US20110074109A1 - Ring toss game and equipment therefor - Google Patents

Ring toss game and equipment therefor Download PDF

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Publication number
US20110074109A1
US20110074109A1 US12924400 US92440010A US20110074109A1 US 20110074109 A1 US20110074109 A1 US 20110074109A1 US 12924400 US12924400 US 12924400 US 92440010 A US92440010 A US 92440010A US 20110074109 A1 US20110074109 A1 US 20110074109A1
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Prior art keywords
ring
sticks
member
propelling
portion
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US12924400
Inventor
Samuel L. Werth
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Werth Samuel L
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B67/00Sporting games or accessories therefor, not provided for in groups A63B1/00 - A63B65/00
    • A63B67/06Ring or disc tossing games, e.g. quoits; Throwing or tossing games, e.g. using balls; Games for manually rolling balls, e.g. marbles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B59/00Bats, rackets or the like, not covered by groups A63B49/00 - A63B57/00
    • A63B59/30Bats, rackets or the like, not covered by groups A63B49/00 - A63B57/00 forming hand-held throwing or catching aids for use with rings, discs, wheels or cylindrical throwing-bodies, or for use with balls having a central bore
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B65/00Implements for throwing ; Mechanical projectors, e.g. using spring force
    • A63B65/12Ball-throwing apparatus with or without catchers ; Mechanical projectors, e.g. using spring force
    • A63B65/122Hand-held mechanical projectors, e.g. for balls
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2207/00Exercising or sporting devices provided with means enabling use in the dark
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2207/00Exercising or sporting devices provided with means enabling use in the dark
    • A63B2207/02Powered illuminating means

Abstract

A tossing game includes playing equipment. The playing equipment includes a first pair of propelling sticks and a tossable ring member. The first pair of propelling sticks include a proximal handle portion, a distal portion and a guard portion. The tossable ring member include a central aperture. The distal portion of the propelling sticks are sized and configured for being received within the central aperture of the ring member.

Description

    I. TECHNICAL FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates to a game, and in particular, a game that enables a participant to toss a ring over a distance; and the equipment used to play the game. Although this game can be played indoors, it is particularly well-suited for outdoor play.
  • II. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Catch and throw games have been popular for many years. Along with organized multi-player team games, such as baseball and lacrosse, other catch and throw games exist that can be played with a smaller number of players, such as one or two people.
  • [0003]
    One of the most popular catch and throw games is the tossing of a Frisbee® flying disc. Other games that involve the tossing of an object from one person to another, or at a target include such games as Cornhole, horseshoes, and bocce. Although the above-referenced games do perform their intended functions well, and entertain those playing the games, room for improvement and alternative games exist.
  • [0004]
    In particular, room for improvement exists in the creation of a game that requires the user to develop a different set of skills while tossing an object that is different than either the flying disc, soft sack, horseshoe or ball of currently existing toss games such as Frisbee, Cornhole, horseshoes or bocce. It is therefore one object of the present invention to create such a game.
  • III. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0005]
    In accordance with the present invention, a tossing game is provided that includes playing equipment. The playing equipment comprises a first pair of propelling sticks and a tossable ring member. The first pair of propelling sticks includes a proximal handle portion, a distal portion and a guard portion. The tossable ring member includes a central aperture, wherein the distal portion of the propelling sticks are sized and configured for being received within the central aperture of the ring member.
  • [0006]
    Preferably, the distal portions of each of the propelling sticks includes a first end disposed adjacent to the proximal portion and a second end. The distal portion is tapered between the first and second end so that the first end has a larger diameter than the second end. The guard member is preferably disposed on an axis that is generally perpendicular to the major axis of the proximal and distal portions.
  • [0007]
    The ring member preferably includes a radially inner portion, a radially outer portion, and a central portion disposed between the radially outer and radially inner portions. An indicia member may be affixed to the central portion to either help the ring member become more easily visible to the user, or else, become more easily distinguishable among a plurality of ring members.
  • [0008]
    Preferably, the central portion includes a channel portion disposed between a radially inner portion and a radially outer portion. The indicia member preferably comprises a luminous indicia member, such as a light stick that is capable of glowing, for permitting the ring member to be seen in the dark.
  • [0009]
    Also in accordance with the present invention a method of playing a tossing game is provided. The method comprises the steps of providing playing equipment for the game that include a first pair of propelling sticks for a first player and a second pair of propelling stick for a second player. The playing equipment also includes a ring member that is tossable between the first player and first propelling sticks, and the second player and second propelling sticks. Each pair of propelling sticks includes a proximal portion and a distal portion, wherein the distal portion includes a first end disposed relatively closer to the proximal portion, and a second end disposed relatively further away from the proximal end portion. The ring member includes a radially inwardly facing portion that defines a central aperture.
  • [0010]
    The central aperture of the ring member is caused to receive the distal portions of each of the first pair of propelling sticks, so that the ring member is disposed relatively closer to the first end of the distal portion than to the second end of the distal portion.
  • [0011]
    The first user then holds the proximal end portion of each of the first pair of ring member containing propelling sticks in a manner wherein the respective first ends of the distal portions of the propelling sticks are relatively closer together than the respective second ends of the propelling sticks. The user then moves the position of the propelling sticks to a launch position, wherein the second ends of the propelling sticks are relatively more closely positioned than the respective first ends of the distal portions, in a manner wherein the application of force by the propelling sticks against the radially inwardly facing portion of the ring member causes the ring member to move in a direction from the first end of the distal portion to the second end of the distal portion, and ultimately become launched off the second end of the distal portion of the propelling sticks, so as to become airborne.
  • [0012]
    Preferably, once airborne, the second player can place the second ends of the second pair of propelling sticks that he is holding, in a position wherein the distance between the second ends of the distal portions of the second pair of apertures are separated by a distance less than the distance of the diameter of the central aperture of the ring member, so that the distal end portions of the pair of propelling sticks can be received into the central aperture of the ring member, so that the ring member may become placed upon the distal portions of the propelling sticks.
  • [0013]
    In a most preferred embodiment of the present invention, four or more propelling sticks are provided, so that each of at least two players can each be given two propelling sticks. With each player having two propelling sticks, the rings can be tossed between players to create a catch and throw game involving the propelling sticks and the ring members.
  • [0014]
    One feature of the present invention is that the present invention comprises a catch and throw game that differs from other catch and throw games, to provide a different game environment than other known catch and throw games. It is also a feature of a preferred embodiment that a lighting member can be added to the ring. This feature has the advantage of enabling the game to be played at night, and in the dark, thus extending the potential playing time for the game.
  • [0015]
    These and other features of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon a review of the drawings and detailed description below, that represent the best mode of practicing the invention perceived presently by the Applicant.
  • IV. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • [0016]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a player holding the playing equipment of the game, and showing a first pair of propelling sticks and the ring member of the tossing game of the present invention;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 2A is a side plan view of a propelling stick of the present invention;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 2B is a top plan view of a propelling stick of the present invention;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 2C is a sectional view taken along lines 2C-2C of FIG. 2A;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 2D is a sectional view taken along lines 2D-2D of FIG. 2D;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 3A is a bottom plan view of a ring member of the present invention;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 3B is a sectional view taken along lines 3B-3B of FIG. 3A;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 3C is a sectional view taken along lines 3C-3C of FIG. 3A;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 4 is a top plan view of a propelling stick of the present invention;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 5 is a top plan view of a propelling stick of the present invention, showing the proximal portion of the propelling stick being gripped by a hand of a user;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 6 is a greatly enlarged view of the proximal end portion, guard portion, and first end of the distal portion of a propelling stick of the present invention;
  • [0027]
    FIG. 7 is a bottom plan view of an underside of the ring member of the present invention;
  • [0028]
    FIG. 7A is a top plan view of the ring member of the present invention;
  • [0029]
    FIG. 8 is a perspective, bottom view of the ring member of the present invention, showing a tubular lighting strip partially inserted within the channel of the ring member;
  • [0030]
    FIG. 8A is an exploded perspective exploded view of the ring member and the lighting member;
  • [0031]
    FIG. 8B is a perspective view of a pair of propelling sticks (either first or second pair) in the hands of a user, wherein the sticks are in a “crossed sword” position;
  • [0032]
    FIG. 9 is a progressive view showing a first stage of a propelling sticks and ring, when said propelling sticks are being used to toss the ring member;
  • [0033]
    FIG. 10 comprises a top plan view of a box showing a complete equipment set comprising four propelling sticks and a ring member;
  • [0034]
    FIG. 11 is a progressive view, following FIG. 9, showing the second stage of the throwing sequence wherein the propelling sticks are used to throw the ring;
  • [0035]
    FIG. 12 is a progressive view, following FIG. 11, that shows the third stage of the launching of the ring member;
  • [0036]
    FIG. 13 is a progressive view, following FIG. 12, that shows the fourth stage in the tossing motion, wherein the ring member has been tossed from, and has lost contact with the propelling stick;
  • [0037]
    FIG. 14 is a progressive view, showing the first stage of the propelling sticks being used to pick up a ring member that has fallen upon the ground;
  • [0038]
    FIG. 15 is a progressive view, following FIG. 14, showing a second pick up stage, wherein the ring member has been engaged onto the distal end portions of the distal portion of a pair of propelling sticks;
  • [0039]
    FIG. 16 is a progressive view, following FIG. 15, showing the propelling sticks being moved to cause the ring member to move proximally, toward the guard members of the propelling sticks;
  • [0040]
    FIG. 17 is a progressive view, following FIG. 16, showing the propelling sticks having been moved to cause the ring member to move proximally, so that the ring member is disposed adjacent to the guard members, and as such, is thereby in the preferred position from which to start the launch of the ring member;
  • [0041]
    FIG. 18 is a progressive view, showing the first stage of the retrieval or “catching” of a ring, wherein the ring has landed, and is disposed on the distal ends of the distal portions of the propelling sticks;
  • [0042]
    FIG. 19 is a progressive view, following FIG. 18, showing the propelling sticks having been moved, to thereby enable the ring to move closer toward the guard members of the propelling sticks of the present invention; and
  • [0043]
    FIG. 20 is a progressive view, following FIG. 19, that shows the ring member being disposed generally on the proximal portion of the distal portion of the propelling members, in a position that will serve well as the start point for the launch of the ring, when the user decides to throw the ring using the propelling sticks.
  • IV. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0044]
    A tossing game 10 includes playing equipment. As shown in the figures, the playing equipment includes a first pair of propelling sticks 12, 14, including first propelling stick 12 and second propelling stick 14. Each of the propelling sticks 12, 14 includes a proximal portion 16, 18 a distal portion 22, 24, and a guard portion 28, 30, respectively. The guard portion 28, 30 is disposed between the proximal 16, 18 and distal portions 22, 24.
  • [0045]
    The proximal portion 16, 18 is sized and configured for being received by the hand H of the user U. The user U grips the propelling sticks 12, 14 in a manner similar to the manner in which one would grip a sword. Preferably, the proximal hand grip portions 16 include padded members 34, 36 to provide additional comfort for the user. The padded members 34, 36 preferably comprise cylindrical deformable foam members having a hollow central passageway for receiving the hard plastic proximal portion 38 of the propelling sticks 12, 14.
  • [0046]
    The distal portions 22, 24 each generally comprise a tapering cylinder that, in one embodiment, tapers from an approximately one inch diameter Dp near the first or proximal end 40, and which tapers down toward the second or distal end 42, so that at the second end 42 the diameter Dd of the propelling sticks 12, 14 is approximately ⅜ inch. The propelling sticks have a major axis A that extends through the proximal 16, 18 and distal 22, 24 portions of each stick 12, 14.
  • [0047]
    The distal portion 22, 24 is sized and configured for being received into the central aperture of a ring-like member 50, and preferably has a length of about 26 inches.
  • [0048]
    The guard portion 28, 30 is disposed between the proximal handle portion 16, 18 and the distal ring-receiving portion 22, 24. The guard portion 28, 30 has one or more radially extending members 32, 33 that have a radial extent that is significantly greater than the radial diameter of either the proximal portion 16, 18 or the distal portion of 22, 24 of a propeller stick 12, 14. In one embodiment, the guard portions 32, 33 comprises a pair of opposed, radially extending members 32, 33 that have an axis G (FIG. 8B) that extends perpendicular to the major axis AA of the sticks 12, 14. The first and second radially extending members 32, 33 are preferably disposed approximately 180° from each other, and extend radially 1.25 inches, past the cylindrical outer surface 44 of the guard portion 28, 30.
  • [0049]
    Each of the radially extending members 32, 33 of the guard portion 28, 30 is preferably formed as a truncated, pyramid shape, although other shapes can be used. Similar to the guard that one might use on a sword, it is also be possible to have a disc-shaped radially extending guard member that extends 360° around the circumference of the cylindrical outer surface 44 guard member 28, 30.
  • [0050]
    The primary purpose of the guard member 28, 30 is to prevent the ring 50 from sliding proximally passed the guard portion 28, 30 onto the proximal portion 16, 18 of the propelling sticks 12, 14. Viewed another way, the purpose of the guard portion 28, 30 is to keep the ring 50 on the distal portions 22, 24 of the sticks 12, 14.
  • [0051]
    The ring member 50 preferably comprises a ring that has an outer diameter ROD of approximately 6.5 inches and an inner diameter RID of approximately 5.625 inches. The ring member is preferably “U” shaped in cross section and includes an annular, axially-extending radially inwardly disposed inner wall 54, an annular, axially-extending radially outwardly disposed outer wall 56, and an annular radially extending wall 58 that comprises a middle portion and that extends between and is coupled to each of the inner axially extending wall 54 and the outer axially extending wall 56.
  • [0052]
    The inner axially extending wall 54 and the outer axially extending wall 56 are joined by the generally planar radially extending wall 58 that extends between the inner annular wall 54 and the outer annular wall 56 to define an annular channel 59. Channel 59 is sized for receiving a lighting member or other accessory or indicia as will be described in more detail below. The radially extending wall 58 can include a plurality of slots 60, 62, 63, 64, therein, so that one can view the interior of the annular slot channel 59 from the side of the ring on which the radially extending wall 56 is disposed.
  • [0053]
    The open sided channel 59 is defined by the inner surface 70 of the axially extending, radially outwardly facing surface of inner annular wall 54, the radially inwardly facing inner surface 74 outer annular wall 56, and the inner surface 78 of the radially extending wall 58. The central aperture of the ring is defined by the axially extending, radially inwardly facing surface 55 of the inner, axially extending annular wall member 54.
  • [0054]
    The channel 59 preferably has an outer diameter of about 0.4375 inches; and an inner diameter of about 0.224 inches. The annular channel 59 is provided for receiving one or more accessories. Probably, the most popular accessory that will be inserted into this annular slot 59 is a light member. For example, “light stick”-type lighting member 80 (FIG. 8) having a width or outer diameter LSOD slightly less than the width of the slot member 59, and a having a length slightly less than the circumference of the slot member 59 can be bent to be inserted into the annular slot.
  • [0055]
    Although there is more than one formula and/or design for producing a suitable light stick, a common commercial light stick employs a solution of hydrogen peroxide that is kept separate from a solution of a phenyl oxalate ester together with a fluorescent dye. The color of the fluorescent dye determines the resulting color of the light stick when the chemical solutions are mixed. The basic premise of the reaction is that the reaction between the two chemicals releases enough energy to excite the electrons in the fluorescent dye. This causes the electrons to jump to a higher energy level and then fall back down and release light.
  • [0056]
    Specifically, the chemical reaction works in the following manner. The hydrogen peroxide oxidizes the phenyl oxalate ester, to form phenol and an unstable peroxyacid ester. The unstable peroxyacid ester decomposes, resulting in phenol and a cyclic peroxy compound. The cyclic peroxy compound decomposes to carbon dioxide. This decomposition reaction releases the energy that excites the dye.
  • [0057]
    When a light stick 80 (FIGS. 8 and 8A) is placed within the annular slot 59 and the chemicals therein are activated, the ring 50 will glow and become “lit up”. When so lit up, the ring 50 can be seen at night, thus enabling the player to use the ring 50 to play the game in the dark at night.
  • [0058]
    In addition to the light stick 80, non-lighted color indicia members can be placed into the channel 59. The use of these colorized indicia members 83 (not shown) can comprise decals, stickers, and/or applique's, and have great utility when the device is used in competitive environments. For example, in competitive environments involving, for example, eight players, four rings 50 can be used with each of the four rings having a different color. Through this vehicle, the four teams can keep track of their particular rings 50, by associating it with the particular color of their indicia sticker 83. Additionally, when used in a non-competitive environment, the use of a particular color indicia member 83 can help closely spaced groups of players ensure that they can identify their ring, and not confuse it with the ring of another person. Another way to import a color indicia to the ring 50 is through the choice of plastic color used to make the ring 50.
  • [0059]
    The color of the ring 50 can be seen preferably from both sides of the ring 50, via the open side of the channel 59 and that enables the color to be seen from one side of the ring 50, and the slots 60, 62, 63, 64, contained in the radial wall 58 that enable the color to be seen from the opposite side of the ring 50.
  • [0060]
    In addition to the light stick discussed above, other lighting members for lighting the rings 50 can be used. For example, LEDs can be used to provide the light, rather than a light stick 80.
  • [0061]
    Additionally, there may be certain circumstances where some players desire that the ring be weighted differently than that obtained from the unitarily formed plastic ring 50 as the weight of the ring 50 affects the flight and propelling characteristics of the ring 50. As such, the annular channel 59 provides a receptacle into which the user can add a weight to the ring 50 to adjust the weight to the user's desired weight. Other adjustments to weight can be effected by changes made to size, materials, and dimension (e.g. thickness) of the ring.
  • [0062]
    Preferably, the propelling sticks 12, 14 are made from a light weight material. An example of such a material is a glass-filled nylon. However, other materials may also may be used to make the propelling sticks. For example, one might wish to make the propelling sticks 12, 14 out of a material such as wood or aluminum either because of the characteristics that wood or aluminum would impart to the device, in terms of weight, strength and rigidity; or also because of the aesthetic characteristics that would be imparted by wood or aluminum or some other material.
  • [0063]
    When designing the propelling sticks 12, 14, it is important that the distal portions 22, 24 maintain sufficient rigidity, and resistance to collapse or bending so as to enable the user to exert a significant radially directed force on the propelling stick 12, 14 during the tossing of the ring 50. As such, a hollow, very thin walled tubular plastic material would likely not have sufficient durability to serve as the distal portion 22, 24 of the propelling sticks 12, 14, as such a material would likely not be able to withstand the radially directed forces that are exerted on the sticks 12, 14 when the propelling sticks 12, 14 are used to toss the ring 50. In addition to the problems that would exist when the ring 50 is being tossed, similar problems would exist when the ring is being caught on the sticks 12, 14, because the impact of the ring 50 hitting the sticks 12, 14 might cause the distal portions 22, 24 to bend under the impact of the force of the ring 50 engaging the sticks. Another method for strengthening the propelling sticks is to form the sticks with longitudinally extending ridges or diametrical members.
  • [0064]
    In order to use the equipment, the following procedure is employed.
  • [0065]
    The most simple game to play with the device 10 is to toss the ring 50 between partners where you have two or more people. Another competitive game might be a target-type game. A target-type game, one might have a scoring hoop that may have a diameter of something between about one and four feet. The object of the game is similar to a Frisbee golf game, in that one would seek to use the sticks 12, 14 to toss the ring 50 into the targets with the fewest number of strokes. Another type of target type game is to create a target that includes a plurality of poles, wherein each of the plurality of poles has different diameters and positions, and accordingly is accorded different point values.
  • [0066]
    Another type of target game is a pass-through-type target game. A pass-through-type target game may be played on a tennis court, for example, where the tennis court includes two tennis nets rather than one. The two tennis nets would be disposed co-planarly and vertically offset, with one net being placed above the other net. The bottom of the upper net would be placed a certain predetermined distance above the top of the lower net to form a space (or gap) between the upper net and the lower net. The object of the game is to pass the ring from a first partner standing on the first side of the net, to the second partner standing on the second side of the net, by tossing the ring 50 through the “space” formed between the upper and lower nets.
  • [0067]
    As a variation on the co-planar pair of tennis nets, a larger unitary tennis net could be used wherein the tennis net included a plurality of apertures of various sizes and dimensions, wherein the object of the game is to pass the ring between players on opposite sides of the tennis net, with the apertures in the tennis net providing the passageway through which the ring would have to pass from one player to another player.
  • [0068]
    Another variation of this would be to use a single tennis net, and plurality of players. If the ring 50 were fitted with a color changeable LED that was placed within channel 59, along with some programming feature for changing color of the LEDs, the ring 50 could be programmed to change between a plurality of colors. For example, if there were four players, the changeable LED could change between four colors, with the particular color of the LED indicating to the players which particular player and/or which particular team is designated to catch the ring 50.
  • [0069]
    One way to improve the attraction of the device is to be able to produce its components in a series of different colors. The use of different colors serves both an aesthetic purpose and a practical purpose. By producing both the ring 50 and sticks 12, 14 in different colors, one can coordinate the playing equipment with particular teams. This color coordination is especially useful in competitions where more than ring 50 is being used, and also helps people keep their playing equipment differentiated from the playing equipment of others to thereby avoid disputes over who owns the particular item of playing equipment.
  • [0070]
    Turning now to FIG. 10, the box system 77 is shown that is designed to package the game. It will be noted that preferably, four sticks 12, 14, 79, 81 are shown in the box 77, and that the sticks 12, 14, 79 and 81 are disposed in a parallel relation. The ring 50 is also included as a part of the boxed set.
  • [0071]
    The manner with which the device can be used is best shown with reference to FIGS. 9, and 11-20. In particular, the reader's attention is first directed to FIGS. 9, 11, 12 and 13, that comprise sequential drawings that help to illustrate the manner in which one uses the propelling sticks 12, 14 to launch the ring 50. Turning first to FIG. 9, it will be noted that both sticks 12, 14 are received within the central aperture of the ring 50. It will also be noted that the proximal portions of the sticks 12, 14 adjacent to the user's hands H are placed fairly close together, and that the ring 50 is resting adjacent to the first (proximal) ends 40 of the distal portions 22, 24 near guard members 28, 30. It will also be noted that the sticks 12, 14 are positioned similarly to crossed swords to form an “X”.
  • [0072]
    Turning now to FIG. 11, it will be noted that the user's hands H have been moved further apart to thereby exert a radially directed force against the radially inwardly facing surface of the ring 50. This results in the sticks 12, 14 being moved away from the proximal end 40 of the sticks 12, 14, when compared to their position shown in FIG. 9. It will also be noted that the ring 50 has moved distally on the sticks 12, 14, as it has begun its path toward the distal ends of the propelling sticks 12, 14, and toward being launched.
  • [0073]
    Turning now to FIG. 12, it will be noted that the propelling sticks 12, 14 are crossed adjacent to their distal ends 42 and that the ring 50 is disposed close to the distal end 42, 42 of the propelling sticks 12, 14. FIG. 12, when compared to FIG. 11, represents a progression of the ring 50 in a distal direction along the propelling sticks 12, 14.
  • [0074]
    In FIG. 13, it will be noted that the sticks 12, 14 are uncrossed, and that the distal ends 42 are separated from each other. In this position, as the movement of the distal ends 42 has caused the ring 50 to launch off the end, in the direction desired by the user. In this regard, it is shown that the ring 50 has traveled away from the propelling sticks 12, 14.
  • [0075]
    Once the ring 50 is so launched, the user then waits for the ring 50 to be caught by the other player so that the second player may launch it back at the first player so that the first player may catch it, as will be described in more detail in connection with FIGS. 18-20.
  • [0076]
    FIGS. 18-20 illustrate the receiving sequence wherein the propelling sticks 12, 14 are used to “retrieve” or catch a ring 50 that has been launched toward the user U. It will be noted that the position of the sticks in FIG. 18 is generally similar to that in FIG. 13, insofar as the second ends 42 of the distal portion of the sticks 12, 14 are separated, and that the ring 50 is disposed adjacent to the second ends 42 of the distal portions 22, 24 of the sticks.
  • [0077]
    As best shown in FIG. 18, the sticks 12, 14 have moved closer together, and have been crossed at intersection point 87, generally close to the distal ends 42. The ring 50 is disposed on the distal portions 22, 24 of the sticks, approximately midway between the second ends 42 and the guard member 28, 30. It will also be noted, that the user's hands H are generally placed closer together than they are in FIG. 18.
  • [0078]
    In FIG. 20, it will be noted that the ring 50 has moved to a position almost adjacent to the guard members 28, 30 at the first end 40 of the distal portions 22, 24. The propelling sticks 12, 14 are crossed together, with the second ends 42 being separated. The crossing of the sticks 12, 14 occurs closer to the guard members 28, 30 than to the distal ends 42. The position of the sticks shown in FIG. 20 is generally similar to the position of the sticks 12, 14 shown in FIG. 9, in that the final receipt position also comprises the initial launch position.
  • [0079]
    One feature of the present invention is that the two sticks are designed to make it easy to help pick up the ring 50 from the floor. In this regard, your attention is directed to FIGS. 14-17 that show the pick-up sequence.
  • [0080]
    A ring 50 that has fallen onto the ground, can be easily picked up using the propelling sticks 12, 14. To do so, the second ends 42 of the distal portions 22, 24 of the propelling sticks 12, 14 are placed adjacent to the inner annular wall 54 of the ring 50. The sticks 12, 14 are placed in a crossed position.
  • [0081]
    Moving next to FIG. 16, the distal ends 42 of the propelling sticks 12, 14 are moved slightly apart, so that the distal end 42 can position themselves underneath the ring 50, and to lift the ring 50 off of the ground surface on which the ring 50 landed.
  • [0082]
    The distal (second) ends 42 of the sticks 12, 14 continue to be moved further apart, as shown in FIG. 16. The engagement between the distal portions 42 and the ring 50 causes the ring to move toward the first ends 40 of the distal portion 22, 24 of the sticks 12, 14 as shown in FIG. 16.
  • [0083]
    Finally, in FIG. 17, the second ends 42 of the sticks 12, 14 are moved to their furthest apart spaced position, while the sticks 12, 14 are crossed, with the crossing occurring close to the guard portions 28, 30. This places the ring 50 adjacent to the guard portions 28, 30 of the sticks 12, 14. It will be noted that in the position shown in FIG. 17, the ring 50 is positioned generally similar to the launch position of FIG. 9, and the final retrieval position.
  • [0084]
    Having described the invention with reference to certain preferred embodiments, it will be appreciated that variations and modifications exist within the scope and spirit of the invention, as defined by the following claims.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A tossing game including playing equipment, the playing equipment comprising a first pair of propelling sticks and a tossable ring member, the first pair of propelling sticks including a proximal handle portion, a distal portion and a guard portion, the tossable ring member including a central aperture, wherein the distal portion of the propelling sticks are sized and configured for being received within the central aperture of the ring member.
  2. 2. The tossing game of claim 1 wherein the distal portion of the propelling sticks includes a first end disposed adjacent to the proximal portion and a second end, the distal portion being tapered between the first and second end so that the first end has a larger diameter than the second end.
  3. 3. The tossing game of claim 1 wherein the propelling sticks include a major axis extending through each of the proximal and distal portions, and wherein the guard member includes a guard member axis extending generally perpendicular to the major axis.
  4. 4. The tossing game of claim 3 wherein the guard member is disposed between the proximal portion and the distal portion and extends outwardly from the distal portion and is configured for preventing a ring received on the distal portion from sliding to the proximal portion.
  5. 5. The tossing game of claim 1 wherein the proximal portion includes a padded hand grip member.
  6. 6. The tossing game of claim 1 wherein the ring includes a radially inner portion, a radially outer portion, and a central portion disposed between the radially outer and radially inner portion and an indicia member.
  7. 7. The tossing game of claim 1 where the indicia member is disposed in the central portion, the indicia member including at least one of a printed decal, sticker, applique and colorant member.
  8. 8. The tossing game of claim 7 wherein the indicia member comprises a luminous indicia member capable of glowing for permitting the ring member to be seen in the dark.
  9. 9. The tossing game of claim 6 wherein the indicia member is disposed in the central portion and comprises a luminous indicia member for permitting the ring member to give off light sufficiently to enable the tossing game to be played in a darkened area.
  10. 10. The tossing game of claim 6 wherein the darkened area comprises at least one of an unlit interior space and an exterior space between dusk and dawn.
  11. 11. The tossing game of claim 1 wherein the ring member includes an axially extending, radially inwardly facing inner member, an axially extending, radially outwardly facing outer member, and a central portion disposed between the inner member and the outer member.
  12. 12. The tossing game of claim 11 wherein the central portion of the ring member includes a radially extending portion that extends between the inner member and the outer member, and defines an annular channel between the inner member and outer member.
  13. 13. The tossing game of claim 12 further comprising a luminous member insertable into the channel, and wherein the radially extending portion includes at least one aperture for permitting the luminous member to be seen from a top and a bottom side of the ring member.
  14. 14. The tossing game of claim 13 wherein the luminous member comprises at least one of a light stick and an LED light.
  15. 15. The tossing game of claim 12 further comprising an indicia member insertable in the channel.
  16. 16. The tossing game of claim 15 wherein the indicia member comprises at least one of a printed decal, sticker, applique and colorant member.
  17. 17. The tossing game of claim 12 further comprising a lighting device capable of lighting up the ring member to permit the tossing game to be played in the dark.
  18. 18. The tossing game of claim 11 wherein the ring has a cross sectional profile that comprises at least one of a U-shaped profile and an H-shaped profile, and wherein the central portion includes at least one aperture for permitting an indicia member placed in the central portion to be seen from each of a top and bottom side of the ring member.
  19. 19. The tossing game of claim 1 further comprising a second pair of propelling sticks for use by a second player.
  20. 20. A method of playing a tossing game comprising the steps of
    (a) providing playing equipment including a first pair of propelling sticks for a first player and a second pair of propelling sticks for a second player and a ring member tossable between the first players and first propelling sticks; and the second player and second propelling sticks, each propelling stick including a proximal portion and a distal portion, wherein the distal portion includes a first end disposed relatively closer to the proximal portion, and a second end disposed relatively further from the proximal portion, the ring member including a radially inwardly facing portion defining a central aperture,
    (b) causing the central aperture of the ring member to receive the distal portions of each of the first pair of propelling sticks, so that the ring member is disposed relatively closer to the first end of the distal portion than the second end of the distal portion,
    (c) having the first user hold the proximal end of each of the first pair of ring member containing propelling sticks in a manner wherein the respective first ends of the distal portions of the propelling sticks are relatively closer together than the respective second ends of the propelling sticks,
    (d) having the user move the position of the propelling sticks to a launch position wherein the second ends of the distal portion of the propelling sticks are relatively more closely positioned than the respective first ends of the distal portions in a manner wherein the application of force by the propelling sticks against the radially inwardly facing portion of the ring member causes the ring member to move in a direction from the first ends of the distal portions to the second ends of the distal portions, and ultimately become launched off the second ends of the distal portions of the propelling sticks so as to become airborne.
US12924400 2009-09-28 2010-09-27 Ring toss game and equipment therefor Abandoned US20110074109A1 (en)

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US27767409 true 2009-09-28 2009-09-28
US12924400 US20110074109A1 (en) 2009-09-28 2010-09-27 Ring toss game and equipment therefor

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US12924400 US20110074109A1 (en) 2009-09-28 2010-09-27 Ring toss game and equipment therefor

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WO2014014973A1 (en) * 2012-07-18 2014-01-23 Mueller Steven T Ring stix game system
WO2015176022A3 (en) * 2014-05-15 2016-02-04 Dezordo Stephen Patrick Improved projectile launching device
US9808690B1 (en) 2012-11-20 2017-11-07 Lazy Athlete LLC Shoot the boots brand backyard and tailgating game

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