US20110136627A1 - Exercise derived currency for exchange or grading - Google Patents

Exercise derived currency for exchange or grading Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110136627A1
US20110136627A1 US12630620 US63062009A US2011136627A1 US 20110136627 A1 US20110136627 A1 US 20110136627A1 US 12630620 US12630620 US 12630620 US 63062009 A US63062009 A US 63062009A US 2011136627 A1 US2011136627 A1 US 2011136627A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
heart rate
computing device
mobile computing
indication
user
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12630620
Inventor
Michael C. Williams
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
ITMP
Original Assignee
ITMP
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B24/00Electric or electronic controls for exercising apparatus of preceding groups; Controlling or monitoring of exercises, sportive games, training or athletic performances
    • A63B24/0059Exercising apparatus with reward systems
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B24/00Electric or electronic controls for exercising apparatus of preceding groups; Controlling or monitoring of exercises, sportive games, training or athletic performances
    • A63B24/0062Monitoring athletic performances, e.g. for determining the work of a user on an exercise apparatus, the completed jogging or cycling distance
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F19/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific applications
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F19/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific applications
    • G06F19/30Medical informatics, i.e. computer-based analysis or dissemination of patient or disease data
    • G06F19/34Computer-assisted medical diagnosis or treatment, e.g. computerised prescription or delivery of medication or diets, computerised local control of medical devices, medical expert systems or telemedicine
    • G06F19/3418Telemedicine, e.g. remote diagnosis, remote control of instruments or remote monitoring of patient carried devices
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/06Resources, workflows, human or project management, e.g. organising, planning, scheduling or allocating time, human or machine resources; Enterprise planning; Organisational models
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/06Indicating or scoring devices for games or players, or for other sports activities
    • A63B2071/0691Maps, e.g. yardage maps or electronic maps
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2220/00Measuring of physical parameters relating to sporting activity
    • A63B2220/10Positions
    • A63B2220/12Absolute positions, e.g. by using GPS
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2220/00Measuring of physical parameters relating to sporting activity
    • A63B2220/17Counting, e.g. counting periodical movements, revolutions or cycles, or including further data processing to determine distances or speed
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2220/00Measuring of physical parameters relating to sporting activity
    • A63B2220/20Distances or displacements
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2220/00Measuring of physical parameters relating to sporting activity
    • A63B2220/30Speed
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2220/00Measuring of physical parameters relating to sporting activity
    • A63B2220/80Special sensors, transducers or devices therefor
    • A63B2220/803Motion sensors
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2225/00Other characteristics of sports equipment
    • A63B2225/20Other characteristics of sports equipment with means for remote communication, e.g. internet or the like
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2230/00Measuring physiological parameters of the user
    • A63B2230/04Measuring physiological parameters of the user heartbeat characteristics, e.g. E.G.C., blood pressure modulations
    • A63B2230/06Measuring physiological parameters of the user heartbeat characteristics, e.g. E.G.C., blood pressure modulations heartbeat rate only
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2230/00Measuring physiological parameters of the user
    • A63B2230/04Measuring physiological parameters of the user heartbeat characteristics, e.g. E.G.C., blood pressure modulations
    • A63B2230/06Measuring physiological parameters of the user heartbeat characteristics, e.g. E.G.C., blood pressure modulations heartbeat rate only
    • A63B2230/062Measuring physiological parameters of the user heartbeat characteristics, e.g. E.G.C., blood pressure modulations heartbeat rate only used as a control parameter for the apparatus
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2230/00Measuring physiological parameters of the user
    • A63B2230/75Measuring physiological parameters of the user calorie expenditure

Abstract

According to various embodiments of the invention, systems and methods are provided to allow a mobile computing device to retrieve exercise related data from a health or fitness monitoring device during an exercise period. The mobile computing device is further configured to use the exercise related data to determine a number of points or an amount of currency earned during the exercise period. These points may then be exchanged for privileges, grades or financial rewards. In some embodiments, this exchange may be conducted or mediated using a system embodied on a second mobile computing device or servers on the internet.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention relates generally to health and fitness, and more particularly, some embodiments relate to providing motivation to increase exercise activity.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE RELATED ART
  • There is a widespread, global “obesity epidemic” among adults and that now includes many children who are now overweight or obese, leading to alarming rates of childhood diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, asthma, cardiovascular disease and many other diseases. While in some cases there are genetic causes, the current “epidemic” is due mostly to the modern sedentary lifestyle.
  • Advancements in technology have changed the way people approach health and fitness. Over time, tools and devices have been developed that provide useful information in attaining and maintaining health and fitness goals. Tools and devices such as heart rate monitors, pace monitors or pedometers, cycling computers, glucose meters, weight scales, blood pressure cuffs, physical training machines integrated with sensors, and other health and fitness sensor devices are commonplace in the world of fitness.
  • Unfortunately, the tools and devices described above and their like have very challenging user interfaces with limited ability to share data. Furthermore, the devices, originally designed for athletic adults, are not very well suited for younger individuals and their parents or teachers.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed toward a system and method to objectively determine the level of effort or exertion based on relative heart rate intensity during exercise for purposes of accruing currency units for exchanging and/or grading purposes. In some embodiments, this system comprises a wireless bridge device that is configured to allow a mobile computing device, such as a smartphone or programmable media playing device, to pull data from a health or fitness sensor. In these embodiments, software present on the mobile computing device provides the ability for a system user to accrue points, or currency, for burning calories at heart rate levels above sedentary zones. The systems and methods of these embodiments further comprise software for system supervisors that is embodied on a website, personal computer, or mobile computing device that is configured to allow the exchange of the earned currency for various privileges or grades.
  • According to an embodiment of the invention, a method of operation comprises: (i) a mobile computing device receiving heart rate data of a user from a heart rate monitor disposed on the user during an exercise period; (ii) the mobile computing device using the heart rate data and a predetermined conversion formula to determine a number of points accumulated during the exercise period; and (iii) the mobile computing device communicating with an external computing device to exchange at least a portion of the accumulated points for a predetermined privilege.
  • Other features and aspects of the invention will become apparent from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate, by way of example, the features in accordance with embodiments of the invention. The summary is not intended to limit the scope of the invention, which is defined solely by the claims attached hereto.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention, in accordance with one or more various embodiments, is described in detail with reference to the following figures. The drawings are provided for purposes of illustration only and merely depict typical or example embodiments of the invention. These drawings are provided to facilitate the reader's understanding of the invention and shall not be considered limiting of the breadth, scope, or applicability of the invention. It should be noted that for clarity and ease of illustration these drawings are not necessarily made to scale.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a system according to an embodiment of invention.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates various heart rate profiles of different exercise periods that may be used during point allocation in some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates an example screen display that may be displayed on a mobile computing device during an exercise period according to an embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a sequence of system operation according to an embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates an example computing module that may be used in implementing various features of embodiments of the invention.
  • The figures are not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. It should be understood that the invention can be practiced with modification and alteration, and that the invention be limited only by the claims and the equivalents thereof.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed toward a system and method for objectively determining level of effort or exertion based on heart rate intensity during exercise for purposes of accruing currency units for exchange and/or grading purposes. In some embodiments, this system comprises a wireless bridge device that is configured to allow a mobile computing device, such as a smartphone or programmable media playing device, to pull data from a health or fitness sensor. In these embodiments, software present on the mobile computing device provides the ability for a system user to accrue points, or currency, for burning calories at heart rate levels above sedentary zones. The systems and methods of these embodiments further comprise software for system supervisors that is embodied on a website, personal computer, or mobile computing device that is configured to allow the exchange of the earned currency for various privileges or grades.
  • In one embodiment, a system for retrieving exercise data from a health or fitness monitoring device comprises a wireless bridging device and a mobile computing device configured as described in co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/624,609, filed Nov. 24, 2009, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. FIG. 1 illustrates such a system in operation. In this embodiment, a user may have access to a variety of health or fitness monitoring devices. Such health or fitness monitoring devices might comprise any health or fitness related computing device, sensor device, or monitoring device. For example, such devices might comprise a blood pressure monitoring or measuring device 74, a bicycling computer 73 coupled to various sensors, various exercise equipment 72, a scale 71, a running computer or related sensors 81, a GPS device 80, a heart rate monitor 79, a fitness watch 78, or a glucose meter 70. In one method of use, an athlete such as a runner may be equipped with a variety of data collecting devices during an exercise period, such as a pedometer 81, a GPS device 80, a heart rate monitor 79, and a fitness watch 78. These devices may be configured to determine various data generated during the exercise period, for example, the stride count, speed, distance, route taken, calories burned, or heart rate profile. In some instances, these devices may be configured to temporarily store data during the exercise period and then provide access to this data at a later point in time. For example, a GPS device 80 may be configured to store a route taken by a runner during a run, and then to provide that route to a computer storage device at a later point in time. Furthermore, some health or fitness monitoring devices may be pre-configured to interoperate before ultimate collection. For example, a fitness watch 78 may be configured to receive and collect data during an exercise period from other health or fitness monitoring devices, such as heart rate monitor 79, GPS device 80, or running sensors 81.
  • In the illustrated embodiment, a mobile computing device 75 is equipped with one or more communications interfaces 76 to allow the device to communicate with the health or fitness monitoring devices and to communicate with an external computer network. For example, the mobile computing device may comprise a cell phone, such as a smartphone, or a digital media player, that has a data connection to an external network such as the Internet 82 and the ability to load and execute computer programs via an operating system, which is housed in a mobile form factor. As a particular example, computing device 75 might comprise a smartphone or other mobile computing device running an operating system and may be configured to be programmed with an application that allows it to control interface 76 for communications with the health or fitness monitoring devices and to control a second interface to allow data collected from the health or fitness monitoring devices to be uploaded to an external data storage.
  • In this embodiment, interface 76 comprises a communications module that is configured to wirelessly communicate 77 with the health or fitness monitoring devices. In some embodiments, this communication may take place as the data is generated, for example, a pedometer 81 might continuously upload pace or stride data to the mobile device 75 during the exercise period. In other embodiments, the data may be stored by a health or fitness monitoring device for a predetermined time or until a predetermined event occurs. For example, a fitness watch 78 might receive and store heart rate data from heart rate monitor 79 until the mobile device 75 transmits a request that the fitness watch 78 uploads the data.
  • In these embodiments, different health or fitness monitoring devices may be configured to communicate according to various protocols. For example, a cycling computer 73 might be equipped with various sensors, such as sensors used to determine speed, cadence, or power, and might be configured to wirelessly communicate according to a digital wireless ultra low power communications standard, such as the ANT+ protocol. Other health or fitness monitoring devices might be configured to communicate according to other communications standards. For example, a GPS device might be configured to wirelessly communicate according to the Bluetooth protocol. Accordingly, the communications module 76 may be configured to communicate according to a plurality of different communications protocols to provide the obtained data to the mobile device 75.
  • In the illustrated embodiment, the mobile device is programmed with software that enables the user to accrue points based on the user exercising at above sedentary levels. In some embodiments, sedentary levels can be established using calibration data. In various embodiments, some calibration data may be provided to the software automatically using a connected device, or may be provided to the software manually.
  • In one embodiment, a system user is considered by the software to be in a sedentary activity zone when their heart rate is within a predetermined range of their resting heart rate. For example, the predetermined range may be expressed as a percentage of their resting heart rate, such as within 15% of their resting heart rate; or the predetermined range may be expressed as a range of beats per unit time, such as 20 beats per min. The sedentary activity zone may be determined by deducting one's age from 220 and applying a percentage to the resulting value, such that it is driven from HRmax rather than resting, wherein HRmax=220−age. The most accurate way of measuring HRmax for an individual is via a cardiac stress test. In such a test, the subject exercises while being monitored by an EKG. During the test, the intensity of exercise is periodically increased (if a treadmill is being used, through increase in speed or slope of the treadmill), or until certain changes in heart function are detected in the EKG, at which point the subject is directed to stop. Typical durations of such a test range from 10 to 20 minutes.
  • In various embodiments, the resting heart rate may be determined using a heart rate monitor 79 that communicates with mobile device 75 directly or through a fitness watch 78. In other embodiments, this resting heart rate may be manually input into mobile device 75, or may be input using other devices, such as a heart rate monitor installed on a piece of exercise equipment.
  • In another embodiment, the sedentary activity zone is determined in terms of a resting heart rate and a maximum heart rate. For example, the sedentary zone might be determined as a percentage between a system user's resting heart rate and their maximum heart rate, such as within 15% of the range between the resting heart rate and maximum heart rate. In this embodiment, further calibration data to determine the system user's maximum heart rate may be provided to the mobile device 75. This data might be manually input to the software by the system user, system supervisor, or other entity, or may be determined through a calibration routine conducted by the mobile device. For example, the mobile device may be configured to instruct a system user to perform a predetermined treadmill workout, such as running at a predetermined speed or incline for a predetermined period, to determine the system user's maximum heart rate. In these embodiments, the system software may be provided with predetermined safety protocols to ensure that a system supervisor is present during the calibration routines. For example, if the system will be employed by school pupils or team members under the supervision of a teacher or coach, the teacher or coach could be required to input a security code to ensure they are present for the maximum heart rate calibration. In other embodiments, this maximum heart rate data may be determined heuristically from other related information. For example, the maximum heart rate may be determined as an estimate based on factors such as the user's age, weight, height, sex, or resting heart rate.
  • The illustrated embodiment is further configured to receive information during a user's exercise periods to allow the user to accumulate points for later use. In some embodiments, these points are determined according to the calories burned by the user once the user has entered a non-sedentary exercise zone. In the illustrated embodiment, the system may receive heart rate data from the heart rate monitor 79 and use this data to determine if the user is exercising at a non-sedentary intensity level. In some instances, the calories burned by a user during an exercise period may vary based on user specific factors, such as basal or resting metabolic rate (RMR), age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), lean body mass (LBM), sex, population based tables and/or self-assessed fitness levels. Furthermore, the calories burned by a user during an exercise period may vary based on exercise specific factors, such as type of exercise, intensity of exercise, or duration of exercise. For example, running may generally burn more calories than walking, even if a user's heart rate is as the same level for both exercises.
  • In some embodiments, these factors may be taken into account for the purpose of calorie determination. For example, the user specific factors may be manually provided to the system, or may be automatically determined in similar manners as described with respect to resting heart rate. In some embodiments, the system may accept a manual input indicating what type of exercise is being conducted, to allow for accurate calorie measurements. For example, the system may display a variety of icons corresponding to difference exercises, allowing a user to input the type of exercise being conducted. In other embodiments, information for other health or fitness monitoring devices may be used for calorie assessment. For example, sensors such as running sensors 81, cycling computer connected sensors 73, or sensors coupled to exercise equipment 72, can be used to determined exercise indicators such as cadence, to allow the system to determine which type of exercise is occurring and its intensity. In other embodiments, calorie burn rate may be determined according to other methods, such as heuristics based on heart rate in relation to other calibration or user specific data.
  • In the illustrated embodiment, the system is configured to display a visual indication 84 of current progress during the non-sedentary exercise period. Additionally, the system may be configured to communicate 85 with other computing devices or systems. For example, in the illustrated embodiment, the system is configured to wirelessly communicate 85 with the internet to provide data to a predetermined website 83 an internet-connected personal computer 86, or a second mobile device 87. As described herein these locations may be used to provide the user a system for managing their accrued points to allow the user to exchange accrued points for various privileges, such as grades or rewards. These locations may also be used by system supervisors to mediate or authorize such exchanges, or to allow the system supervisors to monitor system users' progress. For example, if the system is employed by school children in gym class, the system may upload accrued points to a website 83 to allow a gym teacher to view the students' progress and assign grades based on accumulated points. As another example, the accrued points might be used to allow the students to exchange the points for privileges such as participation in favored activities, or discounts on various products, or various monetary awards.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates various heart rate profiles of different exercise periods that may be used during point allocation in some embodiments of the invention. In one embodiment, points are awarded to a system user based on time spent by a user exercising at a non-sedentary intensity level. In this embodiment, different point accumulation rates may be provided based on different intensity levels. For example, a sedentary zone 100 might be determined according to a predetermined intensity threshold 110. In the illustrated embodiment, the threshold 110 comprises a predetermined heart rate threshold. However, in other embodiments, other metrics may be used to determine non-sedentary activity or point accumulation rates. For example, in a stationary bicycle, a watts measurement might be used to determine exercise intensity.
  • In some embodiments, points may be determined proportionally to calories burned when the user is exercising at a non-sedentary level. In other embodiments, points may be accumulated proportionally to the time spent in a non-sedentary exercise level. In further embodiments, a plurality of different accumulation rates may be provided depending on different intensity levels. For example, a moderate intensity zone 101 and a high intensity zone 104 might be determined according to a first heart rate threshold 111 and a second heart rate threshold 112. The points accumulated while the user is in these zones and the thresholds used to determine these zones may vary according to various factors. For example, it may be preferable that system users spend extended times in a moderate intensity zone 101 rather than shorter times in the high intensity zones 104. Accordingly, the various thresholds and point accumulation rates may vary in order to motivate desired user behavior. For example, providing a relatively small increase in point accumulation between high and moderate intensity, such as 10% points difference, may motivate users to attempt long periods of moderate exercise versus short periods of high intensity exercise. In this embodiment, a user having a heart rate profile similar to profile 106 may have a higher point accumulation than a user having profile similar to profile 105, while a user having a profile 108 would accumulate no points.
  • In still further embodiments, combinations of these point accumulation methods may be used. For example, a point accumulation formula may provide points based on calories, where increased calories per unit time are rewarded based on presence in different heart rate zones. Additionally, the points awarded for various exercise levels may vary with time during an exercise period. For example, a user may be prompted to perform an interval style workout by rewarding high intensity during a first interval and rewarding moderate intensity during a second interval.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates an example screen display that may be employed on a mobile computing device during an exercise period according to an embodiment of the invention. In some embodiments, a mobile computing device might be configured to provide various indications of progress during a user's exercise period. In the illustrated embodiment, the mobile computing device 150 is configured to visually display various progress indicators on a screen 151 of the mobile device 150. For example, these indicators might comprise an indication 154 of the current point earning rate; an indication 158 of total points earned during the exercise period; an indication of exercise intensity 159; or a current heart rate indication 155. In various embodiments, these displays may vary according to which users will be using the system, or according to a user's tastes. For example, the display may be configured to provide younger users, such as first to third graders, with a simpler display than older users. Additionally, a display field 152 may be provided to encourage a user to provide an indication of time left in a predetermined exercise period, or other desired information.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a sequence of system operation according to an embodiment of the invention. In this embodiment, during step 175, a mobile device 182 receives data 179 allowing software embodied on the mobile device 182 to determine a number of points accumulated during an exercise period. In some embodiments, the points may be determined based on information received from health or fitness monitoring devices, such as a heart rate monitor 176. In the illustrated embodiment, a fitness watch 178 may serve as an intermediary between heart rate monitor 176 and mobile device 182. In other embodiments, the heart rate monitor 176 can communicate directly with mobile device 182.
  • In some embodiments, data 179 may be obtained from the health or fitness monitoring devices 176 in real time during an exercise period. In these embodiments, the mobile device 182 may be configured to determine accumulated points as the exercise period progresses, and may also be configured to visually display progress indicators during the exercise period. In other embodiments, the health or fitness monitoring device may be configured to accumulate the generated data 179 during the exercise period. For example, a fitness watch 178 may be configured to store heart rate date from a heart rate monitor 176 during an exercise period. In these embodiments, the mobile device 182 may be configured to download the accumulated data 179 from the storing health or fitness monitoring device after the exercise period, for example as described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/624,609.
  • As illustrated, in step 184 the mobile device 182 uploads information comprising accumulated points to an external point account 186. In some embodiments, the mobile device may be configured to store accumulated points from a plurality of exercise periods, and to upload this data 183 at available access times or at predetermined intervals. In other embodiments, mobile device 182 may be configured to upload the points data 183 as it is accumulated or after each exercise period.
  • In step 185, a system user may perform account management 187 with a system supervisor. In some embodiments, the account 186 might be embodied on a website hosted on a web server, on a computer, or on another mobile device under the control of a system supervisor. In these embodiments, account management 187 may comprise exchanging accumulated points from account 186 for various privileges. In some embodiments, these privileges might comprise grades, account management might comprise earning a particular grade for a predetermined number of points, and the system supervisor might comprise a teacher. For example, an “A” grade might require 100 points, a “B” grade might require 90 points, and so on. In other embodiments, the privileges might comprise monetary rewards or various discounts. For example, a user might be able to earn $1 per 10 points and the system supervisor could comprise a parent. In another embodiment, a user might earn a certain discount on various goods or services. For example, a user might earn a reduction in a monthly health insurance bill, where the system supervisor would comprise an insurance provider. As further examples, a corporate wellness program could give extra days off or reductions in employee paid portions of premiums, and Health Clubs could give discounts for successfully working out.
  • As used herein, the term module might describe a given unit of functionality that can be performed in accordance with one or more embodiments of the present invention. As used herein, a module might be implemented utilizing any form of hardware, software, or a combination thereof. For example, one or more processors, controllers, ASICs, PLAs, PALs, CPLDs, FPGAs, logical components, software routines or other mechanisms might be implemented to make up a module. In implementation, the various modules described herein might be implemented as discrete modules or the functions and features described can be shared in part or in total among one or more modules. In other words, as would be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art after reading this description, the various features and functionality described herein may be implemented in any given application and can be implemented in one or more separate or shared modules in various combinations and permutations. Even though various features or elements of functionality may be individually described or claimed as separate modules, one of ordinary skill in the art will understand that these features and functionality can be shared among one or more common software and hardware elements, and such description shall not require or imply that separate hardware or software components are used to implement such features or functionality.
  • Where components or modules of the invention are implemented in whole or in part using software, in one embodiment, these software elements can be implemented to operate with a computing or processing module capable of carrying out the functionality described with respect thereto. One such example computing module is shown in FIG. 5. Various embodiments are described in terms of this example-computing module 200. After reading this description, it will become apparent to a person skilled in the relevant art how to implement the invention using other computing modules or architectures.
  • Referring now to FIG. 5, computing module 200 may represent, for example, computing or processing capabilities found within desktop, laptop and notebook computers; hand-held computing devices (PDA's, smart phones, cell phones, palmtops, etc.); mainframes, supercomputers, workstations or servers; or any other type of special-purpose or general-purpose computing devices as may be desirable or appropriate for a given application or environment. Computing module 200 might also represent computing capabilities embedded within or otherwise available to a given device. For example, a computing module might be found in other electronic devices such as, for example, digital cameras, navigation systems, cellular telephones, portable computing devices, modems, routers, WAPs, terminals and other electronic devices that might include some form of processing capability.
  • Computing module 200 might include, for example, one or more processors, controllers, control modules, or other processing devices, such as a processor 204. Processor 204 might be implemented using a general-purpose or special-purpose processing engine such as, for example, a microprocessor, controller, or other control logic. In the illustrated example, processor 204 is connected to a bus 202, although any communication medium can be used to facilitate interaction with other components of computing module 200 or to communicate externally.
  • Computing module 200 might also include one or more memory modules, simply referred to herein as main memory 208. For example, preferably random access memory (RAM) or other dynamic memory, might be used for storing information and instructions to be executed by processor 204. Main memory 208 might also be used for storing temporary variables or other intermediate information during execution of instructions to be executed by processor 204. Computing module 200 might likewise include a read only memory (“ROM”) or other static storage device coupled to bus 202 for storing static information and instructions for processor 204.
  • The computing module 200 might also include one or more various forms of information storage mechanism 210, which might include, for example, a media drive 212 and a storage unit interface 220. The media drive 212 might include a drive or other mechanism to support fixed or removable storage media 214. For example, a hard disk drive, a floppy disk drive, a magnetic tape drive, an optical disk drive, a CD or DVD drive (R or RW), or other removable or fixed media drive might be provided. Accordingly, storage media 214 might include, for example, a hard disk, a floppy disk, magnetic tape, cartridge, optical disk, a CD or DVD, or other fixed or removable medium that is read by, written to or accessed by media drive 212. As these examples illustrate, the storage media 214 can include a computer usable storage medium having stored therein computer software or data.
  • In alternative embodiments, information storage mechanism 210 might include other similar instrumentalities for allowing computer programs or other instructions or data to be loaded into computing module 200. Such instrumentalities might include, for example, a fixed or removable storage unit 222 and an interface 220. Examples of such storage units 222 and interfaces 220 can include a program cartridge and cartridge interface, a removable memory (for example, a flash memory or other removable memory module) and memory slot, a PCMCIA slot and card, and other fixed or removable storage units 222 and interfaces 220 that allow software and data to be transferred from the storage unit 222 to computing module 200.
  • Computing module 200 might also include a communications interface 224. Communications interface 224 might be used to allow software and data to be transferred between computing module 200 and external devices. Examples of communications interface 224 might include a modem or softmodem, a network interface (such as an Ethernet, network interface card, WiMedia, IEEE 802.XX or other interface), a communications port (such as for example, a USB port, IR port, RS232 port Bluetooth® interface, or other port), or other communications interface. Software and data transferred via communications interface 224 might typically be carried on signals, which can be electronic, electromagnetic (which includes optical) or other signals capable of being exchanged by a given communications interface 224. These signals might be provided to communications interface 224 via a channel 228. This channel 228 might carry signals and might be implemented using a wired or wireless communication medium. Some examples of a channel might include a phone line, a cellular link, an RF link, an optical link, a network interface, a local or wide area network, and other wired or wireless communications channels.
  • In this document, the terms “computer program medium” and “computer usable medium” are used to generally refer to media such as, for example, memory 208, storage unit 220, media 214, and channel 228. These and other various forms of computer program media or computer usable media may be involved in carrying one or more sequences of one or more instructions to a processing device for execution. Such instructions embodied on the medium, are generally referred to as “computer program code” or a “computer program product” (which may be grouped in the form of computer programs or other groupings). When executed, such instructions might enable the computing module 200 to perform features or functions of the present invention as discussed herein.
  • While various embodiments of the present invention have been described above, it should be understood that they have been presented by way of example only, and not of limitation. Likewise, the various diagrams may depict an example architectural or other configuration for the invention, which is done to aid in understanding the features and functionality that can be included in the invention. The invention is not restricted to the illustrated example architectures or configurations, but the desired features can be implemented using a variety of alternative architectures and configurations. Indeed, it will be apparent to one of skill in the art how alternative functional, logical or physical partitioning and configurations can be implemented to implement the desired features of the present invention. Also, a multitude of different constituent module names other than those depicted herein can be applied to the various partitions. Additionally, with regard to flow diagrams, operational descriptions and method claims, the order in which the steps are presented herein shall not mandate that various embodiments be implemented to perform the recited functionality in the same order unless the context dictates otherwise.
  • Although the invention is described above in terms of various exemplary embodiments and implementations, it should be understood that the various features, aspects and functionality described in one or more of the individual embodiments are not limited in their applicability to the particular embodiment with which they are described, but instead can be applied, alone or in various combinations, to one or more of the other embodiments of the invention, whether or not such embodiments are described and whether or not such features are presented as being a part of a described embodiment. Thus, the breadth and scope of the present invention should not be limited by any of the above-described exemplary embodiments.
  • Terms and phrases used in this document, and variations thereof, unless otherwise expressly stated, should be construed as open ended as opposed to limiting. As examples of the foregoing: the term “including” should be read as meaning “including, without limitation” or the like; the term “example” is used to provide exemplary instances of the item in discussion, not an exhaustive or limiting list thereof; the terms “a” or “an” should be read as meaning “at least one,” “one or more” or the like; and adjectives such as “conventional,” “traditional,” “normal,” “standard,” “known” and terms of similar meaning should not be construed as limiting the item described to a given time period or to an item available as of a given time, but instead should be read to encompass conventional, traditional, normal, or standard technologies that may be available or known now or at any time in the future. Likewise, where this document refers to technologies that would be apparent or known to one of ordinary skill in the art, such technologies encompass those apparent or known to the skilled artisan now or at any time in the future.
  • The presence of broadening words and phrases such as “one or more,” “at least,” “but not limited to” or other like phrases in some instances shall not be read to mean that the narrower case is intended or required in instances where such broadening phrases may be absent. The use of the term “module” does not imply that the components or functionality described or claimed as part of the module are all configured in a common package. Indeed, any or all of the various components of a module, whether control logic or other components, can be combined in a single package or separately maintained and can further be distributed in multiple groupings or packages or across multiple locations.
  • Additionally, the various embodiments set forth herein are described in terms of exemplary block diagrams, flow charts and other illustrations. As will become apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art after reading this document, the illustrated embodiments and their various alternatives can be implemented without confinement to the illustrated examples. For example, block diagrams and their accompanying description should not be construed as mandating a particular architecture or configuration.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A method, comprising:
    a mobile computing device receiving heart rate data of a user from a heart rate monitor disposed on the user during an exercise period;
    the mobile computing device using the heart rate data and a predetermined conversion formula to determine a number of points accumulated during the exercise period; and
    the mobile computing device communicating with an external computing device to exchange at least a portion of the accumulated points for a predetermined privilege.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1, wherein the predetermined privilege comprises a grade.
  3. 3. The method of claim 1, further comprising the mobile computing device visually displaying a progress indication during the exercise period.
  4. 4. The method of claim 3, wherein the progress indication comprises at least one of: a points earned per unit time indication; a total points earned indication; a current heart rate indication; a heart rate history indication; a calorie burn rate indication; and a total calorie burned indication.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
    the mobile computing device receiving a sedentary heart rate value for the user; and
    wherein the conversion formula is configured such that points are not assigned if the heart rate data indicates that a heart rate of the user is within a predetermined range of the sedentary heart rate.
  6. 6. The method of claim 5, further comprising the mobile computing device obtaining a maximum heart rate value for the user; and the mobile computing device determining an intensity level during the exercise period; and wherein the number of points accumulated during the exercise period varies according to the intensity level.
  7. 7. The method of claim 5, further comprising the mobile computing device obtaining a maximum heart rate value for the user; and the mobile computing device determining calories burned during the exercise period; and wherein the number of points accumulated during the exercise period varies according to the calories burned.
  8. 8. Computer executable program code embodied on a computer readable medium configured to cause a mobile computing device to perform the functions of:
    receiving heart rate data of a user from a heart rate monitor disposed on the user during an exercise period;
    using the heart rate data and a predetermined conversion formula to determine a number of points accumulated during the exercise period; and
    communicating with an external computing device to exchange at least a portion of the accumulated points for a predetermined privilege.
  9. 9. The computer executable program code of claim 8, wherein the predetermined privilege comprises a grade.
  10. 10. The computer executable program code of claim 8, further configured to cause the mobile computing device to perform the function of visually display a progress indication during the exercise period.
  11. 11. The computer executable program code of claim 10, wherein the progress indication comprises at least one of: a points earned per unit time indication; a total points earned indication; a current heart rate indication; a heart rate history indication; a calorie burn rate indication; and a total calorie burned indication.
  12. 12. The computer executable program code of claim 8, further configured to cause the mobile computing device to perform the function of receiving a sedentary heart rate value for the user; and wherein the conversion formula is configured such that points are not assigned if the heart rate data indicates that a heart rate of the user is within a predetermined range of the sedentary heart rate.
  13. 13. The computer executable program code of claim 12, further configured to cause the mobile computing device to perform the function of obtaining a maximum heart rate value for the user; and the mobile computing device determining calories burned during the exercise period; and wherein the number of points accumulated during the exercise period varies according to the intensity level.
  14. 14. The computer executable program code of claim 12, further configured to cause the mobile computing device to perform the function of obtaining a maximum heart rate value for the user; and the mobile computing device determining calories burned during the exercise period; and wherein the number of points accumulated during the exercise period varies according to the calories burned.
  15. 15. A system, comprising:
    a mobile computing device having a first computer readable medium embodying computer executable program code configured to perform the functions of:
    receiving heart rate data of a user from a heart rate monitor disposed on the user during an exercise period;
    using the heart rate data and a predetermined conversion formula to determine a number of points accumulated during the exercise period; and
    communicating with an external computing device to exchange at least a portion of the accumulated points for a predetermined privilege; and
    the external computing device having a second computer readable medium embodying computer executable program code configured to perform the functions of:
    maintaining an account of the accumulated points; and
    communicating with the mobile computing device to exchange at least a portion of the accumulated points for a predetermined privilege.
  16. 16. The system of claim 15, wherein the predetermined privilege comprises a grade.
  17. 17. The system of claim 15, wherein the computer executable program code embodied on the first computer readable medium is further configured to cause the mobile computing device to perform the function of visually display a progress indication during the exercise period.
  18. 18. The system of claim 17, wherein the progress indication comprises at least one of: a points earned per unit time indication; a total points earned indication; a current heart rate indication; a heart rate history indication; a calorie burn rate indication; and a total calorie burned indication.
  19. 19. The system of claim 15, wherein the computer executable program code embodied on the first computer readable medium is further configured to cause the mobile computing device to perform the function of receiving a sedentary heart rate value for the user; and wherein the conversion formula is configured such that points are not assigned if the heart rate data indicates that a heart rate of the user is within a predetermined range of the sedentary heart rate.
  20. 20. The system of claim 19, wherein the computer executable program code embodied on the first computer readable medium is further configured to cause the mobile computing device to perform the function of obtaining a maximum heart rate value for the user; and the mobile computing device determining calories burned during the exercise period; and wherein the number of points accumulated during the exercise period varies according to the calories burned.
US12630620 2009-12-03 2009-12-03 Exercise derived currency for exchange or grading Abandoned US20110136627A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12630620 US20110136627A1 (en) 2009-12-03 2009-12-03 Exercise derived currency for exchange or grading

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12630620 US20110136627A1 (en) 2009-12-03 2009-12-03 Exercise derived currency for exchange or grading

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110136627A1 true true US20110136627A1 (en) 2011-06-09

Family

ID=44082587

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12630620 Abandoned US20110136627A1 (en) 2009-12-03 2009-12-03 Exercise derived currency for exchange or grading

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20110136627A1 (en)

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120157265A1 (en) * 2010-12-16 2012-06-21 Kao Ying-So Smartphone Capable of Replacing Meter of Electronic Exercise Machine
US20120268592A1 (en) * 2010-12-13 2012-10-25 Nike, Inc. Processing Data of a User Performing an Athletic Activity to Estimate Energy Expenditure
US20120323496A1 (en) * 2011-02-17 2012-12-20 Nike, Inc. Tracking of User Performance Metrics During a Workout Session
US20130024248A1 (en) * 2011-02-17 2013-01-24 Nike, Inc. Retail Training Application
US20150006274A1 (en) * 2013-06-28 2015-01-01 EveryMove, Inc. Lifestyle Rewards System and Method
WO2015038051A1 (en) * 2013-09-10 2015-03-19 Cloudgym Sweden Ab An integrated system for digitization of gym/health industry
CN104520863A (en) * 2012-06-29 2015-04-15 耐克创新有限合伙公司 Retail Training Application
JP2015107335A (en) * 2010-07-14 2015-06-11 アディダス アーゲー Fitness monitoring method, system, program product and application thereof
US9089182B2 (en) 2008-06-13 2015-07-28 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
US9192816B2 (en) 2011-02-17 2015-11-24 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
US9223936B2 (en) 2010-11-24 2015-12-29 Nike, Inc. Fatigue indices and uses thereof
US9283429B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2016-03-15 Nike, Inc. Method and system for automated personal training
US9358426B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2016-06-07 Nike, Inc. Method and system for automated personal training
US9381420B2 (en) 2011-02-17 2016-07-05 Nike, Inc. Workout user experience
US9389057B2 (en) 2010-11-10 2016-07-12 Nike, Inc. Systems and methods for time-based athletic activity measurement and display
US9410857B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-08-09 Nike, Inc. System and method for analyzing athletic activity
US9457256B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2016-10-04 Nike, Inc. Method and system for automated personal training that includes training programs
US9462844B2 (en) 2008-06-13 2016-10-11 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
US9549585B2 (en) 2008-06-13 2017-01-24 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
US9642415B2 (en) 2011-02-07 2017-05-09 New Balance Athletics, Inc. Systems and methods for monitoring athletic performance
US20170180500A1 (en) * 2014-06-19 2017-06-22 Tencent Technology (Shenzhen) Company Ltd. Method for pushing application content and related device and system
US9743861B2 (en) 2013-02-01 2017-08-29 Nike, Inc. System and method for analyzing athletic activity
US9756895B2 (en) 2012-02-22 2017-09-12 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
WO2017174878A1 (en) * 2016-04-06 2017-10-12 Fitness Village Oy A system and a method for converting exercise activity into user credit
US9811639B2 (en) 2011-11-07 2017-11-07 Nike, Inc. User interface and fitness meters for remote joint workout session
US9977874B2 (en) 2011-11-07 2018-05-22 Nike, Inc. User interface for remote joint workout session
US10070680B2 (en) 2008-06-13 2018-09-11 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system

Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6585622B1 (en) * 1999-12-03 2003-07-01 Nike, Inc. Interactive use an athletic performance monitoring and reward method, system, and computer program product
US20050197063A1 (en) * 2004-03-05 2005-09-08 White Russell W. Pedometer system and method of use
US20060111944A1 (en) * 2003-10-31 2006-05-25 Sirmans James R Jr System and method for encouraging performance of health-promoting measures
US20060287883A1 (en) * 2005-06-20 2006-12-21 Turgiss Jennifer L Interactive, internet supported health and fitness management system
US20080077619A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Systems and methods for facilitating group activities
US20080077620A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Systems and methods for providing audio and visual cues via a portable electronic device
US20080077489A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Rewards systems
US20080076972A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Integrated sensors for tracking performance metrics
US20080077881A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Variable I/O interface for portable media device
US20080076637A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Dynamically adaptive scheduling system
US20080086318A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-04-10 Apple Inc. Lifestyle companion system
US20090069156A1 (en) * 2006-03-03 2009-03-12 Kurunmaeki Veli-Pekka Method and System for Controlling Training
US7618347B2 (en) * 2003-09-04 2009-11-17 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Training control method and apparatus using biofeedback
US20100125028A1 (en) * 2008-11-17 2010-05-20 Life 4 Kids, Llc Physical Activity Reward System
US7773971B1 (en) * 2006-12-20 2010-08-10 Sprint Spectrum L.P. Wireless service incentive system for promoting physical health
US20100292050A1 (en) * 2009-05-18 2010-11-18 Adidas Ag Portable Fitness Monitoring Systems, and Applications Thereof

Patent Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6585622B1 (en) * 1999-12-03 2003-07-01 Nike, Inc. Interactive use an athletic performance monitoring and reward method, system, and computer program product
US7618347B2 (en) * 2003-09-04 2009-11-17 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Training control method and apparatus using biofeedback
US20060111944A1 (en) * 2003-10-31 2006-05-25 Sirmans James R Jr System and method for encouraging performance of health-promoting measures
US20050197063A1 (en) * 2004-03-05 2005-09-08 White Russell W. Pedometer system and method of use
US20060287883A1 (en) * 2005-06-20 2006-12-21 Turgiss Jennifer L Interactive, internet supported health and fitness management system
US20090069156A1 (en) * 2006-03-03 2009-03-12 Kurunmaeki Veli-Pekka Method and System for Controlling Training
US20080077881A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Variable I/O interface for portable media device
US20080076972A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Integrated sensors for tracking performance metrics
US20080077489A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Rewards systems
US20080076637A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Dynamically adaptive scheduling system
US20080086318A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-04-10 Apple Inc. Lifestyle companion system
US20080077620A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Systems and methods for providing audio and visual cues via a portable electronic device
US20080077619A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Apple Inc. Systems and methods for facilitating group activities
US7773971B1 (en) * 2006-12-20 2010-08-10 Sprint Spectrum L.P. Wireless service incentive system for promoting physical health
US20100125028A1 (en) * 2008-11-17 2010-05-20 Life 4 Kids, Llc Physical Activity Reward System
US20100292050A1 (en) * 2009-05-18 2010-11-18 Adidas Ag Portable Fitness Monitoring Systems, and Applications Thereof

Cited By (38)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9089182B2 (en) 2008-06-13 2015-07-28 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
US9622537B2 (en) 2008-06-13 2017-04-18 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
US9549585B2 (en) 2008-06-13 2017-01-24 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
US9462844B2 (en) 2008-06-13 2016-10-11 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
US10070680B2 (en) 2008-06-13 2018-09-11 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
JP2015107335A (en) * 2010-07-14 2015-06-11 アディダス アーゲー Fitness monitoring method, system, program product and application thereof
US9283429B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2016-03-15 Nike, Inc. Method and system for automated personal training
US9919186B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2018-03-20 Nike, Inc. Method and system for automated personal training
US9457256B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2016-10-04 Nike, Inc. Method and system for automated personal training that includes training programs
US9358426B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2016-06-07 Nike, Inc. Method and system for automated personal training
US9389057B2 (en) 2010-11-10 2016-07-12 Nike, Inc. Systems and methods for time-based athletic activity measurement and display
US9429411B2 (en) 2010-11-10 2016-08-30 Nike, Inc. Systems and methods for time-based athletic activity measurement and display
US9757619B2 (en) 2010-11-10 2017-09-12 Nike, Inc. Systems and methods for time-based athletic activity measurement and display
US9223936B2 (en) 2010-11-24 2015-12-29 Nike, Inc. Fatigue indices and uses thereof
US20120268592A1 (en) * 2010-12-13 2012-10-25 Nike, Inc. Processing Data of a User Performing an Athletic Activity to Estimate Energy Expenditure
US9852271B2 (en) * 2010-12-13 2017-12-26 Nike, Inc. Processing data of a user performing an athletic activity to estimate energy expenditure
US20120157265A1 (en) * 2010-12-16 2012-06-21 Kao Ying-So Smartphone Capable of Replacing Meter of Electronic Exercise Machine
US9642415B2 (en) 2011-02-07 2017-05-09 New Balance Athletics, Inc. Systems and methods for monitoring athletic performance
US9192816B2 (en) 2011-02-17 2015-11-24 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
US9924760B2 (en) 2011-02-17 2018-03-27 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
US20130024248A1 (en) * 2011-02-17 2013-01-24 Nike, Inc. Retail Training Application
US20120323496A1 (en) * 2011-02-17 2012-12-20 Nike, Inc. Tracking of User Performance Metrics During a Workout Session
US9381420B2 (en) 2011-02-17 2016-07-05 Nike, Inc. Workout user experience
US9411940B2 (en) 2011-02-17 2016-08-09 Nike, Inc. Selecting and correlating physical activity data with image data
US9977874B2 (en) 2011-11-07 2018-05-22 Nike, Inc. User interface for remote joint workout session
US9811639B2 (en) 2011-11-07 2017-11-07 Nike, Inc. User interface and fitness meters for remote joint workout session
US9756895B2 (en) 2012-02-22 2017-09-12 Nike, Inc. Footwear having sensor system
CN104520863A (en) * 2012-06-29 2015-04-15 耐克创新有限合伙公司 Retail Training Application
US9743861B2 (en) 2013-02-01 2017-08-29 Nike, Inc. System and method for analyzing athletic activity
US9410857B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-08-09 Nike, Inc. System and method for analyzing athletic activity
US10024740B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-07-17 Nike, Inc. System and method for analyzing athletic activity
US9810591B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-11-07 Nike, Inc. System and method of analyzing athletic activity
US20150006274A1 (en) * 2013-06-28 2015-01-01 EveryMove, Inc. Lifestyle Rewards System and Method
WO2015038051A1 (en) * 2013-09-10 2015-03-19 Cloudgym Sweden Ab An integrated system for digitization of gym/health industry
US10009436B2 (en) * 2014-06-19 2018-06-26 Tencent Technology (Shenzhen) Company Limited Method for pushing application content and related device and system
US20170180500A1 (en) * 2014-06-19 2017-06-22 Tencent Technology (Shenzhen) Company Ltd. Method for pushing application content and related device and system
JP2017521771A (en) * 2014-06-19 2017-08-03 テンセント・テクノロジー・(シェンジェン)・カンパニー・リミテッド Methods and associated devices and systems for pushing application content
WO2017174878A1 (en) * 2016-04-06 2017-10-12 Fitness Village Oy A system and a method for converting exercise activity into user credit

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Halson Monitoring training load to understand fatigue in athletes
Rowlands et al. Measurement of physical activity in children with particular reference to the use of heart rate and pedometry
Epstein et al. How much activity do youth get? A quantitative review of heart-rate measured activity
Friedenreich et al. Reliability and validity of the past year total physical activity questionnaire
Drust et al. Future perspectives in the evaluation of the physiological demands of soccer
Abel et al. Validation of the Kenz Lifecorder EX and ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers for walking and running in adults
Ridgers et al. Assessing physical activity during recess using accelerometry
US7717827B2 (en) Method and system for controlling training
Patel et al. Activity monitoring and energy expenditure in COPD patients: a validation study
Richardson et al. A meta-analysis of pedometer-based walking interventions and weight loss
Borresen et al. Changes in heart rate recovery in response to acute changes in training load
Faulkner et al. Validation of a physical activity assessment tool for individuals with schizophrenia
US20050209051A1 (en) User interface for a resistance training device and method of use
US6675041B2 (en) Electronic apparatus and method for monitoring net calorie intake
US7690556B1 (en) Step counter accounting for incline
Boon et al. Validation of the New Zealand physical activity questionnaire (NZPAQ-LF) and the international physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ-LF) with accelerometry
US20120041767A1 (en) Athletic Activity User Experience and Environment
Zuckerman et al. Deconstructing gamification: evaluating the effectiveness of continuous measurement, virtual rewards, and social comparison for promoting physical activity
Dollman et al. A hitchhiker's guide to assessing young people's physical activity: Deciding what method to use
US20090105047A1 (en) Device for analyzing and monitoring exercise done by a user
US20050272564A1 (en) Exercise apparatus and method for tracking number of steps
Karabulut et al. Comparison of two waist-mounted and two ankle-mounted electronic pedometers
US7662065B1 (en) Method and apparatus to provide daily goals in accordance with historical data
Ruiz et al. Artificial neural network-based equation for estimating VO2max from the 20 m shuttle run test in adolescents
US6601016B1 (en) Monitoring fitness activity across diverse exercise machines utilizing a universally accessible server system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: ITMP, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WILLIAMS, MICHAEL C.;REEL/FRAME:023860/0215

Effective date: 20100115