US20110099842A1 - Motion control insole with muscle strengthening component - Google Patents

Motion control insole with muscle strengthening component Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110099842A1
US20110099842A1 US12609358 US60935809A US2011099842A1 US 20110099842 A1 US20110099842 A1 US 20110099842A1 US 12609358 US12609358 US 12609358 US 60935809 A US60935809 A US 60935809A US 2011099842 A1 US2011099842 A1 US 2011099842A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
medial
foot
aspect
region
lateral
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12609358
Inventor
Robert Garfield Burke
Kwan Ho Park
Sean Sihoon Yoo
Doo Suk Shin
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Park Global Footwear Inc
Original Assignee
Park Global Footwear Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/142Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the medial arch, i.e. the navicular or cuneiform bones
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1455Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form with special properties
    • A43B7/1465Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form with special properties with removable or adjustable pads to allow custom fit
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1475Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the type of support
    • A43B7/1485Recesses or holes, traversing partially or completely the thickness of the pad
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1475Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the type of support
    • A43B7/149Pad, e.g. protruding on the foot facing surface

Abstract

The present invention relates to an insole, midsole or unified outsole-midsole-insole device for use with an article of footwear, displaying significant improvement over conventional similar insole type products through its ability to offer to the wearer an adjustable biofeedback component for the rehabilitation and strengthening of the foot's muscles, as well as an adjustable motion control component for the purpose of controlling the pronation and arch deflection of the human foot during gait. Through this means wearers of the device gradually strengthen their foot while simultaneously decreasing their dependence on secondary motion control structures.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention relates to a device to be integrated into an article of footwear, to interact with the plantar surface of the foot, and to address gait related issues surrounding weakened foot structure and faulty gait biomechanics.
  • BACKGROUND ART
  • There is a significant quantity of evidence from the medical and biomechanical professions presenting a strong correlation between faulty foot function and associated foot, leg and lower back disorders. The correlation is such that it has been proposed, and accordingly supported, that non-ideal foot function can be a determining factor for numerous gait related pathologies. The ideal functions of the foot have been falsely categorized by academics studying the trends and data collected during the analysis of gait biomechanics, kinetics and kinematics. The collected data, and observations made, have been from populations whom have traditionally worn shoes. The repeated exposure to the bracing environments, which shoes are, has been shown to have detrimental effects on the foot and most notably the foot's musculo-skeletal structure. Normal, or average, values have been taken from these populations and have been used by those skilled in the art of biomechanics, podiatry and related fields, as descriptors of ideal. This approach however is faulty in that the mean or average, taken from populations, reported to have as much as 85% of their total, displaying symptoms related to less than ideal mechanics, will statistically generate values for the norm that are well below ideal. As such the industry defined “normal” is far less than “ideal”.
  • Numerous inventions have been disclosed to address the excess pronation and inadequate re-supination that is characteristic of our less than ideal gait. However these are based on techniques and designs that encourage a bracing or supportive environment for the foot. These inventions disclose the use of a wide range of materials and methods of fabrication, however the vast majority of these attempt to promote normal gait biomechanics through the bracing of the foot. U.S. Pat. No. 4,232,457 of Mosher, discloses a typical and accepted support device made from rigid or semi-rigid materials and primarily focuses on bracing the medial arch of the foot. In U.S. Pat. No. 5,058,585 Kendall discloses a modified horseshoe shaped structure intended to support and guide the foot through a bracing of the medial arch. Inventions such as these will ultimately lead to a weakening of the foot's supporting musculoskeletal structure, potentially predisposing the foot to injury, and potentially requiring the use of a stronger and more supportive bracing device as the structure continues to weaken. It is well accepted now, in medicine, that bracing of the musculoskeletal system promotes a weakening of the supporting structures, and bracing is not the first choice when rehabilitating.
  • In what has been proposed to be a more holistic and ideal approach, Burke, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,404,659, as well as Gardiner, in U.S. Pat. No's. 6,301,807 and 6,732,457, disclose devices proposed to elicit muscle contractions through the introduction of a proprioceptive stimulus to the plantar aspect of the foot. It has been found, by the inventors, that when using these devices they have considerable limitations and fall short of providing the foot with the support and guidance required to achieve ideal gait biomechanics during the initial phases of use and rehabilitation, and in particular a failure to support the medial aspect of the foot and to guide the foot during propulsion. Although said devices may provide some aspect of stimuli they are incapable of providing quick effective alteration of the users gait mechanics. A device capable of providing both a progressive rehabilitative aspect and a regressive support aspect would prove to be an effective treatment and improvement over current products. In this manner a device which would continue to support the foot until it is strong enough to achieve ideal mechanics on its own is desirable.
  • The invention disclosed by Burke and those of Gardiner are most notably characterized by a dominant apex located in the region of the intersection of the cuboid, navicular and lateral cuneiform. It has been discovered by the inventors, that the plantar pressures generated during normal walking, jogging and running, result in a lateral to medial shifting of the devices, as described by Burke and by Gardiner, inside of the users' footwear. Through the inspection of wear patterns on previously used devices, such as those described by Burke and those of Gardiner, it has been found by the inventors, that the desired apex region that the foot migrates to, is larger and more medial to that disclosed by Burke and disclosed by Gardiner. In fact wear patterns reveal that the highest point does not truly take the form of an apex but a plateau which also serves to reduce the localized pressure caused by the apex which has been found to on occasion cause excess discomfort rendering the device unusable. Although it may be advantageous to promote a domed anatomical structure as described by Burke and by Gardiner, to allow for tri-planar motion, the shape of the domed like structure formed by the foot's arch system is not replicated by the inventions of Burke and by those by Gardiner, and require a more plateau like arrangement. Mitchell, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,388,351, does provide for a plateau, which however is too large with respect to the foot's plantar surface area to allow any form of tri-planar motion and is thus undesirable. A device capable of encouraging a more limited tri-planar motion, in particular regulating but not limiting the pronation, would benefit users.
  • The inventions disclosed by Burke and by Gardiner fail in introducing provisions which control excess pronation during the stance phase of gait and faulty foot position at propulsion. The failure to address these concerns predisposes the users of these inventions to excess strain on the foot's supporting muscles as the foot attempts to conform to the centrally located apex, while simultaneously inwardly rotating as the foot naturally pronates during walking, running and such. An apex of the heights and at the location as disclosed in Gardiner's patents may actually result in an increase in the rate of pronation during the stance phase of the gait cycle. This may as a result, predispose wearers to increased strain on the musculoskeletal system and potentially further discomfort and injury.
  • It is the intent of the present invention to introduce a device capable of promoting a strengthening of the musculoskeletal system, and in particular those regions and organs related to the bones, muscles and connective tissue necessary for ideal and effective gait, while simultaneously providing for the support and guidance required on the foot's medial and anterior aspects for the purpose of reducing the excess pronation which often accompanies a weakened foot structure. The present invention discloses a specific raised area, engineered to receive removable and replaceable inserts, designed and configured to achieve the desired functions of muscular rehabilitation of the foot's muscles and the simultaneous control of harmful excess pronation during walking, running or such activities.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention discloses a device designed to interact with the plantar surface of the wearer's foot, most notably in the form of a shoe insole, a shoe midsole, or similar. The present invention is most distinctively characterized by a dominant or primary area rising upwardly from the body of the device and so positioned to engage the plantar aspect of the foot in the region of the first ray and the common area of the adjoining region of the anterior most portion of the medial tubercle of the talus, the navicular, the 1st cuneiform and the medial most aspect of the cuboid. This area of engagement with the plantar region of the foot generally is characterized by a triangular shape and assumes a plateau region with respect to the balance of the primary raised area.
  • The general shape of the primary raised area is such that on its posterior most aspect there are inherent design characteristics, most notably in the form of a varus type wedge capable of reducing the excess eversion of the calcaneus if the foot is excessively pronating.
  • The general shape of the primary raised area also possesses a defining ridge generally aligned and positioned parallel with the long axis of the 2nd ray for the purpose of encouraging the formation of a metatarsal arch, and encouraging the re-supination of the foot which is required for efficient propulsion during ideal gait. The invention also discloses accommodations, or provisions, in the regions of both the 1st and 5th metatarsals to further encourage efficient propulsion during ideal gait.
  • Most notable in the present invention are provisions within the raised area, in the form of receptacles, for the purpose of receiving compressive inserts generally aligned with the first ray, for the purpose of controlling medial arch deflection, and generally aligned with the soft tissue area of the flexor digitorum brevis and flexor hallicus longus muscles, for the purpose of gradually introducing a biofeedback component to the foot's main supporting musculature. Through their symbiotic application the invention is capable of encouraging a strengthening of the foot's supporting musculature while affording the wearer the ability to continue to support their arch system when needed. The wearer then may gradually reduce said support as the foot strengthens in response to the muscle strengthening insert.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a dorsal view of the present invention illustrating the size, shape and periphery dimension of the preferred embodiment relative to the human skeletal foot. (Right foot shown). Wherein the perimeter of said invention is depicted by a dotted line, the perimeter of the primary raised area is defined by a dashed and dotted line, and the perimeter of the elevated plateau region is depicted by a dashed line. Also shown are key angular orientations, most notably the long axis of the 1st metatarsal and the long axis of the 2nd metatarsal of the foot.
  • FIG. 2 is a dorsal view of the present invention illustrating and localizing the key anatomical structures of significance to the present invention. Of significance are the 1st, 2nd and 5th metatarsals, the cuboid, the calcaneus, the talus, the navicular, and the 3 cuneiforms.
  • FIG. 3 is a plantar view of the present invention illustrating the location of the elevated plateau region of the primary raised area encompassing the pronation controlling insert and the muscle stimulating insert, relative to the muscular structures characteristic of the foot's plantar aspect. Notable are the flexor digitorum brevis and the flexor hallicus longus. (Left Foot Shown)
  • FIG. 4 is an approximation of a medial sagittal plane view of the present invention sectioned through D-D′ and relative to the right foot.
  • FIG. 5 is a plantar view of the primary raised area (Left foot shown) of the invention illustrating the general location of the openings to receive the pronation controlling and the muscle stimulating inserts and the general perimeter shape of the primary raised area, and reference points for the cross sectional drawings
  • FIG. 6 is a cross sectional drawing of the present invention through Section A-A′.
  • FIG. 7 is a cross sectional drawing of the present invention through Section B-B′.
  • FIG. 8 is a cross sectional drawing of the present invention through Section C-C′.
  • FIG. 9 is a cross sectional drawing of the present invention through Section D-D′.
  • FIG. 10 is a cross sectional drawing of the present invention through Section E-E′.
  • FIG. 11 is an illustration showing the pronation controlling and the muscle stimulating inserts to be applied to the present invention as two separate devices.
  • FIG. 12 is an illustration showing the pronation controlling and the muscle stimulating inserts constructed so as they are integrated as a one unit device to be applied to the present invention.
  • FIG. 13 is a posterior view of the human foot and ankle (right foot shown) illustrating the action of pronation (shown by a solid line with a directional arrow), and the location of the sub-talar axis (shown by the dashed-dotted lines), and the effect on correcting rear foot angle (shown by the dashed lines) through the application of a medial heel wedge device.
  • FIG. 14 is a dorsal view illustrating the general peripheral shape of the invention and the primary raised area with a modified anterior most arc and illustrating the general areas of the lateral and medial forefoot accommodations.
  • FIG. 15 is a dorsal view illustrating the elevated plateau area of the present invention and how it maybe interpreted as having a “triangular” shape or a “T” shape.
  • FIG. 16 shows the present invention with the pronation controlling insert and the muscle stimulating insert applied to the present invention in a dorsal-to-plantar direction, as well as the present invention with the pronation controlling insert and the muscle stimulating insert applied to the present invention in a plantar-to-dorsal direction.
  • FIG. 17 is a perspective view of the present invention showing a lower insole type body capable of receiving, upon it's dorsal surface, the primary raised area which is manufactured as a separate unit.
  • FIG. 18 is a perspective view of the present invention showing an upper insole type body capable of receiving, at it's plantar surface, the primary raised area which is manufactured as a separate unit.
  • FIG. 19 is an arrangement of cross sectional designs of possibilities for the openings and corresponding inserts and the potential geometric characteristics of the openings and inserts that enable the secure fixation of the inserts into the openings.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PRESENT INVENTION
  • The present invention provides for a device in the form of a shoe insole or shoe midsole or integrated shoe outsole-midsole-insole unit 1, capable of providing a progressive catalyst for muscle stimulation, muscle strengthening and muscular adaptation while encouraging proper toe off position and controlling for excess pronation of the foot.
  • The present invention may be constructed of materials of a semi-pliable and compressible nature such that it is comfortable to the plantar surface of the foot. The materials of choice may include, but are not limited to, polyurethane and its derivatives, ethyl vinyl acetate and its derivatives, visco-elastic polymers, natural sponge rubbers and its derivatives, and other materials displaying similar characteristics.
  • In particular the present invention discloses a primary raised area 4 designed to engage the plantar surface of the human foot. Said primary raised area 4 has a centrally highest region 3 forming an elevated plateau 5 with a periphery generally in a triangular shape 20, or “T”-shape 21, positioned in the region of the anterior most portion of the medial tubercle of the talus 6, the navicular 7, the 1st cuneiform 8 and the medial most aspect of the cuboid 9. Said triangular elevated plateau 5 has it's longest side 27 positioned to be align able with the medial most aspect of the foot, plantar to the region of the medial arch and running parallel with the long axis 11 of the 1st metatarsal 10, and its opposite vertex 28 positioned in the region of the medial aspect of the navicular 7 and not extending laterally past the lateral most aspect of the 2nd metatarsal 12. Said primary raised area 4 has outwardly directing surfaces 13 tapering downwardly and outwardly from the triangular elevated plateau 5 in all directions so as to terminate at, or merge with, the top layer of the invention 22 upon which the foot rests, at distances approximating the boundaries as set out by the outer boundaries 2 of the primary raised area 4. Said outer boundaries 2 extend medially such that they do not extend past a boundary defined by the position of the medial most aspect of the navicular and extend in the anterior direction such that they do not extend past the distal two-thirds of the 2nd metatarsal, and extend laterally such that they do not extend past the lateral most aspect of the cuboid, and extend in the posterior direction such that they do not extend past the medial tubercle of the calcaneus.
  • In this manner said invention offers to the wearer a system providing for pronation control through the long side 27 of the triangular elevated plateau 5 and the introduction of a muscle rehabilitating proprioceptive stimulus in the vicinity of the vertex 28.
  • Said primary raised area 4 has a noticeable non-symmetric elongation 14 of its posterior and medial region extending rearward and downward from said triangular elevated plateau 5. Said elongation 14 rises simultaneously in an posterior-to-anterior and lateral-to-medial direction so as to create a region of gradually increasing density relative to the corresponding region on the lateral aspect of said device, in the region of the lateral tubercle 25 of the calcaneus, in such a manner as to introduce an inclined plane or wedge 16 effect to the medial and anterior aspect of the calcaneus 15 for the purpose of reducing the eversion of the calcaneus 15 during the stance phase of gait which is characteristic of excess pronation. Said wedge 16 sits anterior of the medial tubercle 24 of the calcaneus and as such does not function as a pronation regulating wedge unless and until the foot begins to excessively pronate, typically during the mid-stance phase of gait.
  • Said primary raised area 4 has noticeable accommodation areas 17, 18 in the regions posterior to the sesamoids 23 and the head of the first metatarsal 10 on the medial boundary of the foot, and the region posterior of the fifth metatarsal head 26 on the lateral boundary of the foot. Said medial accommodation area 17 and said lateral accommodation area 18 are positioned such that on a horizontal plane they lay inferior to the balance of the primary raised area 4 of the insole or midsole surface 22 engaging the plantar aspect of the foot. This feature may be further accentuated through the elongation of the anterior most arc 19 of said raised area 4. Said accommodations allow for the distal portions of the first and fifth metatarsals to sit at a level significantly inferior to the vertical position of the 2nd metatarsal 12. Said primary raised area 4 having a noticeably defined ridge 36 originating from said triangular elevated plateau 5 and running in a posterior to anterior direction generally parallel and dorsal to the ray of the 2nd metatarsal, and terminating where said ridge merges with the top layer 22 in the region of the boundary 2. Said defined ridge 36, running generally parallel and dorsal to the ray of the 2nd metatarsal, may deviate in either a lateral or medial direction such that the long axis of the ridge does not have an angular deviation 42 of greater than 12 degrees. This variability allows for anatomical deviations, created through genetic predisposition or by environmental influences causing foot deformity such as bunions or hallux valgus, to be accommodated.
  • In another aspect of the present invention there are provisions such that the compression of the triangular elevated plateau 5 region, which accompanies walking, running and such, maybe altered through the insertion of removable inserts 33. Said removable inserts may be designed and manufactured such that they are separate and independent inserts wherein one is a pronation controlling insert 34 and another insert is a muscle stimulating insert 35. Said removable inserts 33 may take the form of mechanical devices for example a coiled spring, fluid or hydraulic devices, or compressible materials, such that the medial aspect or long axis of the plateau 27 may display a different compressive characteristic than that of the lateral aspect or vertex 28. The variance in compressive characteristics maybe achieved through the adjustment of height and/or the adjustment of the compression properties of the inserts 33. In this manner users may have the ability to adjust the variance between the desired pronation control provided for in the medial most aspect of the plateau 27 and the muscle simulation pressure provided for in the lateral most aspect of the plateau at the vertex 28. As such these provisions allow the user, at their convenience, to adjust the device to accommodate for differences in foot type, shoe flexibility, rate of musculoskeletal change, and needed pronation control.
  • Said removable muscle stimulating inserts 35, necessary to provide the proprioceptive muscle stimulation, applied at the vertex 28 are located at a region to apply mild upward pressure to the medial aspect of the flexor digitorum brevis 31 and the flexor hallicus longus 32 located immediately dorsal and medial to the flexor digitorum brevis 31. Through the introduction of this pressure proprioceptive responses in the foot's musculature are initiated and result in the creation of muscle contractions and thus function as an exercise component strengthening the foot. In another aspect of the present invention said removable inserts 33 maybe designed and manufactured as a one piece unit 41 wherein an integrated pronation controlling insert 34 and an integrated muscle stimulating insert 35 are mutually joined but may display different height, density or compression characteristics. In another aspect of the invention the top surface 22 in the region of the vertex 28 and/or the top surface of the muscle stimulating insert 35 maybe designed to incorporate pressure nodules 37 to provide additional stimulation to the foot's plantar musculature.
  • In one aspect of the present invention there are provisions for adjusting the compressive characteristics of the inserts 33 which may take the form of the fabrication of the inserts 33 of materials of varying heights and/or densities and/or compression properties. Preferred materials for the fabrication of the inserts 33 include, but are not limited to, foams such as polyurethane or its derivatives, ethyl vinyl acetate or its derivatives, foam sponge rubber or its derivatives, and these maybe molded through compression or injection means or maybe die cut from sheet stock. The inserts 33 may also be manufactured of visco elastic materials such as thermo plastic rubber and its derivatives, silicon and its derivatives and thermo plastic urethane and its derivatives, and maybe manufactured through such means as poring or injection but are not limited to these means. The adjustment provisions may also be achieved through the insertion or application of different substances displaying varying compression properties, or the insertion or applicable of mechanical devices, most notably springs, or gas or fluid filled bladders.
  • In yet another aspect of the invention there are provided openings or receptacles to receive said inserts 33. Correspondingly so there is a medial most opening 29 align able to the desired position of the pronation controlling insert 34 and the long side 27 of the triangular elevated plateau 5 running parallel with the long axis 11 of the first metatarsal 10, and there is a lateral most opening 30 align able to the desired position of the muscle stimulating insert 35 and the vertex 28 of the triangular elevated plateau 5.
  • Said openings maybe designed such that the inserts 33 maybe secured within the openings by friction most notably achieved through the inserts 33 having their outer diameter a fixed percentage larger than the inside dimensions of the respective openings 29 and 30, wherein said fixed percentage is derived from the co-efficient of friction realized by the interaction of the material of manufacture of the inserts 33 and of the shoe insole or shoe midsole or integrated shoe outsole-midsole-insole unit 1 material of manufacture. Said inserts 33 may also be secured within said openings 29 and 30 through the use adhesives, hook and loop type fastening devices, a detent relationship between the opening and the inserts 33, a corresponding design where the entrance end of the opening is a smaller diameter than the distal end of the opening and said inserts are designed to match, or similar design configurations or material selections that ensure the security of the inserts 33 within the openings 29 and 30.
  • The present invention may also be constructed in a manner wherein the shoe insole or shoe midsole or integrated shoe outsole-midsole-insole unit 1 is constructed such that there are two or more structures and there is a lower layer 38, constructed in a similar manner and of similar materials as traditional footwear insoles and a primary raised area 4, wherein the primary raised area 4 is a separate unit 39 with provisions capable of accepting the pronation controlling insert 34 and the muscle stimulating insert 35. The separate unit 39 is applied to the dorsal surface of the lower layer 38 and maybe attached or adhered to the lower layer 38 by means of insertion into a receptacle, through adhesion by adhesive substances, through the application of hoop and loop type fastening materials, most notably Velcro™ type materials, through the use of matching male and female protrusions and matching receptacles as in a detent arrangement, or maybe attached through similar attachment means and devices as described. The present invention may also be constructed such that the there is an upper layer 40 with provisions capable of receiving the separate unit 39 as it is applied to the plantar surface of the upper layer 40, and said separate unit 39 has provisions capable of accepting the pronation controlling insert 34 and the muscle stimulating insert 35.

Claims (20)

  1. 1) An insole or midsole or integrated unit sole for use with an article of footwear which has a characteristic raised area wherein said raised area sits plantar to the foot and rising upwardly from the invention, to interface with the plantar aspect of the foot, and wherein;
    said raised area has a highest portion taking the form of a generally triangular plateau positioned in the region of the planter aspect of the anterior most portion of the medial tubercle of the talus, the navicular, the 1st cuneiform and the medial most aspect of the cuboid and wherein;
    said raised area has two or more openings designed to receive inserts and the openings are arranged such that the medial most opening and corresponding insert is positioned plantar to the foot and in the region of the posterior most aspect of the 1st metatarsal, the navicular, and the anterior most aspect of the talus and the lateral most opening and corresponding insert is positioned plantar to the foot and in the region of the lateral portion of the navicular interfacing in the region of the muscle belly of the digitorum brevis and the flexor hallicus longus muscles.
  2. 2) A device as disclosed in claim 1 wherein;
    said plateau sits at a height which is not less than 2.5% of the total foot length and not greater than 7.5% of the total foot.
  3. 3) A device as disclosed in claim 1 wherein;
    said raised area has outwardly directing surfaces tapering downwardly and outwardly from the triangular plateau in all directions so as to terminate as they merge with the top layer of the invention and said surfaces extend medially such that they do not extend past a boundary defined by the position of the medial most aspect of the navicular, and extend in the anterior direction such that they do not extend past the distal two-thirds of the 2nd metatarsal, and extend laterally such that they do not extend past the lateral most aspect of the cuboid, and extend in the posterior direction such that they do not extend past the medial tubercle of the calcaneus.
  4. 4) A device as disclosed in claim 1 wherein;
    the triangular plateau has it's longest side positioned to be align able with the medial most aspect of the foot, plantar to the region of the medial arch and running parallel with the long axis of the 1st metatarsal and wherein;
    the triangular plateau has its vertex positioned in the region of the medial aspect of the navicular and not extending laterally past the lateral most aspect of the 2nd metatarsal.
  5. 5) A device as disclosed in claim 1 wherein;
    said raised area has a characteristic ridge extending from the triangular plateau forward in the anterior direction, align able and parallel to the 2nd metatarsal of the foot and aligned such that said ridge does not deviate in the medial or lateral direction more than 12 degrees from the centerline of the 2nd metatarsal.
  6. 6) A device as disclosed in claim 1 wherein;
    the raised area has a noticeable non-symmetric elongation of its posterior and medial region extending rearward and downward from said triangular plateau. Said elongation rises in an posterior-to-anterior and lateral-to-medial direction so as to create a region of gradually increasing density relative to the corresponding region on the lateral aspect of said device, in the region of the lateral tubercle of the calcaneus, in such a manner as to introduce an inclined plane or wedge effect to the medial and anterior aspect of the calcaneus for the purpose of reducing the eversion of the calcaneus during the weight bearing phase of gait which is characteristic of excess pronation and;
  7. 7) A device as disclosed in claim 1 wherein;
    said inserts to be applied to said openings are of varying compressive properties enabling varying deflection and support to the medial and lateral aspects of said triangular plateau.
  8. 8) A device as disclosed in claim 1 wherein;
    said raised area has noticeable accommodation areas in the regions posterior to the sesamoids and the head of the first metatarsal on the medial boundary of the foot, and the region posterior of the fifth metatarsal head on the lateral boundary of the foot. Said medial accommodation areas and said lateral accommodation area are positioned such that on a horizontal plane they lay inferior to the balance of the raised area of the insole or midsole surface engaging the plantar aspect of the foot.
  9. 9) An insole or midsole or integrated unit sole for use with an article of footwear which has a characteristic raised area wherein said raised area sits plantar to the foot and rising upwardly from the invention, to interface with the plantar aspect of the foot, and wherein;
    said raised area has a highest portion taking the form of a generally triangular plateau having it's longest side positioned to be align able with the medial most aspect of the foot, plantar to the region of the medial arch and running parallel with the long axis of the 1st metatarsal and having its vertex positioned in the region of the medial aspect of the navicular and not extending laterally past the lateral most aspect of the 2nd metatarsal, and wherein;
    said raised area has a characteristic ridge extending from the triangular plateau forward in the anterior direction, align able and parallel to the 2nd metatarsal of the foot and aligned such that said ridge does not deviate in the medial or lateral direction more than 12 degrees from the centerline of the 2nd metatarsal.
  10. 10) A device as disclosed in claim 9 wherein:
    said triangular plateau sits at a height which is not less than 2.5% of the total foot length and not greater than 7.5% of the total foot.
  11. 11). A device as disclosed in claim 9 wherein;
    the triangular plateau has it's longest side positioned to be align able with the medial most aspect of the foot, plantar to the region of the medial arch and running parallel with the long axis of the 1st metatarsal and wherein;
    the triangular plateau has its vertex positioned in the region of the medial aspect of the navicular and not extending laterally past the lateral most aspect of the 2nd metatarsal.
  12. 12) A device as disclosed in claim 9 wherein:
    the raised area has a noticeable non-symmetric elongation of its posterior and medial region extending rearward and downward from said triangular plateau. Said elongation rises in an posterior-to-anterior and lateral-to-medial direction so as to create a region of gradually increasing density relative to the corresponding region on the lateral aspect of said device, in the region of the lateral tubercle of the calcaneus, in such a manner as to introduce an inclined plane or wedge effect to the medial and anterior aspect of the calcaneus for the purpose of reducing the eversion of the calcaneus during the weight bearing phase of gait which is characteristic of excess pronation and;
  13. 13) A device as disclosed in claim 9 wherein:
    said raised area has two or more openings designed to receive inserts and the openings are arranged such that the medial most opening and corresponding insert is positioned plantar to the foot and in the region of the posterior most aspect of the 1st metatarsal, the navicular, and the anterior most aspect of the talus and the lateral most opening and corresponding insert is positioned plantar to the foot and in the region of the lateral portion of the navicular interfacing in the region of the muscle belly of the digitorum brevis and the flexor hallicus longus muscles, and; said inserts to be applied to said openings are of varying compressive properties enabling varying deflection and support to the medial and lateral aspects of said triangular plateau.
  14. 14). A device as disclosed in claim 9 wherein:
    said raised area has noticeable accommodation areas in the regions posterior to the sesamoids and the head of the first metatarsal on the medial boundary of the foot, and the region posterior of the fifth metatarsal head on the lateral boundary of the foot. Said medial accommodation areas and said lateral accommodation area are positioned such that on a horizontal plane they lay inferior to the balance of the raised area of the insole or midsole surface engaging the plantar aspect of the foot.
  15. 15) An insole or midsole or integrated unit sole for use with an article of footwear which has a characteristic raised area wherein said raised area sits plantar to the foot and rising upwardly from the invention, to interface with the plantar aspect of the foot, and wherein;
    said raised area has a highest portion taking the form of a generally triangular plateau positioned in the region of the planter aspect of the anterior most portion of the medial tubercle of the talus, the navicular, the 1st cuneiform and the medial most aspect of the cuboid and wherein;
    said raised area has outwardly directing surfaces tapering downwardly and outwardly from the triangular plateau in all directions so as to terminate as they merge with the top layer of the invention and said surfaces extend medially such that they do not extend past a boundary defined by the position of the medial most aspect of the navicular, and extend in the anterior direction such that they do not extend past the distal two-thirds of the 2nd metatarsal, and extend laterally such that they do not extend past the lateral most aspect of the cuboid, and extend in the posterior direction such that they do not extend past the medial tubercle of the calcaneus, and wherein:
    said raised area has a noticeable non-symmetric elongation of its posterior and medial region extending rearward and downward from said triangular plateau. Said elongation rises in an posterior-to-anterior and lateral-to-medial direction so as to create a region of gradually increasing density relative to the corresponding region on the lateral aspect of said device, in the region of the lateral tubercle of the calcaneus, in such a manner as to introduce an inclined plane or wedge effect to the medial and anterior aspect of the calcaneus for the purpose of reducing the eversion of the calcaneus during the weight bearing phase of gait which is characteristic of excess pronation and;
  16. 16) A Device as disclosed in claim 15 wherein:
    said raised area has two or more openings designed to receive inserts and the openings are arranged such that the medial most opening and corresponding insert is positioned plantar to the foot and in the region of the posterior most aspect of the 1st metatarsal, the navicular, and the anterior most aspect of the talus and the lateral most opening and corresponding insert is positioned plantar to the foot and in the region of the lateral portion of the navicular interfacing in the region of the muscle belly of the digitorum brevis and the flexor hallicus longus muscles, and; said inserts to be applied to said openings are of varying compressive properties enabling varying deflection and support to the medial and lateral aspects of said triangular plateau.
  17. 17) A device as disclosed in claim 15 wherein;
    said triangular plateau has it's longest side positioned to be align able with the medial most aspect of the foot, plantar to the region of the medial arch and running parallel with the long axis of the 1st metatarsal and wherein;
    the triangular plateau has its vertex positioned in the region of the medial aspect of the navicular and not extending laterally past the lateral most aspect of the 2nd metatarsal.
  18. 18) A device as disclosed in claim 15 wherein;
    said triangular plateau sits at a height which is not less than 2.5% of the total foot length and not greater than 7.5% of the total foot.
  19. 19) A device as disclosed in claim 13 wherein;
    said raised area has a characteristic ridge extending from the triangular plateau forward in the anterior direction, align able and parallel to the 2nd metatarsal of the foot and aligned such that said ridge does not deviate in the medial or lateral direction more than 12 degrees from the centerline of the 2nd metatarsal.
  20. 20) A device as disclosed in claim 15 wherein;
    said raised area has noticeable accommodation areas in the regions posterior to the sesamoids and the head of the first metatarsal on the medial boundary of the foot, and the region posterior of the fifth metatarsal head on the lateral boundary of the foot. Said medial accommodation areas and said lateral accommodation area are positioned such that on a horizontal plane they lay inferior to the balance of the raised area of the insole or midsole surface engaging the plantar aspect of the foot.
US12609358 2009-10-30 2009-10-30 Motion control insole with muscle strengthening component Abandoned US20110099842A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12609358 US20110099842A1 (en) 2009-10-30 2009-10-30 Motion control insole with muscle strengthening component

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12609358 US20110099842A1 (en) 2009-10-30 2009-10-30 Motion control insole with muscle strengthening component

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110099842A1 true true US20110099842A1 (en) 2011-05-05

Family

ID=43923858

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12609358 Abandoned US20110099842A1 (en) 2009-10-30 2009-10-30 Motion control insole with muscle strengthening component

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20110099842A1 (en)

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20130133223A1 (en) * 2011-11-30 2013-05-30 YZ Studio, Inc. Foot Trainer
US20140259754A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Cara Lustik Removable Shoe Insert for Corrective Sizing
US20150173457A1 (en) * 2012-07-26 2015-06-25 Tatsuo Saito Footwear Sheet and Footwear
US20160073726A1 (en) * 2014-09-13 2016-03-17 Yu-Te Wu Foot supporting structure of a cycling shoe with improved ergonomics
US20160192732A1 (en) * 2013-08-22 2016-07-07 Lenthe & Licht Kg Forefoot cushion, computer program product for providing the forefoot cushion and method for providing the forefoot cushion
WO2016119782A1 (en) * 2015-01-30 2016-08-04 Obens Thomas Functional unit for a shoe, an insole, a sock or the like
US20170079371A1 (en) * 2015-09-23 2017-03-23 Cluffy Biomedical, LLC Orthopedic shoe appliance

Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1517170A (en) * 1924-02-20 1924-11-25 Rosenthal Lazarus Foot-supporting pad for shoes
US1594034A (en) * 1925-01-06 1926-07-27 Charles D Anderson Insole and arch supporter
US1710936A (en) * 1925-11-03 1929-04-30 United Shoe Machinery Corp Boot or shoe and method of making the same
US2057510A (en) * 1934-01-15 1936-10-13 Alexander E Block Arch supporting apparatus
US2089798A (en) * 1936-04-08 1937-08-10 Joseph C Howell Arch support
US3066678A (en) * 1960-09-08 1962-12-04 Riecken George Carl Orthopedic sandal
US4442612A (en) * 1982-07-22 1984-04-17 Hapad, Inc. Orthopedic pads
US4631841A (en) * 1985-03-14 1986-12-30 Hickey John L Shoe insert device
US4813157A (en) * 1986-07-21 1989-03-21 Michelle Boisvert Adjustable shoe insole
US4841648A (en) * 1988-02-29 1989-06-27 Shaffer David E Personalized insole kit
US6141890A (en) * 1999-07-09 2000-11-07 Chtn; Shou Sole pad unit with the effects supporting the metatarsal bone and airing and massaging the center of the sole of foot
US6301807B1 (en) * 1997-12-24 2001-10-16 Barefoot Science Technologies Inc. Rehabilitative shoe insole device
US20020014024A1 (en) * 1997-12-24 2002-02-07 Gardiner Roy J.W. Rehabilitative shoe insole device
US6591519B1 (en) * 1989-08-30 2003-07-15 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US20030150134A1 (en) * 2002-02-11 2003-08-14 Hardt John C Anti-roll arch support insole

Patent Citations (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1517170A (en) * 1924-02-20 1924-11-25 Rosenthal Lazarus Foot-supporting pad for shoes
US1594034A (en) * 1925-01-06 1926-07-27 Charles D Anderson Insole and arch supporter
US1710936A (en) * 1925-11-03 1929-04-30 United Shoe Machinery Corp Boot or shoe and method of making the same
US2057510A (en) * 1934-01-15 1936-10-13 Alexander E Block Arch supporting apparatus
US2089798A (en) * 1936-04-08 1937-08-10 Joseph C Howell Arch support
US3066678A (en) * 1960-09-08 1962-12-04 Riecken George Carl Orthopedic sandal
US4442612A (en) * 1982-07-22 1984-04-17 Hapad, Inc. Orthopedic pads
US4631841A (en) * 1985-03-14 1986-12-30 Hickey John L Shoe insert device
US4813157A (en) * 1986-07-21 1989-03-21 Michelle Boisvert Adjustable shoe insole
US4841648A (en) * 1988-02-29 1989-06-27 Shaffer David E Personalized insole kit
US6591519B1 (en) * 1989-08-30 2003-07-15 Anatomic Research, Inc. Shoe sole structures
US6301807B1 (en) * 1997-12-24 2001-10-16 Barefoot Science Technologies Inc. Rehabilitative shoe insole device
US20020014024A1 (en) * 1997-12-24 2002-02-07 Gardiner Roy J.W. Rehabilitative shoe insole device
US6732457B2 (en) * 1997-12-24 2004-05-11 Barefoot Science Technologies Inc Rehabilitative shoe insole device
US6141890A (en) * 1999-07-09 2000-11-07 Chtn; Shou Sole pad unit with the effects supporting the metatarsal bone and airing and massaging the center of the sole of foot
US20030150134A1 (en) * 2002-02-11 2003-08-14 Hardt John C Anti-roll arch support insole
US20040205984A1 (en) * 2002-02-11 2004-10-21 Hardt John C Anti-roll arch support insole

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20130133223A1 (en) * 2011-11-30 2013-05-30 YZ Studio, Inc. Foot Trainer
US9345284B2 (en) * 2011-11-30 2016-05-24 YZ Studio, Inc. Foot trainer
US20150173457A1 (en) * 2012-07-26 2015-06-25 Tatsuo Saito Footwear Sheet and Footwear
US20140259754A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Cara Lustik Removable Shoe Insert for Corrective Sizing
US9737111B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2017-08-22 Cara Lustik Removable shoe insert for corrective sizing
US20160192732A1 (en) * 2013-08-22 2016-07-07 Lenthe & Licht Kg Forefoot cushion, computer program product for providing the forefoot cushion and method for providing the forefoot cushion
US20160073726A1 (en) * 2014-09-13 2016-03-17 Yu-Te Wu Foot supporting structure of a cycling shoe with improved ergonomics
WO2016119782A1 (en) * 2015-01-30 2016-08-04 Obens Thomas Functional unit for a shoe, an insole, a sock or the like
US20170079371A1 (en) * 2015-09-23 2017-03-23 Cluffy Biomedical, LLC Orthopedic shoe appliance

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6948262B2 (en) Cantilevered shoe construction
US6315786B1 (en) Device for treating heel pain
US5713143A (en) Orthotic system
US4620376A (en) Forefoot valgus compensated footwear
US20090193683A1 (en) Anatomically Correct Flexible Contoured Footbed Insole
US7721467B2 (en) Shoe insole with improved support and motion control
US7426794B2 (en) Insole support system
US4642911A (en) Dual-compression forefoot compensated footwear
US6594922B1 (en) Medial/lateral counter foot stabilizer
US6105283A (en) Shoe insole for correction, control, and underfoot comfort
US6510626B1 (en) Custom orthotic foot support assembly
US7665169B2 (en) Shoe insole
US20040194344A1 (en) User-customizable insoles for footwear and method of customizing insoles
US20090307925A1 (en) Shoe Sole Element
US3990159A (en) Therapeutic personalizable health shoe
US6170176B1 (en) Shoe apparatus and method
US20040103561A1 (en) Footwear with orthopedic component system
US5826351A (en) Shoe sole and shoe and sandal including the sole
US20010032400A1 (en) Footwear outsole having arcuate inner-structure
US20020162250A1 (en) Unitary orthotic insert and orthopedic insole
US6131311A (en) Insole insert for footwear
Postema et al. Primary metatarsalgia: the influence of a custom moulded insole and a rockerbar on plantar pressure
US6021588A (en) Shoe assembly
US6026599A (en) Pseudo-planar insole insert
US6874258B2 (en) Orthopedic shoe appliance and method