US20110047698A1 - Weighted blanket - Google Patents

Weighted blanket Download PDF

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Publication number
US20110047698A1
US20110047698A1 US12550917 US55091709A US2011047698A1 US 20110047698 A1 US20110047698 A1 US 20110047698A1 US 12550917 US12550917 US 12550917 US 55091709 A US55091709 A US 55091709A US 2011047698 A1 US2011047698 A1 US 2011047698A1
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Prior art keywords
weighted
blanket
liner
plurality
material
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Abandoned
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US12550917
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Eileen Linda Parker
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Eileen Linda Parker
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47GHOUSEHOLD OR TABLE EQUIPMENT
    • A47G9/00Bed-covers; Counterpanes; Travelling rugs; Sleeping rugs; Sleeping bags; Pillows
    • A47G9/02Bed linen; Blankets; Counterpanes
    • A47G9/0207Blankets; Duvets

Abstract

A weighted blanket includes an inner liner that is filled with weighted filler material and closed to limit movement of the weighted material within the inner liner. In some embodiments, the inner liner is securely sewn within an outer liner to prevent movement of the inner liner within the outer liner, thereby preventing the inner liner from becoming detached from the outer liner.

Description

    TECHNICAL BACKGROUND
  • The disclosure relates generally to blankets. More particularly, the disclosure relates to blankets having weighted filler material.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Autism spectrum disorders affect many children, adolescents, and adults. A number of persons who are affected by autism spectrum disorders also experience difficulties relaxing and sleeping. Sleep difficulties can be caused by various factors, including, for example, serotonin imbalance, insomnia, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), restless leg syndrome (RLS), and various other geriatric and psychiatric conditions. Other conditions, such as fibromyalgia and Parkinson's Disease, may also contribute to sleep difficulties. Various interventions have been used to alleviate sleep difficulties in individuals with autism spectrum disorders, such as white noise and melatonin supplements.
  • Weighted blankets have also been used to calm individuals with autism spectrum disorders and help them sleep. Such blankets can be made from a variety of materials and are available in many shapes, sizes, and designs. Weighted blankets apply deep pressure to the individual's body, helping him or her to relax and inducing sleep.
  • While weighted blankets have been somewhat effective in calming individuals with autism spectrum disorders, conventional designs have been characterized by a number of drawbacks. Some conventional weighted blankets are characterized by uneven weight distribution or uneven pressure points due to, for example, weights that are spaced too far apart. In addition, the craftsmanship of some conventional weighted blankets can result in certain disadvantages. For example, in some cases, the thread that is used to sew the blankets can come loose, particularly when people pick at it. This can cause the filling to fall out of the blanket relatively easily. Wide stitching can also facilitate the filling falling out of the blanket.
  • In addition, in some conventional weighted blankets, the outer covering is only anchored to the blanket along the edges of the blanket. As a result, the outer covering can shift. Over time and with repeated use, the outer covering can become detached from the blanket. Besides damaging the exterior of the blanket, this can cause the filling to fall out of the blanket as well.
  • SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • According to various example embodiments, a weighted blanket includes an inner liner that is filled with weighted filler material and closed to limit movement of the weighted material within the inner liner. In some embodiments, the inner liner is securely sewn within an outer liner to prevent movement of the inner liner within the outer liner, thereby preventing the inner liner from becoming detached from the outer liner.
  • One embodiment is directed to a blanket comprising a weighted material. An inner liner is disposed surrounding the weighted material and closed to limit movement of the weighted material within the inner liner. An outer liner substantially surrounds and is attached to the inner liner.
  • In another embodiment, a blanket includes a liner having a plurality of pockets formed therein. The blanket also includes a plurality of weighted objects. Each weighted object is disposed within a pocket formed in the inner liner and is positioned to apply pressure to a human body when the blanket is in use.
  • Still another embodiment is directed to a method of manufacturing a blanket. A plurality of inner liners are provided. Each inner liner has a first end portion, a second end portion located distally from the first end portion, and a length. For each inner liner, the following steps are performed. The first end portion is closed to form a compartment. A weighted filler material is introduced into the compartment. The second end portion is closed to secure the weighted filler material within the compartment, thereby forming a tube. After these steps are performed for each inner liner, an outer liner is provided. The outer liner surrounds the tubes formed by the inner liners. The tubes formed by the inner liners are attached within the outer liner.
  • Various embodiments may provide certain advantages. For instance, certain embodiments described herein may provide a more even distribution of weighted filler material as compared with conventional weighted blankets. Further, with the inner lining securely attached to the outer lining, product safety is enhanced. In addition, certain embodiments may provide sensory deprivation or stimulation via the sound or absence of sound, depending on the choice of filling material, or via a sensory calming or stimulating experience imparted by the choice of fabric for the outer liner.
  • Additional objects, advantages, and features will become apparent from the following description and the claims that follow, considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a plan view of an example weighted blanket according to one embodiment.
  • FIG. 2 is a plan view of a tube forming part of the weighted blanket of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 is a flow diagram illustrating an example process for manufacturing the blanket of FIG. 1 according to another embodiment.
  • FIG. 4 is a plan view of another example weighted blanket according to still another embodiment.
  • DESCRIPTION OF VARIOUS EMBODIMENTS
  • According to various embodiments, a weighted blanket includes an inner liner that is filled with weighted filler material and closed to limit movement of the weighted material within the inner liner. In some embodiments, the inner liner is securely sewn within an outer liner to prevent movement of the inner liner within the outer liner, thereby preventing the inner liner from becoming detached from the outer liner.
  • The blanket can be manufactured in a variety of thicknesses and weights and from any of a variety of fabrics and materials. In one embodiment, the weighted filler material is filled in tubes, which are sewn at regular intervals and inserted into an outer liner or covering. The blanket is designed to provide a relatively uniform weight distribution over the body of the user to produce a calming effect similar to a hug. Various aspects of the blanket's construction, design, sound, fabric choice, feel, and pattern may be designed to create a sense of either calm and harmony or stimulation for people with insomnia, sensory processing disorder, autism spectrum disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, or other conditions that can contribute to sleep difficulties. The blanket may also be designed to promote a feeling of calm in people without these disorders.
  • Various embodiments disclosed herein may offer certain advantages relative to known weighted blankets because the weighted material is distributed evenly. In addition, in some embodiments, industrial strength thread is used to sew the inner liner to the outer covering, thus providing a secure attachment that substantially prevents movement of the inner liner within the outer covering, prevents the filler material from escaping, and promotes product safety. The durability of the blanket is also enhanced, such that the blanket is machine washer and dryer safe.
  • While not required, certain embodiments may provide sensory deprivation or stimulation via the sound or absence of sound, depending on the choice of filling material, or via a sensory calming or stimulating experience imparted by the choice of fabric for the outer liner.
  • In the following description, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of various embodiments. It will be apparent to one skilled in the art that some embodiments may be practiced without some or all of these specific details. In other instances, well known components and process steps have not been described in detail.
  • Referring now to the drawings, FIG. 1 is a plan view of an example weighted blanket 100 according to one embodiment. The weighted blanket 100 includes an outer liner or covering 102, which is preferably machine washable and dryer safe. The outer covering 102 may be made of a fabric that is chosen for either a sensory limiting or a sensory stimulating effect. For example, the outer covering 102 may consist of one or more layers of natural materials, such as cotton or wool, and/or synthetic materials, such as plastic or TEFLON® brand polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Some materials that provide low sensory stimulation include, for example, polished cotton, fleece, and chenille. By contrast, some materials that provide high sensory stimulation include corduroy and woven plastic. The fabric used for the outer covering 102 may either warm or cool the user's body. Some fabrics that warm the user's body include, for example, fleece, polar fleece, and faux fur. Materials that cool the user's body include, for example, polyester, cotton, and woven plastic.
  • The outer covering 102 may have any of a variety of visual characteristics that are selected for either sensory limitation or sensory stimulation. Some examples include, without limitation, solid colors that provide little visual stimulation, simple repeating patterns, evenly spaced lines, and random patterns that are visually stimulating. Solid colors may have high or low saturation and/or chroma values. Patterns may be symmetrical or asymmetrical. In some embodiments, words, letters, and/or numbers may be employed for stimulation, particularly if the words, letters, and/or numbers are somehow related to one another, e.g., as digits of π (pi). In addition, the outer covering 102 may have fabric, toys, or other materials attached to it for hand manipulation.
  • The outer covering 102 is sewn at regular intervals across either the length of the blanket 100 or the width of the blanket 100, as shown in FIG. 1, to form a number of compartments 104. The outer covering 102 may be sewn with industrial strength thread, e.g., T-40 strength, to promote durability of the blanket 100. Preferably, the stitching is close, e.g., performed with a sewing machine thread count dial set at approximately 2.0 to 3.5. It will be appreciated that, while FIG. 1 depicts nine compartments 104 formed in the outer covering 102, more or fewer compartments 104 may be formed.
  • A number of inner liners are sewn to form tubes 106 that are inserted in the compartments 104 such that the outer covering 102 at least substantially surrounds the tubes 106. With the outer covering 102 substantially surrounding the tubes 106, the tubes 106 may be more securely retained within the blanket 100 as compared with certain conventional weighted blankets, in which the weights are only attached on one side to the blanket surface. The tubes 106 are filled with weighted material (not shown in FIG. 1) and are closed to limit movement of the weighted material within the tubes 106. For example, the tubes 106 may be sewn closed. A seam allowance portion may be provided at one or both ends of each tube 106. While not shown in FIG. 1 and not required, a comfort filling may also be inserted in the compartments 104 between the tubes 106 and the outer covering 102. The comfort filling may consist of batting or of another layer of the same material used to form the tubes 106. Non-limiting examples of materials suitable for the comfort filling include PRIMALOFT® brand synthetic insulation, polyester, cotton, hemp, bamboo, and wool.
  • After the tubes 106 are inserted in the compartments 104, they are attached to the outer covering 102. For example, the tubes 106 may be sewn to the outer covering 102. In some embodiments, the seam allowance portions of the tubes 106, if present, are sewn to the outer covering 102.
  • FIG. 2 is a plan view of a tube 106 forming part of the weighted blanket 100 of FIG. 1. As illustrated in FIG. 1, the weighted blanket 100 includes a number of tubes 106. Each tube 106 is formed from an inner liner material 202, which can be any of a variety of fabrics or textiles. Preferably, the inner liner material 202 is strong and pliable. Non-limiting examples of suitable materials include muslin, woven plastic, polyester, rayon, and TEFLON® brand polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The inner liner material 202 is closed at one end portion 204 to leave a first seam allowance portion 206 between a seam 208 and an edge 210 of the inner liner material 202. The first seam allowance portion 206 may measure approximately ½″ between the seam 208 and the edge 210 of the inner liner material 202. Closing the inner liner material 202 at the end portion 204 forms a compartment in the tube 106. Pouches or bags of weighted material 212 are introduced into the compartment, with additional seams 214 being sewn at intervals along the length of the tube 206 to define additional compartments to accommodate additional pouches or bags of weighted material 212. A second end portion 216 of the inner liner material 202 is closed to leave a second seam allowance portion 218 between a seam 220 and an edge 222 of the inner liner material 202. Like the first seam allowance portion 206, the second seam allowance portion 218 may also measure approximately ½″ between the seam 220 and the edge 222 of the inner liner material 202.
  • Any of a variety of materials can be used for the weighted material 212. For example, the weighted material 212 can consist of plastic beads, pellets, or balls that are designed to be substantially inaudible when they are brought into contact with one another. In other embodiments, by contrast, the weighted material 212 can consist of plastic beads, rocks, metal balls, or other materials that are designed to produce a clinking or cracking sound that is mid- to low-toned. Particular examples of materials that can be used for the weighted material 212 include, without limitation, plastic resin, such as polypropylene or polyethylene, stone, ceramic, and stainless steel.
  • The weighted material 212 can be distributed either uniformly or nonuniformly across compartments. In some embodiments, for example, the bag or pouch in each compartment has the same amount of weighted material 212. On the other hand, in other embodiments, the weighted material 212 can be of varying sizes and weights so as to produce different pressure points on the user's body.
  • FIG. 3 is a flow diagram illustrating an example process 300 for manufacturing the weighted blanket 100 of FIG. 1 according to another embodiment. At a step 302, the inner liner material 202 is provided. The inner liner material 202 is typically provided as a flat sheet, which is then folded and sewn to form the tube 106. As a particular non-limiting example, the inner liner material 202 may be provided as a flat sheet measuring approximately 58″ by 9″. The sheet is then folded and sewn along the long edge to form a tube that is approximately 58″ by 4½″. At this point, the tube 106 is open at both ends. For each tube 106 to be made, the end portion 204 of the inner liner material 202 is closed at a step 304. For example, the end portion 204 may be sewn. In some embodiments, the tube 106 is turned inside out before the end portion 204 is sewn so that the seam along the long edge of the tube 106 is located on the inside of the tube 106. At a step 306, the compartment formed by closing the end portion 204 of the inner liner material 202 is filled with weighted material 212. The compartment is then sewn with another seam 214. If enough room remains along the length of the tube 106 to form another compartment, another compartment is formed and the process returns to step 306, at which the newly formed compartment is filled and sewn.
  • The process of filling and sewing compartments continues until there is insufficient room remaining along the length of the tube 106 to form another compartment. At that point, the process continues to a step 308, at which the end portion 216 of the inner liner material 202 is closed, thereby completing the process of filling one tube 106. As with the outer covering 102, the inner liner material 202 is preferably sewn with industrial strength thread using close stitching, e.g., with a sewing machine thread count dial set to approximately 2.0 to 3.5. This stitch length promotes durability and makes it more difficult to pick at the threads, which is a relatively common issue related to persons living with autism spectrum disorders.
  • The above process is performed for each tube 106 to be formed. When all of the tubes 106 have been formed, they are inserted into the compartments 104 formed in the outer covering 102. The tubes 106 are then attached within the outer covering 102 at a step 310. By way of example, the seam allowance portions 206 and 218 may be sewn to the outer covering 102.
  • FIG. 4 is a plan view of another example weighted blanket 400 according to still another embodiment. The weighted blanket 400 includes an outer covering 402 that is made of a strong but lightweight fabric, such as olefin, woven or netted plastic, or TEFLON® brand polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) sewn at regular intervals across its length and width so as to form compartments 404 that are substantially square in shape. During the sewing process, a weighted filler 406 is introduced into each compartment 404. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the weighted fillers 406 are implemented as substantially spherical balls formed from metal, plastic, or other man-made materials. Alternatively, rocks or other natural materials can be used. In use, the weighted fillers create pressure points on the body of the user.
  • As demonstrated by the foregoing discussion, various embodiments may provide certain advantages. For instance, certain embodiments described herein may provide a more even distribution of weighted filler material as compared with conventional weighted blankets. Further, with the inner lining securely attached to the outer lining, product safety is enhanced. In addition, certain embodiments may provide sensory deprivation or stimulation via the sound or absence of sound, depending on the choice of filling material, or via a sensory calming or stimulating experience imparted by the choice of fabric for the outer liner.
  • It will be understood by those who practice the embodiments described herein and those skilled in the art that various modifications and improvements may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the disclosed embodiments. The scope of protection afforded is to be determined solely by the claims and by the breadth of interpretation allowed by law.

Claims (20)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A blanket comprising:
    a weighted material;
    an inner liner disposed surrounding the weighted material and closed to limit movement of the weighted material within the inner liner; and
    an outer liner substantially surrounding and attached to the inner liner.
  2. 2. The blanket of claim 1, wherein the weighted material comprises a weighted sphere.
  3. 3. The blanket of claim 2, wherein the weighted sphere is formed from a material selected from the group consisting of metal, plastic, glass, wood, and stone.
  4. 4. The blanket of claim 1, wherein the weighted material comprises a weighted tube.
  5. 5. The blanket of claim 4, wherein the weighted tube has a length and sewn at intervals along its length to form a plurality of compartments into which a weighted filling is introduced, and wherein the weighted tube is sewn to the outer liner.
  6. 6. The blanket of claim 5, wherein the weighted filling comprises a plurality of beads that are substantially inaudible when brought into contact with one another.
  7. 7. The blanket of claim 5, wherein the weighted filling comprises a plurality of beads that, when brought into contact with one another, produce audible sound.
  8. 8. The blanket of claim 5, wherein the weighted filling introduced into different compartments have different weights.
  9. 9. The blanket of claim 1, wherein the weighted material comprises a weighted pouch.
  10. 10. A blanket comprising:
    a liner having a plurality of pockets formed therein; and
    a plurality of weighted objects, each weighted object disposed within a pocket formed in the inner liner and positioned to apply pressure to a human body when the blanket is in use.
  11. 11. The blanket of claim 10, wherein the weighted objects are substantially spherical.
  12. 12. The blanket of claim 10, wherein the weighted objects are formed from a material selected from the group consisting of metal, plastic, glass, wood, and stone.
  13. 13. The blanket of claim 10, wherein the liner is formed from a material selected from the group consisting of olefin, plastic, and TEFLON® brand polytetrafluoroethylene.
  14. 14. A method of manufacturing a blanket, the method comprising:
    providing a plurality of inner liners each having a first end portion, a second end portion located distally from the first end portion, and a length;
    for each inner liner, closing the first end portion to form a compartment;
    for each inner liner, introducing a weighted filler material into the compartment;
    for each inner liner, closing the second end portion to secure the weighted filler material within the compartment, thereby forming a tube;
    providing an outer liner surrounding the tubes formed by the inner liners; and
    attaching the tubes formed by the inner liners within the outer liner.
  15. 15. The method of claim 14, further comprising dividing the weighted filler material into a plurality of portions of weighted filler material and, for each inner liner, sewing the each inner liner at intervals along its length to form a plurality of compartments and introducing a portion of the weighted filler material into each of the plurality of compartments.
  16. 16. The method of claim 15, wherein the portions of weighted filler material introduced into different compartments have different weights.
  17. 17. The method of claim 14, wherein the weighted filler material comprises a plurality of beads that are substantially inaudible when brought into contact with one another.
  18. 18. The method of claim 14, wherein the weighted filler material comprises a plurality of beads that, when brought into contact with one another, produce audible sound.
  19. 19. The method of claim 14, further comprising sewing the outer liner at intervals to form a plurality of partitions to receive the tubes formed by the inner liners.
  20. 20. The method of claim 14, further comprising, for each inner liner, providing unfilled portions at the first and second end portions, and wherein attaching the tubes formed by the inner liners within the outer liner comprises sewing the unfilled portions to the outer liner.
US12550917 2009-08-31 2009-08-31 Weighted blanket Abandoned US20110047698A1 (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2014116163A1 (en) * 2013-01-25 2014-07-31 Novista Care of Sweden AB Weight cover
WO2014166557A1 (en) * 2013-04-09 2014-10-16 Protac A/S Blanket with channels filled with replaceable weight bags for individualized therapeutic treatment
DK178030B1 (en) * 2014-03-26 2015-03-30 Den Erhvervsdrivende Fond Samrådet Weight Duvet
DE202017104394U1 (en) 2017-07-24 2017-08-24 Kathrin Hamm Weight duvet
WO2018013025A1 (en) * 2016-07-13 2018-01-18 Novista Of Sweden Ab Weight cover with spherical elements

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US4924541A (en) * 1987-03-10 1990-05-15 Jitsuo Inagaki Bed pad, an automobile seat pad, a pillow or a similar cushionlike item
US5023970A (en) * 1988-03-28 1991-06-18 Tesch Guenter Bed cover
US5653195A (en) * 1993-01-18 1997-08-05 Promat Ltd. Animal mattress
US5706535A (en) * 1994-06-14 1998-01-13 Takashima Co., Ltd. Bedding articles with pockets containing deodorizer elements
US6058535A (en) * 1998-12-14 2000-05-09 Firkins, Jr.; Lester D. Universal sport seat
US6161239A (en) * 2000-01-31 2000-12-19 Grazel; Regina Infant positioning device
US6902792B2 (en) * 2003-05-19 2005-06-07 Swei Mu Wang Pad structure
US20060016005A1 (en) * 2004-07-24 2006-01-26 Roda Ha N Weighted Swaddling Blanket
US20060174410A1 (en) * 2001-02-26 2006-08-10 Mastandrea James C Jr Weighted blanket
USD560947S1 (en) * 2003-04-22 2008-02-05 Kreucher Daniel A Combined portable load-distributing apparatus and upholstery protector
US7353773B2 (en) * 2006-03-22 2008-04-08 Aaron Lamstein Pet bed with chopped memory foam filler
US20090100568A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2009-04-23 Judd Erin M Weighted article
US20090149698A1 (en) * 2007-12-08 2009-06-11 Tastard Cynthia L Weighted lap pad with sensory attachments
US7647657B2 (en) * 2007-02-09 2010-01-19 Pacific Coast Feather Co. Domed comforter

Patent Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4924541A (en) * 1987-03-10 1990-05-15 Jitsuo Inagaki Bed pad, an automobile seat pad, a pillow or a similar cushionlike item
US5023970A (en) * 1988-03-28 1991-06-18 Tesch Guenter Bed cover
US5653195A (en) * 1993-01-18 1997-08-05 Promat Ltd. Animal mattress
US5706535A (en) * 1994-06-14 1998-01-13 Takashima Co., Ltd. Bedding articles with pockets containing deodorizer elements
US6058535A (en) * 1998-12-14 2000-05-09 Firkins, Jr.; Lester D. Universal sport seat
US6161239A (en) * 2000-01-31 2000-12-19 Grazel; Regina Infant positioning device
US20060174410A1 (en) * 2001-02-26 2006-08-10 Mastandrea James C Jr Weighted blanket
USD560947S1 (en) * 2003-04-22 2008-02-05 Kreucher Daniel A Combined portable load-distributing apparatus and upholstery protector
US6902792B2 (en) * 2003-05-19 2005-06-07 Swei Mu Wang Pad structure
US20060016005A1 (en) * 2004-07-24 2006-01-26 Roda Ha N Weighted Swaddling Blanket
US7353773B2 (en) * 2006-03-22 2008-04-08 Aaron Lamstein Pet bed with chopped memory foam filler
US7647657B2 (en) * 2007-02-09 2010-01-19 Pacific Coast Feather Co. Domed comforter
US20090100568A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2009-04-23 Judd Erin M Weighted article
US7870623B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2011-01-18 Judd Erin M Weighted article
US20090149698A1 (en) * 2007-12-08 2009-06-11 Tastard Cynthia L Weighted lap pad with sensory attachments

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2014116163A1 (en) * 2013-01-25 2014-07-31 Novista Care of Sweden AB Weight cover
US9956129B2 (en) 2013-01-25 2018-05-01 Novista Of Sweden Ab Weight cover
WO2014166557A1 (en) * 2013-04-09 2014-10-16 Protac A/S Blanket with channels filled with replaceable weight bags for individualized therapeutic treatment
DK178030B1 (en) * 2014-03-26 2015-03-30 Den Erhvervsdrivende Fond Samrådet Weight Duvet
WO2018013025A1 (en) * 2016-07-13 2018-01-18 Novista Of Sweden Ab Weight cover with spherical elements
DE202017104394U1 (en) 2017-07-24 2017-08-24 Kathrin Hamm Weight duvet

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