 - Golf tee - Google Patents

Golf tee Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20120028735A1
US20120028735A1 US12/956,310 US95631010A US2012028735A1 US 20120028735 A1 US20120028735 A1 US 20120028735A1 US 95631010 A US95631010 A US 95631010A US 2012028735 A1 US2012028735 A1 US 2012028735A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
section
elevation
core
core section
golf tee
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/956,310
Inventor
Lon Klein
Original Assignee
Lon Klein
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US36881410P priority Critical
Application filed by Lon Klein filed Critical Lon Klein
Priority to US12/956,310 priority patent/US20120028735A1/en
Publication of US20120028735A1 publication Critical patent/US20120028735A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B57/00Golfing accessories
    • A63B57/10Golf tees
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2209/00Characteristics of used materials
    • A63B2209/18Characteristics of used materials biodegradable
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B57/00Golfing accessories
    • A63B57/10Golf tees
    • A63B57/15Golf tees height-adjustable

Abstract

A two-part golf tee having a core section with a substantially cylindrical tube, the core section having a first end and a second end, wherein the first end is configured to be inserted into a teeing ground. The two-part golf tee also includes an elevation section having a substantially cylindrical tube, the elevation section having a first end and a second end, wherein the first end of the elevation section is coupleable to the second end of the core section via one of a friction fit or a mechanical fit, the second end of the elevation section being configured to hold a golf ball.

Description

    PRIORITY CLAIM/INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE
  • This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/368,814 entitled “Two-Part Golf Tee” that was filed on Jul. 29, 2010 and names Lon Klein as inventor. The entirety of that application is hereby expressly incorporated by reference into this application.
  • BACKGROUND
  • In golf, a tee is normally used for the first stroke of each hole, and the area from which this first stroke is hit is informally also known as the teeing box, also known as the teeing ground. Normally, teeing the ball is allowed only on the first shot of a hole, called the tee shot, and is usually not allowed for any other shot. Teeing gives a considerable advantage for drive shots, so it is highly desirable whenever allowed. A standard golf tee is 2.750″ (two and three quarter inches) long, but both longer and shorter tees are permitted and are preferred by some players.
  • SUMMARY
  • A two-part golf tee having a core section with a substantially cylindrical tube, the core section having a first end and a second end, wherein the first end is configured to be inserted into a teeing ground. The two-part golf tee also includes an elevation section having a substantially cylindrical tube, the elevation section having a first end and a second end, wherein the first end of the elevation section is coupleable to the second end of the core section via one of a friction fit or a mechanical fit, the second end of the elevation section being configured to hold a golf ball.
  • A two-part golf tee having a core component configured to be at least partially inserted into a teeing ground and an elevation component configured to be releasably coupled to the core component and further configured to hold a golf ball.
  • A system having a plurality of core sections, each core section comprising a substantially cylindrical tube, each core section having a first end and a second end, wherein the first end is configured to be inserted into a teeing ground. The system further includes a plurality of elevation sections, each elevation section comprising a substantially cylindrical tube, each elevation section having a first end and a second end, wherein the first end of the elevation section is coupleable to the second end of the core section via a friction fit or mechanical fit, the second end of the elevation section being configured to hold a golf ball, a first number of the elevation sections having a first length and being color-coded or visually marked based on the first length and a second number of the elevation sections having a second length and being color-coded or visually marked based on the second length.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows a first view of an exemplary embodiment of a two-part golf tee with the two parts separated.
  • FIG. 2 shows a top view of an exemplary embodiment of a two-part golf tee with the two parts separated.
  • FIG. 3 shows an exemplary core section tube of a two-part golf tee that is inserted into a teeing ground.
  • FIG. 4 shows an exemplary assembled two-part golf tee that has been inserted into the teeing ground.
  • FIGS. 5 a-d show four different views of the same exemplary two-part golf tee where the elevation section is inserted at various depths into the core section.
  • FIG. 6 shows an exemplary embodiment of an elevation section that slides over the core section to form the tee.
  • FIG. 7 shows an exemplary core section that includes a variety of hash marks that may indicate the depth of insertion into the teeing ground and/or how far the elevation section has been inserted onto the core section.
  • FIG. 8 shows an exemplary elevation section that includes a variety of hash marks that may be used to indicate the depth to which the elevation section is inserted into the core section.
  • FIG. 9 shows a side view of an exemplary elevation section having an edge for holding the golf ball that includes micro interruptions.
  • FIG. 10 shows a cross-sectional side view of an exemplary elevation section that tapers to the edge for holding the golf ball.
  • FIG. 11 shows an example of a core section having a serrated bottom edge.
  • FIG. 12 shows an example of a core section having an irregularly shaped bottom edge.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The exemplary embodiments may be further understood with reference to the following description and appended drawings, wherein like elements are referred to with the same reference numerals. The exemplary embodiments describe a two-part golf tee that may be implemented to hold a golf ball for a tee shot by a player.
  • FIG. 1 shows a first view of an exemplary embodiment of a two-part golf tee 1 with the two parts 10, 20 separated. The two parts are referred to as the core section 10 and the elevation section 20. As can be seen from FIG. 1 and the other figures, the core section 10 and the elevation section 20 of the two-part golf tee 1 have a generally cylindrical shape. Each of the core section 10 and the elevation section 20 may be constructed from paper, cardboard or any other biodegradable material. Where the construction material is vulnerable to water damage such as paper or any other biodegradable material, it may be advantageous to provide the component 10, 20 with at least a temporary water resistant coating or a glossy material to impede water absorption. Other materials are also possible as will be described in greater detail below. In addition, it is possible that the core section 10 is constructed of a first composition while the elevation section 20 is constructed from a second and different composition.
  • FIG. 2 shows a top view of an exemplary embodiment of a two-part golf tee 1 with the two parts 10, 20 separated. As can be seen from FIG. 2, each of the core section 10 and the elevation section 20 have a generally circular cross-section. As will be described in greater detail below, the core section 10 and the elevation section 20 are constructed in such a manner that they may be connected or coupled to form the two-part golf tee. However, it is also noted that each component, the core section 10 or the elevation section 20 may also be used alone without the other component. This singular use may be with or without an insertion device as will be described in greater detail below. While the exemplary embodiments are shown with a circular cross-section, those skilled in the art will understand that other cross-sectional shapes are also possible, so long as those shapes facilitate the coupling of the core section 10 and the elevation section 20. Moreover, it is also possible that the external cross-section is circular, but the internal cross-section is a different shape or vice versa. The purpose of varying the shape of the cross-section may include to increase the rigidity of the core section 10, to facilitate coupling of the core section 10 with the elevation section 20, to help the core section 10 hold fast in the teeing ground, to provide a specific look/feel for the tee, etc.
  • In the exemplary embodiment, the core section 10 is the outer portion of the two-part golf tee 1 when assembled and is the portion that will be inserted into the teeing ground. The core section 10 is rigid enough that it can be pressed down and inserted into the teeing ground by a golfer using his hand, fingers or even his foot. In addition, the ball can be used to apply leverage to press the core section 10 to imbed that component into the teeing ground. The wall thickness of the core section 10 may be used to provide the rigidity for insertion into the teeing ground. An exemplary wall thickness may be from 0.01 inches to 0.3 inches. However, this range is only exemplary and can vary depending on the construction material, the manufacturing procedures and tolerances. However, depending on playing conditions, other wall thicknesses may also be used. For example, in generally wet climates where the teeing ground tends to be softer, it may be possible to have a core section 10 that has a slightly smaller wall thickness because the core section 10 does not need to be as rigid to be inserted into the teeing ground. This also has the advantage of having less material in both construction of the tee 1 and later biodegradation and/or clean up of the tee 1.
  • In another exemplary embodiment, an insertion tool may be used to insert the core section 10 into the teeing ground. This insertion may vary with the playing conditions of the golf course teeing grounds. For example, when the teeing ground is generally soft, the golfer may insert the core section by hand. However, if the teeing ground is hard, an insertion tool may be used to insert the core section 10 into the hard teeing ground (e.g., the insertion tool provides a mechanical advantage to apply more pressure to the core section 10 for inserting into the teeing ground). In another example, the insertion tool may prepare the teeing ground for insertion of the core section 10 (e.g., the insertion tool may pre-drill or make a depression of suitable size to create a space in preparation for placement of the core section 10).
  • In the exemplary embodiment, the length of the core section 10 is 0.5 inches, but other lengths for the core section 10 are also possible. In the exemplary embodiments, the core section 10 is shown as a hollow cylinder. In the exemplary embodiments, the internal diameter of the core section 10 has a range from 0.35 inches is 0.45 inches and the outside diameter of the core section has a range from 0.45 inches to 0.55 inches, but both the internal diameter and external diameter may vary as necessary for certain teeing ground conditions, with different soils or turf grasses. Moreover, the core section 10 may also be filled or partially filled. For example, partially filling the core section 10 with a structure such as a honeycomb or other corrugated structure may provide for additional rigidity of the core section 10. It should be noted that the core section 10 may have at least a portion of the tube being hollow because, as will be described below, that is the portion that will receive the elevation section 20.
  • The core section 10 may be fully or partially inserted into the teeing ground. FIG. 3 shows an exemplary core section 10 of a two-part golf tee 1 that is inserted into a teeing ground 30. As can be seen in this example, a lower portion 14 of the length of the core section 10 will be below ground in an inserted position and an upper portion 12 of the core section 10 will extend above ground in the inserted position. It is noted that the core section 10 may be provided with markings on the external surface so the golfer knows how far the core section 10 has been inserted into the teeing ground. The insertion of the core section 10 into the teeing ground 30 does not permanently damage the turf nor does it disturb the root structure of the grass, thereby preserving the integrity of the teeing ground 30 and allows for quicker regeneration of turf grasses. In addition, the design of the core section 10 provides for perfect perpendicularity to the surface of the teeing ground 30. Specifically, the generally cylindrical shape of the core section 10 will mean that an even amount of pressure is exerted along the circumference of the core section 10 while it is being inserted into the teeing ground, resulting in the core section 10 being inserted to a uniform depth along its entire circumference. Thus, there will be no tilt to the core section 10 when it is inserted allowing for the upper edge of the core section 10 to be perpendicular with the teeing ground 30.
  • As described above, the core section 10 may be constructed from paper, cardboard or any other biodegradable material. In addition, the core section 10 may also be constructed of any rigid material such as metal, composites, polymers, etc. The core section 10 is not required to be a biodegradable material because it will be placed in the teeing ground and may remain in the teeing ground after the ball has been struck. Thus, groundskeepers generally know the core sections 10 will be in the teeing ground and may clean those up from the teeing grounds and/or leave them in the teeing ground, if instructed. The core sections 10, should they remain in the teeing ground, are easily removed by groundskeepers and maintenance personnel such as by mowers as per part of grass cutting procedure. In addition, the core sections 10 may remain in the teeing ground if so desired to play a second shot, or left to aerate the teeing ground. While not shown in the figures, it is possible for the exterior surface of the core section 10 to have serrations, pleats, texturing, ridges and/or other means for enhanced holding of the core section 10 in the teeing ground. In addition, the edges of the core may be serrated, a teeth-like shape or other regular or irregular shape to facilitate preparation and/or penetration of the teeing ground. FIG. 11 shows an example of a core section 10 having a serrated bottom edge 50, while FIG. 12 shows an example of a core section 10 having an irregularly shaped bottom edge 55. Again, many other shapes are possible and these two are only examples. The interior surface of the core section 10 may also be textured to provide control and/or fit characteristics for the elevation section 20. This will be described in greater detail below.
  • FIG. 1 also shows that the two-part golf tee 1 includes an elevation section 20. The elevation section 20 is the inner part when the two-part golf tee 1 is assembled. Similar to the core section 10, the exemplary elevation section 20 has a generally circular cross-section as shown in FIG. 2. However, as described above, the elevation section 20 may take other shapes to mate with the core section 10. Also similar to the core section 10, the elevation section 20 is shown as being hollow in the examples, but may also be filled or partially filled, with a structure such as a honeycomb to provide additional rigidity to the elevation section 20. In the exemplary embodiments, the internal diameter of the elevation section 20 has a range from 0.3 inches is 0.45 inches and the outside diameter of the elevation section 20 has a range from 0.35 inches to 0.5 inches, but both the internal diameter and external diameter may vary.
  • As described above, the core section 10 may be constructed from a variety of materials. Similarly, the elevation section 20 may also be constructed from a variety of materials including paper, composite materials, metal, plastics, etc. Any material that can support the weight of a golf ball is acceptable for use in constructing the elevation section. However, while not required, if the material used to construct the elevation section 20 is biodegradable, it may result in fewer environmental hazards. For example, it is likely that the elevation section 20 will be deflected and/or dislodged with respect to the core section 10 when the golfer strikes the ball. In many instances, the golfer may not retrieve the elevation section 20 and since the elevation section is no longer anchored to the teeing ground, it may have been hit out of the teeing ground or may make its way out of the teeing ground at later time (e. g., wind, golfer's kicking it, etc.). Thus, groundskeepers may not clean up all the elevation sections 20 because they may become scattered away from the teeing ground. In such cases, it would be helpful, but not required, that he elevation sections be biodegradable. In addition, the material should also not pose any threat to the flora or fauna. Moreover, the material of the elevation section 20 should be such that it does not cause any damage to very thin golf club faces nor that it provides no resistance to the club head path or deflect the club face when it is struck. This is both to prevent damage to the club and to provide the golfer with the maximum benefit of the two-part golf tee.
  • The elevation section 20 is the portion of the two-part tee 1 that will hold the ball when the tee 1 is assembled and inserted into the teeing ground. To provide the golfer with the most efficient experience, the elevation section 20 should provide minimal contact with the ball surface and the material of the elevation section 20 should not sit in the dimples of the golf ball when the golf ball is placed on the elevation section 20. Specifically, the golf ball will lie on the surface of the elevation section 20 such that the elevation section 20 contacts the surface of the golf ball at the interface that forms the boundaries of the dimples. In some exemplary embodiments, the edge of the elevation section 20 which is configured to hold the ball may be shaped in such a manner to permit a minimum of surface contact with the ball. For example, the edge may be a micro-interrupted ring or a tapered point. FIG. 9 shows a side view of the elevation section 20 having an edge 22 that includes micro interruptions, while FIG. 10 shows a cross-sectional side view of the elevation section 20 that tapers to the edge 22. It should be noted that the taper could be from the inside wall to the outside wall or vice versa. Again, these are only two of the many possible embodiments for minimizing surface contact with the golf ball. The portion of the edge that contact the ball would be on the ridges that form the dimple interfaces. The micro-interruptions and tapering are only exemplary and other low contact surfaces may also be used. This efficient sitting of the golf ball on the elevation section 20 allows for freer rotation of the ball and a lower coefficient of friction between the ball and the elevation section 20. This results in reduced spin rate for the ball when it is struck off the tee 1 which should increase the distance the ball is hit by the golfer. Moreover, the tee 1 may allow for more accurately applied spin and tighter dispersion patterns, especially with the driver.
  • In order to accomplish this, the wall thickness of the elevation section 20 should generally be kept to a minimum in the area where the ball will sit on the elevation section 20. In one exemplary embodiment, the wall thickness is in the range of 0.01 inches to 0.30 inches. Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the upper edge 22 of the elevation section 20 is shown. This upper edge 22 is the portion of the elevation section 20 that will support the golf ball. Thus, the wall thickness in this upper edge 22 area is what should be kept to a minimum for the reasons described above. The above wall thickness is only exemplary and other wall thicknesses that are smaller or greater may also be used.
  • It should be noted that the wall thickness may be uniform throughout the entire length of the elevation section 20 or that the wall thickness may vary and taper from one end to the other. In the event that the wall thickness tapers, the tapering could be in either direction, e.g., from the end of the elevation section 20 that is for insertion into the core section 10 to the end of the elevation section that is configured to hold the golf ball, or vice versa. In addition, the tapering could be provided such that the inner surface is tapered and the outer surface is uniform or vice versa. The elevation section 20 may be provided with a means such as a visual cue or insertion mechanism so that the golfer inserts the proper end of the elevation section 20 into the core section 10. If the elevation section 20 has a uniform wall thickness throughout, then such insertion cues may not be needed because either end of the elevation section 20 may be inserted into the core section 10.
  • The elevation section 20 may be inserted into the core section 10 after the core section 10 has been inserted into the teeing ground. Thus, to assemble the two-part golf tee 1, a golfer may first insert the core section 10 into the teeing ground as described above, and then insert the elevation section 20 into the core section 10. The elevation section 20 may then hold the golf ball for the golfer to strike.
  • FIG. 4 shows an exemplary assembled two-part golf tee 1 that has been inserted into the teeing ground 30. As described above, the core section 10 is inserted into the teeing ground 30 such that a first portion 14 is below the surface of the teeing ground and a second portion 12 extends above the teeing ground. The elevation section 20 is inserted into the core section 10. A top edge 22 of the elevation section 20 extends above a top edge 16 of the core section 10. The golf ball may rest on the top edge 22 of the elevation section 20 for the golfer to strike.
  • As shown in FIG. 4, the elevation section 20 is inserted into the center opening of the core section 10. Referring to FIG. 2, it is shown that the cross-sectional outer diameter (d1) of the elevation section 20 is less than the cross-sectional inner diameter (d2) of the core section 10 such that the elevation section 20 may be inserted into the core section 10. The inner diameter (d2) of the core section 10 and the outer diameter (d1) of the elevation section 20 are sized such that the insertion of the elevation section 20 into the core section 10 causes a friction fit between the components 10 and 20. In order to provide the friction fit, the outer diameter (d1) of the elevation section 20 is slightly smaller than the inner diameter (d2) of the core section. The friction fit is such that the placing of a golf ball on top of the elevation section 20 will not cause the elevation section 20 to move in relation to the core section 10, unless the golfer pushes or pulls hard enough to intentionally change the relationship. In addition to the friction fit, the elevation tube 20 may also be supported by the turf material of the teeing ground within the confines of the core section 10.
  • In addition, as described above, the internal surface of the core section 10 and the external surface of the elevation section 20 may be textured to provide additional friction for a better fit between the two components. In addition to or as an alternative to textures, these surfaces, either individually or collectively, may include fine ribs, nubs, pleats, ridges, serrations, score lines, etc. to provide for better friction contact between the two components 10, 20 when the two-part golf tee 1 is assembled. In addition to friction fitting, these additional features of the surface may also lock or selectively engage corresponding features on the other surface. For example, if the outer surface of the elevation section 20 includes nubs, the inner surface of the core section 10 may include depressions or ridges to engage the nubs.
  • The friction fit allows the elevation section 20 to be fully or partially inserted into the core section 10. As described above, in one exemplary embodiment, the core section 10 will be partially inserted into the teeing ground. The elevation section 20 may be inserted to a depth anywhere along the length of the core section 10, including for example, to a depth that is below ground level, even with ground level or above ground level. When above ground level, the friction fit holds the elevation section 20 in relation to the core section 10. Those skilled in the art will understand that this allows for an adjustment in the height of the tee. It is also noted that the external surface of the elevation section 20 may also include markings or visual cues to indicate how far the elevation section 20 has been inserted into the core section 10 or to indicate a height of the tee 1.
  • FIGS. 5 a-d show four different views of the same exemplary two-part golf tee 1 where the elevation section 20 is inserted at various depths into the core section 10. That is, each two-part tee 1 of FIGS. 5 a-d is comprised of the exact same core section 10 having the same core section length and elevation section 20 having the same elevation section length. By way of example, the core section 10 may have a core section length of 0.5 inches, while the elevation section 20 may have an elevation section length of 1.875 inches. In FIG. 5 a, the elevation section 20 is shown as being inserted to a depth of approximately the entire length of the core section 10. The portion of the elevation section 20 is shown as dashed lines within the core section 10. This results in an overall length L1 of the two-part tee 1 being approximately 1.875 inches. That is, since the elevation section 20 is fully inserted into the core section 10, the overall length of the coupled tee 1 is approximately the same as the elevation section 20. It should be noted that in the examples provided, the lengths are described in terms of the tee length and not the tee height because the actual height of the tee will depend on the depth at which the core section 10 is inserted into the teeing ground.
  • FIG. 5 b shows the elevation section 20 as being inserted to a depth of approximately three quarters of the core section 10, or approximately 0.375 inches. This results in the overall length L2 of the two-part tee 1 being approximately 2 inches. FIG. 5 c shows the elevation section 20 as being inserted to a depth of approximately one half of the core section 10, or approximately 0.25 inches. This results in the overall length L3 of the two-part tee 1 being approximately 2.125 inches. FIG. 5 d shows the elevation section 20 as being inserted to a depth of approximately one quarter of the core section 10, or approximately 0.125 inches. This results in the overall length L4 of the two-part tee 1 being approximately 2.25 inches. It is noted that in the exemplary embodiment, the elevation section 20 is inserted to a depth of at least 0.125 inches (as shown in FIG. 5 d) to provide enough contact between the elevation section 20 and the core section 10 to support the elevation section 20 and the golf ball. However, depending on the actual materials from which the sections 10 and 20 are constructed and /or the manufacturing tolerances for the sections 10 and 20, it may be possible to provide a stable fit between the elevation section 20 and the core section 10 at insertion depths that are less than 0.125 inches.
  • As can be seen from the above examples, the same core section 10 and elevation section 20 allow a golfer to adjust the two-part tee 1 through a range of heights. As described above the friction fit between the elevation section 20 and the core section 10 allows the elevation section 20 to remain at the desired height and to hold the ball without moving. It should be understood that the lengths for the core section 10 and the elevation section 20 used above are only exemplary. As described above, the core section 10 may be any length and as will be described in more detail below, the elevation section 20 may come in various lengths. In addition, though only four insertion depths were described it should be apparent that the elevation section 20 may be inserted at any depth within the core section 10 above the minimum depth required for a stable fit.
  • As described above with reference to FIG. 5, the friction fit of the elevation section 20 and the core section 10 allows for some adjustment of the height of the two-part golf tee 1. However, individual golfers may prefer dramatically different tee heights when teeing off with different clubs such as woods, fairway metals, hybrids and irons. In addition, different golfers may prefer dramatically different heights of tees when teeing off with the same club depending on course conditions. The amount of adjustment in one of the embodiments may not be enough to accommodate these differences. Thus, there may be many embodiments of the elevation section 20 that can be pre-cut to various lengths.
  • In the example of FIG. 5, the exemplary elevation section 20 was described as having a length of 1.875 inches. Such an embodiment may be preferred by a golfer using a driver to tee off on a long par 4 or par 5 hole. However, when using an iron to tee off, the golfer may prefer a shorter tee that the embodiment of FIG. 5 cannot accommodate. Thus, in other exemplary embodiments, the elevation section 20 may have an elevation section lengths from 0.5 inches to 3.67 inches which, when used in conjunction with the core section 10 results in a variety of tee heights that conform to the rules of golf
  • Again, the above-mentioned lengths for the elevation section 20 are only two examples of the various lengths that may be used for the elevation section 20. It may be possible to have many multiple lengths for the elevation section 20. The elevation sections 20 having different lengths may be color-coded or visually marked to indicate the length of the elevation section 20 for easy selection by a golfer. This color-coding and/or marking of the elevation sections may also aid the golfer in seeing and recovering the elevation section 20 in the grass after the player has teed off. In addition to the color-coding, or in the alternative, the elevation tubes 20 may be marked to indicate a preferred club with which the elevation tube should be used.
  • In one exemplary embodiment, the two-part tees 1 may be provided in a pack that includes various lengths of the elevation sections 20 and a corresponding number of core sections 10. The pack may be, for example, designed for use for a single round of golf. In the exemplary embodiments, the diameter of the core section 10 and the different lengths of the elevation sections 20 may be consistent, such that any of the different elevation sections 20 may be assembled with any core section 10. Thus, the exemplary pack may be supplied with multiple core sections 10 (e.g., a quantity of thirty (30) core sections) and multiple elevation sections 20 (e.g., a quantity of ten (10) elevation sections 20 having a first length, a quantity of ten (10) elevation sections 20 having a second length 20 and a quantity of ten (10) elevation sections 20 having a third length). Thus, any of the different length elevation sections 20 may be used interchangeably with the core sections 10. It is noted that the above quantities and types of core sections 10 and elevation sections 20 in the pack are only exemplary, any combination of quantities and/or types of core sections 10 and elevation sections 20 may be provided in a pack.
  • It should also be reiterated that while the examples have been described as having a core section 10 with a fixed length, it is also possible to provide different core sections 10 having different lengths. These different length core sections 10 may be designed for universal use with any length elevation section 20 or may also be designed for use with a specific length elevation section 20. Where the core section 10 is designed for use with a specific length elevation section 20, the diameters of the core section 10 and corresponding elevation sections may be complementary such that other elevation sections and/or core sections may not be suitable for use with non-complementary core and/or elevation sections. In an alternative embodiment, the complementary core sections 10 and elevation sections 20 may have a specific cross-sectional shape that indicates they are complementary. Examples of cross-sectional shapes that are not substantially circular include, star shapes, hexagonal shapes, or any multiple sided shape.
  • In the above exemplary embodiments, it was described that the outer diameter of the elevation section 20 was smaller than the inner diameter of the core section 10 so that the elevation section 20 is inserted into the core section 10 to provide the friction fit between the sections 10 and 20. However, in an alternative embodiment, it is also possible that the inner diameter of the elevation section 20 is greater than the outer diameter of the core section 10. In such an embodiment, the elevation section 20 would slip over the core section 10 and form a friction fit in that manner. In such an embodiment, at least a portion of the core section 10 may protrude from the teeing ground when it is inserted to receive the elevation section 20. FIG. 6 shows an exemplary embodiment of an elevation section 20 that slides over the core section 10 to form the tee 1. Thus, in this embodiment, the core section 10 is inserted into the teeing ground with at least a portion of the core section 10 extending above the teeing ground. The outer diameter of the core section 10 is slightly larger than the inner diameter of the elevation section 20 such that when the elevation section 20 is inserted over the core section 10, a friction fit is created to hold the elevation section 20 in a desired relationship with the core section 10. Thus, the embodiment of FIG. 6 is similar to the other embodiments described herein, except that the elevation section 20 slips over the core section 10, rather than into the core section 10 as described for the other embodiments.
  • As described above in various sections, either or both of the core section 10 and the elevation section 20 may include markings to provide for visual feedback to the golfer. In a first example, the core section 10 may be provided with markings indicating a depth to which the core section 10 has been inserted into the teeing ground. In a second example, the markings on the core section may indicate how far the elevation section 20 has been inserted onto the core section 10 in the embodiment of FIG. 6. These markings may be any type of visual markings that allow the golfer to determine the above information including such things as hash marks, lines that extend completely around the core section 10, etc. FIG. 7 shows an exemplary core section 10 that includes a variety of hash marks 40 that may indicate the depth of insertion into the teeing ground and/or how far the elevation section 20 has been inserted onto the core section 10. Similarly, the elevation section 20 may also include markings that show the depth to which the elevation section 20 has been inserted into the core section 10. FIG. 8 shows an exemplary elevation section 10 that includes a variety of hash marks 45 that may be used to indicate the depth to which the elevation section 20 is inserted into the core section 10.
  • From the above examples, it should be seen that the two-part golf tee 1 also provides the golfer with the ability to have a consistent and repeatable tee height for every club in the bag. The golfer may insert the core section 10 into the teeing ground to a consistent depth and then insert the elevation section 20 to a consistent depth within the core section 10 for each tee shot. Thus, the two-part tee 1 may provide the golfer with a better golfing experience because of the consistency of the height of the tee throughout the round of golf and throughout all the clubs in the bag.
  • Throughout this description it was described that the core section 10 is inserted into the teeing ground and then the elevation section 20 is inserted into the core section 20. However, this is only exemplary, it is also possible to insert the core section 10 and the elevation section 20 into the teeing ground as a unified tee. Furthermore, the core section 10 and the elevation section 20 may also be manufactured as a single entity. Also, as described above, the core section 10 and/or the elevation section 20 may be independently used as a single piece if so desired and as conditions permit.
  • It is also noted that throughout this description, it was generally described that the coupling of the core section 10 to the elevation section 20 was accomplished via a friction fit. However, there were also described certain mechanical fit features such as nubs, depressions, ridges, special shapes, etc. These mechanical fit features may be employed in addition to or as an alternative to the friction fit features. That is, it is possible to construct the tee 1 without any friction fit between the core section 10 and elevation section 20, but merely rely on mechanical fit features described herein to accomplish the coupling. Other examples of mechanical fit features may include threads that are included on one or both of the core section 10 or elevation section 20 such that the sections may be screwed together. In another example, one of the sections 10, 20 may have ridges, while the other section 10, 20 may have complementary ridges that accept the ridges on the other section such that the sections can either be rotated to attach or pushed/pulled to connect.
  • It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications may be made in the present invention, without departing from the spirit or the scope of the invention. Thus, it is intended that the present invention cover modifications and variations of this invention provided they come within the scope of the appended claimed and their equivalents.

Claims (20)

1. A two-part golf tee, comprising:
a core section comprising a substantially cylindrical tube, the core section having a first end and a second end, wherein the first end is configured to be inserted into a teeing ground; and
an elevation section comprising a substantially cylindrical tube, the elevation section having a first end and a second end, wherein the first end of the elevation section is coupleable to the second end of the core section via one of a friction fit or a mechanical fit, the second end of the elevation section being configured to hold a golf ball.
2. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein the elevation section is one of color-coded or marked based on a length.
3. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein the friction fit allows the elevation section to be coupled to the core section at any point along a length of the core section.
4. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein an interior of one of the core section and the elevation section is one of filled and partially filled.
5. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein a surface of one of the core section and elevation sections includes one of a texture, a rib, a nub, a pleat, a ridge, a serration, and a score line to aid the friction fit between the elevation section and the core section.
6. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein a surface of the core section includes one of a texture, a rib, a nub, a pleat, a ridge, a serration, and a score line to anchor the core section into the teeing ground.
7. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein a wall thickness of the core section is in the range of 0.01 inches to 0.3 inches.
8. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein a wall thickness of the elevation section in an area configured to hold the golf ball is in the range of 0.01 inches to 0.3 inches.
9. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein one of the core section and the elevation section is constructed of one of paper, cardboard, a composite material, a polymer and a metal.
10. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein the core section includes a visual cue indicating a depth to which the core section has been inserted into the ground.
11. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein the second end is configured to hold the golf ball such that the second end contacts the surface at an interface that forms boundaries of the dimples.
12. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein the elevation section includes a visual cue indicating one of a height of the two-part golf tee or a depth of insertion of the elevation section into the core section.
13. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein the core section has an inner diameter and an outer diameter and the elevation section has an inner diameter and an outer diameter and wherein the friction fit is created by one of the inner diameter of the core section being different from the outer diameter of the elevation section or the outer diameter of the core section being different from the inner diameter of the elevation section.
14. The two-part golf tee of claim 1, wherein an edge of the core section that is configured to be inserted into the ground includes means to facilitate preparation or penetration of the teeing ground to receive the core section.
15. A two-part golf tee, comprising:
a core component configured to be at least partially inserted into a teeing ground; and
an elevation component configured to be releasably coupled to the core component and further configured to hold a golf ball.
16. The two-part golf tee of claim 15, wherein the releasable coupling is based on the core component and the elevation component having complementary shapes.
17. The two-part golf tee of claim 15, wherein the releasable coupling is based on a friction fit or a mechanical fit between the core component and the elevation component.
18. The two-part golf tee of claim 15, wherein the releasable coupling allows for different relationships between the core component and the elevation component so the tee can assume different heights.
19. The two-part golf tee of claim 15, wherein one of the core component and the elevation component is constructed of one of paper, cardboard, a composite material, a polymer and a metal.
20. A system, comprising:
a plurality of core sections, each core section comprising a substantially cylindrical tube, each core section having a first end and a second end, wherein the first end is configured to be inserted into a teeing ground; and
a plurality of elevation sections, each elevation section comprising a substantially cylindrical tube, each elevation section having a first end and a second end, wherein the first end of the elevation section is coupleable to the second end of the core section via a friction fit or mechanical fit, the second end of the elevation section being configured to hold a golf ball, a first number of the elevation sections having a first length and being color-coded or visually marked based on the first length and a second number of the elevation sections having a second length and being color-coded or visually marked based on the second length.
US12/956,310 2010-07-29 2010-11-30 Golf tee Abandoned US20120028735A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US36881410P true 2010-07-29 2010-07-29
US12/956,310 US20120028735A1 (en) 2010-07-29 2010-11-30 Golf tee

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/956,310 US20120028735A1 (en) 2010-07-29 2010-11-30 Golf tee

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20120028735A1 true US20120028735A1 (en) 2012-02-02

Family

ID=45527278

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/956,310 Abandoned US20120028735A1 (en) 2010-07-29 2010-11-30 Golf tee

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20120028735A1 (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120214616A1 (en) * 2011-02-18 2012-08-23 Lipstock Elliot A Adjustable lenght golf tee
US20130190107A1 (en) * 2012-01-23 2013-07-25 Lon Klein Golf tee insertion tool
US20130190108A1 (en) * 2012-01-23 2013-07-25 Lon Klein Golf tee
US20140155196A1 (en) * 2012-11-26 2014-06-05 Lon Klein Golf tee insertion tool
US20150051019A1 (en) * 2013-08-15 2015-02-19 Elwha, Llc Active golf tee
US20150051020A1 (en) * 2013-08-15 2015-02-19 Elwha, Llc Active golf tee
US9320951B2 (en) 2013-08-15 2016-04-26 Elwha Llc Active golf tee
USD779005S1 (en) * 2015-03-23 2017-02-14 Scott Foley Ball tee
US9737773B2 (en) 2015-12-16 2017-08-22 Creative Golf Innovations LLC Adjustable golf tee

Citations (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US638920A (en) * 1899-07-01 1899-12-12 George F Grant Golf-tee.
US1803907A (en) * 1929-10-22 1931-05-05 Maurice M Kruse Adjustable golf tee and anchor therefor
US2079387A (en) * 1936-07-06 1937-05-04 Benton G Sickmiller Golf tee
US3697082A (en) * 1969-08-29 1972-10-10 Arnold E Di Laura Golf tee
US4516780A (en) * 1979-12-11 1985-05-14 Tabet Michael J Adjustable golf ball tee
USD306751S (en) * 1987-10-26 1990-03-20 Orton Joseph R Adjustable golf tee
US5085431A (en) * 1989-10-12 1992-02-04 Mcguire Robert M Golf tee and placement tool
JPH05212142A (en) * 1992-02-05 1993-08-24 Wani Mokko:Kk Golf tee
JPH05337226A (en) * 1992-06-08 1993-12-21 M K Rubber Kogyo:Yugen Golf tee
US5728013A (en) * 1996-12-02 1998-03-17 Luther, Sr.; Walter C. Golf practice tee
US5766100A (en) * 1997-08-28 1998-06-16 Dilmore; Clayton D. Golf tee apparatus
US5776014A (en) * 1996-12-27 1998-07-07 Gustine; Floyd L. Adjustable golf ball tee
US6083121A (en) * 1997-06-27 2000-07-04 Hovey; Gordon E. Adjustable golf tee
US6328663B1 (en) * 1999-08-13 2001-12-11 Elliot A. Lipstock Adjustable golf ball tee
US6475107B1 (en) * 1999-05-14 2002-11-05 Darrel R. Sand Golf tee height set apparatus
US6811499B1 (en) * 2003-04-09 2004-11-02 Chih-Ching Hsien Golf tee structure with adjustable height
WO2005037380A1 (en) * 2003-10-22 2005-04-28 Mariette De Vaal Golf tee
US20050215356A1 (en) * 2004-03-26 2005-09-29 Bainbridge Robert G Height adjustable golf tee support apparatus
US20050245330A1 (en) * 2004-04-29 2005-11-03 Gustine Floyd L Resilient adjustable height golf tee
JP2005305058A (en) * 2004-04-16 2005-11-04 Tsuneo Furusawa Scattering preventive tool of golf tee
US20060079350A1 (en) * 2004-10-11 2006-04-13 Lay Lu Adjustable golf tee
US20060105859A1 (en) * 2002-11-13 2006-05-18 Thirkettle John S Golf tee device
US7090594B2 (en) * 2004-02-25 2006-08-15 Tabata Co., Ltd. Attachment for golf tee
US20060217217A1 (en) * 2005-03-28 2006-09-28 Mundziakiewicz Norman E Golf tee recycler
US20070004538A1 (en) * 2003-09-05 2007-01-04 Lim Eng T Golf tee
US20090325726A1 (en) * 2008-06-27 2009-12-31 Humphrey Robert J Adjustable height practice golf tee

Patent Citations (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US638920A (en) * 1899-07-01 1899-12-12 George F Grant Golf-tee.
US1803907A (en) * 1929-10-22 1931-05-05 Maurice M Kruse Adjustable golf tee and anchor therefor
US2079387A (en) * 1936-07-06 1937-05-04 Benton G Sickmiller Golf tee
US3697082A (en) * 1969-08-29 1972-10-10 Arnold E Di Laura Golf tee
US4516780A (en) * 1979-12-11 1985-05-14 Tabet Michael J Adjustable golf ball tee
USD306751S (en) * 1987-10-26 1990-03-20 Orton Joseph R Adjustable golf tee
US5085431A (en) * 1989-10-12 1992-02-04 Mcguire Robert M Golf tee and placement tool
JPH05212142A (en) * 1992-02-05 1993-08-24 Wani Mokko:Kk Golf tee
JPH05337226A (en) * 1992-06-08 1993-12-21 M K Rubber Kogyo:Yugen Golf tee
US5728013A (en) * 1996-12-02 1998-03-17 Luther, Sr.; Walter C. Golf practice tee
US5776014A (en) * 1996-12-27 1998-07-07 Gustine; Floyd L. Adjustable golf ball tee
US6083121A (en) * 1997-06-27 2000-07-04 Hovey; Gordon E. Adjustable golf tee
US5766100A (en) * 1997-08-28 1998-06-16 Dilmore; Clayton D. Golf tee apparatus
US6475107B1 (en) * 1999-05-14 2002-11-05 Darrel R. Sand Golf tee height set apparatus
US6328663B1 (en) * 1999-08-13 2001-12-11 Elliot A. Lipstock Adjustable golf ball tee
US20060105859A1 (en) * 2002-11-13 2006-05-18 Thirkettle John S Golf tee device
US6811499B1 (en) * 2003-04-09 2004-11-02 Chih-Ching Hsien Golf tee structure with adjustable height
US20070004538A1 (en) * 2003-09-05 2007-01-04 Lim Eng T Golf tee
WO2005037380A1 (en) * 2003-10-22 2005-04-28 Mariette De Vaal Golf tee
US7090594B2 (en) * 2004-02-25 2006-08-15 Tabata Co., Ltd. Attachment for golf tee
US20050215356A1 (en) * 2004-03-26 2005-09-29 Bainbridge Robert G Height adjustable golf tee support apparatus
JP2005305058A (en) * 2004-04-16 2005-11-04 Tsuneo Furusawa Scattering preventive tool of golf tee
US20050245330A1 (en) * 2004-04-29 2005-11-03 Gustine Floyd L Resilient adjustable height golf tee
US20060079350A1 (en) * 2004-10-11 2006-04-13 Lay Lu Adjustable golf tee
US20060217217A1 (en) * 2005-03-28 2006-09-28 Mundziakiewicz Norman E Golf tee recycler
US20090325726A1 (en) * 2008-06-27 2009-12-31 Humphrey Robert J Adjustable height practice golf tee

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120214616A1 (en) * 2011-02-18 2012-08-23 Lipstock Elliot A Adjustable lenght golf tee
US20130190107A1 (en) * 2012-01-23 2013-07-25 Lon Klein Golf tee insertion tool
US20130190108A1 (en) * 2012-01-23 2013-07-25 Lon Klein Golf tee
US9174105B2 (en) * 2012-11-26 2015-11-03 Lon Klein Golf tee insertion tool
US20140155196A1 (en) * 2012-11-26 2014-06-05 Lon Klein Golf tee insertion tool
US20150051019A1 (en) * 2013-08-15 2015-02-19 Elwha, Llc Active golf tee
US20150051020A1 (en) * 2013-08-15 2015-02-19 Elwha, Llc Active golf tee
US9248354B2 (en) * 2013-08-15 2016-02-02 Elwha Llc Active golf tee
US9254427B2 (en) * 2013-08-15 2016-02-09 Elwha Llc Active golf tee
US9320951B2 (en) 2013-08-15 2016-04-26 Elwha Llc Active golf tee
USD779005S1 (en) * 2015-03-23 2017-02-14 Scott Foley Ball tee
USD812161S1 (en) * 2015-03-23 2018-03-06 Scott Foley Ball tee
US9737773B2 (en) 2015-12-16 2017-08-22 Creative Golf Innovations LLC Adjustable golf tee

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US20120028735A1 (en) Golf tee
US20050130769A1 (en) Golf tee-accessory assembly
US7086959B2 (en) Golf putter
AU2007205755A1 (en) Golf tee set
KR20070056123A (en) Structure of a golf club head or other ball striking device
US20060199669A1 (en) Golf tee with ball elevating members
US20070298900A1 (en) Multipurpose golf assembly
US5277425A (en) Golf club including turf repair tool
US20050070378A1 (en) Golf Tee Bristle Cap
EP1894607B1 (en) Golf tee set
US8403776B1 (en) Unbreakable golf tee with flexible shaft
CA2459075A1 (en) Golf tee with a height adjustment device
US6595864B2 (en) Putting practice device
JP2002291949A (en) Golf club
US20090280919A1 (en) Golf putting practice device, method for practicing putting using same, and method for advertising using same
US7066844B1 (en) Golf tee
US20160166898A1 (en) Golf tee
US20060100038A1 (en) Tee stopper
WO2013112127A1 (en) Golf tee
US20090253536A1 (en) Height Adjustable Golf Tee
WO2017124122A1 (en) Golf tee
JP5374746B1 (en) Golf tee
WO2004050194A2 (en) Height selectable golf tee
US20100173730A1 (en) Adjustable golf tee
US10870043B2 (en) Golf tee with reduced friction

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION