US20110112353A1 - Bifurcated outflow cannulae - Google Patents

Bifurcated outflow cannulae Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110112353A1
US20110112353A1 US12/860,106 US86010610A US2011112353A1 US 20110112353 A1 US20110112353 A1 US 20110112353A1 US 86010610 A US86010610 A US 86010610A US 2011112353 A1 US2011112353 A1 US 2011112353A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
blood
channel
direction
egress
arterial system
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/860,106
Inventor
Robert C. Farnan
John P. Budris
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
CircuLite Inc
Original Assignee
CircuLite Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US25934709P priority Critical
Application filed by CircuLite Inc filed Critical CircuLite Inc
Priority to US12/860,106 priority patent/US20110112353A1/en
Publication of US20110112353A1 publication Critical patent/US20110112353A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/10Blood pumps; Artificial hearts; Devices for mechanical circulatory assistance, e.g. intra-aortic balloon pumps
    • A61M1/1008Tubes; Connections therefor
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/10Blood pumps; Artificial hearts; Devices for mechanical circulatory assistance, e.g. intra-aortic balloon pumps
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/10Blood pumps; Artificial hearts; Devices for mechanical circulatory assistance, e.g. intra-aortic balloon pumps
    • A61M1/12Blood pumps; Artificial hearts; Devices for mechanical circulatory assistance, e.g. intra-aortic balloon pumps implantable into the body
    • A61M1/122Heart assist devices, i.e. for assisting an ailing heart, using additional pumping means in the blood circuit
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/10Blood pumps; Artificial hearts; Devices for mechanical circulatory assistance, e.g. intra-aortic balloon pumps
    • A61M1/101Non-positive displacement pumps, e.g. impeller, centrifugal, vane pumps
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/10Blood pumps; Artificial hearts; Devices for mechanical circulatory assistance, e.g. intra-aortic balloon pumps
    • A61M1/12Blood pumps; Artificial hearts; Devices for mechanical circulatory assistance, e.g. intra-aortic balloon pumps implantable into the body

Abstract

A bifurcated cannula for directing blood into the arterial system. The bifurcated cannula including an ingress channel and first and second egress channels. The first egress channel directs a first portion of the blood entering the bifurcated cannula into the arterial system in a first direction. The second egress channel directs a second portion of the blood entering the bifurcated cannula into the arterial system in a direction that opposes the first direction.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims the priority of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/259,347, filed on Nov. 9, 2009 (pending), the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention relates generally to devices for assisting the heart in moving blood through the body; more specifically the invention relates to pump outflow cannulae.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The circulatory system of the human body transports blood containing chemicals, such as metabolites, hormones, and cellular waste products, to and from the cells. This organ system includes the heart, blood, and a vascular network. Veins are vessels that carry blood toward the heart while arteries carry blood away from the heart. The human heart consists of two atrial chambers and two ventricular chambers. Atrial chambers receive blood from the veins and the ventricular chambers, which include larger muscular walls, pump blood from the heart. Movement of the blood is as follows: blood enters the right atrium from either the superior or inferior vena cava and moves into the right ventricle. From the right ventricle, blood is pumped to the lungs via pulmonary arteries to become oxygenated. Once the blood has been oxygenated, the blood returns to the heart by entering the left atrium, via the pulmonary veins, and flows into the left ventricle. Finally, the blood is pumped from the left ventricle into the aorta and the vascular network.
  • In some instances, it becomes necessary to maintain fluidic communication with the vascular network. For example, a circulatory assist system uses a pump to aid in moving blood through the vascular network, thereby relieving the symptoms associated with congestive heart failure (commonly referred to as heart disease). The pump of the circulatory assist system includes inflow and outflow cannulae. Often the inflow cannula connects the left side of the heart to the pump; the outflow cannula connects the pump to the arterial network.
  • However, the fluidic output of the pump will often greatly exceed the natural fluid capacity of the particular artery used for implanting the outflow cannula. The insufficiency of the venous network to then immediately compensate for the increased blood inflow may result in edema of the extremity immediate to the implanted outflow cannula. While the venous network may adapt and compensate over time, it would be beneficial to have devices that better distribute the fluid flow from the pump in a manner that would prevent the initial occurrence of swelling.
  • SUMMARY
  • In one illustrative embodiment, the present invention is directed to a bifurcated cannula for directing blood into the arterial system. The bifurcated cannula including an ingress channel and first and second egress channels. Blood from a pump flows into the bifurcated cannula through the ingress channel. The first egress channel directs a first portion of the blood entering the bifurcated cannula into the arterial system in a first direction. The second egress channel directs a second portion of the blood entering the bifurcated cannula into the arterial system in a direction that opposes the first direction.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic view of a circulatory assist system with the outflow of the pump being connected to the right subclavian artery by a bifurcated cannula, with the heart shown in cross-section.
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of one exemplary embodiment of a bifurcated outflow cannula connected to the right subclavian artery and an implantable pump.
  • FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the bifurcated outflow cannula shown in FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an exemplary method of removing the bifurcated outflow cannula and connecting the stent grafts.
  • FIG. 5A is a cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a bifurcated outflow cannula with a channel fitting.
  • FIG. 5B is a view similar to FIG. 5A, but showing the channel fitting assembled with the bifurcated outflow cannula.
  • FIGS. 6-8 are cross-sectional views of additional embodiments of the bifurcated outflow cannulae.
  • FIG. 9 is a diagrammatic view of an alternate method of implanting the circulatory assist system, with the heart shown in cross-section.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an implanted circulatory assist system 10. For illustrative purposes, certain anatomy is shown including the heart 12 of a patient 14 having a right atrium 16, a left atrium 18, a right ventricle 20, and a left ventricle 22. Blood from the left and right subclavian veins 24, 26 and the left and right jugular veins 28, 30 enters the right atrium 16 through the superior vena cava 32 while blood from the lower parts of the body enters the right atrium 16 through the inferior vena cava 34. The blood is pumped from the right atrium 16, to the right ventricle 20, and to the lungs (not shown) to be oxygenated. Blood returning from the lungs enters the left atrium 18 via pulmonary veins 36 and is then pumped into the left ventricle 22. Blood leaving the left ventricle 22 enters the aorta 38 and flows into the left subclavian artery 40, the left common carotid 42, and the brachiocephalic trunk 44 including the right subclavian artery 46 and the right common carotid 48.
  • With respect to the implanted circulatory assist system 10, a flexible cannula body 50 extends from within the left atrium 18, through the intra-atrial septum 52, and percutaneously to a vascular access site 54 in the right subclavian vein 26. The flexible cannula body 50 is attached to an input port 56 of an implantable pump 58. Though not shown, the flexible cannula body 50 may alternatively be surgically implanted into the heart 12 and extend to the pump 58 through the thoracic cavity.
  • The pump 58 may be an axially-driven pump with an impeller (not shown). Those skilled in this art, however, recognize that other types of pumps may be used in other embodiments but may include pumps such as those described in U.S. application Ser. No. 11/627,444, published as 2007/0197854, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. The suitable pump 58 for use with the circulatory assist system 10 may be capable of pumping blood.
  • A cable 60 can extend transdermally from the pump 58 to a position in the abdomen where the cable 60 exits the patient 14 and may connect to a power supply (not shown). Suitable power supplies may be any universal-type power supply that sends power to the pump 58 via the cable 60 and may include, but is not limited to, a rechargeable battery pack.
  • The physician may position the implantable pump 58 at least subcutaneously and, optionally, submuscularly in a pump pocket 62 located near the vascular access site 54, or alternatively, maintain the pump 58 externally.
  • A bifurcated outflow cannula 64 connects an output port 66 of the implantable pump 58 to a suitable artery, illustrate here as the right subclavian artery 46. One skilled in the art would understand that while the bifurcated outflow cannula 64 is illustrated as extending over the right subclavian vein 26 to the right subclavian artery, in practice the bifurcated outflow cannula 64 would likely reside beneath the right subclavian vein 26.
  • FIGS. 2 and 3 illustrate the bifurcated outflow cannula 64 formed as a y-connector having an ingress channel 68 and first and second egress channels 70, 72. The first egress channel 70, as illustrated, directs blood into the right subclavian artery 46 via a first stent graft 74 and in a direction that opposes (i.e., retrograde) the native blood flow direction of the right artery 46, illustrated by arrow 75. The second egress channel 72, as illustrated, directs blood into the artery 46 via a second stent graft 76 and in a direction that is the same (i.e., radial) as the native blood flow direction of the right subclavian artery 46. The stent grafts 74, 76 may be any commercially-available self expanding, covered, endovascular stent graft, such as the FLAIR, which is manufactured by Bard Peripheral Vascular (Tempe, Ariz.) or the covered WALLSTENT by Boston Scientific (Natick, Mass.). As illustrated, the size of the stent grafts 74, 76 are selected to allow for a minimum of about 5 cm engagement within the vascular structure and up to about 10 cm of length outside of the vascular structure for connection to the bifurcated outflow cannula 64; however, the size and lengths of the stent grafts 74, 76 should not be limited to those specifically shown.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates the further details of the bifurcated outflow cannula 64 in cross-section. The bifurcated outflow cannula 64 may be machined from a metallic material, for example titanium, and polished to minimize the incidence of thrombus formation; alternatively, the bifurcated outflow cannula 64 may be molded from a polymeric material, such as silicone or urethane.
  • The egress channels 70, 72 are constructed to permit a desired, relative amount of blood flow in the radial and retrograde directions. As shown, the second egress channel 72 branches distal to the first egress channel 70; however, other arrangements may be used. The egress channels 70, 72 are constructed with lumens 78, 80 having relative cross-sectional areas that are selected to provide a retrograde:radial flow ratio that is approximately 80:20 to meter the blood flow from the pump 58. Accordingly, a first flow through the first egress channel 70 in the retrograde direction will be high volume while a second flow through the second egress channel 72 in the radial direction will be low volume. Though not specifically shown, it is possible to construct the cross-sectional areas such that the ratios are 50:50 or other ratios as desired, but generally the volume directed in the retrograde direction will meet or exceed the volume directed in the radial direction.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 1, 2, and 3, in use, the physician creates first and second vascular incisions 82, 84 in the appropriate vascular structure, illustrated here as the right subclavian artery 46. The first and second stent grafts 74, 76 are directed into and deployed in the right subclavian artery 46 in a manner that is well known to one that is skilled in the art and that accommodates placement of the bifurcated outflow cannula 64.
  • The physician then positions the proximal ends of the stent grafts 74, 76 over an outer surface of the respective egress channels 70, 72 of the bifurcated outflow cannula 64. The outer surface may be constructed to include one or more barbs 86, 88 for providing resistance against the undesired removal of the stent grafts 74, 76. Graft collets 90, 92 may then be used to clamp and secure the stent grafts 74, 76 onto the egress channels 70, 72 in a manner that is known.
  • If desired, the physician may connect an extension tube 94 between the ingress channel 68 and the outflow port 66 of the pump 58. In this way, the pump 58 may be positioned at a desired distance from the right subclavian artery 46. The extension tube 94 may be constructed from a biodurable, low durometer thermoplastic or thermoset elastomer material. Coupling of the extension tube 94 to the ingress channel 68 may include directing a distal end of the extension tube 94 over the outer surface of the ingress channel 68, which may also include one or more barbs 96. The extension tube 94 may then be secured with a collet 98 and in a manner that is similar to the methods described above. Another collet 100 may be used to secure the extension tube 94 to the outflow port 66 of the pump 58.
  • With the fluidic coupling complete, the circulatory assist system 10 may be used to aid the heart 12 in pumping the patient's blood through the vascular network as was shown in FIG. 1. Accordingly, blood flow can proceed in the native manner with oxygenated blood traveling from the left atrium 18 into the left ventricle 22 to the aorta 38. From the aorta 38, blood moves into the left subclavian artery 40, the left common carotid 42, and the brachiocephalic trunk 44. Blood flow may also proceed along the artificial path by entering the flexible cannula body 50 from the left atrium 18 and traveling through the lumen of the flexible cannula body 50 to the pump 58.
  • From the pump 58, blood flows into the bifurcated outflow cannula 64, which is then distributed in a manner that is consistent with the selected retrograde:radial ratio. For example, with the illustrated bifurcated outflow cannula 64 having the retrograde:radial ratio of 80:20, the majority of the blood will be directed in the retrograde direction. Because the pump 58 is typically operated within a range of about 2 L/min to about 3 L/min and the native flow rate of the right subclavian artery 46 is about 0.5 L/min, the blood pumped in the retrograde direction will overpower the native flow into the right subclavian artery 46. Accordingly, the net blood flow in the right subclavian artery 46 that is distal to the first egress channel 70 will be in the retrograde direction into the brachiocephalic trunk 44, and even the aorta 38. From there, the blood is redistributed, for example, into other arteries, such as the carotid arteries 42, 48 and the vertebral artery 104. The other 20% of the blood flow is directed radially, in the native blood flow direction of the right subclavian artery 46 and, accordingly, will enter the axillary artery 106 and the brachial artery 108 of the right arm 112. In this way, blood is supplied to the patient's right arm 112 or the extremity downstream of the select artery while not overwhelming the venous capacity to remove the same and thus eliminating edema.
  • In some patients, there may be a time after the surgery in which the circulatory assist system 10 is no longer necessary. Thus, it would be beneficial to remove the unnecessary components, such as the implantable pump 58 and the flexible cannula body 50. However, the decrease in blood flow in the portion of the right subclavian artery 46 between the stent grafts 74, 76 will have caused the vessel to thrombus completely and become occluded within a short time after the circulatory assist system 10 is implanted. One exemplary method of reversing the procedure and continuing blood flow through the right subclavian artery 46 is illustrated in FIG. 4.
  • As shown, once the pump 58 (FIG. 1) and flexible cannula body 50 (FIG. 1) have been removed, the extension tube 94 (FIG. 2) and bifurcated outflow cannula 64 (FIG. 2) are also removed. The stent grafts 74, 76 are then coupled together using a U-shaped adaptor 114. The U-shaped adaptor 114 may be constructed in a manner that is similar to the bifurcated outflow cannula 64 (FIG. 3), namely, machined from a metallic material and polished, or molded from a polymeric material. The adaptor 114 may include barbs (not shown) located near the ingress and egress openings, in a manner similar to the bifurcated outflow cannula 64 (FIG. 3), for attaching the first and second stent grafts 74, 76. Collets 116, 118 may then be used to secure the stent grafts 74, 76 to the adaptor 114.
  • With the circulatory assist system 10 (FIG. 1) removed, blood will flow only in accordance with the native path, which was described in detail above. Blood entering the right subclavian artery 46 will be unable to traverse the portion of the vessel residing between the stent grafts 74, 76. Instead, blood will flow through the stent grafts 74, 76 and the U-shaped adaptor 114 and then to the axillary artery 106 (FIG. 1).
  • While the manner of reversing the procedure has been shown with a U-shaped adaptor 114 and the right subclavian artery 46, it would be understood that adaptors having other shapes could also be used in other vascular structures.
  • FIGS. 5A and 5B illustrate a bifurcated outflow cannula 120 having an alternate Y-shaped configuration where egress channels 121, 122 are constructed to diverge angularly from the same point distal to the ingress channel 123. Construction of the alternate bifurcated outflow cannula 120 may be in accordance with the methods described previously. The ingress channel 123 may include a barb 124 for receiving an extension tube 94 (FIG. 2); however, it would be understood that the ingress channel 123 could also couple directly to the output port 66 (FIG. 1) of the pump 58 (FIG. 1), with or without the use of a collet. To achieve a desired retrograde:radial flow ratio, channel fittings 126, 128 may be constructed and fitted into the egress channels 121, 122, respectively. Each channel fitting 126, 128 will include an internal lumen 130, 132 having an internal cross-sectional area for determining the retrograde:radial flow ratio. The channel fittings 126, 128 may include barbs 134, 136 for coupling to the respective egress channel 121, 122. Glue, epoxy, or welding may be used to secure the channel fittings 126, 128. Additional barbs 138, 140 may be included on the channel fittings 126, 128 for receiving the stent grafts 74, 76 (FIG. 1).
  • FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate yet two additional manners of constructing the bifurcated outflow cannula 120 where the desired retrograde:radial ratio is selected by the inclusion of a flow selector. The flow selectors in FIG. 6 include irises 141, 142 having different inner diameters; the flow selectors in FIG. 7 include rings 144, 146 also having different inner diameters. While these figures specifically illustrate the flow selectors within the egress channels 121, 122, it would be understood that the flow selectors could be positioned alternatively, or additionally, in the ingress channel 123, a position between the ingress channel 123 and one of the egress channels 121, 122, or in a combination of these positions. Further, it would be understood that the flow selectors could be positioned in any one of the various embodiments of the bifurcated outflow cannula and can be mixed to suit a particular function.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates yet another alternate configuration of the bifurcated outflow cannula 148, formed as a t-connector. In this particular configuration, the egress channels 150, 152 form a 90° angle with respect to the ingress channel 154 and form a 180° angle therebetween. While the illustrative embodiment is shown with an 80:20 ratio, which was molded or machined, it would be understood that the channel fittings 126, 128 of FIGS. 5A and 5B could alternatively be used. One or more of the channels 150, 152, 154 may be constructed with barbs 156, 158, 160 for securing the stent grafts 74, 76 (FIG. 2) as described previously.
  • It would be appreciated by one skilled in the art that the egress channels need not necessarily direct blood into the same arterial vessel. FIG. 9 illustrates another method of using the bifurcated cannula 64 where the first stent graft 74 enters the aorta 38 at the first vascular incision 82 a and the second stent graft 76 enters the left subclavian artery 40 at the second vascular incision 84 a. In this way, the low volume blood flow is directed into the left subclavian artery 40 for the left arm 162 while the high volume blood flow is directed into the aorta 38 for distribution amongst the left subclavian artery 40, the left common carotid 42, and the brachiocephalic trunk 44. FIG. 9 also illustrates the flexible cannula body 50 being surgically positioned into the left atrium 18.
  • While only a few specific configurations are shown, it would be understood that various arrangements are possible having a single ingress channel and two egress channels.
  • While the present invention has been illustrated by a description of various preferred embodiments and while these embodiments have been described in some detail, it is not the intention of the Applicant to restrict or in any way limit the scope of the appended claims to such detail. Additional advantages and modifications will readily appear to those skilled in the art. The various features of the invention may be used alone or in any combination depending on the needs and preferences of the user. This has been a description of the present invention, along with the preferred methods of practicing the present invention as currently known. However, the invention itself should only be defined by the appended claims.

Claims (17)

1. A bifurcated cannula for directing blood into the arterial system having blood flowing in a first direction, the bifurcated cannula comprising:
an ingress channel for receiving blood flow from a pump;
a first egress channel configured to direct a first portion of the blood from the ingress channel into the arterial system in the first direction; and
a second egress channel configured to direct a second portion of the blood from the ingress channel into the arterial system in a direction that opposes the first direction.
2. The bifurcated cannula of claim 1, wherein a cross-sectional area of each of the first and second egress channels determines the first and second portions of blood flowing through the first and second egress channels.
3. The bifurcated cannula of claim 2, wherein cross-sectional areas of the first and second egress channels are sized such that the first portion of the blood is less than the second portion of the blood.
4. The bifurcated cannula of claim 2, wherein cross-sectional areas of the first and second egress channels are sized such that the first and second portions of the blood are each 50% of the blood flowing through the ingress channel.
5. The bifurcated cannula of claim 1, wherein first and second stent grafts are coupled in fluid communication respectively with the first and second egress channels and further adapted to be connected to the arterial system.
6. The bifurcated cannula of claim 5, wherein an outer surface of each of the first and second egress channels includes barbs for retaining the respective stent grafts.
7. The bifurcated cannula of claim 1, wherein an extension tube is coupled in fluidic communication with the ingress channel and further adapted to be connected to the pump.
8. The bifurcated cannula of claim 1, further comprising a flow selector configured to reduce a cross-sectional area of either of the first or second egress channels.
9. The bifurcated cannula of claim 8, wherein the flow selector is an iris having two or more pivotable blades.
10. The bifurcated cannula of claim 1 further comprising:
a first channel fitting received by the first egress channel, wherein a cross-sectional area of a lumen through the first channel fitting is smaller than a cross-sectional area of the first egress channel.
11. The bifurcated cannula of claim 10, further comprising:
a second channel fitting received by the second egress channel, wherein a cross-sectional area of a lumen through the second channel fitting is smaller than a cross-sectional area of the second egress channel.
12. A method of removing the bifurcated cannula of claim 1, wherein first and second stent grafts couple the first and second egress channels to the arterial system, the method comprising:
disengaging the pump from the ingress channel;
removing the pump;
removing the bifurcated cannula; and
fluidicly coupling the first and second stent grafts such that the blood flowing in the first direction enters the second stent graft and flows into the first stent graft in the first direction and then flows back into the arterial system in the first direction.
13. A method of directing blood from a pump to the arterial system having blood flowing in a first direction with a bifurcated cannula comprising an ingress channel and first and second egress channels, the method comprising:
directing the blood from the pump into the ingress channel of the bifurcated cannula;
directing a first portion of the blood through the first egress channel and into the arterial system such that the first portion enters the arterial system in the first direction; and
directing a second portion of the blood entering the bifurcated cannula from the ingress channel through the second egress channel and into the arterial system such that the second portion of the blood enters the arterial system in a direction that opposes the first direction.
14. The method according to claim 13, wherein directing the first and second portions is determined by relative cross-sectional areas of each of the first and second egress channels.
15. The method according to claim 13, wherein the directing of the first and second portions is determined by a flow selector, wherein the flow selector is configured to reduce a cross-sectional area of either of the first or second egress channels.
16. The method according to claim 13, further comprising:
coupling the first and second egress channels in fluidic communication respectively to the arterial system by first and second stent grafts.
17. A method of disengaging a circulatory assist system from the arterial system of a patient having blood flowing in a first direction, wherein the circulatory assist system includes a flexible cannula body coupling the left side of the heart of a patient to a pump and a bifurcated cannula comprising an ingress channel for receiving blood from the pump, a first egress channel configured to direct a first portion of the blood from the ingress channel into a first stent graft coupled to the arterial system such that the blood moves in the first direction, and a second egress channel configured to direct a second portion of the blood from the ingress channel into a second stent graft coupled to the arterial system such that the blood moves in a direction that opposes the first direction, the method comprising:
disengaging the first and second egress channels from the first and second stent grafts; and
fluidicly coupling the first and second stent grafts such that the blood flowing in the first direction enters the second stent graft and flows into the first stent graft in the first direction and then flows back into the arterial system in the first direction.
US12/860,106 2009-11-09 2010-08-20 Bifurcated outflow cannulae Abandoned US20110112353A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US25934709P true 2009-11-09 2009-11-09
US12/860,106 US20110112353A1 (en) 2009-11-09 2010-08-20 Bifurcated outflow cannulae

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/860,106 US20110112353A1 (en) 2009-11-09 2010-08-20 Bifurcated outflow cannulae
US14/596,665 US9801987B2 (en) 2009-11-09 2015-01-14 Bifurcated outflow cannulae

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/596,665 Division US9801987B2 (en) 2009-11-09 2015-01-14 Bifurcated outflow cannulae

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110112353A1 true US20110112353A1 (en) 2011-05-12

Family

ID=43970223

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/860,106 Abandoned US20110112353A1 (en) 2009-11-09 2010-08-20 Bifurcated outflow cannulae
US14/596,665 Active 2030-08-28 US9801987B2 (en) 2009-11-09 2015-01-14 Bifurcated outflow cannulae

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/596,665 Active 2030-08-28 US9801987B2 (en) 2009-11-09 2015-01-14 Bifurcated outflow cannulae

Country Status (6)

Country Link
US (2) US20110112353A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2498836B1 (en)
JP (1) JP5584773B2 (en)
CA (1) CA2776137A1 (en)
HK (1) HK1175417A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2011056280A1 (en)

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20130281761A1 (en) * 2010-11-05 2013-10-24 Tufts Medical Center, Inc. Cannula with bifurcated tip for a cardiac assist device
US9463268B2 (en) 2010-09-07 2016-10-11 Paul A. Spence Cannula systems and methods
WO2016119771A3 (en) * 2015-01-26 2016-10-20 Xenios Ag Assembly comprising a suction line, a pressure line and a pump
US9585991B2 (en) 2012-10-16 2017-03-07 Heartware, Inc. Devices, systems, and methods for facilitating flow from the heart to a blood pump
US9717830B2 (en) 2015-10-28 2017-08-01 Circulite, Inc. Inflow cannula and blood flow assist system
US9808283B2 (en) 2013-12-04 2017-11-07 Heartware, Inc. Apparatus and methods for cutting an atrial wall
US9993587B2 (en) * 2013-06-26 2018-06-12 Circulite, Inc. Inflow cannula tunneling tool allowing quick exchange with dilating plug

Families Citing this family (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
AU2002952691A0 (en) 2002-11-15 2002-11-28 Sunshine Heart Company Pty Ltd Heart assist device utilising aortic deformation
ES2561354T3 (en) 2003-10-31 2016-02-25 Sunshine Heart Company Pty Ltd Timing Control System
WO2013176746A1 (en) * 2012-05-22 2013-11-28 Sunshine Heart Company, Pty Ltd Methods, systems, and devices relating to a removable percutaneous interface line
WO2017075528A1 (en) 2015-10-30 2017-05-04 ECMOtek, LLC Devices for endovascular access through extracorporeal life support circuits
EP3366332A1 (en) * 2017-02-22 2018-08-29 Berlin Heart GmbH Device and method for connecting two blood vessel sections

Citations (79)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2935068A (en) * 1955-08-04 1960-05-03 Donaldson John Shearman Surgical procedure and apparatus for use in carrying out the same
US3195540A (en) * 1963-03-29 1965-07-20 Louis C Waller Power supply for body implanted instruments
US3433227A (en) * 1965-10-25 1969-03-18 Edward L Kettenbach Surgical drains
US3903895A (en) * 1973-01-05 1975-09-09 Sherwood Medical Ind Inc Cardiovascular catheter
US3942535A (en) * 1973-09-27 1976-03-09 G. D. Searle & Co. Rechargeable tissue stimulating system
US4033331A (en) * 1975-07-17 1977-07-05 Guss Stephen B Cardiac catheter and method of using same
US4534761A (en) * 1981-08-14 1985-08-13 Bentley Laboratories, Inc. Implant device
US4790825A (en) * 1986-09-05 1988-12-13 Electro Catheter Corporation Closed chest cannulation method and device for atrial-major artery bypass
US4995857A (en) * 1989-04-07 1991-02-26 Arnold John R Left ventricular assist device and method for temporary and permanent procedures
US5163954A (en) * 1990-02-21 1992-11-17 Sorin Biomedica Spa Suture ring for heart valve prostheses
US5171218A (en) * 1992-01-02 1992-12-15 Trustees Of Boston University Bidirectional femoral arterial cannula
US5190528A (en) * 1990-10-19 1993-03-02 Boston University Percutaneous transseptal left atrial cannulation system
US5256146A (en) * 1991-10-11 1993-10-26 W. D. Ensminger Vascular catheterization system with catheter anchoring feature
US5287852A (en) * 1993-01-13 1994-02-22 Direct Trends International Ltd. Apparatus and method for maintaining a tracheal stoma
US5290227A (en) * 1992-08-06 1994-03-01 Pasque Michael K Method of implanting blood pump in ascending aorta or main pulmonary artery
US5290251A (en) * 1990-11-20 1994-03-01 Uro Research, Inc. Method of cystostomy tube implantation
US5344443A (en) * 1992-09-17 1994-09-06 Rem Technologies, Inc. Heart pump
US5449342A (en) * 1991-09-30 1995-09-12 Nippon Zeon Co., Ltd. Apparatus for assisting blood circulation
US5545191A (en) * 1994-05-06 1996-08-13 Alfred E. Mann Foundation For Scientific Research Method for optimally positioning and securing the external unit of a transcutaneous transducer of the skin of a living body
US5695471A (en) * 1996-02-20 1997-12-09 Kriton Medical, Inc. Sealless rotary blood pump with passive magnetic radial bearings and blood immersed axial bearings
US5697936A (en) * 1988-11-10 1997-12-16 Cook Pacemaker Corporation Device for removing an elongated structure implanted in biological tissue
US5704891A (en) * 1993-09-10 1998-01-06 Ottawa Heart Institute Research Corporation Electrohydraulic ventricular assist device
US5711753A (en) * 1994-04-15 1998-01-27 Allegheny-Singer Research Institute Blood pump device and method of pumping blood
US5738649A (en) * 1996-04-16 1998-04-14 Cardeon Corporation Peripheral entry biventricular catheter system for providing access to the heart for cardiopulmonary surgery or for prolonged circulatory support of the heart
US5741316A (en) * 1996-12-02 1998-04-21 Light Sciences Limited Partnership Electromagnetic coil configurations for power transmission through tissue
US5743845A (en) * 1995-01-12 1998-04-28 Runge; Thomas M. Biventricular pulsatile cardiac support system having a mechanically balanced stroke volume
US5840070A (en) * 1996-02-20 1998-11-24 Kriton Medical, Inc. Sealless rotary blood pump
US5843088A (en) * 1991-12-23 1998-12-01 Ela Medical Sa Tool and method for installation of a ventricular cannulation device
US5858009A (en) * 1997-08-14 1999-01-12 Medtronic, Inc. Multi-lumen cannula
US5921971A (en) * 1996-09-13 1999-07-13 Boston Scientific Corporation Single operator exchange biliary catheter
US5924848A (en) * 1995-06-01 1999-07-20 Advanced Bionics, Inc. Blood pump having radial vanes with enclosed magnetic drive components
US5924975A (en) * 1995-08-30 1999-07-20 International Business Machines Corporation Linear pump
US5938412A (en) * 1995-06-01 1999-08-17 Advanced Bionics, Inc. Blood pump having rotor with internal bore for fluid flow
US5941813A (en) * 1996-07-23 1999-08-24 Cardiotools Herzchirurgietechnik Gmbh Cardiac assist device
US5947892A (en) * 1993-11-10 1999-09-07 Micromed Technology, Inc. Rotary blood pump
US5948006A (en) * 1998-10-14 1999-09-07 Advanced Bionics Corporation Transcutaneous transmission patch
US5965089A (en) * 1996-10-04 1999-10-12 United States Surgical Corporation Circulatory support system
US6001056A (en) * 1998-11-13 1999-12-14 Baxter International Inc. Smooth ventricular assist device conduit
US6017355A (en) * 1997-06-25 2000-01-25 Bio Tap A/S Intercutaneous implant device
US6116862A (en) * 1996-06-25 2000-09-12 Medos Medizintechnik Gmbh Blood pump
US6176848B1 (en) * 1996-04-04 2001-01-23 Impella Cardiotechnik Gmbh Intravascular blood pump
US6186999B1 (en) * 1998-08-27 2001-02-13 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Rigid clampable cannula
US6217546B1 (en) * 1997-05-19 2001-04-17 United States Surgical Corporation Catheter system
US6273861B1 (en) * 1997-01-30 2001-08-14 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Pneumatically actuated tissue sampling device
US6299575B1 (en) * 1997-10-09 2001-10-09 Orqis Medical Corporation Implantable heart assist system
US6354299B1 (en) * 1997-10-27 2002-03-12 Neuropace, Inc. Implantable device for patient communication
US6358266B1 (en) * 1990-03-02 2002-03-19 General Surgical Innovations, Inc. Active cannulas
US6406420B1 (en) * 1997-01-02 2002-06-18 Myocor, Inc. Methods and devices for improving cardiac function in hearts
US6530876B1 (en) * 2000-04-25 2003-03-11 Paul A. Spence Supplemental heart pump methods and systems for supplementing blood through the heart
US20030093104A1 (en) * 1999-10-29 2003-05-15 Bonner Matthew D. Methods and apparatus for providing intra-pericardial access
US6565536B1 (en) * 1994-12-12 2003-05-20 Srs Medical Systems, Inc. System for catheter fixation
US6605032B2 (en) * 1997-10-02 2003-08-12 Micromed Technology, Inc. Implantable pump system
US6623475B1 (en) * 1998-12-02 2003-09-23 Impella Cardiosystems Ag Blood pump without bearing
US20040015150A1 (en) * 1996-05-20 2004-01-22 Gholam-Reza Zadno-Azizi Method and apparatus for emboli containment
US20040024285A1 (en) * 2002-06-21 2004-02-05 Helmut Muckter Blood pump with impeller
US20040024435A1 (en) * 1999-10-29 2004-02-05 Leckrone Michael E. Method and apparatus for providing intra-pericardial access
US20040193004A1 (en) * 2003-03-28 2004-09-30 Terumo Corporation Method and apparatus for adjusting a length of the inflow conduit on a ventricular assist device
US20040236170A1 (en) * 2000-11-15 2004-11-25 Ducksoo Kim Method for surgically joining a ventricular assist device to the cardiovascular system of a living subject using a piercing introducer assembly
US20050107658A1 (en) * 2003-11-19 2005-05-19 Transoma Medical, Inc. Feedback control of ventricular assist devices
US20050159711A1 (en) * 2004-01-20 2005-07-21 Kathrani Biten K. Medical device for providing access
US6942611B2 (en) * 2000-04-01 2005-09-13 Impella Cardiosystems Ag Paracardiac blood pump
US6955175B2 (en) * 1993-02-22 2005-10-18 Stevens John H Method and apparatus for thoracoscopic intracardiac procedures
US20050273155A1 (en) * 2002-08-20 2005-12-08 Bahler Clinton D Endoluminal device with extracellular matrix material and methods
US6994666B2 (en) * 2001-06-05 2006-02-07 Edwards Lifesciences Corporation Non-porous smooth ventricular assist device conduit
US20060094983A1 (en) * 1998-03-03 2006-05-04 Burbank Fred H Methods and apparatus for securing medical instruments to desired locations in a patient's body
US20060100565A1 (en) * 1997-07-11 2006-05-11 A-Med Systems, Inc. Transport pump and organ stabilization apparatus including related methods
US20060116756A1 (en) * 1999-06-30 2006-06-01 Solem Jan O Method and device for treatment of mitral insufficiency
US20060135946A1 (en) * 2004-12-21 2006-06-22 C. R. Bard, Inc. Hemostasis cuff for catheter securement
US7070555B2 (en) * 2000-08-18 2006-07-04 Impella Cardiosystems Ag Intracardiac blood pump
US7077801B2 (en) * 2003-02-19 2006-07-18 Corlife Gbr Methods and devices for improving cardiac output
US20060235357A1 (en) * 2003-03-21 2006-10-19 Woodward John C Cannula
US20060270893A1 (en) * 1997-10-09 2006-11-30 Bolling Steven F Implantable heart assist system and method of applying same
US20070179591A1 (en) * 1983-12-09 2007-08-02 Endovascular Technologies, Inc. Intraluminal grafting system
US7340288B1 (en) * 2005-02-07 2008-03-04 Pacesetter, Inc. Trans-septal intra-cardiac lead system
US20080058925A1 (en) * 2006-08-02 2008-03-06 Gordon Cohen Bifurcated flow device for cardio-pulmonary assist or support and associated methods
US20090112049A1 (en) * 2007-10-29 2009-04-30 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Heart pump apparatus and method for beating heart surgery
US20090254166A1 (en) * 2008-02-05 2009-10-08 Chou Tony M Interventional catheter system and methods
US20090326463A1 (en) * 2008-06-25 2009-12-31 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Iris seal for single incision surgery
US7766814B2 (en) * 2004-03-02 2010-08-03 Peter William Walsh Vessel or sac wall treatment and a cardiac assist device

Family Cites Families (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3944261A (en) * 1975-03-05 1976-03-16 Texas Medical Products, Inc. Bifurcated tubing connector
JPH08189492A (en) * 1995-01-10 1996-07-23 Nikkiso Co Ltd Inspection device for centrifugal pump console
JPH1015056A (en) * 1996-07-08 1998-01-20 San Medical Gijutsu Kenkyusho:Kk Artificial heart
GB0220340D0 (en) * 2002-09-02 2002-10-09 Anson Medical Ltd Flexible stent-graft
US20050113631A1 (en) * 2003-11-12 2005-05-26 Bolling Steven F. Cannulae having a redirecting tip
JP4282567B2 (en) * 2004-08-03 2009-06-24 英史 伊藤 Feed vessels and blood supply apparatus using the same
ES2458365T3 (en) * 2004-09-07 2014-05-05 Droneon Pty Limited Peripheral devices and access systems

Patent Citations (81)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2935068A (en) * 1955-08-04 1960-05-03 Donaldson John Shearman Surgical procedure and apparatus for use in carrying out the same
US3195540A (en) * 1963-03-29 1965-07-20 Louis C Waller Power supply for body implanted instruments
US3433227A (en) * 1965-10-25 1969-03-18 Edward L Kettenbach Surgical drains
US3903895A (en) * 1973-01-05 1975-09-09 Sherwood Medical Ind Inc Cardiovascular catheter
US3942535A (en) * 1973-09-27 1976-03-09 G. D. Searle & Co. Rechargeable tissue stimulating system
US4033331A (en) * 1975-07-17 1977-07-05 Guss Stephen B Cardiac catheter and method of using same
US4534761A (en) * 1981-08-14 1985-08-13 Bentley Laboratories, Inc. Implant device
US20070179591A1 (en) * 1983-12-09 2007-08-02 Endovascular Technologies, Inc. Intraluminal grafting system
US4790825A (en) * 1986-09-05 1988-12-13 Electro Catheter Corporation Closed chest cannulation method and device for atrial-major artery bypass
US5697936A (en) * 1988-11-10 1997-12-16 Cook Pacemaker Corporation Device for removing an elongated structure implanted in biological tissue
US4995857A (en) * 1989-04-07 1991-02-26 Arnold John R Left ventricular assist device and method for temporary and permanent procedures
US5163954A (en) * 1990-02-21 1992-11-17 Sorin Biomedica Spa Suture ring for heart valve prostheses
US6358266B1 (en) * 1990-03-02 2002-03-19 General Surgical Innovations, Inc. Active cannulas
US5190528A (en) * 1990-10-19 1993-03-02 Boston University Percutaneous transseptal left atrial cannulation system
US5290251A (en) * 1990-11-20 1994-03-01 Uro Research, Inc. Method of cystostomy tube implantation
US5449342A (en) * 1991-09-30 1995-09-12 Nippon Zeon Co., Ltd. Apparatus for assisting blood circulation
US5256146A (en) * 1991-10-11 1993-10-26 W. D. Ensminger Vascular catheterization system with catheter anchoring feature
US5843088A (en) * 1991-12-23 1998-12-01 Ela Medical Sa Tool and method for installation of a ventricular cannulation device
US5171218A (en) * 1992-01-02 1992-12-15 Trustees Of Boston University Bidirectional femoral arterial cannula
US5290227A (en) * 1992-08-06 1994-03-01 Pasque Michael K Method of implanting blood pump in ascending aorta or main pulmonary artery
US5344443A (en) * 1992-09-17 1994-09-06 Rem Technologies, Inc. Heart pump
US5287852A (en) * 1993-01-13 1994-02-22 Direct Trends International Ltd. Apparatus and method for maintaining a tracheal stoma
US6955175B2 (en) * 1993-02-22 2005-10-18 Stevens John H Method and apparatus for thoracoscopic intracardiac procedures
US5704891A (en) * 1993-09-10 1998-01-06 Ottawa Heart Institute Research Corporation Electrohydraulic ventricular assist device
US5947892A (en) * 1993-11-10 1999-09-07 Micromed Technology, Inc. Rotary blood pump
US5711753A (en) * 1994-04-15 1998-01-27 Allegheny-Singer Research Institute Blood pump device and method of pumping blood
US5545191A (en) * 1994-05-06 1996-08-13 Alfred E. Mann Foundation For Scientific Research Method for optimally positioning and securing the external unit of a transcutaneous transducer of the skin of a living body
US6565536B1 (en) * 1994-12-12 2003-05-20 Srs Medical Systems, Inc. System for catheter fixation
US5743845A (en) * 1995-01-12 1998-04-28 Runge; Thomas M. Biventricular pulsatile cardiac support system having a mechanically balanced stroke volume
US5938412A (en) * 1995-06-01 1999-08-17 Advanced Bionics, Inc. Blood pump having rotor with internal bore for fluid flow
US5924848A (en) * 1995-06-01 1999-07-20 Advanced Bionics, Inc. Blood pump having radial vanes with enclosed magnetic drive components
US5924975A (en) * 1995-08-30 1999-07-20 International Business Machines Corporation Linear pump
US5695471A (en) * 1996-02-20 1997-12-09 Kriton Medical, Inc. Sealless rotary blood pump with passive magnetic radial bearings and blood immersed axial bearings
US5840070A (en) * 1996-02-20 1998-11-24 Kriton Medical, Inc. Sealless rotary blood pump
US6176848B1 (en) * 1996-04-04 2001-01-23 Impella Cardiotechnik Gmbh Intravascular blood pump
US5738649A (en) * 1996-04-16 1998-04-14 Cardeon Corporation Peripheral entry biventricular catheter system for providing access to the heart for cardiopulmonary surgery or for prolonged circulatory support of the heart
US20040015150A1 (en) * 1996-05-20 2004-01-22 Gholam-Reza Zadno-Azizi Method and apparatus for emboli containment
US6116862A (en) * 1996-06-25 2000-09-12 Medos Medizintechnik Gmbh Blood pump
US5941813A (en) * 1996-07-23 1999-08-24 Cardiotools Herzchirurgietechnik Gmbh Cardiac assist device
US5921971A (en) * 1996-09-13 1999-07-13 Boston Scientific Corporation Single operator exchange biliary catheter
US5965089A (en) * 1996-10-04 1999-10-12 United States Surgical Corporation Circulatory support system
US5741316A (en) * 1996-12-02 1998-04-21 Light Sciences Limited Partnership Electromagnetic coil configurations for power transmission through tissue
US6406420B1 (en) * 1997-01-02 2002-06-18 Myocor, Inc. Methods and devices for improving cardiac function in hearts
US6273861B1 (en) * 1997-01-30 2001-08-14 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Pneumatically actuated tissue sampling device
US6217546B1 (en) * 1997-05-19 2001-04-17 United States Surgical Corporation Catheter system
US6017355A (en) * 1997-06-25 2000-01-25 Bio Tap A/S Intercutaneous implant device
US20060100565A1 (en) * 1997-07-11 2006-05-11 A-Med Systems, Inc. Transport pump and organ stabilization apparatus including related methods
US5858009A (en) * 1997-08-14 1999-01-12 Medtronic, Inc. Multi-lumen cannula
US6605032B2 (en) * 1997-10-02 2003-08-12 Micromed Technology, Inc. Implantable pump system
US6299575B1 (en) * 1997-10-09 2001-10-09 Orqis Medical Corporation Implantable heart assist system
US20060270893A1 (en) * 1997-10-09 2006-11-30 Bolling Steven F Implantable heart assist system and method of applying same
US6354299B1 (en) * 1997-10-27 2002-03-12 Neuropace, Inc. Implantable device for patient communication
US20060094983A1 (en) * 1998-03-03 2006-05-04 Burbank Fred H Methods and apparatus for securing medical instruments to desired locations in a patient's body
US6186999B1 (en) * 1998-08-27 2001-02-13 The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Rigid clampable cannula
US5948006A (en) * 1998-10-14 1999-09-07 Advanced Bionics Corporation Transcutaneous transmission patch
US6001056A (en) * 1998-11-13 1999-12-14 Baxter International Inc. Smooth ventricular assist device conduit
US6623475B1 (en) * 1998-12-02 2003-09-23 Impella Cardiosystems Ag Blood pump without bearing
US20060116756A1 (en) * 1999-06-30 2006-06-01 Solem Jan O Method and device for treatment of mitral insufficiency
US20040024435A1 (en) * 1999-10-29 2004-02-05 Leckrone Michael E. Method and apparatus for providing intra-pericardial access
US20030093104A1 (en) * 1999-10-29 2003-05-15 Bonner Matthew D. Methods and apparatus for providing intra-pericardial access
US6942611B2 (en) * 2000-04-01 2005-09-13 Impella Cardiosystems Ag Paracardiac blood pump
US6530876B1 (en) * 2000-04-25 2003-03-11 Paul A. Spence Supplemental heart pump methods and systems for supplementing blood through the heart
US7070555B2 (en) * 2000-08-18 2006-07-04 Impella Cardiosystems Ag Intracardiac blood pump
US20040236170A1 (en) * 2000-11-15 2004-11-25 Ducksoo Kim Method for surgically joining a ventricular assist device to the cardiovascular system of a living subject using a piercing introducer assembly
US6994666B2 (en) * 2001-06-05 2006-02-07 Edwards Lifesciences Corporation Non-porous smooth ventricular assist device conduit
US20040024285A1 (en) * 2002-06-21 2004-02-05 Helmut Muckter Blood pump with impeller
US20090248144A1 (en) * 2002-08-20 2009-10-01 Cook Biotech Incorporated Endoluminal device with extracellular matrix material and methods
US20050273155A1 (en) * 2002-08-20 2005-12-08 Bahler Clinton D Endoluminal device with extracellular matrix material and methods
US7077801B2 (en) * 2003-02-19 2006-07-18 Corlife Gbr Methods and devices for improving cardiac output
US20060235357A1 (en) * 2003-03-21 2006-10-19 Woodward John C Cannula
US7048681B2 (en) * 2003-03-28 2006-05-23 Terumo Corporation Method and apparatus for adjusting a length of the inflow conduit on a ventricular assist device
US20040193004A1 (en) * 2003-03-28 2004-09-30 Terumo Corporation Method and apparatus for adjusting a length of the inflow conduit on a ventricular assist device
US20050107658A1 (en) * 2003-11-19 2005-05-19 Transoma Medical, Inc. Feedback control of ventricular assist devices
US20050159711A1 (en) * 2004-01-20 2005-07-21 Kathrani Biten K. Medical device for providing access
US7766814B2 (en) * 2004-03-02 2010-08-03 Peter William Walsh Vessel or sac wall treatment and a cardiac assist device
US20060135946A1 (en) * 2004-12-21 2006-06-22 C. R. Bard, Inc. Hemostasis cuff for catheter securement
US7340288B1 (en) * 2005-02-07 2008-03-04 Pacesetter, Inc. Trans-septal intra-cardiac lead system
US20080058925A1 (en) * 2006-08-02 2008-03-06 Gordon Cohen Bifurcated flow device for cardio-pulmonary assist or support and associated methods
US20090112049A1 (en) * 2007-10-29 2009-04-30 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Heart pump apparatus and method for beating heart surgery
US20090254166A1 (en) * 2008-02-05 2009-10-08 Chou Tony M Interventional catheter system and methods
US20090326463A1 (en) * 2008-06-25 2009-12-31 Tyco Healthcare Group Lp Iris seal for single incision surgery

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9463268B2 (en) 2010-09-07 2016-10-11 Paul A. Spence Cannula systems and methods
US20130281761A1 (en) * 2010-11-05 2013-10-24 Tufts Medical Center, Inc. Cannula with bifurcated tip for a cardiac assist device
US10322217B2 (en) 2012-10-16 2019-06-18 Heartware, Inc. Devices, systems, and methods for facilitating flow from the heart to a blood pump
US9585991B2 (en) 2012-10-16 2017-03-07 Heartware, Inc. Devices, systems, and methods for facilitating flow from the heart to a blood pump
US9993587B2 (en) * 2013-06-26 2018-06-12 Circulite, Inc. Inflow cannula tunneling tool allowing quick exchange with dilating plug
US9808283B2 (en) 2013-12-04 2017-11-07 Heartware, Inc. Apparatus and methods for cutting an atrial wall
US20170319774A1 (en) * 2015-01-26 2017-11-09 Xenios Ag Assembly comprising a suction line, a pressure line and a pump
WO2016119771A3 (en) * 2015-01-26 2016-10-20 Xenios Ag Assembly comprising a suction line, a pressure line and a pump
US9717830B2 (en) 2015-10-28 2017-08-01 Circulite, Inc. Inflow cannula and blood flow assist system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20150133720A1 (en) 2015-05-14
JP5584773B2 (en) 2014-09-03
US9801987B2 (en) 2017-10-31
EP2498836A4 (en) 2014-08-27
JP2013509945A (en) 2013-03-21
HK1175417A1 (en) 2016-05-20
EP2498836B1 (en) 2015-10-14
WO2011056280A1 (en) 2011-05-12
CA2776137A1 (en) 2011-05-12
EP2498836A1 (en) 2012-09-19

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6932792B1 (en) Antegrade cardioplegia catheter and method
EP1383566B1 (en) Dialysis catheter
US7261705B2 (en) Implantable dialysis access port
DE69820466T2 (en) An implantable heart support system
AU2012304627B2 (en) Cannula tips, tissue attachment rings, and methods of delivering and using the same
JP4987999B2 (en) Multi-lumen catheter for the hands and feet of ischemia to a minimum
US7048681B2 (en) Method and apparatus for adjusting a length of the inflow conduit on a ventricular assist device
EP1687055B1 (en) Cannulae having a redirecting tip
EP2151257A1 (en) Method and apparatus for long-term assisting a left ventricle to pump blood
US8690815B2 (en) Device and method for vascular access
US6994666B2 (en) Non-porous smooth ventricular assist device conduit
US4548597A (en) Dual catheter and method for separately withdrawing fluids from the human heart
EP0159773A1 (en) Vena caval catheter and tip therefor
US7566316B2 (en) Dialysis catheter
US7011645B2 (en) Dialysis catheter
US4790825A (en) Closed chest cannulation method and device for atrial-major artery bypass
US6532964B2 (en) Pulmonary and circulatory blood flow support devices and methods for heart surgery procedures
AU2002214653C1 (en) A multilumen catheter for minimizing limb ischemia
US20070100314A1 (en) Apparatus and methods for treating congestive heart disease
US6241699B1 (en) Catheter system and method for posterior epicardial revascularization and intracardiac surgery on a beating heart
US6086557A (en) Bifurcated venous cannula
US8920404B2 (en) Reduction of recirculation in catheters
JP5613430B2 (en) How to use the transseptal cannula device, coaxial balloon delivery device, and their
EP0654276A1 (en) Cardiovascular flow enhancer and method of operation
CA2029441C (en) Dual-lumen catheter apparatus and method

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- AFTER EXAMINER'S ANSWER OR BOARD OF APPEALS DECISION