US20110072684A1 - Support structures in footwear - Google Patents

Support structures in footwear Download PDF

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Publication number
US20110072684A1
US20110072684A1 US12832806 US83280610A US2011072684A1 US 20110072684 A1 US20110072684 A1 US 20110072684A1 US 12832806 US12832806 US 12832806 US 83280610 A US83280610 A US 83280610A US 2011072684 A1 US2011072684 A1 US 2011072684A1
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Prior art keywords
pod
pods
portion
footwear
forefoot
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US12832806
Inventor
Maurice A. Stubblefield
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ACI International
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ACI International
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/02Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the material
    • A43B13/12Soles with several layers of different materials
    • A43B13/122Soles with several layers of different materials characterised by the outsole or external layer
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/143Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form provided with wedged, concave or convex end portions, e.g. for improving roll-off of the foot
    • A43B13/145Convex portions, e.g. with a bump or projection, e.g. 'Masai' type shoes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • A43B13/181Resiliency achieved by the structure of the sole
    • A43B13/184Resiliency achieved by the structure of the sole the structure protruding from the outsole
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • A43B13/20Pneumatic soles filled with a compressible fluid, e.g. air, gas

Abstract

Support structures for footwear are described including, in one embodiment, one structure in the heel portion of the footwear and another structure in the forefoot portion. One or both of the support structures may be hollow and may include internal support elements such as ridges or posts to support the foot. Additionally, air may be included in the structures with a passageway between the internal support structures permitting the transfer of air back and forth as the wearer treads. Thus, energy is absorbed as the foot strikes the treading surface and is either stored to be returned as the foot rolls forward or, when air is included in the design, is transferred from the heel to forefoot portions and then back again as the foot pressure moves from the heel portion to the forefoot portion.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/246,028, filed Sep. 25, 2009, the contents of which are incorporated by reference herein in their entirety.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The present disclosure relates, in general, to support structures in footwear, which are located between the bottom of a wearer's foot and the floor or ground upon which the wearer treads. The footwear may be athletic type footwear, but not necessarily so.
  • More specifically, in an article of footwear having an upper and a sole structure, a support structure is included as part of the sole structure. The support structure may be comprised of any number of resilient materials such as natural rubber, artificial rubber, or any appropriate flexible resilient elastomeric material, which could be thermoplastic urethanes, polyester, polyether, polycaprolactone, polyoxypropylene and polycarbonate macroglycol based materials, and mixtures thereof.
  • The support structure elements may be a part of the midsole, if there is one, or they may be part of the outsole, or portions in both, depending on the manufacturing technique chosen. For example, if the components are molded, the external portions of the support structures will be part of the outsole, whereas the internal support elements of the support structure may be included in either the outsole mold or the midsole mold, or portions in both molds, so that the components properly marry when the outsole and midsole is joined.
  • The disclosed structure, in the embodiments shown and in other related embodiments as claimed, provides support for the foot while also, in some embodiments, creates a limited instability that assists in toning muscles in the lower leg.
  • In certain embodiments, air is transferred from the heel to the forefoot portion of the footwear as the foot impacts the walking, running or exercising surface (sometimes referred to herein as the “treading surface”) to absorb shocks and to assist the walking or running motion by optimizing the transfer of rebound forces to the bottom of the foot. The air then returns to the heel portion as the foot rolls forward, which again assists the forward motion by decreasing the volume under the forefoot. In other embodiments, no air transfer is used, with the support structures providing support and rebounding forces. The amount of support and rebounding will depend on the shapes of the internal support elements and the resiliency of the materials chosen.
  • Previously known structures do not accomplish these objectives in the straightforward manner shown in the present disclosure. The features discussed herein improve the comfort of an article of footwear by combining improved resiliency with improved compressibility, among other things. Furthermore, the present disclosure does not depend on an expensive, hermetically sealed structure or valves to maintain relatively high pressures as shown in prior attempts at achieving the objectives of the present disclosure.
  • SUMMARY
  • Disclosed are various embodiments of a structure to provide support for the foot while also, in some embodiments, to create a limited instability that assists in toning muscles in the lower leg. Three basic embodiments are shown below, although other embodiments may be used, which fall within the scope of the claims.
  • One embodiment comprises two support structures (sometimes referred to as pods) one structure in the heel portion of an article of footwear and another structure in the forefoot portion. One or both of the support structures may be hollow and may include internal support elements such as ridges or posts to support the foot. Additionally, air or another gas may be included in the structures with a passageway between the internal support elements permitting the transfer of gas back and forth as the wearer treads. Thus, energy is absorbed as the foot strikes the treading surface and is either stored to be returned as the foot rolls forward or, when air is included in the design, is transferred from the heel to forefoot portions and then back again as the foot pressure moves from the heel portion to the forefoot portion.
  • Another embodiment comprises three support structures in the heel portion and three in the forefoot portion. Any or all of the support structures may be hollow, and any or all of them may include internal support elements such as ridges, posts or other internal structure to support the foot. Air may be included in some or all of the structures with a passageway between some or all of the internal support elements permitting the transfer of air back and forth as the wearer treads. The number of support structures can be greater or fewer than three in both portions, and the number of support structures may be different in the heel and forefoot portions. All support structures could be entirely in the heel portion or entirely in the forefoot portion.
  • Another embodiment includes one support structure (pod) in the heel portion and one in the forefoot portion. Each pod includes ridges that cause the portion of the outsole that contacts the treading surface to bow outwardly toward the treading surface. No air or other fluid is transferred between the pods.
  • The disclosed construction, in the embodiments shown and in other related embodiments as claimed, provides support for the foot while also, in some embodiments, creates a limited instability that assists in toning muscles in the lower leg. The outer most surfaces of the support structures may be curved outward appearing convex when the outsole is viewed from the outside. In the preferred embodiments, internal support elements such as ridges, posts, columns or other formations of chosen resilience, elasticity and weight bearing properties are constructed within the support structures. In the two-pod configuration of the support structures where one pod is located in the heel portion and the other pod is in the forefoot portion of the outsole, each pod is made convex to a chosen height to provide a measure of instability as the pods impact the treading surface. This instability causes the wearer to make balancing adjustments as the wearer executes his or her stride. These adjustments are made with the muscles in the lower leg thereby promoting muscle toning. Air or another gas may be added to the support structures to work in combination with the solid internal resilient support elements to provide the level of support necessary to maintain the convex shape of a pod to a height sufficient to achieve the toning effect while at the same time not overly emphasizing the instability to the point of making the footwear uncomfortable.
  • The internal support elements that may be placed inside a support structure can be any number of possible configurations or geometries. For example, they may be concentric ridges generally conforming to the shape of the support structure, or pod. If the pod is generally oval, the internal ridges may be oval as well. The ridges closest to the outside of the oval would be the shortest height, with the ridges progressively closer to the central portion of the oval being progressively higher to assist the pod to bulge outward closer to the central portion. The width of the ridges can be varied, as well as the number of ridges. Each ridge could have different properties of resilience and weight bearing capability. Many alternatives are possible and can be deduced by one skilled in the art once the performance parameters are established. The performance parameters include the amount of weight that the structure must carry, the amount of resiliency required for the desired rebounding effect and the amount of convexity to be maintained during the wearer's stride. The recovery characteristics could be the same for each internal support element within a support structure, or the recovery characteristics could vary from one internal support element to another.
  • The internal support elements could be pillars or protrusions that extend for the entire height of the support structure, or they may extend only partially from one surface to the other. The internal support elements or protrusions could be wedge shaped, pyramidal, conical, plateau, ramp shaped, block shaped, rectangular or otherwise depending on the impact and recovery characteristics desired.
  • In addition to the physical internal support elements within the pods, air or another gas can be utilized within the support structures. In certain embodiments, air is transferred within channels from the heel to the forefoot portion of the footwear as the foot impacts the treading surface during walking, running or exercising to absorb shocks and to assist the striding motion by optimizing the transfer of rebound forces to the bottom of the foot. When the footwear impacts the treading surface, usually with the heel first, the air is forced from the heel pod or pods through one or more channels, and then the air is returned to the heel portion as the foot rolls forward, which again assists the forward motion by decreasing the volume under the forefoot. During certain foot movements, especially during exercising, the forefoot portion may strike the treading surface first, forcing the air or other gas through one or more channels to the heel portion. The gas would then return when the pod or pods in the heel portion strike the treading surface. If the heel portion did not strike the ground, the gas would return to the forefoot portion by virtue of known fluid dynamics principles, albeit more slowly. In the preferred embodiment, the gas pressure within the system is at atmospheric pressure, but could be a different pressure in other embodiments. The gas system could be hermetically sealed, but is not in the preferred embodiment. Gas may be permitted to exit the system in predetermined quantities during use as the pods are impacted and be replenished by the resiliency of the internal support elements and the memory characteristics of the outsole shape acting to return the pods to their initial volume.
  • In the preferred embodiment, the convex shape of the pods is flattened somewhat at the apex in order to minimize movement of the internal support elements and to moderate the instability caused by the domed effect of the convex shape.
  • DRAWINGS
  • The above-mentioned features and objects of the present disclosure will become more apparent with reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals denote like elements and in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a side view of the outsole of one embodiment of the footwear in accordance with the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 2 is a plan view of the outsole of one embodiment of the footwear in accordance with the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 3 is a plan view of the interior portion of outsole of one embodiment of the footwear in accordance with the present disclosure taken along line 3-3 in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 4 is a cross section view of the outsole of one embodiment of the footwear in accordance with the present disclosure taken along line 4-4 in FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 5 is a cross section view of a portion of the outsole of one embodiment of the footwear in accordance with the present disclosure taken along line 5-5 in FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 6 is a cross section view of a portion of the outsole of one embodiment of the footwear in accordance with the present disclosure taken along line 6-6 in FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 7 is a plan view of the outsole of a second embodiment of the footwear in accordance with the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 8 is a plan view of the interior portion of the outsole of a second embodiment of the footwear in accordance with the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 9 is a cross section view of a portion the outsole of a second embodiment of the footwear in accordance with the present disclosure taken along line 9-9 in FIG. 8.
  • FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the outsole of a third embodiment of the footwear in accordance with the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 11 is a plan view of the outsole depicted in FIG. 10.
  • FIG. 12 is a cross section view of a portion of the outsole taken along line 12-12 in FIG. 11.
  • FIG. 13 is a cross section view of a portion of the outsole taken along line 13-13 in FIG. 11.
  • FIG. 14 is a cross section view of a portion of the outsole taken along line 14-14 in FIG. 11.
  • FIG. 15 is a cross section view of a portion of the outsole taken along line 15-15 in FIG. 11.
  • DETAIL DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • The preferred and alternative embodiments are shown in the figures. However, other embodiments may be used, which fall within the scope of the claims.
  • One embodiment comprises two support structures or pods, which can be seen in FIGS. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. The forefoot support structure or forefoot pod is shown by numeral 2 and the heel support structure or heel pod is shown by numeral 3. In this embodiment, both of the support structures 2 and 3 are somewhat hollow and are adapted to enclose a volume of gas. The support structures need not be hermetically sealed if they contain air, and may permit some air to move to the atmosphere and vice versa. The support structures 2 and 3 include internal support elements to support the foot. In the embodiment shown, these take the form of concentric, generally elliptical ridges. In pod 2, there are three ridges; namely, outermost ridge 2 a, middle ridge 2 b and innermost ridge 2 c. Pod 3 has two ridges, outermost ridge 3 a and innermost ridge 3 b. In this embodiment, the ridges all have gaps (discussed further below) to allow passage of a gas, which in the preferred embodiment would be air. A passageway or channel 4 connects pods 2 and 3 permitting the transfer of gas back and forth as the wearer walks or runs. Thus, energy is absorbed as the foot strikes the treading surface, such as a floor, and is transferred from the heel to forefoot portions and then back again as the foot pressure moves from the heel portion to the forefoot portion.
  • As can be seen in the figures, the forefoot and heel support structures, numerals 2 and 3 respectively, are curved outward appearing convex when the outsole is viewed from the outside. As discussed above, this creates a limited instability that assists in toning muscles in the lower leg. The amount of the curvature may be altered depending on such factors as the size of the shoe, the weight expected to be carried, the expected age of the wearer and the amount of instability desired. The curvature could be reduced to a very small amount, resulting in only a slight curvature. The external shape and appearance of the pods could also be altered without affecting the utilitarian aspects of the features. For example, the pods could be made more circular or more elliptical, they could have squared or flattened portions, or the appearance of the edges of the pods could be given many different looks depending on aesthetic considerations. Also, designs may be added to the exterior portions of the support structures for the sake of appearance or to serve a functional purpose such as increasing traction. Additionally, the size of the support structures is not limited to what is shown in the drawings. For example, in FIG. 2, one or both of the pods could extend to the outer edge of the outsole.
  • The internal support elements that may be placed inside a support structure can be any number of possible configurations or geometries. In the embodiment of FIG. 3, they are generally concentric ridges 2 a, 2 b, 2 c, 3 a and 3 b that generally conform to the shape of the support structure, or pod. In this embodiment, the pod is generally oval and the internal ridges are generally oval as well. As is shown in FIG. 5, the ridge 2 a closest to the outside of the forefoot pod 2 is shorter than the ridge 2 b next to it. Ridge 2 c is the tallest of the three. As is shown in FIG. 6, in the heel pod 3 ridge 3 a is shorter than ridge 3 b. The number of ridges in each pod could be greater or fewer than depicted in the drawings. This progression assists the pods to maintain a bulge outward closer to the central portion as the wearer strides. However, the width of the ridges can be varied, as well as the number of ridges. Additionally, each ridge could have different properties of resilience and weight bearing capability. Many alternatives are possible and can be deduced by one skilled in the art once the performance parameters of a particular shoe are established. The performance parameters include the amount of weight that the structure must carry, the amount of resiliency required for the desired rebounding effect and the amount of convexity to be maintained during the wearer's stride. The recovery characteristics could be the same for each support element within a support structure, or the recovery characteristics could vary from one support element to another.
  • The convex shape of the pods may be flattened somewhat at the apex in order to minimize movement of the internal support elements and to moderate the instability caused by the domed effect of the convex shape.
  • In addition to the physical internal support elements within the pods, air or another gas can be utilized within the support structures. In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 3, air is transferred from the heel to the forefoot portion and then back again via channel 4 that connects pods 2 and 3. The external channel structure 5 is seen in FIGS. 2 and 3. Looking at the outsole from the perspective of FIG. 2, the outermost surface of the structure 5 may be raised above the arch area 6 of the outsole 8, but it may also be flush with the arch area 6, or below the surface of the arch area 6. In fact, there may be no evidence of a channel 4 when looking at the outsole from the perspective of FIG. 2.
  • In FIG. 3, in between the edges of the pods 2 and 3 and the respective support structures 2 a, 2 b and 2 c, and 3 a and 3 b, are channels that permit the gas to flow within the pods. Also, the support structures themselves have gaps. Forefoot pod gaps are shown as numerals 10 a, 10 b and 10 c and heel pod gaps are shown as numerals 12 a and 12 b. These gaps facilitate the movement of the gas within the pods. The channels could also be cut into the midsole, which in the usual construction of this type of shoe would lie on top of the outsole and the support structures.
  • Another embodiment shown in FIGS. 7-9 comprises three support structures or pods in the heel portion and three in the forefoot portion. The three forefoot pods are shown at numerals 14 a, 14 b and 14 c, and the three heel pods are shown at numerals 16 a, 16 b and 16 c. An alternative to the internal ridges 2 a, 2 b and 2 c are shown as posts 18 a, 18 b and 18 c. Post 18 b is shown in FIG. 9 as being taller than posts 18 a and 18 c. In such a construction, the center posts of an array in each pod depicted in FIG. 8 would be taller than the posts at each side to assist the pods to maintain a convex shape in order to have the same effect as the convex shapes in the first embodiment discussed above. In this embodiment, the areas in between the posts allow for the movement of gas within each pod. A channel 20 connects the forefoot pods 14 a, 14 b and 14 c with each other and also with heel pods 16 a, 16 b and 16 c. Air or another gas is thereby permitted to transfer between the pods as the wearer treads. The number of support structures can be greater or fewer than three in both portions, and the number of support structures may be different in the heel and forefoot portions. Additionally, all of the support structures could be entirely in the heel portion or entirely in the forefoot portion without gas traveling between the forefoot and heel portions.
  • The internal support elements need not be limited to ridges or posts as described above. The internal support elements could be pillars or protrusions that extend for the entire height of the support structure, or they may extend only partially from one surface to the other. The internal support elements or protrusions could be wedge shaped, pyramidal, conical, plateau, ramp shaped, block shaped, rectangular or otherwise, depending on the impact and recovery characteristics desired. A combination of shapes can be used.
  • Another example of an alternative design is shown in FIGS. 10-15, wherein a combination of rectangular and other elements are shown in a relatively intricate structure. In the perspective view of FIG. 10 and the cross section view of FIG. 11, one can see a continuous ramp like configuration generally in the central portions of the forefoot and heel portions of the outsole, on the side of the outsole closest to the foot, at numerals 22 and 24 respectively. The continuous ramps 22 and 24 are highest at their centers so that the external portions of the outsole at both the forefoot portion 48 and heel portion 50 extend outward in a convex shape. Partial ramps are included in both the heel portion (26, 28, 30 and 32) and the forefoot portion (34, 36, 38 and 40). Also shown in this embodiment are wedges in the heel portion (42 and 44) and wedges in the forefoot portion (46, 48, 50 and 52). All of these features assist in the basic function of this disclosure, which is to provide convex shaped structures on the surface contacting portion of the outsole. The shapes of the internal structures and the materials used in the construction of the outsole can vary depending on the loads to be carried by the footwear.
  • While the apparatus and method have been described in terms of what are presently considered to be the most practical and preferred embodiments, it is to be understood that the disclosure need not be limited to the disclosed embodiments. It is intended to cover various modifications and similar arrangements included within the spirit and scope of the claims, the scope of which should be accorded the broadest interpretation so as to encompass all such modifications and similar structures. The present disclosure includes any and all embodiments of the following claims.

Claims (11)

  1. 1. A footwear sole on an article of footwear having a forefoot portion and a heel portion comprising:
    a plurality of pods in the footwear sole with at least one pod located in the forefoot portion and at least one pod located in the heel portion;
    an exterior surface on at least one pod having a generally convex shape on a portion of the exterior surface of the pod;
    an interior portion in at least one pod adapted to house an internal support structure; and
    an internal support structure within at least one of the pods, the support structure supporting at least some of the weight the wearer.
  2. 2. The footwear sole of claim 1 further comprising:
    three forefoot pods; and
    three heel pods.
  3. 3. The footwear sole of claim 1 further comprising:
    a plurality of internal support elements within at least one of the pods.
  4. 4. A footwear sole on an article of footwear having a forefoot portion and a heel portion comprising:
    a plurality of pods in the footwear sole with at least one pod located in the forefoot portion and at least one pod located in the heel portion;
    an exterior surface on at least one pod having a generally convex shape on a portion of the exterior surface of the pod;
    an interior portion in at least one pod adapted to accommodate a volume of gas; and
    an internal support structure within at least one of the pods, the internal support structure supporting at least some of the weight the wearer.
  5. 5. The footwear sole of claim 4 further comprising:
    gas within a plurality of pods;
    a gas passageway between at least two pods;
    wherein when force is exerted against the exterior surface of one pod, gas passes to the other pod.
  6. 6. The footwear sole of claim 5 further comprising:
    three forefoot pods;
    three heel pods; and
    a gas passageway between at least two pods;
    wherein when force is exerted against the exterior surface of one pod, gas passes to the other pod.
  7. 7. The footwear sole of claim 4 further comprising:
    a plurality of internal support elements within at least one of the pods;
    a gap in at least one of the internal support elements; and
    said gap permitting the passage of a gas from one portion of the pod to another portion of the same pod.
  8. 8. The footwear sole of claim 7 further comprising:
    a channel between at least two pods permitting the movement of a gas between the pods.
  9. 9. A footwear sole on an article of footwear having a forefoot portion and a heel portion comprising:
    a forefoot pod and a heel pod;
    internal support elements within both pods; and
    the internal support elements configured to maintain the exterior portion of each pod in a generally convex shape as the footwear is being worn.
  10. 10. The footwear sole of claim 9 further comprising:
    a first ramp like structure within at least one pod; and
    said at first ramp like structure being taller near the apex of the convex shape than it is near the perimeter of the convex shape.
  11. 11. The footwear sole of claim 10 further comprising:
    a second ramp like structure spaced away from the first ramp like structure; and
    a generally wedge shaped structure in the space between the first and second ramp like structures.
US12832806 2009-09-25 2010-07-08 Support structures in footwear Abandoned US20110072684A1 (en)

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US20100325919A1 (en) * 2002-08-19 2010-12-30 Avi Elbaz Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
USD671304S1 (en) * 2009-09-28 2012-11-27 Reebok International Limited Shoe sole
USD675814S1 (en) * 2012-07-06 2013-02-12 Ariat International, Inc. Footwear arch
USD677041S1 (en) 2010-09-20 2013-03-05 The Rockport Company, Llc Heel of a shoe sole
USD677040S1 (en) * 2010-11-17 2013-03-05 Reebok International Limited Shoe
USD677866S1 (en) * 2010-09-24 2013-03-19 Reebok International Limited Shoe
USD682518S1 (en) 2008-09-26 2013-05-21 Reebok International Limited Shoe sole
ES2447217A2 (en) * 2012-07-26 2014-03-11 Calzados Hergar, S.A. Shoe sole
USD719331S1 (en) 2012-03-23 2014-12-16 Reebok International Limited Shoe
USD722750S1 (en) 2012-09-07 2015-02-24 Reebok International Limited Shoe
USD744219S1 (en) * 2015-05-11 2015-12-01 Nike, Inc. Shoe outsole
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US9357812B2 (en) 2002-08-19 2016-06-07 APOS—Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd. Proprioceptive/kinesthetic apparatus and method
CN105747368A (en) * 2016-04-26 2016-07-13 苏州群力防滑材料有限公司 Anti-skid device for basket shoe
USD774740S1 (en) * 2016-04-14 2016-12-27 Skechers U.S.A., Inc. Ii Shoe outsole bottom
USD775460S1 (en) * 2016-04-14 2017-01-03 Skechers U.S.A., Inc. Ii Shoe outsole bottom
USD775799S1 (en) * 2016-06-03 2017-01-10 Skechers U.S.A., Inc. Ii Shoe outsole bottom
USD785304S1 (en) * 2015-08-10 2017-05-02 Jiones Frs Corporation Shoe outsole
US9648925B2 (en) * 2015-09-23 2017-05-16 Hyman Kramer Footwear devices
USD788428S1 (en) * 2016-06-03 2017-06-06 Skechers U.S.A., Inc. Ii Shoe outsole bottom
USD789664S1 (en) * 2015-08-10 2017-06-20 Jione Frs Corporation Shoe outsole
USD790179S1 (en) * 2015-08-18 2017-06-27 Nike, Inc. Shoe outsole
USD790178S1 (en) * 2015-08-17 2017-06-27 Nike, Inc. Shoe outsole
USD790820S1 (en) 2015-08-10 2017-07-04 Jione Frs Corporation Shoe outsole
USD791454S1 (en) * 2015-11-17 2017-07-11 Nike, Inc. Shoe outsole
USD792688S1 (en) 2015-08-10 2017-07-25 Jione Frs Corporation Shoe outsole
USD793048S1 (en) 2015-08-10 2017-08-01 Jione Frs Corporation Shoe outsole
USD796799S1 (en) * 2015-11-17 2017-09-12 Nike, Inc. Shoe midsole
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US10034514B2 (en) 2016-03-04 2018-07-31 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with sole system having carrier member and sensory node elements
US10058145B2 (en) 2016-03-04 2018-08-28 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear and sole structure with a central sensory node element

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