US20120028560A1 - Fresh Air Recovery System - Google Patents

Fresh Air Recovery System Download PDF

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Publication number
US20120028560A1
US20120028560A1 US13194779 US201113194779A US2012028560A1 US 20120028560 A1 US20120028560 A1 US 20120028560A1 US 13194779 US13194779 US 13194779 US 201113194779 A US201113194779 A US 201113194779A US 2012028560 A1 US2012028560 A1 US 2012028560A1
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Prior art keywords
air
space
enclosed
system
exhaust
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Abandoned
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US13194779
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Zivota Nikolic
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Zivota Nikolic
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F7/00Ventilation, e.g. by means of wall-ducts or systems using window or roof apertures
    • F24F7/007Ventilation, e.g. by means of wall-ducts or systems using window or roof apertures with forced flow
    • F24F7/013Ventilation, e.g. by means of wall-ducts or systems using window or roof apertures with forced flow using wall or window fans, displacing air through the wall or window possibly through a grill or through a shutter or flap
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/0001Control or safety arrangements for ventilation
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/30Control or safety arrangements for purposes related to the operation of the system, e.g. for safety or monitoring
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/70Control systems characterised by their outputs; Constructional details thereof
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/50Control or safety arrangements characterised by user interfaces or communication
    • F24F11/61Control or safety arrangements characterised by user interfaces or communication using timers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F7/00Ventilation, e.g. by means of wall-ducts or systems using window or roof apertures
    • F24F2007/003Ventilation, e.g. by means of wall-ducts or systems using window or roof apertures using vent ports in a wall
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/0001Control or safety arrangements for ventilation
    • F24F2011/0002Control or safety arrangements for ventilation for admittance of outside air
    • F24F2011/0004Control or safety arrangements for ventilation for admittance of outside air to create overpressure in a room
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F2110/00Control inputs relating to air properties
    • F24F2110/20Humidity
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F2110/00Control inputs relating to air properties
    • F24F2110/50Air quality properties
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F2110/00Control inputs relating to air properties
    • F24F2110/50Air quality properties
    • F24F2110/65Concentration of specific substances or contaminants
    • F24F2110/70Carbon dioxide
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING, AIR-HUMIDIFICATION, VENTILATION, USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F2110/00Control inputs relating to air properties
    • F24F2110/50Air quality properties
    • F24F2110/65Concentration of specific substances or contaminants
    • F24F2110/76Oxygen

Abstract

The present invention, accordingly, provides a fresh air recovery system preferably including at least one intake opening in a first wall defining a portion of an enclosed space allowing air on an exterior side of the first wall to pass through the first wall into the enclosed space; and at least one exhaust opening in a second wall defining a portion of the enclosed space allowing air on an interior side of the second wall to pass through the second wall into an ambient environment external to the enclosed space.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/368,866, filed Jul. 29, 2010, which application is hereby incorporated herein by reference, in its entirety.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0002]
    The invention relates generally to the air quality of an enclosed space and, more particularly, to a system for introducing fresh air into an enclosed space, particularly a building or home.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0003]
    Over the past forty years, the construction industry in the United States focused its efforts on improving occupant comfort in a finished building. A key way to increase occupant comfort involved the introduction of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (hereinafter “HVAC”) equipment on a large scale. This equipment allowed occupants to control the interior environment of the building so that the occupant could keep the interior building temperature in a range the occupant considered comfortable.
  • [0004]
    Unfortunately, this HVAC equipment increased energy consumption, which in turn increased the cost to own and operate the building. As a result, the construction industry and the HVAC industry began to research the causes behind the large energy consumption of HVAC equipment. The industries discovered that construction standards at the time allowed for air outside the building to seep into the building and conditioned air inside the building to seep out of the building. This seepage, or air exchange, necessitated that the HVAC equipment operate more frequently to keep the interior building temperature in the desired range. Increased operation meant increased energy consumption and increased costs to the building owner/occupant. To combat this, the construction industry has developed methods and practices during the last forty years to decrease the amount of air exchange, in effect the construction industry has developed methods to better seal buildings and decrease the amount of outside air seeping into the interior space.
  • [0005]
    A second cause for increased energy consumption related to the HVAC equipment itself. When first introduced, HVAC equipment drew air exclusively from the area outside of the building. The HVAC equipment would then cool or heat the air prior to exhausting the treated air into the interior building environment. The HVAC industry discovered that if the HVAC equipment instead drew air from the interior space, it required less energy to heat or cool the air to the desired temperature, thus reducing costs to building owner/occupant. Presently, HVAC equipment draws air almost exclusively from the interior building space, virtually eliminating the amount of non-recycled air introduced into the building's interior.
  • [0006]
    During the time period that buildings became better sealed and HVAC equipment more efficient, the United States has seen a significant increase in the incidence of obesity, diabetes, Alzheimer's, asthma, and birth defects, such as autism, as well as lower energy levels among the populace. This can be traced at least in part to exposure to decreased oxygen levels. In a sealed environment, occupants within the space are breathing air that has already been processed through the occupant's body. Thus, with each breath, the occupant in a sealed environment is reducing the amount of available oxygen. A reduction in available oxygen can lead to a decrease in body functions, causing the body to burn fewer calories and store more fat. Similarly, the reduction in the amount of available oxygen is known to exacerbate the symptoms of those suffering from mental illness and increase the instances of asthma. In addition, a reduction in available oxygen can cause mutations in a child's in utero development leading to conditions like autism.
  • [0007]
    Therefore, it would be desirable for a system to increase the amount of available oxygen in a building environment, thus helping to reduce obesity, diabetes, Alzheimer's, asthma and the risk of potential birth defects, alleviate the symptoms of mental illness, and increase energy levels of occupants of buildings, without reducing the efficiency of an HVAC system.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0008]
    The present invention, accordingly, provides a Fresh Air Recovery System comprising an intake opening in a first wall defining a portion of an enclosed space allowing air on an exterior side of the first wall to pass through the first wall into the enclosed space; and an exhaust opening in a second wall defining a portion of the enclosed space allowing air on an interior side of the second wall to pass through the second wall into an ambient environment.
  • [0009]
    The foregoing has outlined rather broadly the features and technical advantages of the present invention in order that the detailed description of the invention that follows may be better understood. Additional features and advantages of the invention will be described hereinafter which form the subject of the claims of the invention. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the conception and the specific embodiment disclosed may be readily utilized as a basis for modifying or designing other structures for carrying out the same purposes of the present invention. It should also be realized by those skilled in the art that such equivalent constructions do not depart from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0010]
    For a more complete understanding of the present invention, and the advantages thereof, reference is now made to the following descriptions taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • [0011]
    FIG. 1 exemplifies a perspective view of a building embodying features of the fresh air recovery system of the present invention;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 2 illustrates a plan view of the building of FIG. 1;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 3 illustrates an elevation view of the building of FIG. 1; and
  • [0014]
    FIG. 4 exemplifies a perspective view of an alternative building embodying features of the fresh air recovery system of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0015]
    In the following discussion, numerous specific details are set forth to provide a thorough understanding of the present invention. However, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the present invention may be practiced without such specific details. Additionally, for the most part, details concerning basic building construction and materials and the like have been omitted inasmuch as such details are not considered necessary to obtain a complete understanding of the present invention, and are considered to be within the skills of persons of ordinary skill in the relevant art.
  • [0016]
    Referring to FIG. 1, there is shown a fresh air recovery system 10 having an exemplified by a building 100 defining an enclosed space 200. The building 100 comprises at least a first wall 101, a second wall 102, a third wall 103, a fourth wall 104, a floor 105, and a ceiling 106, each defining a portion of the outer boundaries of the building 100. The enclosed space 200 comprises a volume of air that is sealed from a volume of air existing outside of the enclosed space 200. In the embodiment exemplified, air cannot pass between the enclosed space 200 and a space outside of the building 100. As used herein, the term “sealed” implies a negligible (possibly zero) rate of air transfer across the outer boundaries of the building 100 such that an entity placed within the enclosed space 200 that relies upon oxygen respiration to survive will deplete the available amount of oxygen in the air contained within the volume of the enclosed space over time.
  • [0017]
    In accordance with principles of the present invention, the building 100 preferably includes a first opening 301 and a second opening 302 strategically positioned to facilitate maximum air flow through the entire space 200. By way of example, and as exemplified in FIG. 1, the first wall 101 further defines a first opening 301 preferably located proximate to the ceiling 106 and the third wall 103. The second wall 102 further defines a second opening 302 preferably located proximate to the floor 105 and the fourth wall 104. An electronically controlled vent 311, preferably having varying states of being open between completely open and completely closed, fits within the first wall opening 301 such that movement of the vanes of the vent 311 may alternatively allow more or less air to pass through the first wall opening 301 between the area outside the building 100 and the enclosed space 200. Similarly, an exhaust fan 312 fits within the second wall opening 302 such that operation of the exhaust fan 312 alternatively increases and decreases the volume of air passing from the enclosed space 200 to the area outside of the building 100. The fan 312 is preferably configured to be operable at a variable speed. A person of ordinary skill in the art will understand that the locations of the first wall opening 301 and the second wall opening 302 may vary in order to maximize the air flow rate between the enclosed space 200 and the area outside the building 100.
  • [0018]
    In a preferred embodiment, an electronic controller 300 is coupled to the vent 311 via electrical wires 304 and to the exhaust fan 312 via electrical wires 304 for controlling operation of each. The controller 300 is preferably configured for manual operation and/or automated operation utilizing a timer (preferably integrated into the controller), an oxygen sensor, a carbon dioxide sensor, humidity sensor, and/or an air pressure sensor. The oxygen sensor, carbon dioxide sensor, humidity sensor, and/or air pressure sensor are preferably positioned both the interior and exterior of the building 100, preferably proximate to the vent 311 and/or wherever people generally reside or sleep, and are coupled to the controller 300 via wires 308. The sensors positioned on the interior of the building 100 are designated collectively by the reference numeral 320, and the sensors positioned on the exterior of the building 100 are designated collectively by the reference numeral 322. While it is preferred that both interior and exterior sensors be used, the system is operable with only interior sensors, or even no sensors, and as discussed below, is operable manually.
  • [0019]
    In a first preferred embodiment, the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 are manually controlled via the controller 300, necessitating that the operation of each device occur at the initiation of manual action. In a second preferred embodiment, the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 are electronically controlled by the timer coupled to the controller 300 that initiates the operation of the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 at timed intervals throughout a 24-hour period.
  • [0020]
    In a third preferred embodiment, the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 are electronically controlled by the oxygen sensors 320 and 322 coupled to the controller 300 that initiates operation, to the degree necessary, of the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 when the interior oxygen sensor 320 reads less than a preset level of oxygen within the volume of space where the oxygen sensor 320 is placed, and the exterior oxygen sensor 322, if there is one, reads a higher level of oxygen.
  • [0021]
    In a fourth preferred embodiment, the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 are electronically controlled by the carbon dioxide sensors 320 and 322 coupled to the controller 300 that initiates operation, to the degree necessary, of the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 when the interior carbon dioxide sensor 320 reads more than a preset level of carbon dioxide within the volume of space where the carbon dioxide sensor is placed, and the exterior carbon dioxide sensor 322, if there is one, reads a lower level of carbon dioxide.
  • [0022]
    In a fifth preferred embodiment, the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 are electronically controlled by the humidity sensors 320 and 322 coupled to the controller 300 that initiates operation, to the degree necessary, of the exhaust fan 312 and of the vent 311 when the interior humidity sensors sensor 320 reads more than a preset level of humidity within the volume of space where the carbon dioxide sensor is placed, and the exterior humidity sensor 322, if there is one, reads a lower level of humidity.
  • [0023]
    In a sixth preferred embodiment, the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 are electronically controlled by the air pressure sensors 320 and 322 coupled to the controller 300 that initiates opening to the degree necessary of the vent 311 (1) to decrease air pressure when the interior air pressure is high and exterior air pressure is low, or (2) to increase air pressure if interior air pressure is low and exterior air pressure is high. Alternatively, if both interior and exterior air pressure are high, then the exhaust fan 312 may be activated to pass air from the interior to the exterior. If both interior and exterior air pressure are low, then the exhaust fan 312 may be activated in reverse to pass air from the exterior to the interior. The air pressure sensors 320 and 322 may be used in conjunction with other methods described herein to, for example, close a vent 311 before or after powering off a fan 312 as needed to maintain air pressure. A person of ordinary skill in the art will understand that the means for controlling the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 may alternatively use any of the above means in combination with one another such that the overall system operates as described below.
  • [0024]
    When operation is desired, e.g., a manual determination to operate the fresh air recovery system 10 is reached, a preset oxygen level is reached, a preset carbon dioxide level is reached, a preset time occurs, and/or a preset air pressure is reached, as discussed above, the vent 311 is activated so that outside air (i.e., air outside the building 100) may freely flow into the enclosed space 200. In addition, the exhaust fan 312 is operated, preferably synchronously with the vent 311, to draw air within the enclosed space 200 into the area exterior to the building 100. Alternatively, operation of the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 may reverse the air flow, drawing outside air into the enclosed space 200 through the exhaust fan 312 and exhausting air through the vent 311. Operation of the exhaust fan 312 and the vent 311 continues until the air within the enclosed space 200 is sufficiently exchanged with air outside the enclosed space 200, e.g., a manual determination is made to cease operation, a preset oxygen level is reached, a preset carbon dioxide level is reached, and/or a preset time occurs. If the building 100 is equipped with HVAC, then the HVAC is preferably powered off while the vent 311 and fan 312 are operating.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 4 exemplifies an alternative embodiment of the invention in which building 400 comprises multiple rooms, exemplified as two rooms 410 and 412. As shown, the building 400 is preferably provided with one fan 312, but each room 410 and 412 is preferably provided with a respective vent 311 and 411. The vent 311 is preferably provided with an oxygen sensor, a carbon dioxide sensor, humidity sensor, and/or an air pressure sensor, collectively designated with the reference numeral 320 for interior (of room 410) sensors, and collectively designated with the reference numeral 322 for exterior (of room 410) sensors, as described above. Similarly, the vent 411 is preferably provided with an oxygen sensor, a carbon dioxide sensor, humidity sensor, and/or an air pressure sensor, collectively designated with the reference numeral 420 for interior (of room 410) sensors, and collectively designated with the reference numeral 422 for exterior (of room 410) sensors, as described above. The fan 312 and vents 311 and 411 are controlled by the controller 300 manually or automatically from the respective sensors 320, 322 for vent 311, and sensors 420 and 422 for vent 411. Similarly as described above with respect to FIG. 1. A door 414 between the rooms allows for air to flow between the rooms. The door 414 may optionally have a raised lower edge to allow air flow even when the door is closed. In operation, the controller 300 runs the fan 312 while each vent 311 and 411 is sequentially opened and then closed, so that only one vent 311 or 411 is open at a time. In larger buildings, multiple fans 312 may be employed.
  • [0026]
    In further alternative embodiments, additional walls may exist within the enclosed space 200 defined by the outer boundaries of the building 100. In these instances, additional openings may be placed within the interior walls to allow for free passage of air throughout the enclosed space 200. A person of ordinary skill in the art will also understand that the first wall opening 301 and the second wall opening 302 may include filters and other media to inhibit the movement of undesired objects and allergens from passing into the enclosed space 200. In addition, other embodiments may include multiple exhaust fans 312 and/or multiple vents 311 as needed to efficiently exchange air within the enclosed space for air outside the enclosed space. Still further, the fresh air recovery system of the present invention may be integrated into an otherwise conventional system that has ventilation already installed within the building 100. Still further, the one or multiple exhaust fans 312 and one or multiple vents 311 may be electronically coupled via the wires 304 and 306, or other means, such as a wireless connection, low voltage connection, or the like, so that, should other controls fail, operation of the one or multiple exhaust fans 312 is always synchronized with operation of the one or multiple exhaust fans 312, so that relatively constant air pressure within the space 200 is maintained, the air pressure preferably being sensed by an air pressure sensor coupled with the controller 300.
  • [0027]
    It may be appreciated that by implementing the present invention, many advantages over the conventional art is obtained. For example, the amount of available oxygen in a building environment is increased, thus helping to reduce obesity, diabetes, asthma, the risk of potential birth defects, and Alzheimer's, increase occupant energy levels, and alleviate the symptoms of mental illness. Moving a relatively large quantity of air through a building relatively quickly over a short period of time is much more efficient than having air slowly leaking in continuously through, e.g., cracks in window seals.
  • [0028]
    Having thus described the present invention by reference to certain of its preferred embodiments, it is noted that the embodiments disclosed are illustrative rather than limiting in nature and that a wide range of variations, modifications, changes, and substitutions are contemplated in the foregoing disclosure and, in some instances, some features of the present invention may be employed without a corresponding use of the other features. Many such variations and modifications may be considered obvious and desirable by those skilled in the art based upon a review of the foregoing description of preferred embodiments. Accordingly, it is appropriate that the appended claims be construed broadly and in a manner consistent with the scope of the invention.

Claims (34)

  1. 1. A fresh air recovery system comprising:
    at least one intake opening positioned in at least one first wall defining a portion of an enclosed space allowing air on an exterior side of the at least one first wall to pass through the at least one first wall into the enclosed space; and
    at least one exhaust opening in at least one second wall defining a portion of the enclosed space allowing air on an interior side of the at least one second wall to pass through the at least one second wall into an environment external of the enclosed space.
  2. 2. The system of claim 1 wherein the at least one intake opening further comprises at least one vent.
  3. 3. The system of claim 2 further comprising an HVAC system that powers off when the at least one vent is activated.
  4. 4. The system of claim 2 wherein the at least one vent further comprises an electronically controlled vent having varying states of being open between completely open and completely closed.
  5. 5. The system of claim 4 wherein the system further comprises an electronic controller communicatively coupled to the at least one vent and configured to variably open and close the at least one vent.
  6. 6. The system of claim 5 wherein the electronic controller is configured to operate the at least one vent in response to a timer.
  7. 7. The system of claim 5 wherein the electronic controller is configured to operate the at least one vent in response to the oxygen level in the enclosed space.
  8. 8. The system of claim 5 wherein the electronic controller is configured to operate the at least one vent in response to the carbon dioxide level in the enclosed space.
  9. 9. The system of claim 5 wherein the electronic controller is configured to operate the at least one vent in response to at least one of the oxygen level in the enclosed space, the carbon dioxide level in the enclosed space, and a timer
  10. 10. The system of claim 1 wherein the at least one exhaust opening further comprises at least one exhaust fan configured to draw air out of the enclosed space into the environment external of the enclosed space.
  11. 11. The system of claim 10 further comprising an HVAC system that powers off when the at least one exhaust fan is activated.
  12. 12. The system of claim 10 wherein the at least one exhaust fan further comprises at least one electronically controlled exhaust fan having variable speed.
  13. 13. The system of claim 11 wherein the system further comprises at least one electronic controller communicatively coupled to the at least one exhaust fan and configured to variably operate the at least one exhaust fan.
  14. 14. The system of claim 12 wherein the at least one electronic controller is configured to operate the at least one exhaust fan in response to at least one timer.
  15. 15. The system of claim 12 wherein the at least one electronic controller is configured to operate the at least one exhaust fan in response to the oxygen level in the enclosed space.
  16. 16. The system of claim 12 wherein the at least one electronic controller is configured to operate the at least one exhaust fan in response to the carbon dioxide level in the enclosed space.
  17. 17. The system of claim 12 wherein the at least one electronic controller is configured to operate the at least one exhaust fan in response to at least one of the oxygen level in the enclosed space, the carbon dioxide level in the enclosed space, and a timer.
  18. 18. The system of claim 1 wherein the enclosed space comprises one or more interior walls having at least one air flow opening allowing air flow from the at least one intake opening to the at least one exhaust opening.
  19. 19. The system of claim 1 wherein the at least one exhaust opening and the at least one intake opening are coupled to operate synchronously.
  20. 20. The system of claim 1 wherein the at least one exhaust opening and the at least one intake opening are operable to maintain a desired air pressure in said enclosed space.
  21. 21. The system of claim 1 wherein the at least one intake opening is positioned in an upper portion of the at least one first wall, and the at least one exhaust opening is positioned in an lower portion of the at least one second wall.
  22. 22. A fresh air recovery system consisting essentially of:
    at least one intake opening positioned in at least one first wall defining a portion of an enclosed space allowing air on an exterior side of the at least one first wall to pass through the at least one first wall into the enclosed space; and
    at least one exhaust opening in at least one second wall defining a portion of the enclosed space allowing air on an interior side of the at least one second wall to pass through the at least one second wall into an environment external of the enclosed space.
  23. 23. The system of claim 22 wherein the at least one intake opening further comprises at least one vent.
  24. 24. The system of claim 23 further comprising an HVAC system that powers off when the at least one vent is activated.
  25. 25. The system of claim 23 wherein the at least one vent further comprises an electronically controlled vent having varying states of being open between completely open and completely closed.
  26. 26. The system of claim 25 wherein the system further comprises an electronic controller communicatively coupled to the at least one vent and configured to variably open and close the at least one vent.
  27. 27. The system of claim 22 wherein the at least one exhaust opening further comprises at least one exhaust fan configured to draw air out of the enclosed space into the environment external of the enclosed space.
  28. 28. The system of claim 27 further comprising an HVAC system that powers off when the at least one exhaust fan is activated.
  29. 29. The system of claim 27 wherein the at least one exhaust fan further comprises at least one electronically controlled exhaust fan having variable speed.
  30. 30. The system of claim 27 wherein the at least one electronic controller is configured to operate the at least one exhaust fan in response to at least one timer.
  31. 31. The system of claim 27 wherein the at least one electronic controller is configured to operate the at least one exhaust fan in response to a sensor of at least one of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and humidity.
  32. 32. The system of claim 22 wherein the at least one exhaust opening and the at least one intake opening are operable to maintain a desired air pressure in said enclosed space.
  33. 33. The system of claim 22 wherein the at least one intake opening is positioned in an upper portion of the at least one first wall, and the at least one exhaust opening is positioned in an lower portion of the at least one second wall.
  34. 34. A method for recovering fresh air, the method comprising:
    allowing air in an environment on an exterior side of an at least one first wall defining a portion of an enclosed space to pass through at least one intake opening positioned in the at least one first wall into the enclosed space; and
    allowing air on an interior side of an at least one second wall defining a portion of an enclosed space to pass through at least one exhaust opening positioned in the at least one second wall into the environment external of the enclosed space.
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WO2016188723A1 (en) * 2015-05-27 2016-12-01 Xtralis Global Ventilation system
EP3169941A4 (en) * 2014-07-16 2018-03-28 Arch Williams Ventilation and drying system and method of using the same
WO2018063102A1 (en) * 2016-09-27 2018-04-05 Chitipalungsri Somsak Automatic ventilation control system

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