US20110054420A1 - Reduced-pressure wound dressings and systems for re-epithelialization and granulation - Google Patents

Reduced-pressure wound dressings and systems for re-epithelialization and granulation Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110054420A1
US20110054420A1 US12857179 US85717910A US2011054420A1 US 20110054420 A1 US20110054420 A1 US 20110054420A1 US 12857179 US12857179 US 12857179 US 85717910 A US85717910 A US 85717910A US 2011054420 A1 US2011054420 A1 US 2011054420A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
pressure
reduced
sensitive
water
tissue
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12857179
Inventor
Christopher Brian Locke
Timothy Mark Robinson
Richard Daniel John Coulthard
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
KCI Licensing Inc
Original Assignee
KCI Licensing Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F13/00051Accessories for dressings
    • A61F13/00068Accessories for dressings specially adapted for application or removal of fluid, e.g. irrigation or drainage of wounds, under-pressure wound-therapy
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F13/02Adhesive plasters or dressings
    • A61F13/0203Adhesive plasters or dressings having a fluid handling member
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M1/00Suction or pumping devices for medical purposes; Devices for carrying-off, for treatment of, or for carrying-over, body-liquids; Drainage systems
    • A61M1/008Drainage tubes; Aspiration tips
    • A61M1/0088Drainage tubes; Aspiration tips with a seal, e.g. to stick around a wound for isolating the treatment area
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M27/00Drainage appliances for wounds or the like, i.e. wound drains, implanted drains

Abstract

Methods, apparatuses, and systems for promoting re-epithelialization and granulation as an aspect of wound healing are presented. A method and system for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound at the same time involves using a reduced-pressure treatment dressing and applying a moist, water-sensitive barrier to promote re-epithelialization and to inhibit granulation. Other systems, apparatuses, and methods are presented.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    The present invention claims the benefit, under 35 USC §119(e), of the filing of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/237,504 entitled “Reduced-Pressure Wound Dressings and Systems For Re-Epithelialization and Granulation,” filed Aug. 27, 2009, which is incorporated herein by reference for all purposes.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    The present disclosure relates generally to medical treatment systems and, in particular but not by way of limitation, to reduced-pressure wound dressings, systems, and methods for re-epithelialization and granulation of a wound.
  • [0003]
    The physiological process of wound healing involves different phases that may occur simultaneously or sequentially. As used herein, “or” does not require mutual exclusivity. Two phases of the wound healing process involve granulation (proliferation) and re-epthiliazation.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0004]
    Improvements to certain aspects of wound care dressings, methods, and systems are addressed by the present invention as shown and described in a variety of illustrative, non-limiting embodiments herein. According to an illustrative, non-limiting embodiment, a method for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound includes the steps of providing a reduced-pressure treatment dressing having a first side and a second, tissue-facing side. The second, tissue-facing side of the reduced-pressure treatment dressing has a micro-strain inducing surface. The method further includes the steps of creating a moist, water-sensitive barrier on portions of the wound to promote re-epithelialization and to inhibit granulation; placing the reduced-pressure treatment dressing adjacent to the wound; and causing a fluid seal over the reduced-pressure treatment dressing. The method also includes applying reduced pressure to the reduced-pressure treatment dressing.
  • [0005]
    According to an illustrative, non-limiting embodiment, a system for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of a patient includes a reduced-pressure treatment dressing and a moist, water-sensitive barrier disposed adjacent the reduced-pressure treatment dressing at portions of the wound to promote re-epithelialization and to inhibit granulation. The system further includes a sealing member for placing over the reduced-pressure treatment dressing and a portion of epidermis of the patient and a reduced-pressure source for providing reduced pressure to the reduced-pressure treatment dressing.
  • [0006]
    According to an illustrative, non-limiting embodiment, a kit for deploying a dressing for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of a patient includes a reduced-pressure treatment dressing and a water-sensitive, flowable material for disposing adjacent to the reduced-pressure treatment dressing at portions of the wound to promote re-epithelialization and to inhibit granulation. The kit also includes a sealing member for placing over the reduced-pressure treatment dressing and a portion of epidermis of the patient. The kit may also include a reduced-pressure delivery conduit for providing reduced pressure to the reduced-pressure treatment dressing. Finally, the kit includes a delivery device for applying the water-sensitive, flowable material.
  • [0007]
    Other features and advantages of the illustrative, non-limiting embodiments will become apparent with reference to the drawings and detailed description that follow.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0008]
    FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram with a portion in cross section of an illustrative, non-limiting embodiment of a system and dressing for re-epithelialization and granulation of a wound;
  • [0009]
    FIG. 2 is a schematic, cross-sectional view of a wound to which a moist, water-sensitive barrier is being applied to a portion of the tissue;
  • [0010]
    FIG. 3 is a schematic, perspective view of water-sensitive, flowable material being applied to a reduced-pressure treatment dressing; and
  • [0011]
    FIG. 4 is a schematic, perspective view of an illustrative, non-limiting embodiment of a wound dressing.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0012]
    In the following detailed description of the illustrative, non-limiting embodiments, reference is made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof. These embodiments are described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention, and it is understood that other embodiments may be utilized and that logical structural, mechanical, electrical, and chemical changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. To avoid detail not necessary to enable those skilled in the art to practice the embodiments described herein, the description may omit certain information known to those skilled in the art. The following detailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, and the scope of the illustrative embodiments are defined only by the appended claims.
  • [0013]
    Referring now primarily to FIG. 1, an illustrative, non-limiting embodiment of a wound treatment system 100 that facilitates granulation and re-epithelialization is presented. The system 100 is shown deployed for treatment of a tissue site 102 and, in particular, a wound 104. The wound 104 is shown extending through epidermis 112 and into subcutaneous tissue 114. A peri-wound area may include the wound 104 and intact tissue near the wound 104 or may include the wound 104 alone. The tissue site 102 may be the bodily tissue of any human, animal, or other organism, including bone tissue, adipose tissue, muscle tissue, dermal tissue, vascular tissue, connective tissue, cartilage, tendons, ligaments, or any other tissue. The wound treatment system 100 facilitates re-epithelialization of a portion of the tissue site 102 and facilitates granulation of another portion of the tissue site 102 with both potentially occurring at the same time. The wound 104 may have wound edges 106 and may include one or more islands of intact epidermis, such as island 108 of intact epidermis, which has wound edges 110. The wound 104 may be regarded as including wound edges 106, 110.
  • [0014]
    The epithelialization, or re-epithelialization, phase of acute wound healing involves resurfacing of the wound 104 and changes in the wound edges 106, 110. The process protects a patient's body from invasion by outside organisms and may occur concurrently with other phases if not restricted. The resurfacing aspect involves keratinocytes.
  • [0015]
    Among other things, keratinocytes form layers of the dermis and epidermis. Keratinocytes are derived from epidermal stem cells located in the bulge area of hair follicles and migrate from that location into the basal layers of epidermis. The keratinocytes proliferate and differentiate to produce epidermis and thereby replenish the epidermis. Keratinocytes may respond to signals released from growth factors, which may be in wound exudate, by advancing in a sheet to resurface a space. Because of this migration, a moist wound environment may speed the migration of keratinocytes toward one another from the wound edges 106, 110. The wound treatment system 100 promotes the re-epithelialization phase or process and the granulation phase or process.
  • [0016]
    The wound treatment system 100 includes a moist barrier 116, a reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118, and a sealing member 120. When the wound treatment system 100 is deployed, the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118 will be disposed adjacent to portions of the tissue site 102 where primarily granulation is desired and adjacent the moist barrier 116 in other locations. The moist barrier 116 will be adjacent to portions of the tissue site 102 where primarily re-epithelialization is to be promoted and where granulation is to be inhibited or not facilitated. Among other things, the moist barrier 116 reduces or prevents reduced pressure from being experienced at the location covered by the moist barrier 116 or reduces or prevents contact by a micro-strain-inducing surface of a manifold 128 of the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118.
  • [0017]
    After the moist barrier 116 is deployed at the desired location, e.g., the wound edges 106, 110, and the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118 is placed over the tissue site 102 and the moist barrier 116, the sealing member 120 is deployed. The sealing member 120 is deployed over the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118 and a portion of a patient's intact epidermis 112.
  • [0018]
    The sealing member 120 has a first side 121 and a second, tissue-facing side 123. The sealing member 120 may be formed from any material that provides a fluid seal. “Fluid seal,” or “seal,” means a seal adequate to maintain reduced pressure at a desired site given the particular reduced-pressure source or subsystem involved. The sealing member may, for example, be an impermeable or semi-permeable, elastomeric material. “Elastomeric” means having the properties of an elastomer. Elastomer generally refers to a polymeric material that has rubber-like properties. More specifically, most elastomers typically have ultimate elongations greater than 100% and a significant amount of resilience. The resilience of a material refers to the material's ability to recover from an elastic deformation. Examples of elastomers may include, but are not limited to, natural rubbers, polyisoprene, styrene butadiene rubber, chloroprene rubber, polybutadiene, nitrile rubber, butyl rubber, ethylene propylene rubber, ethylene propylene diene monomer, chlorosulfonated polyethylene, polysulfide rubber, polyurethane, EVA film, co-polyester, and silicones. Additional examples of sealing member materials include a silicone drape, 3M Tegaderm® drape, polyurethane (PU) drape such as one available from Avery Dennison Corporation of Pasadena, Calif.
  • [0019]
    An attachment device 122 may be used to form a fluid seal between the epidermis 112 and the sealing member 120. The attachment device 122 may be used to hold the sealing member 120 against the patient's epidermis 112 or another layer, such as a gasket or additional sealing member. The attachment device 122 may take numerous forms. For example, the attachment device 122 may be a medically acceptable, pressure-sensitive adhesive 124 that extends about a periphery of the sealing member 120.
  • [0020]
    The reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118, which has a first side 130 and a second, tissue-facing side 132, may be any dressing that distributes reduced pressure and that may help promote micro-strain at the tissue site 102. For example, the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118 may be or include the manifold 128. The term “manifold” as used herein generally refers to a substance or structure that is provided to assist in applying reduced pressure to, delivering fluids to, or removing fluids from the tissue site 102. The manifold 128 typically includes a plurality of flow channels or pathways that distribute fluids provided to and removed from the tissue site 102 around the manifold 128. In one illustrative, non-limiting embodiment, the flow channels or pathways are interconnected to improve distribution of fluids provided or removed from the tissue site 102. The manifold 128 may be a biocompatible material that is capable of being placed in contact with the tissue site 102 and distributing reduced pressure to the tissue site 102.
  • [0021]
    Examples of the manifold 128 may include, for example, without limitation, devices that have structural elements arranged to form flow channels, such as, for example, cellular foam, open-cell foam, porous tissue collections, liquids, gels, and foams that include, or cure to include, flow channels. The manifold 128 may be porous and may be made from foam, gauze, felted mat, or any other material suited to a particular biological application. In one embodiment, the manifold 128 is a porous foam and includes a plurality of interconnected cells or pores that act as flow channels. The porous foam may be a polyurethane, open-cell, reticulated foam, such as GranuFoam® material manufactured by Kinetic Concepts, Incorporated of San Antonio, Tex. Other embodiments may include “closed cells.” The manifold 128 has a first side 129 and a second, tissue-facing side 131. The second, tissue-facing side 131 may provide a micro-strain-inducing surface, such as open cells or protrusions or other devices that impinge on the tissue site 102 when under reduced pressure or a force.
  • [0022]
    In one embodiment, the manifold 128 may be constructed from bioresorbable materials that do not have to be removed from a patient's body following use of the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118. Suitable bioresorbable materials may include, without limitation, a polymeric blend of polylactic acid (PLA) and polyglycolic acid (PGA). The polymeric blend may also include without limitation polycarbonates, polyfumarates, and capralactones. The manifold 128 may further serve as a scaffold for new cell-growth, or a scaffold material may be used in conjunction with the manifold 128 to promote cell-growth. A scaffold is a substance or structure used to enhance or promote the growth of cells or formation of tissue, such as a three-dimensional porous structure that provides a template for cell growth. Illustrative examples of scaffold materials include calcium phosphate, collagen, PLA/PGA, coral hydroxy apatites, carbonates, or processed allograft materials.
  • [0023]
    In some situations, the manifold 128 may also be used to distribute fluids, such as medications, antibacterials, growth factors, and various solutions to the tissue site 102. Other layers may be included in or on the manifold 128, such as absorptive materials, wicking materials, hydrophobic materials, and hydrophilic materials.
  • [0024]
    A reduced-pressure connector 134 may be associated with the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118 to provide reduced pressure thereto. The reduced-pressure connector 134 may have a flange portion 136 that may be disposed between the sealing member 120 and the first side 130 of the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118. A portion of the reduced-pressure connector 134 extends through a connector aperture 138 in the sealing member 120. A reduced pressure delivery conduit 140 may be used to fluidly couple the reduced-pressure connector 134 to a reduced-pressure source 142. One or more devices 144 may be associated or fluidly coupled to the reduced-pressure delivery conduit 140. The device or devices 144 that may be fluidly coupled to the reduced-pressure delivery conduit 140 include, for example, without limitation, a fluid reservoir or collection member to hold exudates and other fluids removed, a pressure-feedback device, a volume detection system, a blood detection system, an infection detection system, a flow monitoring system, a temperature monitoring system, or other device.
  • [0025]
    The reduced-pressure source 142 provides reduced pressure as a part of the system 100. The term “reduced pressure” as used herein generally refers to a pressure less than the ambient pressure at a tissue site that is being subjected to treatment. In most cases, this reduced pressure will be less than the atmospheric pressure at which the patient is located. Alternatively, the reduced pressure may be less than a hydrostatic pressure of tissue at the tissue site. Although the terms “vacuum” and “negative pressure” may be used to describe the pressure applied to the tissue site, the actual pressure applied to the tissue site may be significantly more than the pressure normally associated with a complete vacuum. Unless otherwise indicated, values of pressure stated herein are gauge pressures.
  • [0026]
    The reduced pressure delivered by the reduced-pressure source 142 may be constant or varied (patterned or random) and may be delivered continuously or intermittently. In order to maximize patient mobility and ease, the reduced-pressure source 142 may be a battery-powered, reduced-pressure generator. This facilitates application in the operating room and provides mobility and convenience for the patient during the rehabilitation phase. Other sources of reduced pressure might be utilized, such as V.A.C.® therapy unit, which is available from KCI of San Antonio, Tex., wall suction, a mechanical unit, or a micro-pump imbedded in the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118. The pressure may in the range of −5 mm Hg to −500 mm Hg and more typically between −100 mm Hg and −200 mm Hg.
  • [0027]
    The reduced pressure developed by the reduced-pressure source 142 is delivered through the reduced-pressure delivery conduit 140, or medical conduit or tubing, to the reduced-pressure connector 134. A hydrophobic membrane filter may be interspersed between the reduced-pressure delivery conduit 140 and the reduced-pressure source 142. In another illustrative embodiment, reduced pressure is delivered by a micro-pump to a sealed spaced under the sealing member 120.
  • [0028]
    The moist barrier 116 may be formed from numerous materials. In one illustrative, non-limiting embodiment, the moist barrier 116 is a moist, water-sensitive barrier, such as a hydrogel, hydrocolloid, or other part solid solution. The moist barrier 116 may also be a substance in a foam formulation such as a hydrogel or hydrocolloid foam form or may be an emulsified oil. The material from which the moist barrier 116 is formed may be water-sensitive, or a fluid balancing material, meaning that the material will provide moisture to dry wounds and will absorb moisture from excessively moist, or wet, wounds. In one illustrative, non-limiting embodiment, the moist barrier 116 may be a water-sensitive, flowable material 146, such as a flowable hydrogel or flowable hydrocolloid. The moist barrier 116 may include additional substances, such as growth factors. The moist barrier 116 may promote bio-mimicry.
  • [0029]
    The water-sensitive, flowable material 146 may be a high viscosity fluid, like a flowable hydrogel or hydrocolloid that is low enough in viscosity to flow, but high enough in viscosity to occlude the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118. The water-sensitive, flowable material 146 may move partially into the manifold 128. The degree to which the water-sensitive, flowable material 146 moves into the manifold 128 is, in the case of a foam manifold, governed primarily by pore size, the level of reduced pressure, and the viscosity of the water-sensitive, flowable material 146. For example, with a relatively viscous embodiment of the water-sensitive, flowable material 146 against a fine pore size foam, a majority of the water-sensitive, flowable material 146 will remain at the interface of the water-sensitive, flowable material 146 and the foam.
  • [0030]
    As an illustrative, non-limiting example, the water-sensitive, flowable material 146 may have a viscosity in the range of 2,000 to 250,000 centipoise (cP) at 25° C. As another illustrative, non-limiting example, the water-sensitive, flowable material 146 may have a viscosity in the range of 50,000 to 150,000 cP at 25° C. In another illustrative, embodiment, the water-sensitive, flowable material 146 may be a gel that is pseudoplastic (capable of shear thinning, i.e., shear dependent viscosity) so that the material has a low viscosity as dispensed with high shear, but once in place with a low shear situation, the material increases in viscosity.
  • [0031]
    The moist barrier 116 is typically deployed in a position to cover the wound edges 106, 110 and may be deployed in a number of ways. Referring now primarily to FIG. 2, one illustrative, non-limiting description of a process for forming the moist barrier 116 is presented. In this illustrative example, the moist barrier 116 comprises the water-sensitive, flowable material 146. A delivery device 150, such as a squirtable container of material, a syringe 152, or other device, is used to deliver the water-sensitive, flowable material 146 directly to portions of the tissue site 102 where granulation is not desired, but re-epithelialization is desired. In this way, the moist barrier 116 is formed in situ. The water-sensitive, flowable material 146 may provide a moist environment for the portions of the tissue site 102 that are covered by the water-sensitive, flowable material 146, and the water-sensitive, flowable material 146 restricts or prevents reduced pressure from being delivered through the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118 to the covered tissue or otherwise prevents micro-strain from being induced at the covered locations. In the illustrative example in which the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118 is formed from an open cell foam, the water-sensitive, flowable material 146 may occlude cells that contact the water-sensitive, flowable material 146.
  • [0032]
    Referring now primarily to FIG. 3, another illustrative, non-limiting example of how the moist barrier 116 may be formed is presented. In this illustrative, non-limiting embodiment, the delivery device 150, e.g., the syringe 152, is used to apply a water-sensitive, flowable material 146 onto the second, tissue-facing side 131 of the manifold 128. The water-sensitive, flowable material 146 is applied at locations on the second, tissue-facing side 131 of the manifold 128 that correspond or align, when deployed, with the portions of the tissue site 102 where granulation is not desired and re-epithelialization is desired. Thus, once the water-sensitive, flowable material 146 is applied to the second, tissue-facing side 131 of the manifold 128 and the manifold 128 is deployed adjacent to the tissue site 102, only the desired portions of the tissue site 102 will receive reduced pressure in operation.
  • [0033]
    Referring now primarily to FIG. 4, still another illustrative, non-limiting example of how the moist barrier 116 may be formed is presented. In this illustrative example, a layer 154 of water-sensitive material is applied to the second, tissue-facing side 131 of the manifold 128 and substantially covers the second, tissue-facing side 131 of the manifold 128. The layer 154 includes perforations or cuts 156 that readily allow one to remove one or more segments, or portions 158, of the layer 154 to expose a portion of the second, tissue-facing side 131 of the manifold 128. As such, the segments 158 may be removed that correspond, when deployed, to portions of the tissue site 102 where granulation is desired. When the reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118 is deployed with the second, tissue-facing side 131 adjacent the tissue site 102, the remaining portions of the layer 154 that form the moist barrier 116 will be adjacent to the areas where no granulation is desired but re-epthiliazation is desired. At the same time, the second, tissue-facing side 131 of the manifold 128 will be against the portions of the tissue site 102 where granulation is desired.
  • [0034]
    According to one illustrative, non-limiting embodiment, the moist barrier 116 may be formed from a hydrogel, hydrocolloid, or other material. In this embodiment, the hydrogel or hydrocolloid may be cast onto a woven liner and cross-linked. In this illustrative embodiment, the hydrogrel or hydrocolloid is not mobile.
  • [0035]
    According to one illustrative, non-limiting method of deploying the wound treatment system 100, the moist barrier 116 is placed adjacent to the portion of the tissue site 102 where granulation is not desired and where re-epithelialization is desired. The second, tissue-facing side 131 of the manifold 128 is placed directly adjacent to the portion of the tissue site 102 where granulation is desired. The sealing member 120 is placed over the tissue site 102 and a portion of the patient's intact epidermis 112 to form a fluid seal. Reduced pressure is supplied to the manifold 128.
  • [0036]
    A kit for deploying a dressing for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of a patient may be formed that provides an easy and convenient manner to treat a wound. The kit may include a reduced-pressure treatment dressing (e.g., reduced-pressure treatment dressing 118) and a water-sensitive, flowable material (e.g., water-sensitive, flowable material 146) for disposing adjacent to the reduced-pressure treatment dressing (e.g., reduced-pressure dressing 118) at locations on the wound where granulation is not desired and where re-epithelialization is desired. The kit also may include a sealing member (e.g., sealing member 120) for placing over the reduced-pressure treatment dressing and a portion of epidermis of the patient and may include a reduced-pressure delivery conduit (e.g., reduced-pressure delivery conduit 140) for providing reduced pressure to the reduced-pressure treatment dressings. The kit may include a delivery device (e.g., delivery device 150) for applying the water-sensitive, flowable material and may include a reduced-pressure connector (e.g., reduced-pressure connector 134).
  • [0037]
    Although the present invention and its advantages have been disclosed in the context of certain illustrative, non-limiting embodiments, it should be understood that various changes, substitutions, permutations, and alterations can be made without departing from the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. It will be appreciated that any feature that is described in a connection to any one embodiment may also be applicable to any other embodiment.

Claims (21)

  1. 1. A method for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of a patient, the method comprising the steps of:
    providing a reduced-pressure treatment dressing having a first side and a second, tissue-facing side, wherein the second, tissue-facing side has a micro-strain inducing surface;
    creating a moist, water-sensitive barrier on at least a portion of the wound to promote re-epithelialization and to inhibit granulation;
    placing the reduced-pressure treatment dressing over a peri-wound area such that the reduced-pressure treatment dressing covers at least a portion of the wound and at least
    a portion of the moist, water-sensitive barrier;
    forming a fluid seal over the reduced-pressure treatment dressing and a portion of epidermis of the patient; and
    applying reduced pressure to the reduced-pressure treatment dressing.
  2. 2. The method for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of claim 1, wherein the step of creating a moist, water-sensitive barrier comprises the step of creating a moist, water-sensitive barrier over wound edges of the wound.
  3. 3. The method for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of claim 1, wherein the step of creating a moist, water-sensitive barrier comprises the step of deploying a water-sensitive, flowable material.
  4. 4. The method for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of claim 1, wherein the step of creating a moist, water-sensitive barrier comprises the step of deploying a water-sensitive, flowable material on the at least a portion of the wound to promote re-epithelialization and to inhibit granulation; and wherein the water-sensitive, flowable material has a viscosity in the range of 50,000 to 150,000 cP at 25° C.
  5. 5. The method for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of claim 1, wherein the reduced-pressure treatment dressing comprises a layer of removable, moist water-sensitive barrier material on a manifold, and wherein the step of creating a moist, water-sensitive barrier comprises the steps of removing a portion of the removable, moist water-sensitive barrier material from the manifold at a location to promote granulation on a portion of the wound.
  6. 6. The method for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of claim 1, wherein the micro-strain inducing surface is an open-cell foam.
  7. 7. The method for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of claim 1, wherein the step of creating a moist, water-sensitive barrier comprises the step of deploying a water-sensitive, flowable material to inhibit granulation and to promote re-epithelialization; and wherein the water-sensitive, flowable material is a hydrogel.
  8. 8. The method for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of claim 1, wherein:
    creating a moist, water-sensitive barrier comprises deploying a water-sensitive, flowable material to align with locations to inhibit granulation and to promote re-epithelialization;
    the water-sensitive, flowable material comprises a hydrogel having a viscosity in the range of 50,000 to 150,000 cP at 25° C.;
    deploying a water-sensitive, flowable material comprises using a syringe to deliver the water-sensitive, flowable material onto the micro-strain inducing surface on portions that will interface with tissue to promote re-epithelialization and to inhibit granulation.
  9. 9. The method for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of claim 1, wherein the step of deploying a water-sensitive, flowable material comprises using a syringe to deliver the water-sensitive, flowable material onto the micro-strain inducing surface on portions that will interface with tissue where re-epithelialization is desired and granulation is not desired.
  10. 10. The method for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of claim 1, wherein:
    the step of creating a moist, water-sensitive barrier comprises the step of deploying a water-sensitive, flowable material to align with locations where granulation is not desired;
    the water-sensitive, flowable material comprises a hydrogel; and
    the step of deploying a water-sensitive, flowable material comprises using a delivery device to deliver the water-sensitive, flowable material onto tissue where re-epithelialization and not granulation is desired.
  11. 11. A system for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of a patient, the system comprising:
    a reduced-pressure treatment dressing having a first side and a second, tissue-facing side, wherein the second, tissue-facing side has a micro-strain inducing surface;
    a moist, water-sensitive barrier disposed adjacent to the reduced-pressure treatment dressing at locations to promote re-epithelialization and to inhibit granulation;
    a sealing member for placing over the reduced-pressure treatment dressing and a portion of epidermis of the patient; and
    a reduced-pressure source for providing reduced pressure to the reduced-pressure treatment dressing.
  12. 12. The system of claim 11, wherein the moist, water-sensitive barrier comprises a water-sensitive, flowable material aligned with portions of the wound to promote re-epithelialization and to inhibit granulation.
  13. 13. The system of claim 11, wherein the moist, water-sensitive barrier comprises a water-sensitive, flowable material aligned with portions of the wound to promote re-epithelialization and to inhibit granulation, and wherein the water-sensitive, flowable material is a hydrogel.
  14. 14. The system of claim 11, wherein the reduced-pressure treatment dressing comprises a layer of removable, moist water-sensitive barrier on a manifold, and wherein the removable, moist water-sensitive barrier is absent on portions of the manifold on a tissue-facing surface to promote granulation.
  15. 15. The system of claim 11, wherein the micro-strain inducing surface is an open-cell foam.
  16. 16. The system of claim 11, wherein the micro-strain inducing surface is a gauze.
  17. 17. A kit for deploying a dressing for promoting granulation and re-epithelialization of a wound of a patient, the kit comprising:
    a reduced-pressure treatment dressing having a first side and a second, tissue-facing side, wherein the second, tissue-facing side has a micro-strain inducing surface;
    a water-sensitive, flowable material for disposing adjacent to the reduced-pressure treatment dressing and adjacent to portions of the wound to promote re-epithelialization and to inhibit granulation;
    a sealing member for placing over the reduced-pressure treatment dressing and a portion of epidermis of the patient; and
    a delivery device for applying the water-sensitive, flowable material.
  18. 18. The kit of claim 17, wherein delivery device comprises a syringe.
  19. 19. The kit of claim 17, wherein the water-sensitive, flowable material comprises a flowable hydrogel and the delivery device comprises a syringe.
  20. 20. The kit of claim 17, wherein the water-sensitive, flowable material comprises a flowable hydrogel; the delivery device comprises a syringe; and wherein the flowable hydrogel has a viscosity in the range of 50,000 to 150,000 cP at 25° C.
  21. 21. The kit of claim 17, further comprising a reduced-pressure delivery conduit for providing reduced pressure to the reduced-pressure treatment dressings.
US12857179 2009-08-27 2010-08-16 Reduced-pressure wound dressings and systems for re-epithelialization and granulation Abandoned US20110054420A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US23750409 true 2009-08-27 2009-08-27
US12857179 US20110054420A1 (en) 2009-08-27 2010-08-16 Reduced-pressure wound dressings and systems for re-epithelialization and granulation

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12857179 US20110054420A1 (en) 2009-08-27 2010-08-16 Reduced-pressure wound dressings and systems for re-epithelialization and granulation
US14135120 US20140107600A1 (en) 2009-08-27 2013-12-19 Reduced-pressure wound dressings and systems for re-epithelialization and granulation

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14135120 Division US20140107600A1 (en) 2009-08-27 2013-12-19 Reduced-pressure wound dressings and systems for re-epithelialization and granulation

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110054420A1 true true US20110054420A1 (en) 2011-03-03

Family

ID=43625925

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12857179 Abandoned US20110054420A1 (en) 2009-08-27 2010-08-16 Reduced-pressure wound dressings and systems for re-epithelialization and granulation
US14135120 Pending US20140107600A1 (en) 2009-08-27 2013-12-19 Reduced-pressure wound dressings and systems for re-epithelialization and granulation

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14135120 Pending US20140107600A1 (en) 2009-08-27 2013-12-19 Reduced-pressure wound dressings and systems for re-epithelialization and granulation

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US20110054420A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110125113A1 (en) * 2008-06-23 2011-05-26 Carmeli Adahan Tissue enclosure

Citations (112)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2547758A (en) * 1949-01-05 1951-04-03 Wilmer B Keeling Instrument for treating the male urethra
US2632443A (en) * 1949-04-18 1953-03-24 Eleanor P Lesher Surgical dressing
US2682873A (en) * 1952-07-30 1954-07-06 Johnson & Johnson General purpose protective dressing
US2969057A (en) * 1957-11-04 1961-01-24 Brady Co W H Nematodic swab
US3367332A (en) * 1965-08-27 1968-02-06 Gen Electric Product and process for establishing a sterile area of skin
US3520300A (en) * 1967-03-15 1970-07-14 Amp Inc Surgical sponge and suction device
US3568675A (en) * 1968-08-30 1971-03-09 Clyde B Harvey Fistula and penetrating wound dressing
US3648692A (en) * 1970-12-07 1972-03-14 Parke Davis & Co Medical-surgical dressing for burns and the like
US3682180A (en) * 1970-06-08 1972-08-08 Coilform Co Inc Drain clip for surgical drain
US3826254A (en) * 1973-02-26 1974-07-30 Verco Ind Needle or catheter retaining appliance
US4080970A (en) * 1976-11-17 1978-03-28 Miller Thomas J Post-operative combination dressing and internal drain tube with external shield and tube connector
US4096853A (en) * 1975-06-21 1978-06-27 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Device for the introduction of contrast medium into an anus praeter
US4139004A (en) * 1977-02-17 1979-02-13 Gonzalez Jr Harry Bandage apparatus for treating burns
US4165748A (en) * 1977-11-07 1979-08-28 Johnson Melissa C Catheter tube holder
US4184510A (en) * 1977-03-15 1980-01-22 Fibra-Sonics, Inc. Valued device for controlling vacuum in surgery
US4245630A (en) * 1976-10-08 1981-01-20 T. J. Smith & Nephew, Ltd. Tearable composite strip of materials
US4256109A (en) * 1978-07-10 1981-03-17 Nichols Robert L Shut off valve for medical suction apparatus
US4261363A (en) * 1979-11-09 1981-04-14 C. R. Bard, Inc. Retention clips for body fluid drains
US4275721A (en) * 1978-11-28 1981-06-30 Landstingens Inkopscentral Lic, Ekonomisk Forening Vein catheter bandage
US4284079A (en) * 1979-06-28 1981-08-18 Adair Edwin Lloyd Method for applying a male incontinence device
US4333468A (en) * 1980-08-18 1982-06-08 Geist Robert W Mesentery tube holder apparatus
US4373519A (en) * 1981-06-26 1983-02-15 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Composite wound dressing
US4382441A (en) * 1978-12-06 1983-05-10 Svedman Paul Device for treating tissues, for example skin
US4392858A (en) * 1981-07-16 1983-07-12 Sherwood Medical Company Wound drainage device
US4392853A (en) * 1981-03-16 1983-07-12 Rudolph Muto Sterile assembly for protecting and fastening an indwelling device
US4465485A (en) * 1981-03-06 1984-08-14 Becton, Dickinson And Company Suction canister with unitary shut-off valve and filter features
US4525166A (en) * 1981-11-21 1985-06-25 Intermedicat Gmbh Rolled flexible medical suction drainage device
US4525374A (en) * 1984-02-27 1985-06-25 Manresa, Inc. Treating hydrophobic filters to render them hydrophilic
US4569348A (en) * 1980-02-22 1986-02-11 Velcro Usa Inc. Catheter tube holder strap
US4605399A (en) * 1984-12-04 1986-08-12 Complex, Inc. Transdermal infusion device
US4608041A (en) * 1981-10-14 1986-08-26 Frese Nielsen Device for treatment of wounds in body tissue of patients by exposure to jets of gas
US4640688A (en) * 1985-08-23 1987-02-03 Mentor Corporation Urine collection catheter
US4655754A (en) * 1984-11-09 1987-04-07 Stryker Corporation Vacuum wound drainage system and lipids baffle therefor
US4664662A (en) * 1984-08-02 1987-05-12 Smith And Nephew Associated Companies Plc Wound dressing
US4733659A (en) * 1986-01-17 1988-03-29 Seton Company Foam bandage
US4743232A (en) * 1986-10-06 1988-05-10 The Clinipad Corporation Package assembly for plastic film bandage
US4758220A (en) * 1985-09-26 1988-07-19 Alcon Laboratories, Inc. Surgical cassette proximity sensing and latching apparatus
US4826494A (en) * 1984-11-09 1989-05-02 Stryker Corporation Vacuum wound drainage system
US4838883A (en) * 1986-03-07 1989-06-13 Nissho Corporation Urine-collecting device
US4840187A (en) * 1986-09-11 1989-06-20 Bard Limited Sheath applicator
US4897081A (en) * 1984-05-25 1990-01-30 Thermedics Inc. Percutaneous access device
US4906240A (en) * 1988-02-01 1990-03-06 Matrix Medica, Inc. Adhesive-faced porous absorbent sheet and method of making same
US4906233A (en) * 1986-05-29 1990-03-06 Terumo Kabushiki Kaisha Method of securing a catheter body to a human skin surface
US4919654A (en) * 1988-08-03 1990-04-24 Kalt Medical Corporation IV clamp with membrane
US4941882A (en) * 1987-03-14 1990-07-17 Smith And Nephew Associated Companies, P.L.C. Adhesive dressing for retaining a cannula on the skin
US4985019A (en) * 1988-03-11 1991-01-15 Michelson Gary K X-ray marker
US5018515A (en) * 1987-12-14 1991-05-28 The Kendall Company See through absorbent dressing
US5037397A (en) * 1985-05-03 1991-08-06 Medical Distributors, Inc. Universal clamp
US5086170A (en) * 1989-01-16 1992-02-04 Roussel Uclaf Process for the preparation of azabicyclo compounds
US5092858A (en) * 1990-03-20 1992-03-03 Becton, Dickinson And Company Liquid gelling agent distributor device
US5100396A (en) * 1989-04-03 1992-03-31 Zamierowski David S Fluidic connection system and method
US5106629A (en) * 1989-10-20 1992-04-21 Ndm Acquisition Corp. Transparent hydrogel wound dressing
US5134994A (en) * 1990-02-12 1992-08-04 Say Sam L Field aspirator in a soft pack with externally mounted container
US5160315A (en) * 1991-04-05 1992-11-03 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Combined adhesive strip and transparent dressing delivery system
US5176663A (en) * 1987-12-02 1993-01-05 Pal Svedman Dressing having pad with compressibility limiting elements
US5215522A (en) * 1984-07-23 1993-06-01 Ballard Medical Products Single use medical aspirating device and method
US5278100A (en) * 1991-11-08 1994-01-11 Micron Technology, Inc. Chemical vapor deposition technique for depositing titanium silicide on semiconductor wafers
US5279550A (en) * 1991-12-19 1994-01-18 Gish Biomedical, Inc. Orthopedic autotransfusion system
US5298015A (en) * 1989-07-11 1994-03-29 Nippon Zeon Co., Ltd. Wound dressing having a porous structure
US5356372A (en) * 1993-12-01 1994-10-18 Ludlow Corporation Occlusive pressure-reducing wound dressing
US5423737A (en) * 1993-05-27 1995-06-13 New Dimensions In Medicine, Inc. Transparent hydrogel wound dressing with release tab
US5437651A (en) * 1993-09-01 1995-08-01 Research Medical, Inc. Medical suction apparatus
US5527293A (en) * 1989-04-03 1996-06-18 Kinetic Concepts, Inc. Fastening system and method
US5607388A (en) * 1994-06-16 1997-03-04 Hercules Incorporated Multi-purpose wound dressing
US5636643A (en) * 1991-11-14 1997-06-10 Wake Forest University Wound treatment employing reduced pressure
US5645081A (en) * 1991-11-14 1997-07-08 Wake Forest University Method of treating tissue damage and apparatus for same
US5844013A (en) * 1992-10-02 1998-12-01 Beiersdorf Ag Hydrophilic polyurethane gel foams, particularly for treating deep wounds, wound dressing based on hydrophilic polyurethane gel foams and method of manufacture
US6071267A (en) * 1998-02-06 2000-06-06 Kinetic Concepts, Inc. Medical patient fluid management interface system and method
US6201164B1 (en) * 1996-07-11 2001-03-13 Coloplast A/S Hydrocolloid wound gel
US6241747B1 (en) * 1993-05-03 2001-06-05 Quill Medical, Inc. Barbed Bodily tissue connector
US20010043943A1 (en) * 2000-05-22 2001-11-22 Coffey Arthur C. Combination SIS and vacuum bandage and method
US6345623B1 (en) * 1997-09-12 2002-02-12 Keith Patrick Heaton Surgical drape and suction head for wound treatment
US20020077661A1 (en) * 2000-12-20 2002-06-20 Vahid Saadat Multi-barbed device for retaining tissue in apposition and methods of use
US6420622B1 (en) * 1997-08-01 2002-07-16 3M Innovative Properties Company Medical article having fluid control film
US20020132540A1 (en) * 2000-12-29 2002-09-19 Dave Soerens Absorbent, lubricious coating and articles coated therewith
US6566575B1 (en) * 2000-02-15 2003-05-20 3M Innovative Properties Company Patterned absorbent article for wound dressing
US20030203011A1 (en) * 2002-04-12 2003-10-30 3M Innovative Properties Company Gel materials, medical articles, and methods
US20030232905A1 (en) * 2000-04-06 2003-12-18 Ives Christopher L. Pressure sensitive adhesive compositions
US6685681B2 (en) * 2000-11-29 2004-02-03 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Vacuum therapy and cleansing dressing for wounds
US20040030304A1 (en) * 2000-05-09 2004-02-12 Kenneth Hunt Abdominal wound dressing
US20040243073A1 (en) * 2001-12-26 2004-12-02 Lockwood Jeffrey S. Wound vacuum therapy dressing kit
US20050037194A1 (en) * 2003-08-15 2005-02-17 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Thermoplastic polymers with thermally reversible and non-reversible linkages, and articles using same
US20050064021A1 (en) * 2001-11-20 2005-03-24 Rippon Mark Geoffrey Medical dressings
US20050085795A1 (en) * 2002-02-28 2005-04-21 Lockwood Jeffrey S. External catheter access to vacuum bandage
US20050137539A1 (en) * 2002-09-13 2005-06-23 Biggie John J. Closed wound drainage system
US20050228329A1 (en) * 2004-04-13 2005-10-13 Boehringer John R Wound contact device
US20060041247A1 (en) * 2002-08-21 2006-02-23 Robert Petrosenko Wound packing for preventing wound closure
US7004915B2 (en) * 2001-08-24 2006-02-28 Kci Licensing, Inc. Negative pressure assisted tissue treatment system
US7070584B2 (en) * 2001-02-20 2006-07-04 Kci Licensing, Inc. Biocompatible wound dressing
US20060155260A1 (en) * 2002-10-28 2006-07-13 Blott Patrick L Apparatus for aspirating, irrigating and cleansing wounds
US20060173253A1 (en) * 1999-04-06 2006-08-03 Kci Licensing, Inc. Systems and methods for detection of wound fluid blood and application of phototherapy in conjunction with reduced pressure wound treatment system
US20060189910A1 (en) * 2001-02-16 2006-08-24 Kci Licensing, Inc. Biocompatible wound dressing
US20060264796A1 (en) * 1995-09-05 2006-11-23 Argentum Medical, Llc Medical device
US20070055209A1 (en) * 2005-09-07 2007-03-08 Patel Harish A Self contained wound dressing apparatus
US20070185426A1 (en) * 2001-02-16 2007-08-09 Kci Licensing, Inc. Biocompatible wound dressing
US20070219532A1 (en) * 2005-07-14 2007-09-20 Boehringer Technologies, Lp Pump system for negative pressure wound therapy
US20080011368A1 (en) * 2006-04-25 2008-01-17 Singh Vinay K Inline swivel connection for multi-lumen tubing
US20080039763A1 (en) * 2002-12-31 2008-02-14 Sigurjonsson Gudmundur F Wound dressing
US20080076844A1 (en) * 2006-09-22 2008-03-27 The Dow Chemical Company Fibrillated polyolefin foam
US20080215020A1 (en) * 2007-01-22 2008-09-04 Reeves William H Apparatuses and methods for healing wounds
US20080300555A1 (en) * 2007-05-10 2008-12-04 Olson Jonathan S Reduced pressure wound dressing having a wound contact surface with columnar protrusions
US20090043268A1 (en) * 2007-08-06 2009-02-12 Eddy Patrick E Wound treatment system and suction regulator for use therewith
US20090254066A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2009-10-08 Keith Patrick Heaton Reduced pressure indicator for a reduced pressure source
US20090275922A1 (en) * 2008-05-02 2009-11-05 Richard Daniel John Coulthard Manually-actuated reduced pressure treatment system having regulated pressure capabilities
US20090306630A1 (en) * 2008-06-04 2009-12-10 Christopher Brian Locke Reduced-pressure, liquid-collection canister with multi-orientation filter
US7651484B2 (en) * 2006-02-06 2010-01-26 Kci Licensing, Inc. Systems and methods for improved connection to wound dressings in conjunction with reduced pressure wound treatment systems
US20100125258A1 (en) * 2008-11-14 2010-05-20 Richard Daniel John Coulthard Fluid pouch, system, and method for storing fluid from a tissue site
US20110230848A1 (en) * 2010-03-16 2011-09-22 Michael Manwaring Epithelialization methods, dressings, and systems
US20110288512A1 (en) * 2010-05-18 2011-11-24 Christopher Brian Locke Reduced-pressure medical systems and methods employing a moisture processing device
US20120016323A1 (en) * 2010-07-19 2012-01-19 Kci Licensing, Inc. Inflatable off-loading wound dressing assemblies, systems, and methods
US20120046624A1 (en) * 2010-08-18 2012-02-23 Christopher Brian Locke Reduced-pressure, multi-orientation, liquid-collection canister
US8172816B2 (en) * 2008-05-30 2012-05-08 Kci Licensing, Inc. Anisotropic drapes and systems

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6855135B2 (en) * 2000-11-29 2005-02-15 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Vacuum therapy and cleansing dressing for wounds
US6838589B2 (en) * 2003-02-19 2005-01-04 3M Innovative Properties Company Conformable wound dressing
KR20110058872A (en) * 2008-09-18 2011-06-01 케이씨아이 라이센싱 인코포레이티드 Therapy delivery systems and methods

Patent Citations (128)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2547758A (en) * 1949-01-05 1951-04-03 Wilmer B Keeling Instrument for treating the male urethra
US2632443A (en) * 1949-04-18 1953-03-24 Eleanor P Lesher Surgical dressing
US2682873A (en) * 1952-07-30 1954-07-06 Johnson & Johnson General purpose protective dressing
US2969057A (en) * 1957-11-04 1961-01-24 Brady Co W H Nematodic swab
US3367332A (en) * 1965-08-27 1968-02-06 Gen Electric Product and process for establishing a sterile area of skin
US3520300A (en) * 1967-03-15 1970-07-14 Amp Inc Surgical sponge and suction device
US3568675A (en) * 1968-08-30 1971-03-09 Clyde B Harvey Fistula and penetrating wound dressing
US3682180A (en) * 1970-06-08 1972-08-08 Coilform Co Inc Drain clip for surgical drain
US3648692A (en) * 1970-12-07 1972-03-14 Parke Davis & Co Medical-surgical dressing for burns and the like
US3826254A (en) * 1973-02-26 1974-07-30 Verco Ind Needle or catheter retaining appliance
US4096853A (en) * 1975-06-21 1978-06-27 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Device for the introduction of contrast medium into an anus praeter
US4245630A (en) * 1976-10-08 1981-01-20 T. J. Smith & Nephew, Ltd. Tearable composite strip of materials
US4080970A (en) * 1976-11-17 1978-03-28 Miller Thomas J Post-operative combination dressing and internal drain tube with external shield and tube connector
US4139004A (en) * 1977-02-17 1979-02-13 Gonzalez Jr Harry Bandage apparatus for treating burns
US4184510A (en) * 1977-03-15 1980-01-22 Fibra-Sonics, Inc. Valued device for controlling vacuum in surgery
US4165748A (en) * 1977-11-07 1979-08-28 Johnson Melissa C Catheter tube holder
US4256109A (en) * 1978-07-10 1981-03-17 Nichols Robert L Shut off valve for medical suction apparatus
US4275721A (en) * 1978-11-28 1981-06-30 Landstingens Inkopscentral Lic, Ekonomisk Forening Vein catheter bandage
US4382441A (en) * 1978-12-06 1983-05-10 Svedman Paul Device for treating tissues, for example skin
US4284079A (en) * 1979-06-28 1981-08-18 Adair Edwin Lloyd Method for applying a male incontinence device
US4261363A (en) * 1979-11-09 1981-04-14 C. R. Bard, Inc. Retention clips for body fluid drains
US4569348A (en) * 1980-02-22 1986-02-11 Velcro Usa Inc. Catheter tube holder strap
US4333468A (en) * 1980-08-18 1982-06-08 Geist Robert W Mesentery tube holder apparatus
US4465485A (en) * 1981-03-06 1984-08-14 Becton, Dickinson And Company Suction canister with unitary shut-off valve and filter features
US4392853A (en) * 1981-03-16 1983-07-12 Rudolph Muto Sterile assembly for protecting and fastening an indwelling device
US4373519A (en) * 1981-06-26 1983-02-15 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Composite wound dressing
US4392858A (en) * 1981-07-16 1983-07-12 Sherwood Medical Company Wound drainage device
US4608041A (en) * 1981-10-14 1986-08-26 Frese Nielsen Device for treatment of wounds in body tissue of patients by exposure to jets of gas
US4525166A (en) * 1981-11-21 1985-06-25 Intermedicat Gmbh Rolled flexible medical suction drainage device
US4525374A (en) * 1984-02-27 1985-06-25 Manresa, Inc. Treating hydrophobic filters to render them hydrophilic
US4897081A (en) * 1984-05-25 1990-01-30 Thermedics Inc. Percutaneous access device
US5215522A (en) * 1984-07-23 1993-06-01 Ballard Medical Products Single use medical aspirating device and method
US4664662A (en) * 1984-08-02 1987-05-12 Smith And Nephew Associated Companies Plc Wound dressing
US4826494A (en) * 1984-11-09 1989-05-02 Stryker Corporation Vacuum wound drainage system
US4655754A (en) * 1984-11-09 1987-04-07 Stryker Corporation Vacuum wound drainage system and lipids baffle therefor
US4605399A (en) * 1984-12-04 1986-08-12 Complex, Inc. Transdermal infusion device
US5037397A (en) * 1985-05-03 1991-08-06 Medical Distributors, Inc. Universal clamp
US4640688A (en) * 1985-08-23 1987-02-03 Mentor Corporation Urine collection catheter
US4758220A (en) * 1985-09-26 1988-07-19 Alcon Laboratories, Inc. Surgical cassette proximity sensing and latching apparatus
US4733659A (en) * 1986-01-17 1988-03-29 Seton Company Foam bandage
US4838883A (en) * 1986-03-07 1989-06-13 Nissho Corporation Urine-collecting device
US4906233A (en) * 1986-05-29 1990-03-06 Terumo Kabushiki Kaisha Method of securing a catheter body to a human skin surface
US4840187A (en) * 1986-09-11 1989-06-20 Bard Limited Sheath applicator
US4743232A (en) * 1986-10-06 1988-05-10 The Clinipad Corporation Package assembly for plastic film bandage
US4941882A (en) * 1987-03-14 1990-07-17 Smith And Nephew Associated Companies, P.L.C. Adhesive dressing for retaining a cannula on the skin
US5176663A (en) * 1987-12-02 1993-01-05 Pal Svedman Dressing having pad with compressibility limiting elements
US5018515A (en) * 1987-12-14 1991-05-28 The Kendall Company See through absorbent dressing
US4906240A (en) * 1988-02-01 1990-03-06 Matrix Medica, Inc. Adhesive-faced porous absorbent sheet and method of making same
US4985019A (en) * 1988-03-11 1991-01-15 Michelson Gary K X-ray marker
US4919654A (en) * 1988-08-03 1990-04-24 Kalt Medical Corporation IV clamp with membrane
US5086170A (en) * 1989-01-16 1992-02-04 Roussel Uclaf Process for the preparation of azabicyclo compounds
US5100396A (en) * 1989-04-03 1992-03-31 Zamierowski David S Fluidic connection system and method
US5527293A (en) * 1989-04-03 1996-06-18 Kinetic Concepts, Inc. Fastening system and method
US5298015A (en) * 1989-07-11 1994-03-29 Nippon Zeon Co., Ltd. Wound dressing having a porous structure
US5106629A (en) * 1989-10-20 1992-04-21 Ndm Acquisition Corp. Transparent hydrogel wound dressing
US5134994A (en) * 1990-02-12 1992-08-04 Say Sam L Field aspirator in a soft pack with externally mounted container
US5092858A (en) * 1990-03-20 1992-03-03 Becton, Dickinson And Company Liquid gelling agent distributor device
US5160315A (en) * 1991-04-05 1992-11-03 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Combined adhesive strip and transparent dressing delivery system
US5278100A (en) * 1991-11-08 1994-01-11 Micron Technology, Inc. Chemical vapor deposition technique for depositing titanium silicide on semiconductor wafers
US5645081A (en) * 1991-11-14 1997-07-08 Wake Forest University Method of treating tissue damage and apparatus for same
US5636643A (en) * 1991-11-14 1997-06-10 Wake Forest University Wound treatment employing reduced pressure
US5279550A (en) * 1991-12-19 1994-01-18 Gish Biomedical, Inc. Orthopedic autotransfusion system
US5844013A (en) * 1992-10-02 1998-12-01 Beiersdorf Ag Hydrophilic polyurethane gel foams, particularly for treating deep wounds, wound dressing based on hydrophilic polyurethane gel foams and method of manufacture
US6241747B1 (en) * 1993-05-03 2001-06-05 Quill Medical, Inc. Barbed Bodily tissue connector
US5489262A (en) * 1993-05-27 1996-02-06 New Dimensions In Medicine, Inc. Transparent hydrogel wound dressing with release tab
US5423737A (en) * 1993-05-27 1995-06-13 New Dimensions In Medicine, Inc. Transparent hydrogel wound dressing with release tab
US5437651A (en) * 1993-09-01 1995-08-01 Research Medical, Inc. Medical suction apparatus
US5356372A (en) * 1993-12-01 1994-10-18 Ludlow Corporation Occlusive pressure-reducing wound dressing
US5607388A (en) * 1994-06-16 1997-03-04 Hercules Incorporated Multi-purpose wound dressing
US20060264796A1 (en) * 1995-09-05 2006-11-23 Argentum Medical, Llc Medical device
US6201164B1 (en) * 1996-07-11 2001-03-13 Coloplast A/S Hydrocolloid wound gel
US20020128578A1 (en) * 1997-08-01 2002-09-12 3M Innovative Properties Company Medical article having fluid control film
US6420622B1 (en) * 1997-08-01 2002-07-16 3M Innovative Properties Company Medical article having fluid control film
US6553998B2 (en) * 1997-09-12 2003-04-29 Kci Licensing, Inc. Surgical drape and suction head for wound treatment
US6345623B1 (en) * 1997-09-12 2002-02-12 Keith Patrick Heaton Surgical drape and suction head for wound treatment
US6814079B2 (en) * 1997-09-12 2004-11-09 Kci Licensing, Inc. Surgical drape and suction head for wound treatment
US6071267A (en) * 1998-02-06 2000-06-06 Kinetic Concepts, Inc. Medical patient fluid management interface system and method
US20060173253A1 (en) * 1999-04-06 2006-08-03 Kci Licensing, Inc. Systems and methods for detection of wound fluid blood and application of phototherapy in conjunction with reduced pressure wound treatment system
US7947033B2 (en) * 1999-04-06 2011-05-24 Kci Licensing Inc. Systems and methods for detection of wound fluid blood and application of phototherapy in conjunction with reduced pressure wound treatment system
US20110196284A1 (en) * 1999-04-06 2011-08-11 Premnarayan Ganapathy Systems and methods for detection of wound fluid blood and application of phototherapy in conjunction with reduced pressure wound treatment system
US6566575B1 (en) * 2000-02-15 2003-05-20 3M Innovative Properties Company Patterned absorbent article for wound dressing
US20030232905A1 (en) * 2000-04-06 2003-12-18 Ives Christopher L. Pressure sensitive adhesive compositions
US20080243044A1 (en) * 2000-05-09 2008-10-02 Kenneth Hunt Abdominal wound dressing
US20040030304A1 (en) * 2000-05-09 2004-02-12 Kenneth Hunt Abdominal wound dressing
US20010043943A1 (en) * 2000-05-22 2001-11-22 Coffey Arthur C. Combination SIS and vacuum bandage and method
US6752794B2 (en) * 2000-11-29 2004-06-22 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Vacuum therapy and cleansing dressing for wounds
US20040064111A1 (en) * 2000-11-29 2004-04-01 Lockwood Jeffrey S. Vacuum therapy and cleansing dressing for wounds
US6685681B2 (en) * 2000-11-29 2004-02-03 Hill-Rom Services, Inc. Vacuum therapy and cleansing dressing for wounds
US20020077661A1 (en) * 2000-12-20 2002-06-20 Vahid Saadat Multi-barbed device for retaining tissue in apposition and methods of use
US20020132540A1 (en) * 2000-12-29 2002-09-19 Dave Soerens Absorbent, lubricious coating and articles coated therewith
US20070185426A1 (en) * 2001-02-16 2007-08-09 Kci Licensing, Inc. Biocompatible wound dressing
US20060189910A1 (en) * 2001-02-16 2006-08-24 Kci Licensing, Inc. Biocompatible wound dressing
US7070584B2 (en) * 2001-02-20 2006-07-04 Kci Licensing, Inc. Biocompatible wound dressing
US7004915B2 (en) * 2001-08-24 2006-02-28 Kci Licensing, Inc. Negative pressure assisted tissue treatment system
US20050064021A1 (en) * 2001-11-20 2005-03-24 Rippon Mark Geoffrey Medical dressings
US20040243073A1 (en) * 2001-12-26 2004-12-02 Lockwood Jeffrey S. Wound vacuum therapy dressing kit
US20050085795A1 (en) * 2002-02-28 2005-04-21 Lockwood Jeffrey S. External catheter access to vacuum bandage
US20060039982A1 (en) * 2002-04-12 2006-02-23 3M Innovative Properties Company Gel materials, medical articles, and methods
US20030203011A1 (en) * 2002-04-12 2003-10-30 3M Innovative Properties Company Gel materials, medical articles, and methods
US20060041247A1 (en) * 2002-08-21 2006-02-23 Robert Petrosenko Wound packing for preventing wound closure
US7520872B2 (en) * 2002-09-13 2009-04-21 Neogen Technologies, Inc. Closed wound drainage system
US20050137539A1 (en) * 2002-09-13 2005-06-23 Biggie John J. Closed wound drainage system
US20060155260A1 (en) * 2002-10-28 2006-07-13 Blott Patrick L Apparatus for aspirating, irrigating and cleansing wounds
US20080039763A1 (en) * 2002-12-31 2008-02-14 Sigurjonsson Gudmundur F Wound dressing
US20050037194A1 (en) * 2003-08-15 2005-02-17 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Thermoplastic polymers with thermally reversible and non-reversible linkages, and articles using same
US20050228329A1 (en) * 2004-04-13 2005-10-13 Boehringer John R Wound contact device
US20070219532A1 (en) * 2005-07-14 2007-09-20 Boehringer Technologies, Lp Pump system for negative pressure wound therapy
US20070055209A1 (en) * 2005-09-07 2007-03-08 Patel Harish A Self contained wound dressing apparatus
US20100106118A1 (en) * 2006-02-06 2010-04-29 Keith Patrick Heaton Systems and methods for improved connection to wound dressings in conjunction with reduced pressure wound treatment systems
US7651484B2 (en) * 2006-02-06 2010-01-26 Kci Licensing, Inc. Systems and methods for improved connection to wound dressings in conjunction with reduced pressure wound treatment systems
US20080011368A1 (en) * 2006-04-25 2008-01-17 Singh Vinay K Inline swivel connection for multi-lumen tubing
US8002313B2 (en) * 2006-04-25 2011-08-23 Kci Licensing, Inc. Inline swivel connection for multi-lumen tubing
US20110301557A1 (en) * 2006-04-25 2011-12-08 Kci Licensing, Inc. Inline swivel connection for multi-lumen tubing
US20080076844A1 (en) * 2006-09-22 2008-03-27 The Dow Chemical Company Fibrillated polyolefin foam
US20090254066A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2009-10-08 Keith Patrick Heaton Reduced pressure indicator for a reduced pressure source
US20080215020A1 (en) * 2007-01-22 2008-09-04 Reeves William H Apparatuses and methods for healing wounds
US20080300555A1 (en) * 2007-05-10 2008-12-04 Olson Jonathan S Reduced pressure wound dressing having a wound contact surface with columnar protrusions
US8057447B2 (en) * 2007-05-10 2011-11-15 Kci Licensing Inc. Reduced pressure wound dressing having a wound contact surface with columnar protrusions
US20090043268A1 (en) * 2007-08-06 2009-02-12 Eddy Patrick E Wound treatment system and suction regulator for use therewith
US20090275922A1 (en) * 2008-05-02 2009-11-05 Richard Daniel John Coulthard Manually-actuated reduced pressure treatment system having regulated pressure capabilities
US8172816B2 (en) * 2008-05-30 2012-05-08 Kci Licensing, Inc. Anisotropic drapes and systems
US8172818B2 (en) * 2008-06-04 2012-05-08 Kci Licensing, Inc. Reduced-pressure, liquid-collection canister with multi-orientation filter
US20090306630A1 (en) * 2008-06-04 2009-12-10 Christopher Brian Locke Reduced-pressure, liquid-collection canister with multi-orientation filter
US20100125258A1 (en) * 2008-11-14 2010-05-20 Richard Daniel John Coulthard Fluid pouch, system, and method for storing fluid from a tissue site
US20110230848A1 (en) * 2010-03-16 2011-09-22 Michael Manwaring Epithelialization methods, dressings, and systems
US20110288512A1 (en) * 2010-05-18 2011-11-24 Christopher Brian Locke Reduced-pressure medical systems and methods employing a moisture processing device
US20120016323A1 (en) * 2010-07-19 2012-01-19 Kci Licensing, Inc. Inflatable off-loading wound dressing assemblies, systems, and methods
US20120046624A1 (en) * 2010-08-18 2012-02-23 Christopher Brian Locke Reduced-pressure, multi-orientation, liquid-collection canister

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110125113A1 (en) * 2008-06-23 2011-05-26 Carmeli Adahan Tissue enclosure

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20140107600A1 (en) 2014-04-17 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8241261B2 (en) Super-absorbent, reduced-pressure wound dressings and systems
US8114126B2 (en) Modular, reduced-pressure, wound-closure systems and methods
US8814842B2 (en) Delivery-and-fluid-storage bridges for use with reduced-pressure systems
US20100160876A1 (en) Reduced-pressure wound treatment systems and methods employing manifold structures
US20100121286A1 (en) Reduced-pressure, wound-treatment dressings and systems
US8158844B2 (en) Limited-access, reduced-pressure systems and methods
US20100125259A1 (en) Dynamic, reduced-pressure treatment systems and methods
US20100160874A1 (en) Reduced-pressure wound treatment systems and methods employing microstrain-inducing manifolds
US20100069858A1 (en) Laminar dressings, systems, and methods for applying reduced pressure at a tissue site
US20100305526A1 (en) Reduced-pressure treatment systems and methods employing hydrogel reservoir members
US20100268128A1 (en) Reduced-pressure treatment systems and methods employing a variable cover
US20090054856A1 (en) Reduced-pressure system and method employing a gasket
US20080208171A1 (en) Device and method for removing edema
US20110054422A1 (en) Re-epithelialization wound dressings and systems
US20130066285A1 (en) Reduced-pressure systems and methods employing a leak-detection member
US20130030394A1 (en) Systems and methods for treating a tissue site with reduced pressure involving a reduced-pressure interface having a cutting element
US20120302979A1 (en) Wound healing system using positive pressure to promote granulation at a tissue site
US20120209226A1 (en) Reduced-pressure dressings, systems, and methods for use with linear wounds
US20120123358A1 (en) Systems and methods for managing reduced pressure at a plurality of wound sites
US20110224633A1 (en) Reduced-pressure dressing connection pads, systems, and methods
US20120143113A1 (en) Wound healing apparatus for promoting granulation and epithelialisation at a tissue site
US8486032B2 (en) Reduced-pressure treatment systems and methods employing debridement mechanisms
US8313449B2 (en) Foot manifolds, apparatuses, systems, and methods for applying reduced pressure to a tissue site on a foot
WO2010017484A2 (en) Reduced-pressure treatment systems with reservoir control
US20130096536A1 (en) System and apparatus for treating a tissue site having an in-line canister

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: KCI LICENSING, INC., TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:LOCKE, CHRISTOPHER BRIAN;ROBINSON, TIMOTHY MARK;COULTHARD, RICHARD DANIEL JOHN;REEL/FRAME:035980/0758

Effective date: 20091102