US20110172180A1 - Heat stable hyaluronic acid compositions for dermatological use - Google Patents

Heat stable hyaluronic acid compositions for dermatological use Download PDF

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US20110172180A1
US20110172180A1 US12/714,377 US71437710A US2011172180A1 US 20110172180 A1 US20110172180 A1 US 20110172180A1 US 71437710 A US71437710 A US 71437710A US 2011172180 A1 US2011172180 A1 US 2011172180A1
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formulation
dermal filler
ha
gel
anti
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US12/714,377
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Cecile Gousse
Pierre F. Lebreton
Nicolas PROST
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Allergan Industrie SAS
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Allergan Industrie SAS
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Priority to US12/687,048 priority Critical patent/US20110171286A1/en
Application filed by Allergan Industrie SAS filed Critical Allergan Industrie SAS
Priority to US12/714,377 priority patent/US20110172180A1/en
Assigned to ALLERGAN, INC., ALLERGAN INDUSTRIE, SAS reassignment ALLERGAN, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: GOUSSE, CECILE, LEBRETON, PIERRE F., PROST, NICOLAS
Priority claimed from US12/956,542 external-priority patent/US20110171310A1/en
Priority claimed from US13/005,860 external-priority patent/US20110171311A1/en
Publication of US20110172180A1 publication Critical patent/US20110172180A1/en
Priority claimed from US13/350,518 external-priority patent/US9114188B2/en
Assigned to ALLERGAN INDUSTRIE, S.A.S. reassignment ALLERGAN INDUSTRIE, S.A.S. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ALLERGAN, INC.
Priority claimed from AU2015234293A external-priority patent/AU2015234293B2/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L27/00Materials for grafts or prostheses or for coating grafts or prostheses
    • A61L27/14Macromolecular materials
    • A61L27/20Polysaccharides
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K8/00Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations
    • A61K8/18Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations characterised by the composition
    • A61K8/30Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations characterised by the composition containing organic compounds
    • A61K8/40Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations characterised by the composition containing organic compounds containing nitrogen
    • A61K8/41Amines
    • A61K8/415Aminophenols
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K8/00Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations
    • A61K8/18Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations characterised by the composition
    • A61K8/30Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations characterised by the composition containing organic compounds
    • A61K8/40Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations characterised by the composition containing organic compounds containing nitrogen
    • A61K8/42Amides
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K8/00Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations
    • A61K8/18Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations characterised by the composition
    • A61K8/72Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations characterised by the composition containing organic macromolecular compounds
    • A61K8/73Polysaccharides
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K8/00Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations
    • A61K8/18Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations characterised by the composition
    • A61K8/72Cosmetics or similar toilet preparations characterised by the composition containing organic macromolecular compounds
    • A61K8/73Polysaccharides
    • A61K8/735Mucopolysaccharides, e.g. hyaluronic acid; Derivatives thereof
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L27/00Materials for grafts or prostheses or for coating grafts or prostheses
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L27/00Materials for grafts or prostheses or for coating grafts or prostheses
    • A61L27/50Materials characterised by their function or physical properties, e.g. injectable or lubricating compositions, shape-memory materials, surface modified materials
    • A61L27/54Biologically active materials, e.g. therapeutic substances
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61QSPECIFIC USE OF COSMETICS OR SIMILAR TOILET PREPARATIONS
    • A61Q19/00Preparations for care of the skin
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61QSPECIFIC USE OF COSMETICS OR SIMILAR TOILET PREPARATIONS
    • A61Q19/00Preparations for care of the skin
    • A61Q19/08Anti-ageing preparations
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L2300/00Biologically active materials used in bandages, wound dressings, absorbent pads or medical devices
    • A61L2300/20Biologically active materials used in bandages, wound dressings, absorbent pads or medical devices containing or releasing organic materials
    • A61L2300/204Biologically active materials used in bandages, wound dressings, absorbent pads or medical devices containing or releasing organic materials with nitrogen-containing functional groups, e.g. aminoxides, nitriles, guanidines
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L2300/00Biologically active materials used in bandages, wound dressings, absorbent pads or medical devices
    • A61L2300/20Biologically active materials used in bandages, wound dressings, absorbent pads or medical devices containing or releasing organic materials
    • A61L2300/23Carbohydrates
    • A61L2300/232Monosaccharides, disaccharides, polysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L2300/00Biologically active materials used in bandages, wound dressings, absorbent pads or medical devices
    • A61L2300/40Biologically active materials used in bandages, wound dressings, absorbent pads or medical devices characterised by a specific therapeutic activity or mode of action
    • A61L2300/402Anaestetics, analgesics, e.g. lidocaine

Abstract

The disclosure provides hyaluronic acid (HA) gel formulations and methods for treating the appearance of the skin. The formulations hyaluronic acid and at least one additional ingredient. Methods for treating lines, wrinkles, fibroblast depletions, and scars with the disclosed composition are provided as well.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE
  • This application is a continuation in part of U.S. application Ser. No. 12/687,048, filed Jan. 13, 2010, the entire content of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Skin aging is a progressive phenomenon, occurs over time and can be affected by lifestyle factors, such as alcohol consumption, tobacco and sun exposure. Aging of the facial skin can be characterized by atrophy, slackening, and fattening. Atrophy corresponds to a massive reduction of the thickness of skin tissue. Slackening of the subcutaneous tissues leads to an excess of skin and ptosis and leads to the appearance of drooping cheeks and eye lids. Fattening refers to an increase in excess weight by swelling of the bottom of the face and neck. These changes are typically associated with dryness, loss of elasticity, and rough texture.
  • A variety of compounds can have an effect on the skin such as wrinkle reduction, antioxidant, haemostatic, vasoconstriction, anti-itching, anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant effects. For example, various vitamins as well and hyaluronic acid (HA) are known to have an effect on skin. Vitamin C is the L-enantiomer of ascorbate and has a well-described role in collagen development. Vitamin C is involved in the hydroxylation of collagen, which allows it to assume its triple-helix structure. Vitamin C is also known for its antioxidant effects and is well tolerated. HA is a natural polysaccharide. It is a polymer of disaccharides that are themselves composed of D-glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine, linked to one another by alternating beta-1,4 and beta-1,3 glycosidic linkages. The polymers of this recurring unit may be from 102 and 104 kilo Daltons (kDa) in size, in vivo. Hyaluronic acid represents a natural constituent of the dermis, where it plays an important role in the hydration and elasticity of skin. There is a strong correlation between the water content in the skin and levels of HA in the dermal tissue. As skin ages, the amount and quality of HA in the skin is reduced. These changes lead to drying and wrinkling of the skin.
  • The use of HA in cosmetic and dermatological applications is known. HA is tolerated well and there is no immunogenicity associated with its use. The low incidence of side effects has lead to the use of HA for the treatment of wrinkles, fine lines, and scars. HA is subject to degradation through different pathways (e.g. enzymatic, temperature, free radicals), and therefore, its longevity in vivo is limited.
  • Disclosures of HA, vitamin C, and C-glycosides include U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/393,884; U.S. Pat. No. 6,921,819 (a process for cross-linking solid hyaluronic acid (HA) by reacting it with a polyfunctional linker during hydration of the HA); U.S. Pat. No. 6,685,963 (acrylic particles of HA); U.S. publication 200610194758 (a method for making a hydrogel by cross linking high and low molecular weight sodium HAs); U.S. publication 2009/0036403 (cross-linking HA with a tetra functional PEG epoxide to provide “tunably” cross-linked HA); U.S. publication 2009/0143331 (a HA dermal filler with a degradation inhibitor, such as chondroitin sulphate, in order to provide a longer lasting filler); U.S. publication 2009/0143348 (HA combined with a steroid); and U.S. publication 2009/0155314 (HA combined with a botulinum toxin). Additionally, U.S. publications 2009/0148527, 2009/0093755, and 2009/0022808 disclose HA in microspheres, cross-linked with collagen, and coated with a protein, respectively. Further disclosures of HA include: WO 2009/034559 (a process for aesthetic and/or reparative treatment of the skin with compositions that contain at least one C-glycoside derivative); WO 2009/024719 (cosmetic and pharmaceutical compositions that contain HA and a C-glycoside derivative useful for filling recesses/depressions in the skin, restore volume of the body or the face, and to reduce the sign of aging); WO 2007/128923 (a method for preparing a biocompatible gel with controlled release of one or more active lipophilic and/or amphiphilic ingredients); U.S. publication 2009/0018102 (compositions containing HA and at least one retinoid or salt/derivative thereof in combination with an oligosaccharide and a HA degradation inhibitor, to treat wrinkles, lines fibroblast depletions and scars); U.S. Pat. No. 3,763,009 (a process for improving the oxidation resistance of ascorbic acid by subjecting a mixture of ascorbic acid, maltose and/or oligosaccharides to an enzyme derived from genera Aspergillus, Penicillium or others to enzymatically convert the mixture into ascorbic acid glucoside); U.S. Pat. No. 5,616,611 (a α-Glycosyl-L-ascorbic acid that exhibits no direct reducing activity, is stable, and is useful as a stabilizer, quality-improving agent, antioxidant, physiologically active agent, a UV-absorbant in pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries); U.S. Pat. No. 5,843,907 (the production and use of a crystalline 2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid suitable for vitamin C enriching agents, food stuffs, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics); and EP 0539196 (an industrial scale preparation of high purity 2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid) and US publication 2002/0151711. Commercial products incorporating HA and/or vitamin C agents include: MESOGLOW® products, REVITACARE®, and NCTF® 135/135HA Mesotherapy products. Each of the above-cited references and printed publications are individually incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.
  • SUMMARY
  • Our invention includes a stable dermal filler formulation comprising a hyaluronic acid (HA) and at least one additional ingredient selected from the group consisting of a wrinkle reduction, antioxidant, haemostatic, vasoconstriction, anti-itching, anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant ingredient. Stability of the dermal filler formulation can be determined by subjecting the dermal filler formulation to a heat treatment selected from the group consisting of (a) steam sterilization (equivalently “autoclaving”) and (b) about 32 days at about 45° C., with substantial retention after the heat treatment of one or more of the dermal filler characteristics of being clear, homogenous, and cohesive, and without substantial degradation of the dermal filler formulation after the heat treatment. Preferably the steam sterilization is carried out at a temperature of at least about 120° C., as we have found that a high temperature steam sterilization reduces the sterilization time required while still providing all sterility requirements, without degradation of the dermal filler formulation occurring when the additional ingredients set forth herein are present in the formulation. More preferably, the steam sterilization is carried out at a temperature between about 130° C. and 135° C., because we found that such a particular high temperature steam sterilization not only further reduces the sterilization time required while still providing all sterility requirements but as well can be carried out with little or no degradation of the dermal filler formulation occurring. Preferably, the steam sterilization is carried out for between about one minute and about 10 minutes and more preferably for between about 1 minute and about 5 minutes.
  • Our invention also includes a steam sterilization stable dermal filler formulation comprising a hyaluronic acid (HA) and at least one additional ingredient selected from the group consisting of wrinkle reduction, antioxidant, haemostatic, vasoconstriction, anti-itching, anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant ingredients, wherein the formulation is substantially clear (i.e. little or no modification of the pre-heat [i.e. steam] treatment dermal filler formulation color occurs as compared to the color of the post heat treatment dermal filler formulation), homogenous, cohesive stable and not substantially degraded after steam sterilization. Degradation can be shown after steam sterilization by, for example, discoloration of the steam sterilized dermal filler formation and/or by a decrease in the homogeneity of the formulation or in other formulation rheological properties. Substantially clear means that on visual inspection the dermal filler formulation both before and after steam sterilization is not opaque. Substantially homogenous means the dermal filler formulation both before and after steam sterilization has the same consistency (eg well mixed throughout). Substantially monophasic means the dermal filler formulation both before and after steam sterilization comprises only one phase, meaning it is a gel with no particles. Substantially cohesive means the ability of the dermal filler formulation both before and after steam sterilization to retain its shape and resist deformation. Cohesiveness is affected by, among other factors, the molecular weight ratio of the initial free HA, the degree of crosslinking, the amount of residual free HA following crosslinking, and the ph of the dermal filler formulation. Moreover, a cohesive dermal filler formulation resists phase separation when tested according to the method disclosed by Example 1A herein.
  • Our dermal filler formulations are stable after steam sterilization (i.e. at a temperature between about 120° C. to 135° C. or greater). Additionally our dermal filler formulations have long term storage or shelf life stability as shown for example by maintenance of stability of the dermal filler formulations in an environment at about 45° C. for about 32 days (accelerated heat testing), which can be considered to show that stability will be maintained for about 1 to 3 years at room temperature; stability can be determined by substantial retention at room temperature of one or more of the dermal filler characteristics of being clear, homogenous, and cohesive, and without substantial degradation of the dermal filler formulation. Stability of our dermal filler formulations can be determined over a period of or about 25 days to about 35 days at a temperature of about 35° to 50 C. Preferably, as set forth above, the accelerated heat stability testing is carried out for about 32 days at about 45° C. Substantially stable after the accelerated heat (stability) testing carried out as set forth above, or substantially stable after autoclaving or after steam sterilization of the dermal filler formulation, means the dermal filler formulation retains (as being resistant to degradation) at least 80% and preferably at least 90% and most preferably at least about 95% of at least one of its measured characteristics of transparency, pH, extrusion force, rheological characteristics, hyaluronic acid (HA) concentration, sterility, osmolarity, and same additional ingredient concentration. In our dermal filler formulation the HA is preferably cross-linked and the HA can be present in an amount of about 1 to about 40 mg/mL.
  • An additional ingredient in our dermal filler formulation can be a vitamin B, C or E and the additional ingredient can be present in an amount of about 0.001% to about 10% w/w, and preferably be present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 3% w/w. Important, the additional ingredient can provide the dermal filler formulation with improved rheological properties resulting in less extrusion force required for administration compared to an HA gel formulation without the additional constituent.
  • Our invention also includes a method for treating a dermal condition such as fine lines, wrinkles, fibroblast depletions, and/or scars of a patient by administering to the patient an effective amount of a steam sterilization stable dermal filler formulation comprising a hyaluronic acid (HA) and at least one additional ingredient selected from the group consisting of wrinkle reduction, antioxidant, haemostatic, vasoconstriction, anti-itching, anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant ingredients, wherein the formulation is clear, homogenous, cohesive, stable and not degraded after steam sterilization and wherein the appearance of the fine lines, wrinkles, fibroblast depletions, or scars is diminished. The administration can be by sub dermal, intra-dermal or subcutaneous injected (i.e. local injection administration) into a facial skin of the subject.
  • Our invention also includes a steam sterilization stable dermal filler formulation comprising a hyaluronic acid and at least one additional ingredient selected from the group consisting of AA2G and dexpanthenol, wherein the stability of the dermal filler formulation is significantly increased by the additional ingredient—as shown by the dermal filler formulation having a Δ Tan δ 1 Hz<−0.05.
  • DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a representation of the structure of an ascorbyl-2-glucoside, also known as AA2G™ (Hayashibara Co., Japan).
  • FIG. 2 is a graph showing the synthesis of pro-collagen (% control) for control, gel+lidocaine 0.3%, AA2G™ 0.6% in phosphate buffer, and gel+AA2G™ 0.6%+lidocaine 0.3%.
  • FIG. 3 is a graph showing the extrusion force over time (3 yr equivalent at 25° C.) in compositions: control, AA2G™ plus lidocaine, and AA2G™ plus lidocaine and TPGS.
  • FIG. 4 is a graph showing the pH over time (3 yr equivalent at 25° C.) in compositions: control, AA2G™ plus lidocaine, and AA2G™ plus lidocaine and TPGS.
  • FIG. 5 is a graph of tan delta 1 Hz over time (3 yr equivalent at 25° C.) in compositions: control, AA2G™ plus lidocaine, and AA2G™ plus lidocaine and TPGS.
  • FIG. 6 is an HPLC analysis (C18 column, eluent: sodium phosphate buffer (pH=2.2)/2-propanol 10%, 0.7 ml/min; detection at 260 nm) of AA2G™, lidocaine, and IPA (coeluent) after autoclaving (3 yr equivalent at 25° C.).
  • FIG. 7 is a graph comparing antioxidant properties in compositions: control versus JUVEDERM® Ultra with lidocaine AA2G™, and JUVEDERM® Ultra with lidocaine.
  • DESCRIPTION
  • Our invention is based on the discovery that a steam sterilization stable HA based dermal filler can be prepared with an additional ingredient (that is besides the HA present in the formation) which is a wrinkle reduction, antioxidant, haemostatic, vasoconstriction, anti-itching, anti-inflammatory and/or anti-irritant ingredient. An HA dermal filler within the scope of our invention (“the dermal filler formulation”) is (autoclaving) steam sterilization stable and as demonstrated stability after about 32 days at about 45° C. The formulation does not exhibit any degradation as shown by the pre and post autoclaved formulations both being clear, homogenous, and cohesive. The dermal filler formulation can also exhibit greater stability than an HA gel formulation without the additional constituent. Without wishing to be bound by theory it may be that the matrix of the cross-linked HA used in our formulation sequesters, renders non-reactive and thereby prevents the additional ingredient (as set forth for example in Examples 4-6, 10-11, 13, 15-16, 20, 24, and 25-29, supra) from degrading and causes degradation of the dermal filler formulation during steam sterilization. Additionally, the additional ingredient can be hydrophilic and provides protection to the HA from degradation during steam sterilization and/or after administration of the dermal filler formulation to a patient. Without wishing to be bound by theory, the incorporation of an additional ingredient in the dermal filler formulation may inhibit free-radical scavenging at the injection/implant site, thereby prolonging dermal filler duration after patient administration. After steam sterilization the additional ingredient can upon administration (as by subdermal injection) be released from the dermal filler formulation for cosmetic or therapeutic effect.
  • Autoclave stable or steam sterilization stable as used herein means a dermal filler formulation that is resistant to degradation such that the formulation retains at least one, and preferably all, of the following aspects after steam sterilization: transparent or clear appearance pH, extrusion force and/or rheological characteristics, hyaluronic acid (HA) concentration, osmolarity, and same additional ingredient concentration.
  • High molecular weight HA as used herein describes a HA material having a molecular weight of at least about 1.0 million Daltons (mw≧106 Da or 1 MDa) to about 4.0 MDa. For example, the high molecular weight HA in the present compositions may have a molecular weight of about 2.0 MDa. In another example, the high molecular weight HA may have a molecular weight of about 2.8 MDa.
  • Low molecular weight HA as used herein describes a HA material having a molecular weight of less than about 1.0 MDa. Low molecular weight HA can have a molecular weight of between about 200,000 Da (0.2 MDa) to less than about 1.0 MDa, for example, between about 300,000 Da (0.3 M Da) to about 750,000 Da. (0.75 MDa).
  • Degree of crosslinking as used herein refers to the intermolecular junctions joining the individual HA polymer molecules, or monomer chains, into a permanent structure, or as disclosed herein the soft tissue filler composition. Moreover, degree of crosslinking for purposes of the present disclosure is further defined as the percent weight ratio of the crosslinking agent to HA-monomeric units within the crosslinked portion of the HA based composition. It is measured by the weight ratio of HA monomers to crosslinker (HA monomers:crosslinker).
  • Free HA as used herein refers to individual HA polymer molecules that are not crosslinked to, or very lightly crosslinked to (very low degree of crosslinking) the highly crosslinked (higher degree of crosslinking) macromolecular structure making up the soft tissue filler composition. Free HA generally remains water soluble. Free HA can alternatively be defined as the “uncrosslinked,” or lightly crosslinked component of the macromolecular structure making up the soft tissue filler composition disclosed herein.
  • The presence of an additional ingredient in the dermal filler formulation can provide a stability and longevity that is not exhibited in a dermal filler formulation containing HA without the additional ingredient. The disclosed formulations after steam sterilization are homogenous, uncolored, clear, cohesive gel. Our invention includes methods for treating dermatological conditions, such as fine lines, wrinkles, fibroblast depletions, and/or scars afflicting a subject by administering to a patient an effective amount of a the dermal filler formulation. The patient can be any mammal, preferably a human of any age, gender or race. Although typically a subject experiencing the signs of aging skin is an adult, subjects experiencing premature aging or other skin conditions suitable for treatment (for example, a scar) with the HA gel formulation can be treated as well.
  • Our dermal filler formulation comprise HA which is preferably at least partly cross-linked and can contain some not cross-linked HA. Although any pharmaceutically or cosmetically acceptable HA can be used in the disclosed compositions and formulations, in certain embodiments, the preferred HA utilized includes those sold as JUVEDERM®, JUVEDERM® 30, JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus, JUVEDERM® Ultra injectable gel (Allergan Inc, Irvine, Calif.). In certain embodiments, the formulation comprises a HA gel matrix and an additional constituent. HA is a known hydrogel. The gel can be injectable, bioresorbable, monophasic, or biphasic. In some embodiments, the additional constituent can be directly incorporated into the HA gel. In other embodiments, in order to increase affinity with the medium or increase stability, modification of the molecule by derivatization or encapsulation of the constituent can be performed, as described above. For instance, certain oily molecules cannot be introduced directly into a hydrophilic matrix, and lead to a heterogeneous product. Derivatization of the molecule by grafting hydrophilic moieties is required to increase homogeneity of the gel. In some embodiments, the gel composition can include a biocompatible or biodegradable vessel.
  • The HA gel can be made by any known, suitable methods. Cross-linked HA gels typically have high viscosity and require considerable force to extrude through a fine needle. Uncross-linked HA is often used as a lubricant to facilitate the extrusion process. However, especially in HA dermal fillers and implants, uncross-linked HA does not contribute to the persistence of the final product in vivo. The formulations exhibit increased stability compared to formulations containing HA without the additional constituent. Stability is determined by assessing the homogeneity, color, and clarity, pH, and rheological properties of the gel formulation. The formulations disclosed herein are considered stable if they remain homogenous, colorless, and/or clear, and exhibit stable pH and rheology. The disclosed formulations remain stable for at least about 6 months, at least about 1 year, at least about 2 years or at least about 3 years.
  • A cross-linking agent can be used to cross-link the HA according to the present disclosure. The cross-linking agent may be any agent known to be suitable for cross-linking HA and its derivatives via hydroxyl groups. Suitable cross-linking agents include but are not limited to, 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether, 1,4-bis(2,3-epoxypropoxy)butane, and/or 1,4-bisglycidyloxybutane (commonly known as BDDE), 1,2-bis(2,3-epoxypropoxy)ethylene, and 1-(2,3-epoxypropyl)-2,3-epoxycyclohexane. The use of more than one cross-linking agent or a different cross-linking agent is included from the scope of the present disclosure.
  • Dermal fillers can be used to treat moderate to severe facial wrinkles and folds such as nasolabial folds (those lines that extend from the nose to the corners of the mouth). In one embodiment, a dermal filler can be a gel implant formulation that includes HA and an additional constituent. The formulations disclosed herein can further include additional cosmetic agents that supplement and improve the appearance of skin. The cosmetic active ingredients may include, but are not limited to, antioxidants, vitamins, tension agents, and moisturizers.
  • The formulations disclosed herein can be injected with a syringe into the mid to deep dermis of the face. The dermis is the subsurface skin layer that contains connective tissue, nerve endings, and blood vessels. The formulations, when administered as dermal fillers can improve skin appearance by lifting and adding volume to the wrinkles and folds in the treatment area. Further, in certain embodiments, improvement can be seen due to increased collagen production that results from administration of the formulation.
  • As used herein, “cosmetic” is an adjective referring to improving the appearance of a surface or covering defects. Typically, cosmetic compositions can be used to improve aesthetic rather than functional aspects of a surface. Most commonly, cosmetic compositions are formulated for application as a health and beauty treatment or for affecting personal appearance of the body, for example, keratinous surfaces such as skin, hair, nails, and the like.
  • As used herein, “formulation” and “composition” may be used interchangeably and refer to a combination of elements that is presented together for a given purpose. Such terms are well known to those of ordinary skill in the art.
  • Examples of additional ingredients (agents) which can be included in the present dermal filler formulations are anti-itch, anti-cellulite, anti-scarring, and anti-inflammatory agents, anesthetics, anti-irritants, vasoconstrictors, vasodilators, as well as agents to prevent/stop bleeding, and improve/remove pigmentation, moisturizers, desquamating agents, tensioning agents, anti-acne agents. Anti-itch agents can include methyl sulphonyl methane, sodium bicarbonate, calamine, allantoin, kaolin, peppermint, tea tree oil, camphor, menthol, hydrocortisone and combinations thereof. Anti-cellulite agents can include forskolin, xanthine compounds such as, but not limited to, caffeine, theophylline, theobromine, and aminophylline, and combinations thereof. Anesthetic agents can include lidocaine, benzocaine, butamben, dibucaine, oxybuprocaine, pramoxine, proparacaine, proxymetacaine, tetracaine, and combinations thereof. Anti-scarring agents can include IFN-.gamma., fluorouracil, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), methylated polyethylene glycol, polylactic acid, polyethylene glycol and combinations thereof. Anti-inflammatory agents can include dexamethasone, prednisolone, corticosterone, budesonide, estrogen, sulfasalazine, mesalamine, cetirizine, diphenhydramine, antipyrine, methyl salicylate, loratadine, and derivatives and combinations thereof. Additionally, active agents such as epinephrine, thymidine, cytidine, uridine, antiypyrin, aminocaproic acid, tranexamic acid, eucalyptol, allantoin, glycerin, and sodium selenite, can be included. The disclosed dermal filler formulations can further comprise degradation inhibitors. Degradation inhibitors, include but are not limited to, glycosaminoglycans (e.g., heparin, heparin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chrondroitin sulfate, o-sulfated HA, Inamarin, glucosamine, and amygdalin), antioxidants (e.g. ascorbic acid, melatonin, vitamin C, vitamin E, sodium selenite, glutathion, retinoic acid, coenzyme, beta-carotene, allopurinol, mannitol, caffeic acid, caffeine, polyphenol, theobromine, catechin), proteins (e.g., serum hyaluronidase inhibitor), and fatty acids (e.g. saturated C10 to C22 fatty acids), vitamin B and complex, and combinations thereof as noted, in certain embodiments, the additional ingredient can be an antioxidant. In certain embodiments, the antioxidant comprises a vitamin C such as ascorbyl-2-glucoside (available as AA2G™. Hayashibara Co., Japan) (FIG. 1), and/or a vitamin E such as d-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS). Anti-irritants can include thymol, bisabolol. Healing agents can include allantoin, eucalyptol, chitosane, cytidine, thimidine, uridine, lanoline. Anti-bleeding: epinephrine, norepinephrine, phenylephrine, synephrine, naphazoline, aminocaproic acid, tranexamic acid, ethamsylate, vitamin K. Collagen promoters can include retinol, peptide sequences. Additionally, active ingredients (agents) such as epinephrine, thymidine, cytidine, uridine, antiypyrine, aminocaproic acid, eucalyptol, sodium selenite, can be included.
  • In some embodiments, the HA is present at a concentration of about 1 to about 40 mg/mL, or about 10 to about 40 mg/mL, or about 20 to about 30 mg/mL. In certain embodiments, the HA is present in a concentration of about 20 to about 25 mg/mL. In certain embodiments, the HA is present at a concentration of 24 mg/mL. The additional constituent can be present in an amount of about 0.001 to about 10% w/w, or from about 0.001 to about 5% w/w, or from 0.3 to about 3% w/w.
  • In certain embodiments, the disclosure provides a dermal filler comprising (a) about 90 wt %, or about 95 wt %, or about 100 wt % of a high molecular weight (about 1 million to about 3 million Daltons) HA; and (b) 0 wt %, or about 5 wt %, or about 10 wt % of a low molecular weight (less than 1 million Daltons) HA. In certain embodiments, the HA is present in the dermal filler at a concentration of about 10 to about 24 mg HA/mL dermal filler and the HA is about 4% to about 11% cross-linked. In certain embodiments, the cross linker is 4-butane diol diglycidyl ether (BDDE). The dermal filler can further comprise about 0.1 wt % or 0.6 wt %, or 1.0 wt % of an ascorbyl-2-glucoside, such as AA2G™ (Hayashibara, Japan). In a preferred embodiment, 0.6 wt % AA2G™ (i.e., 6 mg AA2G™/g HA) is utilized and renders a concentration of 2.1012 mM AA2G™
  • Topical formulations of AA2G™ are known. However, there are no subdermally administered formulations of AA2G™ available, which is likely due to the fact that a topical AA2G™ is not thought to lend itself to an injectable formulation. The disclosure provides the first injectable formulation of AA2G™ that is efficacious, compatible, and stable over time.
  • The disclosed compositions are also well suited for mesotherapy. Mesotherapy is a non-surgical cosmetic treatment technique involving intra-epidermal, intra-dermal, and/or subcutaneous injection of an agent (micronutrients, vitamins, mineral salts, etc). The compositions are administered in the form of small multiple droplets into the epidermis, dermo-epidermal junction, and/or the dermis.
  • The formulations of the disclosure can be injected utilizing needles with a diameter of about 0.26 to about 0.4 mm and a length ranging from about 4 to about 14 mm. Alternately, the needles can be 21 to 32 G and have a length of about 4 mm to about 70 mm. Preferably, the needle is a single-use needle. The needle can be combined with a syringe, catheter, and/or a pistol (for example, a hydropneumatic-compression pistol).
  • The formulations can be administered once or over several sessions with the subject spaced apart by a few days, or weeks. For instance, the subject can be administered a formulation every 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, days or every 1, 2, 3, or 4, weeks. The administration can be on a monthly or bi-monthly basis. Further, the formulation can be administered every 3, 6, 9, or 12 months.
  • Our dermal filler formulation can optionally include one or more agents such as, without limitation, emulsifying agents, wetting agents, sweetening or flavoring agents, tonicity adjusters, preservatives, buffers antioxidants and flavonoids. Tonicity adjustors useful in a pharmaceutical composition of the present disclosure include, but are not limited to, salts such as sodium acetate, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, mannitol or glycerin and other pharmaceutically acceptable tonicity adjusters. Preservatives useful in the dermal filler formulation described herein include, without limitation, benzalkonium chloride, chlorobutanol, thimerosal, phenyl mercuric acetate, and phenyl mercuric nitrate. Various buffers and means for adjusting pH can be used to prepare the dermal filler formulation, including but not limited to, acetate buffers, citrate buffers, phosphate buffers and borate buffers. Similarly, antioxidants useful in the dermal filler formulation include for example, sodium metabisulfite, sodium thiosulfate, acetylcysteine, butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene. Flavonoids are compounds found in plants that are well known to have diverse beneficial biochemical and antioxidant effects. Subcategories of flavonoids include: flavones, flavonols, flavanonse and flavanonols. Examples of flavonoids include: luteolin, apigenin, tangeritin, quercetin, kaempferol, myricetin, fisetin, isorhamnetin, pachypodol, rhamnazin, hesperetin, naringenin, eriodictyol, homoeriodictyol, taxifolin, dihydroquercetin, dihydrokaempferol, tannic acid, tannis, condensed tannis, and hydrolysable tannis. It is understood that these and other substances known in the art can be included in the dermal filler formulations disclosed herein. The pH of the disclosed dermal filler formulations can be about 5.0 to about 8.0, or about 6.5 to about 7.5. In certain embodiments, the pH of the formulation is about 7.0 to about 7.4 or about 7.1 to about 7.3.
  • A dermal filler formulation must be capable of withstanding sterilization which is a strict requirement before the product can be sold (the product must be sterile). Sterilization can be carried out by steam sterilization, filtration, microfiltration, gamma radiation, ETO light or by a combination of these methods. It is known that a dermal filler can be steam sterilized (autoclaved) without degradation of physical properties, but when a dermal filler formulation contains an additional labile ingredient (such as an anti-oxidant, wrinkle reduction, haemostatic, vasoconstriction, anti-itching, anti-inflammatory, and/or anti-irritant ingredient, such as a vitamin, vitamin derivative or analgesic compound) the entire dermal filler formulation or at least the additional (heat labile) ingredient is sterilized by a non-heat treatment such as by a filtration sterilization method. Thus, the known dermal filler product (“Revitacare”) is sold in two separate vials or containers, one vial containing the HA (which is autoclave sterilized)) and the second vial containing any additional ingredients (the second vial contents are sterilized by filtration). Another known dermal filler product NCTF®135 HA is sold in a single container holding both HA and any additional ingredients, all having been sterilized by microfiltration. It is an important aspect of our invention that we mix the HA and the additional ingredients and then autoclave the completed dermal filler formulation with maintenance of gel properties (i.e. non-degraded and storage stable formulation). Additionally we have discovered dermal filler formulations that exhibit retention of stability after being treated (accelerated heat test environment) to about 45° C. for about 30 days, or at least about 60 days, or at least about 90 days with no degradation of physical properties.
  • To reiterate an important aspect of our invention and a significant distinction over known dermal fillers is that our dermal filler formulations are prepared by: (1) mixing the HA and the additional ingredient(s), and then; (2) autoclaving (no filtration sterilization of any component) the complete dermal filler formulation with; (3) maintenance of the desired gel properties (no degradation of any dermal filler constituent or ingredient, and stable).
  • EXAMPLES
  • In the Examples below autoclaving means steam sterilization carried out at a temperature between about 130° C. to about 135° C. for between about one minute and about 10 minutes.
  • Example 1A Method for Determining Gel Cohesivity
  • For purposes of example only and not to be considered as limiting the present invention in any way, the following tests may be performed in order to evidence or quantify cohesivity of a HA-based gel composition.
  • First, 0.2 g or 0.4 g of a gel composition to be tested is placed in a glass syringe. Next, 0.2 g or more of phosphate buffer is added to the syringe and the mixture is thoroughly mixed for about 1 hour to obtain a homogenous mixture. Then, the homogenized mixture is centrifuged for 5 min at 2000 tr/min to remove the air bubbles and to allow the decantation of any particles. The syringe is then held in a vertical position and one drop of eosin colorant is deposited at the surface of the gel by means of a syringe and an 18G needle. After 10 min, the dye has slowly diffused through the gel.
  • After dilution of the gel, homogenization and decantation, a relatively low cohesivity gel shows a phase separation (an upper diluted less viscous phase without particles and a lower one composed of decanted particles that are visible with the naked eye or under microscope). Under the same conditions, a highly cohesive gel shows substantially no phase separation, and the dye is prevented from diffusing into the cohesive formulation. A relatively less cohesive gel, on the other hand, shows a clear phase separation.
  • Example 1 Properties of Formulations of NaHA and Water Soluble Molecules are Tested
  • The active ingredient was incorporated into a NaHA matrix and autoclaved. The properties of the gel, aspect (i.e., color/clarity/homogeneity) and extrusion force were analyzed after sterilization at 3 years equivalent at room temperature. Table 1 shows that all formulations were clear, homogenous, and uncolored at the 3-year mark. The extrusion forces after autoclaving and at 3 years equivalent at room temperature are shown as well. In conclusion, the incorporation of the molecules has no impact on gel properties and ingredient structure.
  • TABLE 1
    Extrusion Extrusion
    force (N) force (N)
    Content after 3 years ~
    Ingredient (%) Aspect autoclaving room T° C.
    Allantoin 0.3 Clear PASSED PASSED
    0.5 Homogeneous PASSED PASSED
    Cytidine 0.5 uncolored PASSED PASSED
    1 PASSED PASSED
    Thymidine 0.5 PASSED PASSED
    1 PASSED PASSED
    Uridine 0.5 PASSED PASSED
    1 PASSED PASSED
    Antipyrin 0.5 PASSED PASSED
    1 PASSED PASSED
    Aminocaproic 0.5 PASSED PASSED
    acid 1 PASSED PASSED
    Tranexamic acid 0.5 PASSED PASSED
    Eucalyptol 0.5 PASSED PASSED
    Sodium selenite 0.1 PASSED PASSED
    Glycerin 0.5 PASSED PASSED

    Acceptance criteria: “Passed” means that the change of extrusion force (ΔF) was less than two Newtons (<2 N). In other words the measured ΔF of the extrusion force of the HA gel with the specified ingredients minus the extrusion force of the HA gel without the added ingredients was <2 N.
  • Example 2 Preparation of NaHA Gel Containing Vitamin C
  • Ascorbic acid (1% w/w) was incorporated into a NaHA matrix. (JUVEDERM® FORMA). The pH was adjusted to about 7 and composition was autoclaved. The gel obtained was clear, yellow and degraded.
  • Example 3 Alternative Preparation of NAHA Gel Containing Vitamin C
  • Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate (MAP) (0.6%, 1 or 2% w/w) was incorporated in a NaHA matrix (JUVEDERM® Ultra). The pH was adjusted to about 7 and the compositions were autoclaved. All gels obtained were uncolored and clear. The gel properties after autoclaving are shown in Table 2. Extrusion force acceptance criteria: Conform with NaHA matrix specifications
  • TABLE 2
    After autoclaving
    Formulation Extrusion force (N)
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra + 0.6% MAP PASSED
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra + 1% MAP PASSED
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra + 2% MAP PASSED
  • Rheology data of the gel containing 2% MAP after autoclaving is shown in Table 3. Rheological properties are followed as a function of time using a controlled stress rheometer according to the following method: frequency sweep from 0.05 to 10 Hz with 0.8% controlled strain. A degradation of the gel was observed by rheology. TAN δ×HZ is a rheological characterisation which shows the ratio of viscous modulus to elastic modulus. It shows the degradation of the gel.

  • Δ Tan δ 1 Hz=(Tan δ 1 Hz formulation)−(Tan δ 1 Hz NaHA matrix)
  • Acceptance criterion: Δ Tan δ 1 Hz<0.1
  • TABLE 3
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra + 2% MAP 0.344
  • Example 4 Alternative Preparation of NAHA Gel Containing Vitamin C
  • Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate (SAP) (0.6%, 1% and 2% w/w) was incorporated in an NaHA matrix (JUVEDERM® Ultra). The pH was adjusted to about 7 and the composition was autoclaved. All gels obtained were uncolored and clear. The gel properties after autoclaving are shown in Table 4.
  • TABLE 4
    After autoclaving
    Formulation Extrusion force (N)
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra + 0.6% SAP PASSED
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra + 1% SAP PASSED
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra + 2% SAP PASSED
  • Rheology data of the gel containing 2% SAP after autoclaving is shown in Table 5. No degradation of the gel was observed by rheology.
  • TABLE 5
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra + 2% SAP 0.089
  • Example 5 Alternative Preparation of NaHA Gel Containing Vitamin C
  • Ascorbic acid 2-Glucoside (AA2G™) at a concentration of 0.6%, 1% and 2% w/w was incorporated in an NaHA matrix (JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus). The pH was adjusted to about 7 and the composition was autoclaved. All gels obtained were uncolored and clear. The gel properties after autoclaving are shown in Table 6.
  • TABLE 6
    After autoclaving
    Formulation Extrusion force (N)
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 0.6% AA-2G PASSED
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 1% AA-2G PASSED
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 2% AA-2G PASSED
  • The gels containing 0.6%, 1% and 2% were stable (pH, injection force) after autoclaving. Rheology data of the gels containing 0.6%, 1% and 2% w/w AA2G™ after autoclaving is shown in Table 7. No degradation of the gel was observed by rheology at each AA2G™ concentration.
  • TABLE 7
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 0.6% AA2G ™ −0.010
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 1% AA2G ™ −0.014
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 2% AA2G ™ −0.016
  • Rheological studies showed an slightly increase of the stability of the gel in the presence of the additive.
  • Example 6 Effect of Vitamin C on Aspect and Stability of the Gel
  • The shelf-life at 45° C. during 32 days was tested for the formulations prepared in example 5 and the NaHA matrix JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus. Rheology data of the gels containing 0.6%, 1% and 2% of AA2G™ are shown in Table 8.
  • TABLE 8
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 0.6% AA2G ™ −0.050
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 1% AA2G ™ −0.045
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 2% AA2G ™ −0.059
  • The gels containing ascorbyl glucoside maintained their properties after autoclaving and over a period of 32 days at 45° C. Surprising Rheological studies showed an increase of the stability of the gel in the presence of the additive.
  • Example 7 Preparation of NaHA Gel Containing Vitamin E
  • Tocopheryl Acetate (0.5% w/w) was incorporated into a NaHA matrix. (JUVEDERM® 30) and autoclaved. The gel obtained was unclear, white.
  • Example 8 Alternative Preparation of NaHA Gel Containing Vitamin E
  • Sodium Tocopheryl Phosphate (STP), at 0.4%, 1.2% w/w, was incorporated in a NaHA matrix (JUVEDERM® FORMA) and autoclaved. The gel obtained was not clear (white).
  • Example 9 Alternative Preparation of NaHA Gel Containing Vitamin E
  • Polyoxyethanyl-α-tocopheryl sebacate (0.7% w/w) was incorporated in a NaHA matrix (JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus) and autoclaved. The gel obtained was clear, but heterogenous.
  • Example 10 Alternative Preparation of NaHA Gel Containing Vitamin E
  • Tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was incorporated in varying concentrations (1%, 3.5% and 7% w/w) in a NAHA matrix (JUVEDERM® FORMA) and autoclaved. “JUVEDERM® FORMA” means the Juvederm formulation was used. All gels obtained were uncolored and clear. The gel properties after autoclaving are shown in Table 9.
  • TABLE 9
    Formulation Extrusion force (N)
    JUVEDERM ® FORMA + 1% TPGS PASSED
    JUVEDERM ® FORMA + 3.5% TPGS PASSED
    JUVEDERM ® FORMA + 7% TPGS PASSED
  • Rheology data of the gels containing 1%, 3.5% and 7% TPGS after autoclaving is shown in Table 10. No degradation of the gel was observed by rheology at each TPGS concentration.
  • TABLE 10
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® FORMA + 1% TPGS 0.008
    JUVEDERM ® FORMA + 3.5% TPGS −0.007
    JUVEDERM ® FORMA + 7% TPGS −0.011
  • These rheological studies showed the stability of the dermal filler formulation with a particular additional ingredient.
  • Example 11 Stability of Formulations Containing Additional Ingredients
  • The stability of various formulations was tested. The ingredients shown in Table 11 were incorporated into a NaHA matrix, and autoclaved. The degradation of the formulations after autoclaving is shows in Table 11 and after 48 days at 45° C. in Table 12. The stability of extrusion force, pH, and degradation are shown over time in FIGS. 3, 4, and 5, respectively. HPLC analysis (C18 column; eluent: sodium phosphate buffer (pH 2.2), 2-propanol 10%, 0.7 ml/min; detection at 260 nm) confirmed the ingredients after autoclaving and 3-year shelf-life are shown in FIG. 6.
  • TABLE 11
    Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    After autoclaving 45° C., 48 days
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 0.059 0.020
    AA2G ™ 0.6% + Lidocaine 0.3%
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 0.016 0.007
    AA2G ™ 0.6% + TPGS 1.5% +
    lidocaine 0.3%
  • Example 12 AA2G™ Promotes Collagen Synthesis
  • Human skin fibroblasts were cultured in a 12 wells plate. At confluence, 100 μl of each compound (Juverderm® FORMA with 0.3% lidocaine, Juverderm® FORMA+AA2G™ 0.6%+Lidocaine 0.3% and Phosphate Buffer with 0.6% AA2G) was deposited in a culture insert (porosity of 0.4 μm), which was itself laid on the fibroblast monolayers. In parallel, a control without treatment was performed. Cultures were incubated for 72 hours and each experimental condition was conducted done in triplicate. At the end of incubation, cell viability was verified by microscopic observation and MTT reduction assay. Pro-collagen I secretion was measured using ELISA kit. The presence of 0.6% AA2G™ in a hyaluronic acid gel containing 0.3% lidocaine increased pro-collagen synthesis by a factor 3 (+292%), whereas JUVEDERM® gel with 0.3% lidocaIne showed an increase of 40% of the pro-collagen secretion (see FIG. 2).
  • Example 13 AA2G™ Protects NaHA from Oxidative Degradation
  • The effect of AA2G™ on NaHA oxidative degradation was studied. Oxidation testing was used as it allows testing of the resistance of a NaHA matrix to free radicals. Degradation by free radicals was simulated on a rheometer (Haake Rheostress 600) by addition of 1/7 ratio of H2O2 30% on the surface of a spread gel measured with a controlled stress rheometer according to the following method: frequency of 1 Hz with 0.8% controlled strain, during 3600 s at 35° C. The time value is taken at 5 Pa/s.
  • Further, a comparison of antioxidant properties for JUVEDERM® Ultra with AA2G™ 0.6%/Lidocaine 0.3% formulation (15 800 s) versus NaHA matrix JUVEDERM® Ultra with Lidocaine (4 942 s) showed that the gel containing AA2G™ and lidocaine is more stable with respect to free radical activity (see FIG. 7). AA2G™ protected against oxidative degradation by a factor of 3.
  • Example 14 Implantation Study
  • A gel containing AA2G™ at 0.6% (=6 mg/g=2.10−2 mM) was implanted in the deep dermis and subcutaneous tissues in rats. Histological evaluation at 1 week showed some mononuclear cells (lymphocytes and plasmocytes) around the implants in all implantation sites (test and control). They were also associated with macrophages. The gel containing AA2G™ appeared to be less inflammatory. The irritation index in test samples (AA2G™+NaHA) was 9.9 compared to 12.3 in controls (NaHA only). Table 12 shows the histological results at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months. The irritation score of AA2G™ gel are (for each implantation time) lower than control (gel without AA2G™).
  • TABLE 12
    NAHA + AA2G + Lido
    Biocompatibility ISO 10993
    Cytotoxicity ✓ (non cytotoxic)
    Irritation ✓ (non irritant)
    Sensitization ✓ (non sensitizing)
    Implantation Test
    1 week ✓ (no skin reaction)
    3 weeks ✓ (no skin reaction)
    3 months ✓ (no skin reaction)
  • Example 15 Incorporation of Dexpanthenol in NaHA Gel Formulations
  • Dexpanthenol was incorporated into a NaHA matrix JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus with Lidocaine (with 0.3% w/w lidocaine) with a content of 1% w/w. The gel was autoclaved. The gel obtained was clear and uncolored before and after autoclaving. The gel properties after autoclaving are shown in Table 13.
  • TABLE 13
    After autoclaving
    Extrusion
    Formulation force (N) Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus with PASSED 0.026
    Lidocaine (0.3%) + Dexpanthenol 1%
  • Example 16 Effect of the Incorporation of Dexpanthenol in NAHA Gel Formulations
  • The shelf-life at 45° C. during 30 days was tested of the formulations prepared in example 15 and the NaHA matrix JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus XC. The gel was clear, uncolored. Rheology data of the gels containing dexpanthenol 1% w/w and lidocaine 0.3% w/w are shown in Table 14.
  • TABLE 14
    After 30 days at 45° C.
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus with −0.071
    Lidocaine (0.3%) + Dexpanthenol 1%
  • Rheological studies showed an increase of the stability of the gel in the presence of the additive.
  • Example 17 Incorporation of Epinephrine in NaHA Gel Formulations
  • Epinephrine was incorporated into a NaHA matrix (JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus) with a 10 ppm epinephrine bitartrate. The gel was autoclaved. The gel obtained was clear and uncolored before and after autoclaving. The gel (dermal filler formulation) properties after autoclaving are shown in Table 15.
  • TABLE 15
    After autoclaving
    Extrusion
    Formulation force (N) Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + PASSED 0.165
    epinephrine bitartrate 10 ppm
  • Degradation of the gel was observed by rheological analysis.
  • Example 18 Incorporation of Epinephrine in NaHA Gel Formulations
  • Epinephrine was incorporated into a NaHA matrix (JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus) with 0.3% lidocaine and 10 ppm epinephrine bitartrate. The gel was autoclaved. The gel obtained was clear and colored after autoclaving. The gel properties after autoclaving are shown in Table 16.
  • TABLE 16
    After autoclaving
    Extrusion
    Formulation force (N) Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + PASSED 0.092
    Lidocaine 0.3% + epinephrine
    bitartrate 10 ppm
  • A slight degradation of the gel was observed by rheological analysis.
  • Example 19 Effect of Additional Ingredient on the Stability of Gel Containing Epinephrine and Lidocaine
  • The shelf-life at 45° C. during 60 days was tested of the formulations prepared in Example 18 and the NaHA matrix JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus. The gel was clear, slightly colored. Rheology data of the gels containing epinephrine bitartrate (10 ppm), lidocaine (0.3% w/w) is shown in Table 17.
  • TABLE 17
    After 60 days at 45° C.
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + 0.185
    Lidocaine 0.3% + epinephrine
    bitartrate 10 ppm
  • After a stability of 60 days at 45° C., the gel containing epinephrine and lidocaine was unstable.
  • Example 20 Incorporation of Epinephrine in NaHA Gel Formulations Containing an Antioxidant
  • Epinephrine was incorporated into a NaHA matrix (JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus) with epinephrine bitartrate (10 ppm) and mannitol (0.9 or 4.5% w/w). The gels were autoclaved. The gel with 4.5% mannitol was clear and uncolored before and after autoclaving whereas with 0.9% mannitol was slightly colored. The gel properties after autoclaving is shown in Table 18.
  • TABLE 18
    After autoclaving
    Extrusion
    Formulation force (N) Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + epinephrine PASSED 0.047
    bitartrate 10 ppm + mannitol 0.9%
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + epinephrine PASSED 0.015
    bitartrate 10 ppm + mannitol 4.5%
  • No degradation was observed for either of the dermal filler formulations tested.
  • Example 21 Effect of Additional Ingredient on the Stability of Gel Containing Epinephrine and an Antioxidant
  • The shelf-life at 45° C. during 60 days was tested of the formulations prepared in example 20 and the NaHA matrix JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus. The gels were clear, slightly colored. Rheology data of the gels containing epinephrine bitartrate (10 ppm) and mannitol (0.9 or 4.5% w/w) is shown in Table 19.
  • TABLE 19
    After 60 days at 45° C.
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + epinephrine 0.061
    bitartrate 10 ppm + mannitol 0.9%
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus + epinephrine 0.006
    bitartrate 10 ppm + mannitol 4.5%
  • After a stability of days at 45° C., both gels containing epinephrine, lidocaine and manitol were stable. The composition containing 4.5% mannitol was more stable.
  • Example 22 Incorporation of Epinephrine in NaHA Gel Formulations Containing Lidocaine and Antioxidant
  • Epinephrine was incorporated into a NaHA matrix (JUVEDERM® Forma) with epinephrine bitartrate (20 ppm), lidocaine (0.3% w/w) and mannitol (4.5% w/w). The gel was autoclaved. The gel obtained was clear slightly colored after autoclaving. The gel properties after autoclaving are shown in Table 20.
  • TABLE 20
    After autoclaving
    Extrusion
    Formulation force (N) Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Forma + Lidocaine 0.3% + PASSED 0.026
    epinephrine bitartrate 20 ppm +
    mannitol 4.5%
  • No degradation was observed.
  • Example 23 Effect of Additional Ingredient on the Stability of Gel Containing Epinephrine, Lidocaine and an Antioxidant
  • The shelf-life at 45° C. during 60 days was tested of the formulations prepared in example 22 and the NaHA matrix JUVEDERM® Forma. The gel was clear, slightly colored. Rheology data of the gel containing epinephrine bitartrate (20 ppm), lidocaine (0.3% w/w) and mannitol (4.5% w/w) is shown in Table 21.
  • TABLE 21
    After 60 days at 45° C.
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Forma + epinephrine −0.030
    bitartrate 20 ppm + mannitol 4.5%
  • The gel (dermal filler formulation) was stable after 60 days at 45° C.
  • Example 24 Incorporation of Synephrine in NaHA Gel Formulations Containing Lidocaine and Antioxidant
  • Synephrine was incorporated into a NaHA matrix Juverderm Ultra Plus with Lidocaine (with 0.3% w/w lidocaine) with a content of 100 ppm of synephrine. The gel was autoclaved. The gel obtained was clear and uncolored before and after autoclaving. The gel properties after autoclaving is shown in Table 22.
  • TABLE 22
    After autoclaving
    Extrusion
    Formulation force (N) Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® with lidocaine (0.3%) + PASSED −0.006
    synephrine 100 ppm
  • Example 25 Effect of Additional Ingredient on the Stability of Gel Containing Synephrine and Lidocaine
  • The shelf-life at 45° C. during 60 days was tested of the formulations prepared in example 24 and the NaHA matrix JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus with Lidocaine. The gels was clear, uncolored. Rheology data of the gel containing synephrine 100 ppm and lidocaine 0.3% w/w is shown in Table 23.
  • TABLE 23
    After 60 days at 45° C.
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus with −0.028
    lidocaine (0.3%) + synephrine 100 ppm
  • This rheological study showed maintenance of the stability of the gel (dermal filler formulation) in the presence of the particular additional ingredient (additive) shown.
  • Example 26 Incorporation of Phenylephrine in NaHA Gel Formulations Containing Lidocaine
  • Phenylephrine was incorporated into a matrix JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus with Lidocaine (with 0.3% w/w lidocaine) with a content of 100 ppm phenylephrine. The gel was autoclaved. The gel obtained was clear and uncolored before and after autoclaving. The gel properties after autoclaving are shown in Table 24.
  • TABLE 24
    After autoclaving
    Extrusion
    Formulation force (N) Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus with Lidocaine PASSED −0.002
    0.3% + Phenylephrine 100 ppm
  • Example 27 Effect of Additional Ingredient on the Stability of Gel Containing Phenylephrine and Lidocaine
  • The shelf-life at 45° C. during 60 days was tested of the formulations prepared in example 26 and the NaHA matrix JUVEDERM® Ultra Plus with Lidocaine. The gel was clear, uncolored. Rheology data of the gel containing phenylephrine 100 ppm and lidocaine 0.3% w/w are shown in Table 25.
  • TABLE 25
    After 60 days at 45° C.
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus with Lidocaine −0.017
    (0.3%) + Phenylephrine 100 ppm
  • This rheological study showed maintenance of the stability of the gel (dermal filler formulation) in the presence of the particular additional ingredient (additive) shown.
  • Example 28 Incorporation of Naphazoline in NaHA Gel Formulations Containing Lidocaine and Antioxidant
  • Naphazoline was incorporated into a matrix Juverderm Ultra Plus with Lidocaine (with 0.3% w/w lidocaine) with a content of 100 ppm. The gel was autoclaved. The gel obtained was clear and uncolored before and after autoclaving. The gel properties after autoclaving are shown in Table 26.
  • TABLE 26
    After autoclaving
    Extrusion
    Formulation force (N) Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus with Lidocaine PASSED −0.003
    (0.3%) + Naphazoline 100 ppm
  • Example 29 Effect of Additional Ingredient on the Stability of Gel Containing Naphazoline and Lidocaine
  • The shelf-life at 45° C. over 60 days was tested of the formulations prepared in example 28 and the NaHA matrix JUVEDERM© Ultra Plus with Lidocaine. The gel was clear, uncolored. Rheology data of the gel containing naphazoline 100 ppm and lidocaine 0.3% w/w is shown in Table 27.
  • TABLE 27
    After 60 days at 45° C.
    Formulation Δ Tan δ 1 Hz
    JUVEDERM ® Ultra Plus with Lidocaine −0.008
    0.3% + Naphazoline 100 ppm
  • Example 30 Treatment Example
  • A woman, age 37, presents with fine lines around her eyes and deeper wrinkles on the sides of her mouth. She receives injections of a formulation of Example 10. She receives the injections in the fine lines and in the wrinkles once a week for 3 weeks and notices a visible improvement in the appearance of her skin.
  • Example 31 Alternate Treatment Example
  • A 59 year old man presents with wrinkles between his eyebrows and in the nasolabial folds. He receives injections of the dermal filler formulation of Example 11, every 3 months. A visible improvement in the wrinkles is seen.
  • Example 32 Alternate Treatment Example
  • A 35 year old woman presents with fine lines across her forehead. She receives injections of the dermal filler formulation of Example 15, once a week for two weeks, and notices an improvement in the appearance of the skin on her forehead.
  • Example 33 Alternate Treatment Example
  • A woman, age 44, presents with uneven texture on her right cheek resulting from a loss of collagen due to aging. She receives injections of the dermal formulation of Example 20 (using the 4.5% mannitol dermal filler formulation), in her cheek to build up the areas where the collagen has been lost. A visible improvement is seen in the texture of the skin on her cheek after 3 series of injections over a 2 week period of time.
  • Example 34 Alternate Treatment Example
  • A 35 year old man presents with a deep wrinkle across his chin and fine lines on the sides of his eyes. He receives the dermal filler formulation of Example 26 along the sides of his eyes. He receives 2 series of injections in his chin, spaced 1 week apart. The fine lines and wrinkle are visibly diminished after treatment.
  • Example 35 Alternate Treatment Example
  • A woman, age 62, presents with wrinkles across her forehead, on the sides of her eyes, in the nasolabial folds, and a scar on her chin. She receives injections of the dermal filler formulation of Example 29 each week for one month. After the injections, the appearance of the wrinkles and the scar is visibly diminished.
  • Our results above show that at least each of the two additional ingredients AA2G and dexpanthenol significantly increased the stability of the dermal filler formulation (HA gel), as shown by the dermal filler formulation having a Δ Tan δ 1 Hz<−0.05.
  • With regard to dexpanthenol: panthenol is the alcohol analog of pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), and is thus the provitamin of B5 which in vivo is oxidized to pantothenate. Panthenol is a highly viscous transparent liquid at room temperature, but salts of pantothenic acid (for example sodium pantothenate) are powders (typically white). Panthenol is soluble in water, alcohol and propylene glycol, soluble in ether and chloroform, and slightly soluble in glycerin. Panthenol has two D and L enantiomers with only the D enantiomer (D-panthenol, alos called dexpanthenol) being biologically active, however both the D and L forms have moisturizing properties. For topical cosmetic use panthenol has been used in the D form and as a racemic mixture of D and L (DL-panthenol). Thus topical dexpanthenol cream (sold under the generic name “panthoderm”) is made by mixing with an emollient and has been used for relieving dry skin, preventing and treating sore nipples during breast-feeding, and promoting healing of burns and poorly-healing wounds.
  • Unless otherwise indicated, all numbers expressing quantities of ingredients, properties such as molecular weight, reaction conditions, and so forth used in the specification and claims are to be understood as being modified in all instances by the term “about.” Accordingly, unless indicated to the contrary, the numerical parameters set forth in the specification and attached claims are approximations that may vary depending upon the desired properties sought to be obtained by the present invention. At the very least, and not as an attempt to limit the application of the doctrine of equivalents to the scope of the claims, each numerical parameter should at least be construed in light of the number of reported significant digits and by applying ordinary rounding techniques. Notwithstanding that the numerical ranges and parameters setting forth the broad scope of the invention are approximations, the numerical values set forth in the specific examples are reported as precisely as possible. Any numerical value, however, inherently contains certain errors necessarily resulting from the standard deviation found in their respective testing measurements.
  • The terms “a,” “an,” “the” and similar referents used in the context of describing the invention (especially in the context of the following claims) are to be construed to cover both the singular and the plural, unless otherwise indicated herein or clearly contradicted by context. Recitation of ranges of values herein is merely intended to serve as a shorthand method of referring individually to each separate value falling within the range. Unless otherwise indicated herein, each individual value is incorporated into the specification as if it were individually recited herein. All methods described herein can be performed in any suitable order unless otherwise indicated herein or otherwise clearly contradicted by context. The use of any and all examples, or exemplary language (e.g., “such as”) provided herein is intended merely to better illuminate the invention and does not pose a limitation on the scope of the invention otherwise claimed. No language in the specification should be construed as indicating any non-claimed element essential to the practice of the invention.
  • Groupings of alternative elements or embodiments of the invention disclosed herein are not to be construed as limitations. Each group member may be referred to and claimed individually or in any combination with other members of the group or other elements found herein. It is anticipated that one or more members of a group may be included in, or deleted from, a group for reasons of convenience and/or patentability. When any such inclusion or deletion occurs, the specification is deemed to contain the group as modified thus fulfilling the written description of all Markush groups used in the appended claims.
  • Certain embodiments of this invention are described herein, including the best mode known to the inventors for carrying out the invention. Of course, variations on these described embodiments will become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art upon reading the foregoing description. The inventor expects skilled artisans to employ such variations as appropriate, and the inventors intend for the invention to be practiced otherwise than specifically described herein. Accordingly, this invention includes all modifications and equivalents of the subject matter recited in the claims appended hereto as permitted by applicable law. Moreover, any combination of the above-described elements in all possible variations thereof is encompassed by the invention unless otherwise indicated herein or otherwise clearly contradicted by context.
  • Specific embodiments disclosed herein may be further limited in the claims using consisting of or consisting essentially of language. When used in the claims, whether as filed or added per amendment, the transition term “consisting of” excludes any element, step, or ingredient not specified in the claims. The transition term “consisting essentially of limits the scope of a claim to the specified materials or steps and those that do not materially affect the basic and novel characteristic(s). Embodiments of the invention so claimed are inherently or expressly described and enabled herein. Furthermore, numerous references have been made to patents and printed publications throughout this specification. Each of the above-cited references and printed publications are individually incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.
  • In closing, it is to be understood that the embodiments of the invention disclosed herein are illustrative of the principles of the present invention. Other modifications that may be employed are within the scope of the invention. Thus, by way of example, but not of limitation, alternative configurations of the present invention may be utilized in accordance with the teachings herein. Accordingly, the present invention is not limited to that precisely as shown and described. Specific embodiments disclosed herein may be further limited in the claims using consisting of or consisting essentially of language. When used in the claims, whether as filed or added per amendment, the transition term “consisting of excludes any element, step, or ingredient not specified in the claims. The transition term “consisting essentially of limits the scope of a claim to the specified materials or steps and those that do not materially affect the basic and novel characteristic(s). Embodiments of the invention so claimed are inherently or expressly described and enabled herein.

Claims (17)

1. A stable dermal filler formulation comprising a hyaluronic acid (HA) and at least one additional ingredient selected from the group consisting of a wrinkle reduction, antioxidant, haemostatic, vasoconstriction, anti-itching, anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant ingredient
2. The dermal filler formulation of claim 1, wherein stability of the dermal filler formulation is determined by subjecting the dermal filler formulation to a heat treatment selected from the group consisting of (a) steam sterilization at between about 120° C. and about 135° C., and (b) about 32 days at about 45° C., with substantial retention after the heat treatment of one or more of the dermal filler characteristics of being clear, homogenous, and cohesive, and without substantial degradation of the dermal filler formulation after the heat treatment.
3. The dermal filler formulation of claim 1, wherein the HA is cross-linked.
4. The dermal filler formulation of claim 1, wherein the HA is present in an amount of about 1 to about 40 mg/mL.
5. The formulation of claim 1, wherein the additional ingredient is a vitamin C.
6. The formulation of claim 1, wherein the additional ingredient is a vitamin E.
7. The formulation of claim 1, wherein the formulation is stable, as determined by substantial retention at room temperature of one or more of the dermal filler characteristics of being clear, homogenous, and cohesive, and without substantial degradation of the dermal filler formulation, for a period of at least 2 years.
8. The formulation of claim 7, wherein the formulation is stable for at least 3 years.
9. The formulation of claim 1, wherein the additional ingredient is present in an amount of about 0.001% to about 10% w/w.
10. The formulation of claim 1, wherein the additional ingredient provides the formulation with improved rheological properties resulting in less extrusion force required for administration compared to an HA gel formulation without the additional constituent.
11. A method of treating fine lines, wrinkles, fibroblast depletions, or scars of a patient, the method comprising the step of administering to the patient an effective amount of a steam sterilization stable dermal filler formulation comprising a hyaluronic acid (HA) and at least one additional ingredient selected from the group consisting of wrinkle reduction, antioxidant, haemostatic, vasoconstriction, anti-itching, anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant ingredients, wherein the formulation is clear, homogenous, monophasic, cohesive, stable and not degraded after steam sterilization and wherein the appearance of the fine lines, wrinkles, fibroblast depletions, or scars is diminished.
12. The method of claim 11 wherein the formulation is sub dermal injected into the facial skin of the subject.
13. The method of claim 11, wherein the additional ingredient is present in an amount of about 0.1% to about 3% w/w.
14. The method of claim 11, wherein the HA is cross-linked.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein the HA is present in an amount of about 1 to about 40 mg/mL.
16. A method of treating fine lines, wrinkles, fibroblast depletions, or scars of a patient, the method comprising the step of local injection to the patient of a steam sterilization stable dermal filler formulation comprising about 1 to about 40 mg/mL of a cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) and at least one additional ingredient selected from the group consisting of wrinkle reduction, antioxidant, haemostatic, vasoconstriction, anti-itching, anti-inflammatory and anti-irritant ingredients, wherein the formulation is clear, homogenous, cohesive, stable and not degraded after steam sterilization and wherein the appearance of the fine lines, wrinkles, fibroblast depletions, or scars is diminished by the injection.
17. A steam sterilization stable dermal filler formulation comprising a hyaluronic acid and at least one additional ingredient selected from the group consisting of AA2G and dexpanthenol, wherein the stability of the dermal filler formulation is significantly increased by the addition of the additional ingredient.
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US12/956,542 US20110171310A1 (en) 2010-01-13 2010-11-30 Hydrogel compositions comprising vasoconstricting and anti-hemorrhagic agents for dermatological use
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US20130072453A1 (en) 2013-03-21
US9333160B2 (en) 2016-05-10
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US20160220729A1 (en) 2016-08-04
US20180078674A1 (en) 2018-03-22

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