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Bumping Electronic Components Using Transfer Substrates

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US20110092066A1
US20110092066A1 US12911210 US91121010A US2011092066A1 US 20110092066 A1 US20110092066 A1 US 20110092066A1 US 12911210 US12911210 US 12911210 US 91121010 A US91121010 A US 91121010A US 2011092066 A1 US2011092066 A1 US 2011092066A1
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Prior art keywords
substrate
solder
transfer
mask
balls
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US12911210
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John MacKay
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Mackay John
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    • HELECTRICITY
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    • H01L21/02Manufacture or treatment of semiconductor devices or of parts thereof
    • H01L21/04Manufacture or treatment of semiconductor devices or of parts thereof the devices having at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier, e.g. PN junction, depletion layer, carrier concentration layer
    • H01L21/34Manufacture or treatment of semiconductor devices or of parts thereof the devices having at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier, e.g. PN junction, depletion layer, carrier concentration layer the devices having semiconductor bodies not provided for in groups H01L21/0405, H01L21/0445, H01L21/06, H01L21/16 and H01L21/18 with or without impurities, e.g. doping materials
    • H01L21/44Manufacture of electrodes on semiconductor bodies using processes or apparatus not provided for in groups H01L21/38 - H01L21/428
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
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    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
    • B23K1/00Soldering, e.g. brazing, or unsoldering
    • B23K1/0008Soldering, e.g. brazing, or unsoldering specially adapted for particular articles or work
    • B23K1/0016Brazing of electronic components
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
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    • B23KSOLDERING OR UNSOLDERING; WELDING; CLADDING OR PLATING BY SOLDERING OR WELDING; CUTTING BY APPLYING HEAT LOCALLY, e.g. FLAME CUTTING; WORKING BY LASER BEAM
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    • B23K3/06Solder feeding devices; Solder melting pans
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    • B23K3/0623Solder feeding devices for shaped solder piece feeding, e.g. preforms, bumps, balls, pellets, droplets
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K2203/00Indexing scheme relating to apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits covered by H05K3/00
    • H05K2203/04Soldering or other types of metallurgic bonding
    • H05K2203/043Reflowing of solder coated conductors, not during connection of components, e.g. reflowing solder paste
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K2203/00Indexing scheme relating to apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits covered by H05K3/00
    • H05K2203/05Patterning and lithography; Masks; Details of resist
    • H05K2203/0548Masks
    • H05K2203/0557Non-printed masks
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K2203/00Indexing scheme relating to apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits covered by H05K3/00
    • H05K2203/08Treatments involving gases
    • H05K2203/085Using vacuum or low pressure
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K2203/00Indexing scheme relating to apparatus or processes for manufacturing printed circuits covered by H05K3/00
    • H05K2203/15Position of the PCB during processing
    • H05K2203/1581Treating the backside of the PCB, e.g. for heating during soldering or providing a liquid coating on the backside

Abstract

A method for forming solder bumps on an electronic component. Providing a transfer substrate having a plurality of solder balls, disposing the transfer substrate on the surface of the electronic component, heating to reflow the solder balls onto the electronic component; and removing the sacrificial substrate. The transfer substrate may comprise a sacrificial film and a metal layer patterned with a mask which is used to form solder balls on the transfer substrate. Or, the transfer substrate may comprise a sheet of material having solder balls embedded at least partially in the sheet. A method of aligning a part being bumped with a transfer substrate, using a shuttle mechanism and an alignment film is disclosed.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO PENDING APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This is continuation-in-part (CIP) of U.S. Ser. No. 10/989,107 filed Nov. 15, 2004 (U.S. Pat. No. 7,288,471, Oct. 30, 2007).
  • [0002]
    This is also a continuation-in-part of commonly-owned, copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/370,500 filed Mar. 7, 2006 (Status, pending).
  • [0003]
    Ser. No. 10/989,107 is a non-provisional filing of Provisional Patent Application No. 60/520,701 filed Nov. 17, 2003 by Mackay.
  • [0004]
    Ser. No. 10/989,107 is a continuation-in-part of commonly-owned, copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/643,766 filed Aug. 18, 2003 (now U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,833), which is a continuation-in-part of:
      • Ser. No. 09/962,007 filed Sep. 24, 2001 (U.S. Pat. No. 6,609,652, Aug. 26, 2003; hereinafter referred to as the '652 patent) which discloses ball bumping substrates, particularly wafers;
      • which is a continuation-in-part of:
      • U.S. Ser. No. 09/273,517 filed 3/22/1999 (U.S. Pat. No. 6,293,456, 9/25/2001), which is a continuation-in-part of each of:
      • U.S. Ser. No. 08/863,800 filed 27 May 1997 (U.S. Pat. No. 5,988,487, 11/23/1999);
      • U.S. Ser. No. 60/079,006 filed 23 March 1998;
      • U.S. Ser. No. 60/079,221 filed 24 March 1998; and
      • U.S. Ser. No. 60/092,055 filed 8 July 1998,
        all of which are incorporated in their entirety by reference herein.
  • [0012]
    Ser. No. 10/989,107 is also a continuation-in-part of commonly-owned, copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/630,310 filed Jul. 30, 2003 (abandoned), incorporated in its entirety by reference herein, which is a continuation-in-part of the aforementioned U.S. Ser. No. 09/962,007 filed Sep. 24, 2001 (U.S. Pat. No. 6,609,652, Aug. 26, 2003)
  • TECHNICAL FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0013]
    The invention relates to methods of forming solder balls on (“bumping”) circuitized substrates which are electronic components such as semiconductor devices (integrated circuit chips) and interconnection substrates, and to techniques for forming the solder balls on the electronic components.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0014]
    In recent years, flip-chip bonding techniques have increasingly been used to connect (bond) integrated circuit (IC) chips to interconnection substrates and to package substrates. In flip-chip bonding an IC chip component to an interconnection component such as ceramic interconnection substrate, a plurality (e.g., an array) of solder balls (also called “solder bumps”) is formed on a face of a component, typically the IC chip component, and the bumped component is brought into a face-to-face relationship with the other component. The two components are then heated (such as in a furnace) to reflow (heat, then allow to cool) the solder bumps, thereby making electrical connections between respective terminals of the two components.
  • [0015]
    A “captured cell” technique is described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,609,652 (the '652 patent). For example, FIG. 1 of the '652 patent, reproduced as FIG. 1 herein, illustrates a technique 100 for forming solder balls on a surface of a substrate 102. The substrate 102 has number of pads 104 on its top (as viewed) surface. The pads 104 are typically arranged in an array, having a pitch (center-to-center spacing from one another). The substrate 102 is disposed atop a heater stage 106. A mask (stencil) 110 is provided. The mask 110 is a thin planar sheet of relatively stiff material, such as molybdenum, having a plurality of openings (cells) 112, each corresponding to a pad 104 whereupon it is desired to form a solder ball on the substrate 102. The mask 110 is placed on the top (as viewed) surface of the substrate 102 with the cells 112 aligned over the pads 104. The cells 112 in the mask 110 are filled with solder material 114. This is done in any suitable manner such as by smearing solder material on the top (as viewed) surface of the mask 110 and squeegee-ing the solder material 114 into the cells 112 of the mask 110. A pressure plate 120 is disposed onto the top (as viewed) surface of the mask 110. This holds the mask 110 down onto the substrate 102, and the substrate 102 down onto the heater stage 106. This also closes off the cells 112—hence, the terminology “captured cell”. The heater stage 106 is heated up, typically gradually, to a temperature sufficient to cause the solder material in the cells 112 to melt (reflow). When the solder material melts, the individual solder particles will merge (flow) together and, due to surface tension, will try to form (and, typically, will form) a sphere. When the solder material re-solidifies, it assumes a general spherical or hemispherical shape. The mask 110 is then removed from the substrate 102.
  • [0016]
    A mechanism for shuttling a mask from a printing station to a product being ball bumped is described in the '652 patent. For example, FIG. 10 of the '652 patent, reproduced as FIG. 2 herein. illustrates an exemplary ball bumping machine 200 having a base 202, a chuck 204 on the left side for holding a wafer 206 and a heater stage 208 on the right side. A mask 210 is held in a frame 212. The chuck 204 is disposed in chuck base 214. The heater stage 208 is disposed in a heater stage base 216. An elongate shuttle (carriage) mechanism 218 is pivotally attached to the base 202 at a point “P” between the chuck 204 and the heater stage 208. The frame 212 is held in a carrier 220 which is attached to the opposite (free) end of the shuttle mechanism 218. A motor 221 controls the position of the shuttle mechanism 218. The shuttle mechanism 218 can shuttle the mask 210 (i.e., the carrier 220) between the heater stage 208 on the right side (as shown) and the chuck 204 on the left side. The shuttle mechanism 216 pivots about the point “P” Cameras (not shown) are used to make alignments, for example of the mask 210 to the wafer 206. A set of holddown magnets 222, which preferably are electromagnets, selectively hold the chuck base 214 to the machine base 202. Similarly, a set of holddown magnets 222, which preferably are electromagnets, selectively hold the heater stage base 216 to the machine base 202. The carrier 220 is ferrous, or has ferrous “lands”. A set of lift magnets 226, which preferably are electromagnets, selectively hold the carrier 220 to the heater stage base 216. Similarly, a set of lift magnets 228, which preferably are electromagnets, selectively hold the carrier 220 to the chuck base 214. In this manner, the mask can be brought down onto the heater stage, the magnets 226 turned on, the magnets 224 turned off, and the heater stage can be lifted by the shuttle mechanism 216. In other words, when the mask is shuttled, it can take the heater stage with it. Similarly, the mask can be brought down onto the chuck, the magnets 228 turned on, the magnets 222 turned off, and the chuck can be lifted by the shuttle mechanism 216.
  • REFERENCES CITED
  • [0017]
    The following patents and published applications are incorporated by reference in their entirety herein:
  • [0018]
    U.S. Pat. No. 4,898,320 (Dunaway; 1990) discloses method of manufacturing a high-yield solder bumped semiconductor wafer. The method comprises providing a non-solderable transfer substrate having a transfer surface for receipt of solder material; depositing solder material onto the transfer surface to form solder bumps in a predetermined pattern; aligning solderable conductive elements of a semiconductor wafer with the predetermined solder bumps on the transfer surface; and reflowing the patterned solder bumps into wetted contact with the wafer conductive elements.
  • [0019]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,153,505 (Bolde; 2000) discloses plastic solder array using injection molded solder. A solder injection mold apparatus and method for providing solder balls to a printed circuit board substrate using the solder injection mold apparatus in the plastic ball grid array (PBGA). The solder mold through holes are chamfered at entry and at exit ends to assist in receipt of molten solder and the formation and transfer of solder balls to lands on the substrate. A blind recess is provided in the second major surface of the mold, i.e. the side facing the substrate, in order to accommodate electronic components mounted thereon. Solder balls are delivered and metallurgically affixed to the lands in a process that requires only one reflow, leaving the through holes clean of solder and the mold ready for reuse. The material of which the substrate, mold and base plate are comprised is selected to be non-wettable by solder and mutually compatible with respect to CTE when exposed to temperatures of molten solder.
  • [0020]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,333,469 (Inoue; 2001) discloses wafer-scale package structure and circuit board attached thereto. A wafer-scale package structure in which a circuit board for rearranging electrode pads of a wafer is laminated on the wafer integrally. The circuit board can be divided into individual chip-size packages (CSPS) and which includes a layer of polyimide resin, and connection between the wafer and the circuit board is performed by solder bump, while the circuit board is stuck on the wafer with an adhesive.
  • [0021]
    U.S. 20050263571 (Belanger et al.; 2005) discloses injection molded continuously solidified solder method and apparatus. A method and apparatus for forming solder bumps by molten solder deposition into cavity arrays in a substrate immediately followed by solidification of molten solder such that precise replication of cavity volumes is consistently achieved in formed solder bump arrays. Various solder filling problems, such as those caused by surface tension and oxidation effects, are overcome by a combination of narrow molten Solder dispense slots and solidification of dispensed molten solder.
  • [0022]
    U.S. 20060035454 (Belanger et al.; 2006) discloses fluxless solder transfer and reflow process. A process that permits the transfer and reflow of solder features produced by Injection Molded Solder (IMS) from a mold plate to a solder receiving substrate without the use of flux. Several embodiments produce solder transfer and reflow separately or together and use either formic acid vapor or partial concentration of hydrogen, both in nitrogen, as the oxide reducing atmosphere. A final embodiment produces fluxless transfer and reflow in only nitrogen through the use of ultrasonic vibration between the solder filled mold plate and solder receiving substrate.
  • BRIEF DISCLOSURE (SUMMARY) OF THE INVENTION
  • [0023]
    It is an object of the invention to provide an improved process for forming solder balls on electronic components.
  • [0024]
    The present invention advantageously utilizes various of the techniques set forth in the '652 patent, as well as in other commonly-owned patents and pending applications, and presents a new method for ball bumping a substrate. All of the matter that is discussed in previous commonly-owned patents and pending applications is incorporated by reference herein.
  • [0025]
    According to the invention generally, a bump transfer substrate is prepared (bumped) with the proper alloy, bump size, and layout allowing the end user to transfer the solder (bumps) onto his products without high capital investments or large NRE (non-recurring) costs for small volumes. The technique is compatible with BGA (ball grid array), PCB (printed circuit board) pads, CSP (chip scale packaging), wafer level CSP, flip-chip, and the like.
  • [0026]
    The bump transfer substrate is essentially a sacrificial substrate. It may be bumped using the captured cell technique described in the '652 patent (refer to FIGS. 1 and 2, above). Many advantages can accrue to first bumping a sacrificial substrate, then transferring the solder balls formed from the sacrificial substrate to a product.
  • [0027]
    According to the invention, a method for forming solder bumps on an electronic component comprises the steps of: providing a transfer substrate comprising a sacrificial substrate and plurality of solder balls; disposing the transfer substrate on the surface of the electronic component; heating to reflow the solder balls onto the electronic component; and removing the sacrificial substrate.
  • [0028]
    The transfer substrate may comprise a polyimide film, preferably substantially see-through, such as Kapton™ covered with a layer of metal, such as copper. The layer of metal is patterned using a mask. The solder balls are formed on the transfer substrate, and this can be using the same mask.
  • [0029]
    The transfer substrate is urged against the electronic component, using a pressure plate or air pressure. A sheet of resilient material may be disposed between the pressure plate and the transfer substrate.
  • [0030]
    The sacrificial substrate may be removed either before or after cooling.
  • [0031]
    Alternatively, the sacrificial substrate comprises a sheet of silicone rubber; and the solder balls are at least partially, such as at least 50% embedded in the sheet of silicone rubber.
  • [0032]
    The silicone rubber with embedded solder balls embodiment of transfer substrate may be formed by: providing a blind hole mask having a planar substrate and a plurality of cells extending into a surface of the substrate; filling the cells with solder paste; reflowing the solder paste to form solder balls; encapsulating the mask with a curable resilient material (silicone rubber); allowing the curable material to cure, forming a sheet; and removing the curable resilient material from the mask, with the solder balls least partially embedded therein.
  • [0033]
    According to the invention, a method of aligning a transfer substrate to a product being bumped comprises the steps of: providing a machine having first a chuck for holding the product being bumped, a second chuck for holding a transfer substrate, and frame for holding an alignment film; shuttling the alignment film to the product being bumped, and aligning the product being bumped; and shuttling the alignment film to the transfer substrate, and aligning the transfer substrate.
  • [0034]
    Then, for bumping the product, removing the alignment film, shuttling the transfer substrate to the product being bumped, urging the transfer substrate against the product being bumped, supplying heat to reflow solder balls from the transfer substrate to the product being bumped, and releasing the transfer substrate.
  • [0035]
    Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become apparent in light of the following description thereof.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0036]
    Reference will be made in detail to preferred embodiments of the invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. The drawings are intended to be illustrative, not limiting. Although the invention will be described in the context of these preferred embodiments, it should be understood that it is not intended to limit the spirit and scope of the invention to these particular embodiments.
  • [0037]
    The structure, operation, and advantages of the present preferred embodiment of the invention will become further apparent upon consideration of the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings (FIGs).
  • [0038]
    FIG. 1 is an exploded cross-sectional view of a method and apparatus for forming solder balls on substrates, as set forth in FIG. 1 of the '652 patent.
  • [0039]
    FIG. 2 is a schematic side view of a ball bumping machine, as set forth in FIG. 10 of the '652 patent.
  • [0040]
    FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a fixtureless transfer mechanism, according to the invention.
  • [0041]
    FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of a precision tool transfer mechanism, according to the invention.
  • [0042]
    FIGS. 5A, 5B and 5C are cross-sectional views of an embodiment of the invention.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 6A is a side cross-sectional view illustrating a “composite” mask, according to the invention.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 6B is a side cross-sectional view illustrating a “bridge the gap” feature of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0045]
    U.S. Pat. No. 5,988,487 discloses methods for forming solder bumps on integrated circuit chips (and other similar circuitized units). A screening stencil is laid over the surface of the substrate and solder paste material is deposited into the stencil's apertures with a screening blade. The stencil is placed in such a manner that each of its apertures is positioned over a substrate pad, upon which a solder bump is to be formed. Next, a flat pressure plate is laid over the exposed top surface of the stencil, which creates a fully enclosed or “captured”, cell of solder paste within each stencil aperture. Then, with the stencil and plate remaining in place on top of the substrate, the substrate is heated to a temperature sufficient to reflow the solder paste material. After reflow, the substrate is cooled, and the pressure plate and stencil are thereafter removed, leaving solder bumps on the substrate. The use of the pressure plate ensures the proper formation of the solder bumps at high densities of solder bumps (i.e., high densities corresponding to small solder bump sizes and small pitch distances between solder bumps).
  • [0046]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 5,988,487, a method of forming solder bump structures on corresponding pads of a substrate comprises the steps of:
      • (a) laying a stencil over the surface of the substrate, the stencil having apertures, said stencil being laid in such a manner that an aperture is positioned over a substrate pad;
      • (b) screen depositing a solder paste material into the stencil apertures;
      • (c) thereafter laying a flat plate over the exposed top surface of the stencil; and
      • (d) thereafter heating the substrate with the stencil and plate on top thereof to a temperature sufficient to reflow the solder paste material.
  • [0051]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 5,988,487, a method of forming solder bump structures on corresponding pads of a substrate further comprises the steps of:
      • (e) thereafter lowering the temperature of said substrate to a temperature point below 95% of the melting point of the reflowed solder, as measured in degrees Kelvin, and above 80% of said melting point; and
      • (f) thereafter lifting the plate and stencil from said substrate at this temperature point.
  • [0054]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 5,988,487, a method of forming solder bump structures on corresponding pads of a substrate further comprises the steps of:
      • (a′) the stencil having apertures which correspond one-to-one with corresponding pads of the substrate.
  • [0056]
    U.S. Pat. No. 6,609,652, discloses a mask (stencil) having cells (openings) is disposed on a surface of a heater stage, and is then filled (printed) with solder paste. Then a substrate is assembled to the opposite side of the mask. Then the solder paste is reflowed. This may be done partially inverted. Then the mask is separated from the substrate, either before or after cooling. Solder balls are thus formed on the substrate, which may be a semiconductor wafer, A method for printing the mask with solder paste is described.
  • [0057]
    In U.S. Pat. No. 6,609,652, a ball bumping machine comprises a machine base, a chuck for holding a substrate, a heater stage, and a frame for holding a mask, and the ball bumping machine is characterized by:
      • the chuck is disposed on one side of the machine base;
      • the heater stage is on an opposite side of the machine base; and
      • means for shuttling the frame between the heater stage and the chuck.
  • [0061]
    U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/643,766 (U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,833) discloses a mask (stencil) having cells (openings) is disposed on a surface of a heater stage, and is then filled (printed) with solder paste. Then a substrate is assembled to the opposite side of the mask. Then the solder paste is reflowed. This may be done partially inverted. Then the mask is separated from the substrate, either before or after cooling. Solder balls are thus formed on the substrate, which may be a semiconductor wafer. A biased chuck urges the substrate into intimate contact with the mask. A method for printing the mask with solder paste is described. Methods of forming high aspect ratio solder bumps (including balls and reflowable interconnect structures) are described.
  • [0062]
    In U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/643,766 (U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,833), a method for forming solder bumps on a substrate having a plurality of pads on a surface thereof, comprises:
      • providing a mask having a first surface and a second surface, and a plurality of cells extending from the first surface at least partially through the mask to the second surface thereof; filling the cells with solder paste; disposing the substrate in a biased chuck assembly;
      • disposing the mask on the surface of the substrate with the first surface of the mask adjacent the surface of the substrate; urging the substrate into positive contact with the mask so as to maintain substantially intimate contact between the first surface of the mask and the surface of the substrate;
      • reflowing the solder paste; and
      • separating the substrate from the mask.
  • [0067]
    In U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/643,766 (U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,833), a chuck assembly for holding a semiconductor wafer in intimate contact with a mask, comprising a rigid, generally planar chuck base, is characterized by:
      • a central recess extending into the stage from a top surface thereof, said recess sized and shaped to receive a generally planar, flexible diaphragm, said diaphragm extending across the recess.
  • [0069]
    The above inventions (U.S. Pat. No. 5,988,487; U.S. Pat. No. 6,609,652; U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,833) relate to methods of forming solder balls on substrates which are electronic components such as semiconductor devices (integrated circuit chips) and interconnection substrates, and to apparatuses for forming the solder balls on the electronic components. Very generally, and this was done “directly” by filling cells of a mask with solder paste, placing the filled mask on the electronic component being bumped, reflowing the solder paste, and removing the mask. (Many more specifics such as closed cell are involved.)
  • [0070]
    The present invention advantageously utilizes many of the techniques disclosed in Dockets M-1, M-3, M-6, but rather than bumping an electronic component directly, a “sacrificial substrate” is bumped, and the bumped sacrificial substrate, or “transfer substrate” is used to bump the electronic component.
  • [0071]
    As used herein, the verb “bump” means to form solder balls on, and the noun “bump” means a solder ball.
  • Basic Transfer Substrate Manufacturing, Generally
  • [0072]
    According to the invention, generally, rather than bumping an electronic component, first a sacrificial substrate (bump transfer substrate) is bumped, then the bumps (solder balls) are transferred to the electronic component—namely, to corresponding pads on the electronic component.
  • [0073]
    The bump transfer substrate may be a film sheet, wafer, or substrate which is coated with a base thin film (layer) of metal. The film can be a continuous (not patterned), blanket deposition. Utilizing the a wafer bumping process, such as disclosed in the '652 patent, a very thin layer of copper, or equivalent can be soldered to. (As described below, the layer gets patterned.) This is due to the unique methods of interference liquid sphere attachment described in the '652 patent. This allows the bump to consume this thin film and release from the substrate when the user heats to the suggested re-flow profile.
  • [0074]
    A wafer bump mask is produced from etching, laser cutting, or additive manufacturing. It is noted that this mask when used with the method described in the '652 patent, hole size variations and positions do not require exact precision. The final product however produces excellent bump height uniformity, and a high tolerance for mismatches in material expansions. The typical mask costs are equivalent to a SMT (surface mount technology) mask.
  • [0075]
    The bump mask can be similar to the masks that were used (in U.S. Pat. No. 5,988,487; U.S. Pat. No. 6,609,652; U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,833) for bumping the electronic component. Here, the mask is used to form bumps on the transfer substrate, but first can be used to pattern the metal film (layer) on the transfer substrate, thereby advantageously serving a “dual” purpose.
  • [0076]
    This bump mask is then used to photo process the thin film (metal layer) into pad defined patterns. (The pads are processed using the bump mask as a shadow mask for photoresist coat, followed by etching.) It may also be used with liquid photo-imageable solder masks, as a mask defined pad pattern. This typically depends on the bump size and pitch requirements. This greatly reduces processing costs requiring only low cost laser film masks produced form auto cad, or Gerber files.
  • [0077]
    This produces a transfer substrate with the bump(s) attached, flux coated, ready to be transferred/released at the point of use. This method produces transfer substrates for about $500 tooling cost and substrate cost of $5-7 and turn around times of 2-3 days are possible. Allowing a substantial markup while providing customers exceptional cost savings and time to market solutions.
  • [0078]
    The process of the present invention has few limitations. Any ball size or alloy can be produced, this bridges the gap presently experienced by the industry as ball drop techniques are limited to about 10 mils and flip chip manufactures mostly have a hard time producing ball sizes greater than 5 mils.
  • Embodiment 1: Fixture-Less Transfer
  • [0079]
    Reference FIG. 3. Fixture-less transfers utilize a transfer substrate which is a film, which is metallized. A typical film substrate material is polyimide material (such as Kapton™), having a thickness of 0.003 in, and is preferably transparent or translucent (the sacrificial substrate is substantially see-through). The film itself is a “sacrificial film substrate”. A metal film such as copper (material) is deposited on one surface of the film substrate. The metal thickness is in the range of 500-3000 Å, such as approximately 1000 Å.
  • [0080]
    First, the transfer substrate (metallized film substrate) is patterned (such as by using the bump mask, as described above) and bumped (again, using the bump mask). Typically, this would be done bump-up (bumping the top, metallized surface of the transfer substrate). The transfer substrate (bumped film substrate) can be set aside until needed, or shipped to a customer. This is one of the advantages of the invention. The bumping service provider does not necessarily need to handle (and risk damaging) the product (electronic component). The transfer substrate can be fluxed, now or later.
  • [0081]
    The thickness of the metal film on the film substrate should be thick enough that it is not consumed in the step of bumping the film substrate. Later, when reflowing the bumps from the transfer substrate to the electronic component, as described hereinbelow, the metal film will be consumed, thereby also releasing the balls from the film substrate, so it cannot be too thick. Exemplary ranges for the dimensions are set forth above.
  • [0082]
    Then, the bump prepared film (transfer substrate) and flux is inverted (bump-down) and aligned visually through the film with an underling product being bumped (electronic component). Typically, the flux is tacky enough to maintain alignment between the transfer substrate and the electronic component. This can be done on a hot plate (not yet heated, of course). If visual alignment is not possible, other conventional alignment means can be employed.
  • [0083]
    Next, a cover plate stack is placed on the top of the aligned film. The cover plate stack comprises;
      • a sheet of resilient material, such as conformal silicone rubber (silicone rubber is a synthetic elastomer made from a cross-linked polymer which is reinforced with silica); and
      • a pressure plate—such as a quartz disk.
  • [0086]
    The conformal silicone rubber suitably has a thickness of from one-eight to one-quarter of an inch (0.125-0.250 inches). This sheet of silicone rubber serves various purposes:
      • it acts as a thermal barrier so that the pressure plate does not “sink” heat which is being provided by the hot plate (FIG. 3) to reflow the solder balls on the transfer substrate; and
      • is equalizes pressure and reduces stress concentrations such as may result from an uneven topology across the top surface of the product (electronic component) being bumped (FIG. 3)
  • [0089]
    It is within the scope of the invention that a manifold delivering air pressure to the back side (top, as viewed in FIG. 3) of the silicone rubber is used in lieu of a pressure plate to hold the transfer substrate (bump prepared film) securely to the product being bumped (electronic component). The use of air pressure rather than a pressure plate is also pertinent to Embodiment 3, discussed hereinbelow. The pressure plate (or air pressure mechanism) urges the transfer substrate against the electronic component.
  • [0090]
    Next, the cover plate stack (pressure plate and silicone rubber) is placed atop the product/film on a cool (not yet heated) hot plate. Then the hot plate is heated to reflow the solder bumps on the transfer substrate). As mentioned hereinabove, this is when the copper film (pads under the balls) on the transfer substrate gets consumed, releasing the balls.
  • [0091]
    In this example, heating takes place through the electronic component, and should therefore be controlled so as to not damage the component. Some of the techniques described (in U.S. Pat. No. 5,988,487; U.S. Pat. No. 6,609,652; U.S. Pat. No. 7,007,833) could be employed to minimize heating the electronic component.
  • [0092]
    Then the cover plate stack (pressure plate, silicone rubber; or pressure manifold and silicone rubber) is removed. This can be done before or after cooling.
  • [0093]
    Then the sacrificial film substrate can be peeled off, either hot or cold (before or after cooling).
  • [0094]
    If the sacrificial film substrate is removed before cooling, nice spherical will result bumps on the electronic component (product being bumped).
  • [0095]
    If the sacrificial film substrate is removed after cooling, there is no need to handle hot materials. However, bump distortions (for example, flat top bumps) may occur. But, as may be desirable to some clients, a second re-flow would reform (reflow) the bumps as spheres, if required.
  • [0096]
    With respect to bumping the electronic component, the process of FIG. 3 could be done inverted (turn the drawing sheet upside down to visualize this), as discussed for example in the '652 patent.
  • Embodiment 2: Precision Tool Transfer
  • [0097]
    Reference FIG. 4. A precision tool modeled after (based on, substantially similar to, functionally comparable to) the FIG. 10 of the '652 patent (FIG. 2, herein) would perform all of the needed functions to transfer bumps from transfer (sacrificial) substrates onto products (electronic components). This would include alignment functions, contact and re-flow, and separation.
  • [0098]
    The unit has two chucks one for holding the product to be soldered (bumped) and one for holding the transfer substrate, both have flex heater inserts. A frame (in the shuttle mechanism) holds the film for alignment. This is copy of the film used to manufacture the mask and costs about $10-$20.
  • [0099]
    As in the '652 patent, means are provided (shuttle mechanism) for shuttling the frame between two positions—namely, between the product being bumped and the transfer substrate.
  • [0100]
    The alignment film is rotated (shuttled) to the product being bumped and alignment using knobs is accomplished. The film is then rotated (shuttled) to the transfer substrate which is then aligned.
  • [0101]
    The alignment film is then removed and the transfer substrate (in any of the embodiments set forth herein) is rotated (shuttled) directly over the product. Pressure is then supplied to mate the bumps on the transfer substrate to the pads on the electronic component. (The transfer substrate is urged against the product being bumped) Heat is supplied, solder balls are reflowed onto the pads of the product being bumped, and the transfer substrate is released.
  • [0102]
    The system can then separate and cool or cool in place as desired.
  • [0103]
    Using the alignment film provides a cheap way using no cameras to achieve appropriate alignments. A low cost laser film is produced. The operator loads this into the frame that swings back and forth between the transfer substrate and the wafer (product being bumped), a visual alignment is made at wafer, then swing back to the transfer substrate and align, then remove the alignment film and swing (shuttle) the transfer substrate to the wafer and heat (reflow), then swing the transfer substrate away (before or after cooling, as described hereinabove). Also, by using the alignment film, the transfer substrate does not need to be transparent (e.g., kapton), as in the previous embodiment.
  • Embodiment 3. Silicone Rubber Transfer Substrate In this embodiment, a “blind hole” mask is used. A blind hole mask is discussed, for example, in the '652 patent. In the '652 patent (see FIGS. 5A and 5B), cells (512) in the blind hole mask (520) were filled with solder paste (514), then reflowed with the electronic component (302) in place. The mask material is suitably molybdenum (moly).
  • [0104]
    In this embodiment of the present invention, generally, the solder is reflowed in the blind hole mask, forming solder balls, the solder balls are captured to a substrate, then later transferred to the electronic component (product being bumped).
  • [0105]
    With reference to FIG. 5A, first a blind hole mask 500 is created which is a planar substrate 502 having two opposite sides (top and bottom, as viewed), and a plurality of holes (cells) 504 extending into the substrate from on side (surface) thereof towards the other side thereof. Next, the holes are filled with solder paste, and reflowed to form solder balls 506. The substrate 502 is suitably molybdenum (moly). The solder will not wet to the moly. Suitable exemplary dimensions are:
      • h, thickness of the mask, approximately 8 mils (0.008 inches)
      • d, depth of the cells, approximately 6 mils
      • w, cross-dimension of a cell, approximately 16 mils
      • s, spacing (pitch) of the cells, approximately 20 mils
      • D, diameter of a solder ball, approximately 11.8 mils (0.3 mm)
  • [0111]
    A word about the figure (FIG. 5A). In reality, the cells 504 are not so square as illustrated. Actually, they are rounded, as a result of etching. Including dished out somewhat at the bottom. This is normal.
  • [0112]
    In any case, it will be noted that the resulting solder balls 506 stick up, significantly, out of the cells 504 in the mask 500. It should also be remembered that when solder paste forms solder balls, about half the original volume is lost due to volatiles etc.
  • [0113]
    FIG. 5B shows a next step. The blind hole mask 500 was used to create individual, organized spheres (solder) 506 of a well-defined size at a well-defined pitch. It should then be allowed to cool down, but can still be warm. As shown here, the front surface of the mask 500 is encapsulated a curable material 510, such as silicone rubber, which is allowed to cure. The silicone rubber forms a sheet. The top surface is shown a little wavy just to indicate that when applied, it is a liquid, and when cured it will be generally planar. Any curable material which can later be applied in substantially liquid form, cure to a resilient sheet, and can be peeled away will work here. RTV (room temperature vulcanize) silicone rubber materials are a good choice.
  • [0114]
    A word about the figure (FIG. 5B). In reality, the silicone rubber material 510 would enter the cells 504 in the gap between the spheres 506 and the walls of the cell 504. For example, rather than encompassing only about half of the sphere, the silicone rubber would encompass approximately 75% of the sphere—namely, more than half (50%) but not 100%. 60%-80% is adequate. (The figure is highly stylized. In reality, the bottoms of the cells are dished, and the solder balls will always be poking at least slightly out of the rubber sheet.)
  • [0115]
    Then, as shown in FIG. 5C the sheet of cured silicone rubber 510 has been peeled away (removed) from the mask (not shown in this figure), and it has solder balls 506 sticking out of its surface, the solder balls being of a well-defined size at a well-defined pitch. (The solder balls stick (adhere lightly) to the sheet of silicone rubber, also the silicone rubber captures the balls by encompassing more than half of the sphere, yet is removable.) This is a saleable product, like the other ball bumped transfer substrates discussed herein, ready to ship to an electronic component manufacturer who wants to bump their product without significant equipment costs and problems.
  • [0116]
    A word about the figure (FIG. 5C). This presents a more realistic view where the balls 506 are about 75% buried (only 25% poking out) of the silicone rubber sheet 510.
  • [0117]
    The sheet 510 with balls 506 is then used as a transfer substrate, as described above. First aligned, using any suitable alignment technique, as described above. Then held securely to the product being bumped using either a pressure plate or an air pressure manifold, as described above. Then remove the rubber. (Silicone rubber will peel away easily, because it is resilient, and where it wraps around the equators of the spheres, it will yield.) Particularly with this method (silicone rubber sheet with solder balls embedded), the use of air pressure (rather than a solid pressure plate) offers constant force even on non-flat substrates (being bumped).
  • [0118]
    This method (solder balls embedded in a sheet of silicone rubber) does not require a thin films on the transfer substrate, as in the previously-described embodiments.
  • [0119]
    In all embodiments, the solder wets to pads on the product being bumped, and said pads should of course have UBM (under bump metal) which is not consumed when reflowing the solder balls from the transfer substrate to the product being bumped.
  • [0120]
    The invention is useful for virtually any size and arrangement of balls. Custom arrangements can be formed. Or, standard pitch grids can be mass-produced, for example:
      • 0.3 mm balls on 0.5 mm pitch (such as for chip scale)
      • 5 mm balls on 8 mm pitch (such as for BGA package)
  • Regarding the Transfer Substrate
  • [0123]
    As discussed hereinabove, the bump transfer substrate is essentially a sacrificial substrate, and may be bumped using the captured cell technique described in the '652 patent.
  • [0124]
    The transfer substrate may comprise a polyimide film, preferably substantially see-through, such as Kapton™.
  • [0125]
    The transfer substrate may be urged against the electronic component, using a pressure plate or air pressure. A sheet of resilient material may be disposed between the pressure plate and the transfer substrate.
  • [0126]
    The sacrificial substrate may be removed either before or after cooling.
  • [0127]
    Alternatively, the sacrificial substrate comprises a sheet of silicone rubber; and the solder balls are at least partially, such as at least 50% embedded in the sheet of silicone rubber.
  • [0128]
    The silicone rubber with embedded solder balls embodiment of transfer substrate may be formed by: providing a blind hole mask having a planar substrate and a plurality of cells extending into a surface of the substrate; filling the cells with solder paste; reflowing the solder paste to form solder balls; encapsulating the mask with a curable resilient material (silicone rubber); allowing the curable material to cure, forming a sheet; and removing the curable resilient material from the mask, with the solder balls least partially embedded therein.
  • [0129]
    A blind hole mask is discussed, for example, in the '652 patent. In the '652 patent (see FIGS. 5A and 5B), cells (512) in the blind hole mask (520) were filled with solder paste (514), then reflowed with the electronic component (302) in place. The mask material is suitably molybdenum (moly).
  • [0130]
    In the present invention, generally, the solder may be reflowed in the blind hole mask, forming solder balls, the solder balls are captured to a substrate, then later transferred to the electronic component (product being bumped).
  • [0131]
    FIGS. 6A and 6B correspond to FIGS. 5A and 5B of the aforementioned U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,293,456 and 6,609,652.
  • Composite Mask And Pressure Plate
  • [0132]
    The benefit of using a pressure plate to capture the solder material in the cells of the mask has been discussed hereinabove. It is generally preferred that the pressure plate be intimately held against the mask so that there are no gaps for leakage, particularly when reflowing inverted or partially inverted.
  • [0133]
    According to an aspect of the invention, a composite mask performing the functions of a mask and a pressure (contact) plate are formed as an integral unit, thereby assuring no leakage between the two.
  • [0134]
    FIG. 6A illustrates an embodiment of a composite mask 600. The composite mask 600 is a rigid planar structure having two portions—a mask portion 610 comparable (e.g.) to the mask 110 described hereinabove, and a pressure plate portion 620 comparable to the pressure plate 120 described hereinabove. A plurality of cells 612 (compare 112) extend from a one surface of the composite mask 600, through the mask portion 610, to the pressure plate portion 620. These “blind hole” type openings 612 are filled with solder material 614 (compare 114) in the manner described hereinabove.
  • [0135]
    The composite mask 600 is suitably formed of a sheet of metal, such as molybdenum, which is etched to have cells 612 extending into a surface thereof (but not all the way through the sheet). Alternatively, the composite mask 600 can be formed from a sheet of metal comprising the pressure plate portion 620, a surface of which is masked, patterned, and plated up to form the mask portion 610 (with cells 612).
  • [0136]
    Alternatively, a composite-type mask can be formed from a discrete mask welded or otherwise intimately joined (including adhered) to a discrete pressure plate.
  • Bridging A Gap
  • [0137]
    An interesting feature/capability of the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 6A and 6B, but is not limited to the use of a composite mask. The composite mask 600 is illustrated disposed beneath a substrate which is in an inverted position, for example the substrate 302 from FIG. 3A in the '652 patent (see also FIG. 3E). Note that no part of the substrate 302 actually is in contact with the composite mask 600—rather, that there is a small gap 624 between the opposing faces of the substrate and the mask.
  • [0138]
    As best viewed in FIG. 6B, when the solder material 614 reflows and forms a ball, the ball has a diameter (height) which is greater than the thickness of the mask (in this illustrative case, greater than the thickness of the mask portion 610 of composite mask 600), so it sticks out of the mask, “bridges” the gap 624, and wets itself to the pad 304 on the substrate 302. The solder ball does this while it is in a liquid state, at which point the mask can easily be separated from the substrate, thereafter allowing the solder ball to cool off (solidify).
  • [0139]
    Although, for example, the cells in the blind hole mask 600 are shown as being rectangular in cross-section, they could have the shapes, such as hemispherical.
  • [0140]
    As discussed hereinabove (with reference to FIG. 5A), a blind hole mask 500 may a planar substrate 502 having two opposite sides (top and bottom, as viewed), and a plurality of holes (cells) 504 extending into the substrate from on side (surface) thereof towards the other side thereof. Next, the holes may be filled with solder paste, and reflowed to form solder balls 506. The substrate should be non-wettable. The cells 504 may not be so square as illustrated. They may be rounded. The resulting solder balls 506 stick up, significantly, out of the cells 504 in the mask 500.
  • [0141]
    According to a feature of the invention, the transfer substrate is a substantially planar sheet having a substantially planar front surface, a thickness, and a back surface which may be substantially parallel to the front surface. The transfer substrate may comprise a sheet of any rigid or semi-rigid, preferably “non-wettable” material, such as metal, molybdenum, silicone rubber, polyimide film, ceramic, quartz, glass.
  • [0142]
    Generally, the transfer substrate may be considered to be a “sacrificial” substrate in that it's primary purpose is to provide a medium upon which solder masses (such as solder balls) may be formed, at pre-defined locations, later (subsequently) to be transferred to a circuitized substrate such as an electronic component. The transfer substrate itself need not be circuitized, and may or may not be reusable (after having been used for bumping a circuitized substrate, usable again (and again) for bumping additional circuitized substrates). In the case, for example, of a transfer substrate formed of a glass sheet, the transfer substrate may readily be reusable.
  • [0143]
    According to a feature of the invention, the transfer substrate may have holes or depressions extending only partially through the substrate into the front surface thereof, and the holes or depressions may have any suitable geometry, including dished out, hemispherical, and the like.
  • [0144]
    According to a feature of the invention, solder balls formed in the transfer substrate may be partially embedded (disposed in the holes or recesses) in the surface of the substrate, and extend at least partially out of the surface of the substrate.
  • [0145]
    According to a feature of the invention, after applying the transfer substrate to the circuitized substrate, and heating to form solder balls on the circuitized substrate, the transfer substrate may be removed while the solder balls are still in liquid form (melted), or after the solder balls have solidified on the circuitized substrate, or when the solder balls are partially solidified.
  • [0146]
    According to a feature of the invention, inasmuch as the transfer substrate may be considered to be a “sacrificial” substrate, the transfer substrate may be left in place until the solder balls have solidified upon the circuitized substrate and then, rather than simply lifting off the transfer substrate, the transfer substrate may first be partially or fully dissolved (such as with a suitable solvent). This can help to release the solder balls from the transfer substrate, and can be used in cases where the solder balls tend to stick (such as by wetting, cohesion surface tension or other forces) to the transfer substrate.
  • [0147]
    According to a feature of the invention, in any instance where “solder paste” is mentioned hereinabove, it should be understood that solder without flux can be used. As mentioned in the aforementioned U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,293,456 and 6,609,652, for example, although a solder material comprising solder particles and flux is described, the solder material may be dry, such as fluorine-treated, or using a forming or reducing gas. (column 24, line 64)
  • [0148]
    According to a feature of the invention, a blind hole mask such as has been described, with solder balls extending from recesses in a surface thereof, may be used as the transfer substrate itself (rather than to bump a separate transfer substrate), for bumping an electronic component (or circuitized substrate). And, when using the blind hole mask (with solder balls formed therein) as a transfer substrate, the electronic component may be bumped without using conventional flux. For example, various other fluxless solder transfer and reflow processes may be used that permit the transfer and reflow of solder bumps from the transfer substrate to a circuitized substrate, without the use of flux. For example, producing solder transfer and reflow separately or together, and using either formic acid vapor or partial concentration of hydrogen, both in nitrogen, as the oxide reducing atmosphere. Or, producing fluxless transfer and reflow in only nitrogen through the use of ultrasonic vibration between the solder filled mold plate and solder receiving substrate. Any chemical, mechanical, including ultrasonic, inert, nitrogen or hydrogen gas and any other “fluxless” method may be used.
  • [0149]
    Although the invention has been illustrated and described in detail in the drawings and foregoing description, the same is to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive in character—it being understood that only preferred embodiments have been shown and described, and that all changes and modifications that come within the spirit of the invention are desired to be protected. Undoubtedly, many other “variations” on the “themes” set forth hereinabove will occur to one having ordinary skill in the art to which the present invention most nearly pertains, and such variations are intended to be within the scope of the invention, as disclosed herein.

Claims (16)

1-20. (canceled)
21. A method for forming solder bumps on a circuitized substrate comprising the steps of:
providing a transfer substrate comprising a sacrificial substrate and plurality of preformed solder balls;
disposing the transfer substrate on the surface of the circuitized substrate;
reflowing the solder balls onto the circuitized substrate; and
removing the transfer substrate;
wherein:
the transfer substrate comprises a sheet of material selected from the group comprising metal, ceramic and glass; and
the solder balls are at least partially embedded in a surface of the transfer substrate.
22. The method of claim 21, wherein:
the solder balls extend at least partially out of the surface of the transfer substrate.
23. The method of claim 21, wherein:
the transfer substrate is removed after solder balls have solidified on the circuitized substrate.
24. The method of claim 21, wherein:
the transfer substrate is reusable.
25. The method of claim 21, wherein:
the transfer substrate is a substantially planar sheet having a substantially planar front surface, a thickness, and a back surface.
26. The method of claim 21, wherein:
the transfer substrate comprises a sheet of a rigid or semi-rigid material.
27. The method of claim 21, wherein:
the transfer substrate comprises a non-wettable material.
28. The method of claim 21, wherein:
the transfer substrate comprises holes or depressions extending only partially through the substrate into a front surface thereof.
29. The method of claim 28, wherein:
the holes or depressions comprise one of the following geometries: dished out, and hemispherical.
30. The method of claim 21, wherein:
the transfer substrate is substantially see-through.
31. The method of claim 21, further comprising:
prior to heating, urging the transfer substrate against the circuitized substrate.
32. The method of claim 31, further comprising:
urging the transfer substrate against the electronic component using a pressure plate and a sheet of resilient material disposed between the pressure plate and the transfer substrate.
33. The method of claim 21, wherein:
the transfer substrate is removed before cooling.
34. The method of claim 21, wherein:
the solder balls are at least 50% embedded in the transfer substrate.
35. The method of claim 21, wherein:
the circuitized substrate is an electronic component.
US12911210 1997-05-27 2010-10-25 Bumping Electronic Components Using Transfer Substrates Abandoned US20110092066A1 (en)

Priority Applications (13)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US08863800 US5988487A (en) 1997-05-27 1997-05-27 Captured-cell solder printing and reflow methods
US7900698 true 1998-03-23 1998-03-23
US7922198 true 1998-03-24 1998-03-24
US9205598 true 1998-07-08 1998-07-08
US09273517 US6293456B1 (en) 1997-05-27 1999-03-22 Methods for forming solder balls on substrates
US09962007 US6609652B2 (en) 1997-05-27 2001-09-24 Ball bumping substrates, particuarly wafers
US10630310 US20040069840A1 (en) 2001-09-24 2003-07-30 Method and apparatus for filling a mask with solder paste
US10643766 US7007833B2 (en) 1997-05-27 2003-08-18 Forming solder balls on substrates
US52070103 true 2003-11-17 2003-11-17
US10989107 US7288471B2 (en) 1997-05-27 2004-11-15 Bumping electronic components using transfer substrates
US11370500 US7604153B2 (en) 1997-05-27 2006-03-07 Forming solder balls on substrates
US11873396 US7842599B2 (en) 1997-05-27 2007-10-16 Bumping electronic components using transfer substrates
US12911210 US20110092066A1 (en) 1997-05-27 2010-10-25 Bumping Electronic Components Using Transfer Substrates

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US12911210 Abandoned US20110092066A1 (en) 1997-05-27 2010-10-25 Bumping Electronic Components Using Transfer Substrates

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