US20110045306A1 - Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same - Google Patents

Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110045306A1
US20110045306A1 US12934088 US93408809A US2011045306A1 US 20110045306 A1 US20110045306 A1 US 20110045306A1 US 12934088 US12934088 US 12934088 US 93408809 A US93408809 A US 93408809A US 2011045306 A1 US2011045306 A1 US 2011045306A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
major surface
base layer
polymeric material
layer
thermoformable substrate
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Granted
Application number
US12934088
Other versions
US8551279B2 (en )
Inventor
Michael A. Johnson
Frank A. Brandys
Kent E. Nielsen
Charlie C. Ho
Vijay Rajamani
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
3M Innovative Properties Co
Original Assignee
3M Innovative Properties Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/40Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin comprising polyurethanes
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C43/00Compression moulding, i.e. applying external pressure to flow the moulding material; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C43/22Compression moulding, i.e. applying external pressure to flow the moulding material; Apparatus therefor of articles of indefinite length
    • B29C43/28Compression moulding, i.e. applying external pressure to flow the moulding material; Apparatus therefor of articles of indefinite length incorporating preformed parts or layers, e.g. compression moulding around inserts or for coating articles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C43/00Compression moulding, i.e. applying external pressure to flow the moulding material; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C43/22Compression moulding, i.e. applying external pressure to flow the moulding material; Apparatus therefor of articles of indefinite length
    • B29C43/30Making multilayered or multicoloured articles
    • B29C43/305Making multilayered articles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C43/00Compression moulding, i.e. applying external pressure to flow the moulding material; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C43/32Component parts, details or accessories; Auxiliary operations
    • B29C43/36Moulds for making articles of definite length, i.e. discrete articles
    • B29C43/3697Moulds for making articles of definite length, i.e. discrete articles comprising rollers or belts cooperating with non-rotating mould parts
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C67/00Shaping techniques not covered by groups B29C39/00 - B29C65/00, B29C70/00 or B29C73/00
    • B29C67/24Shaping techniques not covered by groups B29C39/00 - B29C65/00, B29C70/00 or B29C73/00 characterised by the choice of material
    • B29C67/246Moulding high reactive monomers or prepolymers, e.g. by reaction injection moulding [RIM], liquid injection moulding [LIM]
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/06Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin as the main or only constituent of a layer, which is next to another layer of the same or of a different material
    • B32B27/08Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin as the main or only constituent of a layer, which is next to another layer of the same or of a different material of synthetic resin
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B27/00Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin
    • B32B27/32Layered products comprising a layer of synthetic resin comprising polyolefins
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B37/00Methods or apparatus for laminating, e.g. by curing or by ultrasonic bonding
    • B32B37/14Methods or apparatus for laminating, e.g. by curing or by ultrasonic bonding characterised by the properties of the layers
    • B32B37/24Methods or apparatus for laminating, e.g. by curing or by ultrasonic bonding characterised by the properties of the layers with at least one layer not being coherent before laminating, e.g. made up from granular material sprinkled onto a substrate
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B38/00Ancillary operations in connection with laminating processes
    • B32B2038/0052Other operations not otherwise provided for
    • B32B2038/0076Curing, vulcanising, cross-linking
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2250/00Layers arrangement
    • B32B2250/022 layers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2250/00Layers arrangement
    • B32B2250/033 layers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2307/00Properties of the layers or laminate
    • B32B2307/40Properties of the layers or laminate having particular optical properties
    • B32B2307/402Coloured
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2307/00Properties of the layers or laminate
    • B32B2307/70Other properties
    • B32B2307/738Thermoformability
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2605/00Vehicles
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/11Methods of delaminating, per se; i.e., separating at bonding face
    • Y10T156/1168Gripping and pulling work apart during delaminating
    • Y10T156/1195Delaminating from release surface
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24628Nonplanar uniform thickness material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24802Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/31504Composite [nonstructural laminate]
    • Y10T428/31551Of polyamidoester [polyurethane, polyisocyanate, polycarbamate, etc.]

Abstract

Multilayer articles comprising a thermoformable substrate, a base layer and an optional transparent protective layer. Methods of making and paint film composites, and shaped articles made thereby, are also disclosed.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • It is common practice to decorate the surface of manufactured articles to create an aesthetically pleasing look for the product. This has traditionally been accomplished through the use of liquid paints and clear coats, typically containing solvents that evaporate from the paint leaving behind the solids in the form of a uniform film that decorates the surface of the article.
  • Traditional vehicle assembly methods typically include a spray painting step to paint and/or coat visible vehicle parts and provide a protective and aesthetic appealing outer surface. However, the process of spray painting is time-consuming and generally involves volatile organic solvents that present special handling and/or environmental issues.
  • The transportation industry has sought to reduce solvents in vehicle assembly plants through the development and use of decorative films, known in the art as “paint films” and “paint protection films”. The original idea behind paint film was to utilize a conventional paint, which would simply be coated onto a liner and dried. The liner would then be releasably removed from the paint film which would then be applied to, for example, a three-dimensionally shaped vehicle body part. In order to improve the appearance of paints, a transparent clear coat (commonly known as a clear coat) is known to be applied onto the colored paint (commonly known as a base coat). Similarly, paint films may have a transparent clear layer disposed on a color layer. Paint protection films have a transparent clear layer, typically in combination with an adhesive layer.
  • However, achieving a high quality application (for example, free of wrinkles and/or puckers) remains a serious concern with paint films and paint protection films, especially if applied to large or severely contoured surfaces.
  • There are two predominant techniques used to manufacture paint films and paint protection films: (1) solution-casting; and (2) extrusion. Each of these processes typically requires the use of elevated temperature (120° C. to 250° C. or more) to either evaporate the solvent (solution casting) or to melt the polymer (extrusion). Such temperatures are prone to thermally inducing shifts in color and other appearance properties of paint films, making color and appearance matching difficult to achieve.
  • High gloss and high image clarity are among the most common requirements for automotive finishes. While solvent based paints and clear coats are typically capable of acceptable appearance, extruded plastic films fall well short of achieving a desirable rich ‘wet-look’.
  • If paint films or paint protection films are applied to three-dimensional shaped vehicle parts problems may be encountered such as, for example, stretching, wrinkling, and/or puckering of the film during application that renders the finished body parts aesthetically, and possibly functionally, unsuitable. These problems may be made even worse by molecular orientation of the film (for example, during extrusion) such that stretchability of the film varies with film orientation.
  • SUMMARY
  • In one aspect, the present disclosure provides a multilayer article comprising:
      • a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite the first major surface;
      • a base layer having a first major surface contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate, the base layer comprising a polymeric material and being substantially isotropic, the first major surface of the base layer being permanently adhered and covalently bonded to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate.
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a multilayer article comprising:
      • a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
      • a base layer having a first major surface contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate, the base layer comprising a polymeric material, the base layer having a second major surface opposite its first major surface, each of the first and second major surfaces of the base layer being a substantial inverse image of a major surface of first and second respective corresponding forming webs, and the first major surface of the base layer being permanently adhered and covalently bonded to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate.
  • In certain embodiments, at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprises a colorant, and wherein a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate is opaque or translucent. In certain embodiments, the polymeric material is selected from the group consisting of silicones, epoxies, acrylics, polyurethanes, and combinations thereof. In certain embodiments, the polymeric material comprises a polyurethane. In certain embodiments, the polyurethane has hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight. In certain embodiments, the multilayer article further comprises a liner releasably adhered to and contacting the second major surface of the base layer.
  • In certain embodiments, the multilayer article further comprises a transparent protective layer, the transparent protective layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface. In certain embodiments, the multilayer article further comprises a liner releasably adhered to and contacting the second major surface of the transparent protective layer.
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a multilayer article comprising:
      • a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
      • a base layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the base layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate, and the base layer comprising a first polymeric material;
      • a transparent protective layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the transparent protective layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the base layer, and wherein the transparent protective layer comprises a second polymeric material; and
      • at least one of the base layer and the transparent protective layer being substantially isotropic, at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprising a colorant, and a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent.
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a multilayer article comprising:
      • a thermoformable substrate having first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
      • a base layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the base layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface, and the base layer comprising a first polymeric material;
      • a transparent protective layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the transparent protective layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the base layer, and the transparent protective layer comprising a second polymeric material; and
      • at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprising a colorant, a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent, and:
      • i) each of the first and second major surfaces of the base layer being a substantial inverse image of a major surface of first and second respective corresponding forming webs;
      • ii) each of the first and second major surfaces of the transparent protective layer being a substantial inverse image of a major surface of third and fourth respective corresponding forming webs; or
      • iii) both i) and ii).
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a multilayer article comprising:
      • a thermoformable substrate having first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
      • an adhesive layer;
      • a base layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the base layer being permanently adhered to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate by the adhesive layer, the base layer comprising a first polymeric material;
      • a transparent protective layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the transparent protective layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the base layer, and the transparent protective layer comprising a second polymeric material and being substantially isotropic; and
      • at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprising a colorant, and a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent.
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a multilayer article comprising:
      • a thermoformable substrate having first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
      • an adhesive layer;
      • a base layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the base layer being permanently adhered to the second major surface by the adhesive layer, the base layer comprising a first polymeric material;
      • a transparent protective layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the transparent protective layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the base layer, the transparent protective layer comprising a second polymeric material; and
      • at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprising a colorant, a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent, and:
      • i) each of the first and second major surfaces of the base layer being a substantial inverse image of a major surface of first and second respective corresponding forming webs;
      • ii) each of the first and second major surfaces of the transparent protective layer being a substantial inverse image of a major surface of third and fourth respective corresponding forming webs; or
      • iii) both i) and ii).
  • In certain embodiments, the second major surface of the base layer exhibits surface shape recovery. In certain embodiments, the second major surface of the transparent protective layer exhibits surface shape recovery. In certain embodiments, the second polymeric material is selected from the group consisting of silicones, polyethers, acrylics, polyurethanes, and combinations thereof. In certain embodiments, the second polymeric material comprising a polyurethane. In certain embodiments, the polyurethane has hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight. In certain embodiments, the multilayer article further comprises an adhesive backsize disposed on the first major surface of the thermoformable substrate. In certain embodiments, the multilayer article further comprises a liner releasably adhered to and contacting the second major surface of the base layer. In certain embodiments, the multilayer article further comprises a liner releasably adhered to and contacting the second major surface of the transparent protective layer.
  • Advantageously, multilayer articles according to the present disclosure generally have one or more useful physical and aesthetic properties such as, but not limited to, little or no volatile organic solvent content (for example, resulting in multi that are substantially or essentially solvent-free) and/or with essentially no solvent gradient with respect to film thickness, substantially identical mechanical properties with respect to length and width, very low visual defect rate, high gloss and good distinctness of image (for example, wet look), and the ability to form the multilayer articles into shaped parts without compromising the paint film appearance.
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a method of using a multilayer article, the method comprising thermoforming a multilayer article according to the present disclosure.
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a method of using a multilayer article, the method comprising injection cladding a multilayer article according to the present disclosure.
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a method of forming a shaped article, the method comprising forming a multilayer article according to the present disclosure into a predetermined shape. In certain embodiments, the predetermined shape corresponds to a vehicle body part, vehicle trim, or at least a portion of an appliance housing. In certain embodiments, the predetermined shape corresponds to a vehicle body part or vehicle trim. In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a shaped article formed by a method of forming a shaped article according to the present disclosure.
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a method of making a multilayer article, the method comprising:
      • providing a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate comprising reactive groups;
      • contacting a curable composition with the second major surface and a forming web to form a rolling bank of the curable composition disposed between the thermoformable substrate and the forming web, the curable composition comprising a curable polymeric material precursor, and the curable composition being covalently reactive with the reactive groups;
      • passing at least a portion of each of the thermoformable substrate, the forming web, and the curable composition through a nip to provide a curable layer precursor while said at least a portion of the curable composition is sandwiched between the thermoformable substrate and the forming web; and
      • at least partially curing the curable layer precursor to provide a base layer, the base layer comprising a polymeric material, and
      • at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprising a colorant, and a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent.
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a method of making a multilayer article, the method comprising:
      • providing a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, a base layer being adhered to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate, the base layer comprising a first polymeric material.
      • contacting a curable composition with the base layer and a forming web to form a rolling bank of the curable composition disposed between the base layer and the forming web, the curable composition comprising a curable polymeric material precursor;
      • passing at least a portion of each of the thermoformable substrate, the base layer, the forming web, and the curable composition through a nip to provide a curable layer precursor while said at least a portion of the curable composition is sandwiched between the base layer and the forming web; and
      • at least partially curing the curable layer precursor to provide a transparent protective layer comprising a second polymeric material.
  • In certain embodiments, the method further comprises disposing an adhesive layer of the thermoformable substrate on the first major surface of the base layer. In certain embodiments, at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprising a colorant, and a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent.
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a method of making a multilayer article, the method comprising:
      • providing a first forming web and a base layer releasably adhered to the first forming web, the base layer comprising a first polymeric material, and the base layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
      • contacting a curable composition with the base layer and a second forming web to form a rolling bank of the curable composition disposed between the base layer and the second forming web, the curable composition comprising a curable polymeric material precursor;
      • passing at least a portion of each of the first forming web, the base layer, the second forming web, and the curable composition through a nip to provide a curable layer precursor while said at least a portion of the curable composition is sandwiched between the base layer and the second forming web;
      • at least partially curing the curable layer precursor to provide a transparent protective layer comprising a second polymeric material;
      • separating the first forming web from the base layer;
      • disposing a first adhesive layer on the first major surface of base layer;
      • providing a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface; and
      • permanently adhering the first adhesive layer to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate.
  • In certain embodiments, at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprises a colorant, and a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent. In certain embodiments, the method further comprises disposing a second adhesive layer on the first major surface of the thermoformable substrate. In certain embodiments, at least one of the first polymeric material and the second polymeric material being selected from the group consisting of silicones, polyethers, acrylics, polyurethanes, and combinations thereof. In certain embodiments, at least one of the first polymeric material and the second polymeric material comprises a polyurethane. In certain embodiments, the polyurethane has hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight.
  • In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a multilayer article made according to a method of making a multilayer article according to the present disclosure.
  • Advantageously, methods of multilayer articles according to the present disclosure have low coating defect rates, may be practiced using little or no volatile organic solvent, are suitable for preparing films of thicknesses not achievable in a single coating pass out of solvent, and are not prone to creating films with anisotropic mechanical properties. And, methods of making multilayer articles according to the present disclosure are useful for making special effects (for example, metal flake, pearlescent) pigment-containing multilayer articles.
  • The following definitions apply throughout the specification and claims.
  • “Adherend” refers to an object being adhered.
  • “Substantially isotropic” means having at least one mechanical property that does not vary, or only slightly varies, along the length direction and width direction, and also means not having an organic solvent gradient across the thickness direction. Thus, an extruded polymeric layer is not considered substantially isotropic, when the polymeric layer has at least one mechanical property that is different when measured along its length compared to the same mechanical property measured along its width. In addition, a solvent-cast polymeric layer is not considered substantially isotropic, when the polymeric layer has an organic solvent concentration gradient across its thickness. Such a concentration gradient generally indicates that the polymeric layer was solvent cast.
  • “Essentially isotropic” means having the same mechanical properties with respect to length and width, and not having an organic solvent gradient with respect to thickness.
  • “Substantially solvent-free” means containing less than or equal to 0.5 percent by weight of volatile organic solvent.
  • “Essentially solvent-free” means containing less than or equal to 0.3 percent by weight of volatile organic solvent.
  • “Forming web” refers to a film, layer, belt or other web-shaped substrate having a major surface on which a corresponding major surface of the base layer or the protective transparent layer is removably or permanently formed.
  • “Layer” refers to a unitary layer unless otherwise specified.
  • “One-part urethane” and “two-part urethane” refer to curable resins that react to form a polyurethane.
  • “Permanently adhered” in reference to two adherends means not mechanically separable without causing significant physical damage to (for example, tears or rips in) the adhesive layer or either of the two adherends.
  • “Polyurethane” refers to polymers having repeated subunits in the backbone that have —OC(═O)NH— and/or —HNC(═O)NH— groups.
  • “Thermoformable” means capable of being thermoformed.
  • “Thermoforming” refers to a process for in which a sheet or film of material, typically comprising an organic polymeric material, is heated to a forming temperature, and then stretched over or into a temperature controlled single-surface mold. The sheet is held against the mold surface until cooled. The formed part is then trimmed from the sheet or film.
  • “Volatile organic solvent” refers to any organic solvent having an initial boiling point less than or equal to 250° C. at a pressure of 1 atmosphere (101.3 kPa).
  • Other objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent from the following drawings wherein like numerals refer to like parts, the accompanying description and the appended claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a side-view of an exemplary multilayer article according to the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 2 is a side-view of an exemplary multilayer article according to the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 3 is a side-view of a thermoformed exemplary multilayer article according to the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an automobile showing multilayer article according to the present disclosure shaped into vehicle body parts and trim; and
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective schematic side-view showing an exemplary method of forming a multilayer article according to the present disclosure.
  • While the invention is amenable to various modifications and alternative forms, specifics thereof that have been shown by way of example in the drawings will be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that the intention is not to limit the invention to the particular embodiments described. To the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the spirit and scope of the present disclosure.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • To promote an understanding of the principles of the present invention, descriptions of specific embodiments of the present invention follow and specific language is used to describe the specific embodiments. It will nevertheless be understood that no limitation of the scope of the present invention is intended by the use of specific language. Alterations, further modifications, and such further applications of the principles of the present invention discussed are contemplated as would normally occur to one ordinarily skilled in the art to which the invention pertains.
  • An exemplary embodiment of a multilayer article is broadly shown in FIG. 1. Referring now to FIG. 1, multilayer article 100 comprises thermoformable substrate 110, optional adhesive layer 120, and base layer 130. Thermoformable substrate 110 has first major surface 112 and second major surface 114 opposite first major surface 112. Base layer 130 has first major surface 142 and second major surface 144 opposite first major surface 142. First major surface 142 of base layer 130 is permanently bonded to second major surface 114 of thermoformable substrate 110. In some embodiments, thermoformable substrate 110 includes optional tie layer 111 (comprising second major surface 114) and bulk portion 108. Base layer 130 is permanently adhered to and covalently bonded (that is, bonded through a continuous sequence of covalent chemical bonds) to thermoformable substrate 110.
  • If present, optional transparent protective layer 150 has first major surface 152 and second major surface 154 opposite first major surface 152. First major surface 152 of the optional transparent protective layer 150 contacts and is permanently adhered to second major surface 144 of base layer 130.
  • If present, optional protective liner 180 is releasably adhered to second major surface 144 of base layer 130 or, if optional transparent protective layer 150 is present, second major surface 154 of transparent protective layer 150.
  • Thermoformable Substrate 110
  • The thermoformable substrate may be, for example, in the form of a film (for example, a continuous film) and/or sheet. The thermoformable substrate may be limp and flexible, stiff and self-supporting, or any stiffness in between. The thermoformable substrate may have any thickness; typically, between about 0.01 millimeters and 10 millimeters, more typically between about 0.1 millimeters and 5 millimeters, although this is not a requirement.
  • The thermoformable substrate may be flat or flattenable, or it may be formed into a shape corresponding to an automotive body part or some other three-dimensional shape. Typically the thermoformable substrate will be of sufficient size that it can be readily used in conjunction with industrial thermoforming equipment, although this is not a requirement. The thermoformable substrate, or at least the bulk portion thereof, may comprise one or more thermoplastic materials and/or lightly covalently crosslinked polymeric materials exhibiting sufficient deformability at temperature(s) useful in thermoforming process(es). Examples of such materials include: fluoropolymers such as, for example, fluorinated ethylene-propylene copolymers, polyvinylidene fluoride, and polychlorotrifluoroethylene; thermoplastic silicones; polyethers; acrylics (for example, poly(butyl acrylate), poly(isobutyl methacrylate), poly(methyl acrylate), poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(propyl methacrylate), and polyacrylonitrile); polyesters such as for example, poly(ethylene terephthalate), polyethylene terephthalate glycol, and polycaprolactone; poly(vinyl ethers) such as, for example, poly(vinyl acetate); cellulosics such as, for example, ethyl cellulose, cellulose acetate, cellulose propionate, cellulose acetate butyrate, and cellulose nitrate; polyolefins such as, for example, poly(4-methylpent-1-ene), polybutylene, polyisobutylene, polystyrenes (including high impact polystyrenes), polyethylene (including low density and high density polyethylenes), and polypropylene; acrylonitrile butadiene styrene copolymers; polyetheramides; polyether ether ketones; polyetherimides; polycarbonates; ionomeric resins such as for example, ionomeric resins marketed by E.I. du Pont de Nemours, Wilmington, Del., under the trade designation SURLYN; natural rubber; polyamides such as, for example, nylon-6 and nylon-6,6; polyimides; thermoplastic polyurethanes; copolymers of styrene and acrylonitrile; copolymers of styrene and butadiene; polycarbonates; and blends and mixtures thereof.
  • These materials may be used in combination with additives such as, for example, plasticizers, flow additives, fillers, antioxidants, light stabilizers, colorants (for example, dye, metal flake, or pigment), and flame retardants.
  • The thermoformable substrate may have multiple layers or components (for example, on the side opposite the base layer) or it may be a unitary thermoformable substrate.
  • The thermoformable substrate may have a surface treatment comprising at least a portion of the second major surface to enhance adhesion to the base layer. Examples of surface treatments include flame treatment, corona treatment, and reactive grafting of monomers (for example, by electron beam radiation in the presence of a free-radically polymerizable monomer having at least one functional group (for example, hydroxyl, epoxy, trialkoxysilyl, or carboxyl) that is reactive with the base layer or to monomers and/or oligomers used to make the base layer). Examples of monomers useful for such reactive grafting include acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, 2-triethoxysilylethyl methacrylate, glycidyl methacrylate, and glycidyl acrylate. Such treatments are typically useful for enhancing adhesion to low energy materials such as polyolefins (for example, polypropylene, polyethylene), silicones, and fluoropolymers.
  • Optional Tie Layer
  • Optionally, at least a portion of the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate may comprise a tie layer, which may optionally be covalently bonded to the bulk portion of the thermoformable substrate 110 to optional adhesive layer 120 or base layer 130. Examples of materials useful in tie layers include polyamides, ethylene vinyl acetate copolymers, chlorinated polyolefins, maleic anhydride grafted polymers, and combinations thereof.
  • Optional Adhesive Layer 120
  • The optional adhesive layer may comprise any adhesive that is capable of permanently adhering the base layer to the thermoformable substrate. For example, the adhesive layer may comprise a pressure-sensitive adhesive, a hot melt adhesive, or a combination thereof. Examples of pressure-sensitive adhesives include tackified or untackified materials such as tackified natural rubbers, tackified synthetic rubbers, tackified styrene block copolymers, self-tacky or tackified acrylate or methacrylate copolymers, self-tacky or tackified poly(alpha-olefins), and self-tacky or tackified silicones. Examples of hot melt adhesives include hot melt adhesives based on polyester, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), polyamides, polyurethanes, and polyethers. The optional adhesive layer may have any thickness, but will typically have a thickness in a range of from 1 to 100 micrometers.
  • The optional adhesive layer may be supplied by any suitable technique. For example, the optional adhesive layer can be applied to the thermoformable substrate prior to applying the base layer, or it may be applied to the base layer and then bonded to the thermoformable substrate. Suitable application methods for the optional adhesive layer include, for example, spraying, solvent coating, and lamination.
  • Base Layer 130
  • Base layer 130 comprises a material that, as implemented, is thermoformable.
  • Examples of polymeric materials suitable for use in base layer 130 include melt-processable polymeric materials such as thermoplastic or lightly cross-linked polymeric materials, and in some cases even thermoset polymeric materials. As used herein, the term “thermoset” means chemically crosslinked to the point where melt flow cannot occur.
  • Examples of suitable polymeric materials include silicones (for example, as made by moisture curing silicone resin, optionally in the presence of an appropriate catalyst), polyethers (for example, from polymerization of a one-part or two-part epoxy resin, optionally in the presence of an appropriate catalyst), acrylics (for example, as made by thermal or photo-polymerization of acrylic monomer(s)), polyurethanes (for example, as made by condensation polymerization of one-part or two-part urethane resins, optionally in the presence of an appropriate catalyst), and combinations thereof.
  • Typically, the polymeric materials are prepared from components (for example, monomers, oligomers, hardeners, initiators) that do not off-gas at or near ambient conditions. Accordingly, it is typically desirable to place the components comprising base layer 130 under vacuum to remove volatile components prior to forming base layer 130. In general, to achieve useful film properties the functionality of addition polymerizable monomers and oligomers (for example, epoxies, acrylates) should be at least one (1), more typically at least 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, or even at least 1.8 or 2.0, or more. In general, to achieve useful film properties the functionality of condensation polymerizable monomers and oligomers (for example, alkoxysilanes, two-part urethanes) should be at least two (2) for each reactive component (for example, a polyisocyanate/polyol pair), more typically at least 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, or even at least 2.8 or 3.0, or more. In general, lower functionality is associated with relatively increased extensibility (for example, elongation at break) and relatively lower hardness, while the converse is generally true with higher functionality.
  • Combinations of the foregoing curable monomers and oligomers may also be used (for example, silicone/acrylate or urethane/acrylate). The specific choice of materials will typically depend on the desired physical properties (for example, strength, appearance, weatherability, formability, abrasion resistance) of color layer 130.
  • Silicones and curable systems for their preparation are well-known. Silicones may be obtained, for example, by curing of moisture-cure silicones (for example, RTV silicones), two-part silicones (for example, a Part A of hydroxy-terminated polydimethylpolysiloxane and a Part B of trialkoxysilyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane), or photo- or thermal curing of vinyl substituted polydimethylsiloxanes and hydride-terminated polydimethylsiloxanes using a hydrosilation catalyst. In addition, silicones may be prepared from monomeric silanes such as, for example, dimethoxydimethylsilane, dimethoxydiethylsilane, diethoxydimethylsilane, diethoxydiethylsilane, and other dialkoxydialkylsilanes; trimethoxymethylsilane, trimethoxyethylsilane, trimethoxypropylsilane, triethoxymethylsilane, triethoxyethylsilane, and other trialkoxyalkylsilanes; tetramethoxysilane, tetraethoxysilane, tetrapropoxysilane, and other tetraalkoxysilanes; methyltri(methoxyethoxy)silane, and other alkoxyalkoxysilanes; methyltriisopropenoxy-silane, and other alkenoxysilanes; methyltriacetoxysilane, and other acyloxysilanes. Optionally, an acid catalyst may be included such as, for example, acetic acid, propionic acid, and fatty acids.
  • Polyethers and curable systems for their preparation are well-known. Examples of polyethers include polymers containing ethylenoxy, propylenoxy, and/or butylenoxy monomeric units. Polyethers may be uncrosslinked, but more typically are cross-linked (thermoset) produced by curing of epoxy monomer(s) and resin(s).
  • Examples of useful epoxy monomers include trimethylolpropane triglycidyl ether, 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether, ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether, cyclohexanedimethanol diglycidyl ether, polypropylene glycol diglycidyl ether, polyglycol diglycidyl ether, 1,6-hexanediol diglycidyl ether, trimethylolethane triglycidyl ether, castor oil triglycidyl ether, propoxylated glycerin triglycidyl ether, glycerol polyglycidyl ether; diglycerol polyglycidyl ether; glycerol propoxylate triglycidyl ether; trimethylolpropane triglycidyl ether; sorbitol polyglycidyl ether; poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether; poly(propylene glycol) diglycidyl ether; neopentyl glycol diglycidyl ether; N,N-diglycidyl-4-glycidyloxyaniline; N,N-diglycidyltoluidine; diglycidyl 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylate; diglycidyl bisphenol A; a polymer of diglycidyl bisphenol A; poly(bisphenol A-co-epichlorohydrin), glycidyl end capped; diglycidyl ether of a hydrogenated bisphenol A propylene oxide adduct; diglycidyl ester of terephthalic acid; diglycidyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydrophthalate; spiroglycol diglycidyl ether; hydroquinone diglycidyl ether and derivatives thereof, propylene oxide, epichlorohydrin, styrene oxide, vinylcyclohexene oxide, vinylcyclohexene dioxide, glycidol, butadiene oxide, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, cyclohexene oxide, 3,4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate, 3,4-epoxy-6-methylcyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxy-6-methylcyclohexanecarboxylate, bis(3,4-epoxy-6-methylcyclohexylmethyl)adipate, dicyclopentadiene dioxide, epoxidized polybutadiene, 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether, polyglycidyl ether of phenolformaldehyde resole or novolac resin, resorcinol diglycidyl ether, and epoxy silicones, for example, dimethylsiloxanes having cycloaliphatic epoxide or glycidyl ether groups, and mixtures thereof. Epoxy resins and monomers can be polymerized, for example, using a photocatalyst or a Lewis acid (for example, BF3).
  • Two part-epoxy resins (for example, having a Part A of an amine or thiol hardener and a Part B having an epoxy group functional resin) are widely available and may also be used.
  • Acrylic polymers may be prepared by free-radical polymerization of free-radically polymerizable monomers such as, for example, (meth)acrylates (that is, acrylates and/or methacrylates) and vinyl ester functionalized materials. Of particular use are (meth)acrylates. They can be monomers and/or oligomers such as (meth)acrylates (meth)acrylamides, vinyl pyrrolidinone and azlactones. Such monomers include mono-, di-, or polyacrylates and methacrylates such as methyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, ethyl acrylate, isopropyl methacrylate, isooctyl acrylate, acrylic acid, n-hexyl acrylate, stearyl acrylate, allyl acrylate, glycerol diacrylate, glycerol triacrylate, ethylene glycol diacrylate, diethyleneglycol diacrylate, triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, 1,3-propanediol diacrylate, 1,3-propanediol dimethacrylate, trimethanol triacrylate, 1,2,4-butanetriol trimethylacrylate, 1,4-cyclohexanediol diacrylate, pentaerythritol triacrylate, pentaerythritol tetraacrylate, pentaerythritol tetramethacrylate, sorbitol hexacrylate, bis[1-(2-acryloxy)]-p-ethoxyphenyl dimethylmethane, bis[1-(3-acryloxy-2-hydroxy)]-p-propoxyphenyl-dimethylmethane, tris-hydroxyethyl isocyanurate trimethacrylate; the bis-methacrylates of polyethylene glycols of molecular weight 200-500 g/mole, copolymerizable mixtures of acrylated monomers such as those described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,652,274 (Boettcher et al.), and acrylated oligomers such as those described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,642,126 (Zador et al.), the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference). Typically, a thermal initiator (for example, a peroxide or an azo initiator such as azobis(isobutyronitrile)) or a photoinitiator (for example, as available from Ciba Specialty Chemicals, Tarrytown, N.Y., under the trade designations DAROCUR and IRGACURE).
  • Methods and catalysts for curing the foregoing monomers may be found in U.S. Pat. No. 5,252,694 (Willett et al.), the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • In certain embodiments, the polymeric material comprises a polyurethane.
  • Polyurethanes may be prepared, for example, by the reaction of one or more polyols and/or polyamines and/or aminoalcohols with one or more polyisocyanates, optionally in the presence of non-reactive component(s). For applications where weathering is likely, it is typically desirable for the polyols, polyamines, and/or aminoalcohols and the polyisocyanates to be free of aromatic groups.
  • Suitable polyols include, for example, materials commercially available under the trade designation DESMOPHEN from Bayer Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pa. The polyols can be polyester polyols (for example, Desmophen 631A, 650A, 651A, 670A, 680, 110, and 1150); polyether polyols (for example, Desmophen 550U, 1600U, 1900U, and 1950U); or acrylic polyols (for example, Demophen A160SN, A575, and A450BA/A).
  • Suitable polyamines include, for example: aliphatic polyamines such as, for example, ethylene diamine, 1,2-diaminopropane, 2,5-diamino-2,5-dimethylhexane, 1,11-diaminoundecane, 1,12-diaminododecane, 2,4- and/or 2,6-hexahydrotoluoylenediamine, and 2,4′-diamino-dicyclohexylmethane; and aromatic polyamines such as, for example, 2,4- and/or 2,6-diaminotoluene and 2,4′- and/or 4,4′-diaminodiphenylmethane; amine-terminated polymers such as, for example, those available from Huntsman Chemical (Salt Lake City, Utah), under the trade designation JEFFAMINE polypropylene glycol diamines (for example, Jeffamine XTJ-510) and those available from Noveon Corp., Cleveland, Ohio, under the trade designation Hycar ATBN (amine-terminated acrylonitrile butadiene copolymers), and those disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,436,359 (Hubin et al.) and U.S. Pat. No. 4,833,213 (Leir et al.) (amine-terminated polyethers, and polytetrahydrofuran diamines); and combinations thereof.
  • Suitable aminoalcohols include, for example, 2-aminoethanol, 3-aminopropan-1-ol, alkyl-substituted versions of the foregoing, and combinations thereof.
  • Suitable polyisocyanate compounds include, for example: aromatic diisocyanates (for example, 2,6-toluene diisocyanate; 2,5-toluene diisocyanate; 2,4-toluene diisocyanate; m-phenylene diisocyanate; p-phenylene diisocyanate; methylene bis(o-chlorophenyl diisocyanate); methylenediphenylene-4,4′-diisocyanate; polycarbodiimide-modified methylenediphenylene diisocyanate; (4,4′-diisocyanato-3,3′,5,5′-tetraethyl) diphenylmethane; 4,4′-diisocyanato-3,3′-dimethoxybiphenyl (o-dianisidine diisocyanate); 5-chloro-2,4-toluene diisocyanate; and 1-chloromethyl-2,4-diisocyanato benzene), aromatic-aliphatic diisocyanates (for example, m-xylylene diisocyanate and tetramethyl-m-xylylene diisocyanate); aliphatic diisocyanates (for example, 1,4-diisocyanatobutane; 1,6-diisocyanatohexane; 1,12-diisocyanatododecane; and 2-methyl-1,5-diisocyanatopentane); cycloaliphatic diisocyanates (for example, methylenedicyclohexylene-4,4′-diisocyanate; 3-isocyanatomethyl-3,5,5-trimethylcyclohexyl isocyanate (isophorone diisocyanate); 2,2,4-trimethylhexyl diisocyanate; and cyclohexylene-1,4-diisocyanate), polymeric or oligomeric compounds (for example, polyoxyalkylene, polyester, polybutadienyl, and the like) terminated by two isocyanate functional groups (for example, the diurethane of toluene-2,4-diisocyanate-terminated polypropylene oxide glycol); polyisocyanates commercially available under the trade designation MONDUR or DESMODUR (for example, Desmodur XP7100 and Desmodur N 3300A) from Bayer Corporation (Pittsburgh, Pa.); and combinations thereof.
  • In some embodiments, the polyurethane comprises a reaction product of components comprising at least one polyisocyanate and at least one polyol. In some embodiments, the polyurethane comprises a reaction product of components comprising at least one polyisocyanate and at least one polyol. In some embodiments, the at least one polyisocyanate comprises an aliphatic polyisocyanate. In some embodiments, the at least one polyol comprises an aliphatic polyol. In some embodiments, the at least one polyol comprises a polyester polyol or a polycarbonate polyol.
  • Typically, the polyurethane(s) is/are extensible and/or pliable. For example, the polyurethane(s), or any layer containing polyurethane, may have a percent elongation at break (at ambient conditions) of at least 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 125, 150, 175, 200, 225, 250, 275, 300, 350, or even at least 400 percent, or more. In certain embodiments, the polyurethane has hard segments, typically segments corresponding to one or more polyisocyanates, in any combination, in an amount of from 35, 40, or 45 percent by weight up to, 50, 55, 60, or even 65 percent by weight.
  • As used herein: wt % means percent by weight based on the total weight of material, and

  • Hard Segment wt %=(weight of short chain diol and polyol+weight of short chain di- or polyisocyanate)/total weight of resin
  • wherein:
      • short chain diols and polyols have an equivalent weight≦185 g/eq, and a functionality≧2; and
      • short chain isocyanates have an equivalent weight≦320 g/eq and a functionality≧2.
  • One or more catalysts are typically included with two-part urethanes. Catalysts for two-part urethanes are well known and include, for example, aluminum-, bismuth-, tin-, vanadium-, zinc-, tin-, and zirconium-based catalysts. Tin-based catalysts have been found to significantly reduce the amount of outgassing during formation of the polyurethane. Examples of tin-based catalysts include dibutyltin compounds such as dibutyltin diacetate, dibutyltin dilaurate, dibutyltin diacetylacetonate, dibutyltin dimercaptide, dibutyltin dioctoate, dibutyltin dimaleate, dibutyltin acetonylacetonate, and dibutyltin oxide. If present, any catalyst is typically included at levels of at least 200 parts per million by weight (ppm), 300 ppm, or more; however, this is not a requirement.
  • Additional suitable two-part urethanes are described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,258,918 B1 (Ho et al.) and 5,798,409 (Ho), the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • In general, the amounts of polyisocyanate to polyol, polyamine, and/or aminoalcohol in a two-part urethane are selected in approximately stoichiometrically equivalent amounts, although in some cases it may be desirable to adjust the relative amounts to other ratios. For example, a slight stoichiometric excess of the polyisocyanate may be useful to ensure a high degree of incorporation of the polyol, polyamine, and/or aminoalcohol, although any excess isocyanate groups present after polymerization will typically react with materials having reactive hydrogens (for example, adventitious moisture, alcohols, amines, etc.).
  • Base layer 130 may further comprise one or more optional additives such as, for example, flame retardants, fillers, antioxidants, UV light absorbers, hindered amine light stabilizers (HALS), plasticizers, and rheology modifiers.
  • In some embodiments, base layer 130 may contain one or more volatile organic solvents, typically in amounts of less than about 5 percent, more typically less than one (1) percent, more typically less than 0.5 percent, and even more typically in an amount of less than 0.3 or even 0.1 percent, or base layer 130 may even be essentially solvent-free.
  • Base layer 130 may have any thickness and may be coextensive in boundaries with the thermoformable substrate, or it may be disposed on only a portion or separate portions of a major surface of the thermoformable substrate. Typically, the thickness of base layer 130 has a thickness of from about 0.3 mil (8 micrometers) to about 20 mils (0.51 millimeters), and more typically from about 3 mil (80 micrometers) to about 7 mils (0.2 millimeters).
  • Advantageously, base layer 130 may be substantially or even essentially isotropic, and/or substantially or even essentially solvent-free, for example, if made according to at least some embodiments of methods according to the present disclosure. This is a typical result of polymerizing a base layer precursor between two forming webs under conditions wherein no orientation of the resultant base layer 130 occurs, and even in the event that a volatile organic solvent is present, no volatile organic solvent gradient is formed due to evaporation as occurs during solvent casting.
  • Alternatively, or in addition, each of the first and second major surfaces of base layer 130 may be a substantial inverse image of a major surface of a corresponding forming web, for example, if made according to at least some embodiments of methods according to the present disclosure. This feature may directly result from forming base layer 130 between two forming webs such that polymerization of a base layer precursor occurs to form base layer 130 while it is in intimate contact with major surfaces of two corresponding forming webs, thereby imparting a predetermined surface topography to the first and second major surfaces (142, 144) of base layer 130, the predetermined topography of each being a substantial inverse image of the major surface of a corresponding web forming substrate. In some embodiments, the forming webs may comprise releasable liners (release liners). In some embodiments, the thermoformable substrate comprises one of the forming webs. In some embodiments, the thermoformable substrate and optional adhesive layer comprise one of the forming webs.
  • In certain embodiments, for example, if made according to methods of the present disclosure generally shown in FIG. 5, base layer 130 may be essentially free of visible surface defects, that is, free of surface defects that are noticeable to an unaided human eye, with normal 20/20 vision, at a distance of 0.3 meter.
  • Base layer 130 may have any desired appearance, for example, ranging from matte to glossy. If base layer 130 forms an exterior surface of the multilayer article it may be desirable that the second major surface of base layer 130 has a 60 degree gloss according to ASTM Test Method D2457-03 “Standard Test Method for Specular Gloss of Plastic Films and Solid Plastics” of at least about 60 gloss units, and typically at least about 80 gloss units, in substantially all areas of the second major surface of base layer 130, including those that have been permanently deformed (that is, strained). Similarly, if base layer 130 forms an exterior surface of the multilayer article it may be desirable that the second major surface of base layer 130 has a distinctness of image according to ASTM Test Method D5767-95 “Standard Test Methods for Instrumental Measurement of Distinctness-of-Image Gloss of Coating Surfaces” of at least about 60, and typically at least about 80, in substantially all areas of the second major surface of base layer 130, including those that have been permanently deformed.
  • In some embodiments, the second major surface of base layer 130 exhibits surface shape recovery. As used herein, the term “surface shape recovery” refers to the ability of a surface of a material (for example, a base layer or a transparent protective layer) to rapidly recover from indentations made therein to its prior non-indented visual appearance, either spontaneously or upon heating. Without wishing to be bound by theory, it is believed that surface shape recovery results at least in part from the existence of a three-dimensional crosslink network (either chemical or physical) formed by polymeric material (for example, in base layer 130 or transparent protective layer 250), where the crosslinks are separated by flexible segments with sufficient molecular weight that the segments at least collapse into random coils as initially formed but extend linearly if deformed (for example, indented). Upon standing or heating the material returns to its original dimensions; in the case of a surface of a layer of such a polymeric material the surface will recover its original appearance.
  • Examples of segments capable of this behavior include segments in polyurethanes that are derived from polyester diols or polyether diols having molecular weight on the order of at least about 1500, 2000, 2500, or even at least about 3000 grams per mole, or more.
  • Optional Transparent Protective Layer 150
  • Optionally, a transparent protective layer 150 may be present in combination with base layer 130. The transparent protective layer may comprise any material capable of forming a transparent film. Examples include any materials known for use as clear coats or clear coat films in the automotive industry. Clear coats can be applied, for example, by casting out of solvent. Clear coat films (typically having a pressure sensitive adhesive layer on a major surface thereof) may be laminated using conventional techniques.
  • Additional examples of materials suitable for use in forming the transparent protective layer 150 include transparent polyurethanes described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,258,918 B1 (Ho et al.) and 5,798,409 (Ho).
  • The optional transparent protective layer 150 may have any thickness and may be coextensive in boundaries with base layer 130, or it may be disposed on only a portion or separate portions of the second major surface of base layer 130. Typically, the thickness of the transparent protective layer 150 has a thickness of from about 0.4 mil (10 micrometers) to about 30 mils (0.76 millimeters), and more typically from about 6 mil (200 micrometers) to about 14 mils (0.36 millimeters).
  • Optional Protective Liner 180
  • An optional protective liner 180 may be present in contact with and releasably adhered to with the outermost of the second major surface of base layer 130 or the second major surface of the optional transparent layer (if present). Suitable protective liners include, for example, polymer sheets, films, or papers, optionally coated with an adhesive or a low surface energy coating. Suitable low surface energy coatings may include, for example, those formed from polyacrylics, silicones, and/or fluorochemicals.
  • Additional exemplary embodiments of multilayer articles are broadly shown in FIG. 2. Referring now to FIG. 2, multilayer article 200 comprises thermoformable substrate 110, optional adhesive layer 120, and base layer 240. Base layer 240 has first major surface 242 and second major surface 244 opposite first major surface 242. In various embodiments, base layer 240 may contact and be permanently adhered to thermoformable substrate 110, or it may be permanently adhered to thermoformable substrate 110 by optional adhesive layer 120. In some embodiments, thermoformable substrate 110 includes optional tie layer 111 (comprising second major surface 114) and bulk portion 108. Transparent protective layer 250 has first major surface 252 and second major surface 254. First major surface 252 of transparent protective layer 250 contacts and is permanently adhered to second major surface 244 of base layer 240. If present, optional protective liner 180 is releasably adhered to second major surface 254 of transparent protective layer 250.
  • In these embodiments, thermoformable substrate 110, optional adhesive layer 120, and optional protective liner 180, are as described above.
  • Base Layer 240
  • Base layer 240 comprises a polymeric material. In some embodiments, base layer 240 is the same as base layer 130, while in other embodiments it is different.
  • Examples of polymeric materials useful in base layer 240 include all those suitable for use in base layer 130, but may also include in addition, or in place of, other polymeric materials not suitable for achieving the desired characteristics of base layer 130. For example, base layer 240 may be formed from extruded thermoplastic materials comprising, for example, one or more thermoplastic polyolefins, thermoplastic polyurethanes, thermoplastic acrylics, thermoplastic fluoropolymers, thermoplastic polyamides, thermoplastic polyesters, thermoplastic polycarbonates, or a combination thereof. Also, base layer 240 may be formed by solvent casting methods, for example, using gravure coating. In such cases, base layer 240 typically comprises one or more colorants dispersed in a polymeric binder, which may be thermoplastic or thermoset. Examples of polymeric binders include acrylics, urethanes, silicones, polyethers, phenolics, aminoplasts, and combinations thereof. Base layer 240 may also be formed by printing an ink.
  • Base layer 240 may further comprise one or more optional additives such as, for example, flame retardants, fillers, antioxidants, UV light absorbers, hindered amine light stabilizers (HALS), plasticizers, and rheology modifiers.
  • In some embodiments, base layer 240 may contain one or more volatile organic solvents, typically in amounts of less than about 5 percent, more typically less than one (1) percent, more typically less than 0.5 percent, and even more typically in an amount of less than 0.3 or even 0.1 percent, or base layer 240 may even be essentially solvent-free.
  • Base layer 240 may have any thickness and may be coextensive in boundaries with the thermoformable substrate, or it may be disposed on only a portion or separate portions of a major surface of the thermoformable substrate. Typically, the thickness of base layer 240 has a thickness of from about 0.3 mil (8 micrometers) to about 20 mils (0.51 millimeters), and more typically from about 3 mils (80 micrometers) to about 7 mils (0.2 millimeters).
  • Transparent Protective Layer 250
  • Transparent protective layer 250 is first of all transparent, although it may be colored, or more typically essentially colorless.
  • Examples of polymeric materials useful in transparent protective layer 250 include all those suitable for use in base layer 130, except that little or no colorant would be incorporated.
  • Transparent protective layer 250 may have any thickness and may be coextensive in boundaries with base layer 240, or it may be disposed on only a portion or separate portions of the second major surface of base layer 240. Typically, the thickness of the transparent protective layer 250 has a thickness of from about 0.4 mil (10 micrometers) to about 30 mils (0.76 millimeters), and more typically from about 6 mil (0.2 millimeters) to about 14 mils (0.36 millimeters).
  • Advantageously, transparent protective layer 250 may be substantially or even essentially isotropic, and/or substantially or even essentially solvent-free, for example, if made according to at least some embodiments of methods according to the present disclosure. This is a typical result of polymerizing a transparent protective layer precursor between two forming webs under conditions wherein no orientation of the resultant transparent protective layer 250 occurs, and even in the event that a volatile organic solvent is present, no volatile organic solvent gradient is formed due to evaporation as occurs during solvent casting.
  • Alternatively, or in addition, each of the first and second major surfaces of transparent protective layer 250 may be a substantial inverse image of a major surface of a corresponding forming web, for example, if made according to at least some embodiments of methods according to the present disclosure. This feature may directly result from forming transparent protective layer 250 between two forming webs such that polymerization of a transparent protective layer precursor occurs to form transparent protective layer 250 while it is in intimate contact with major surfaces of two corresponding forming webs, thereby imparting a predetermined surface topography to the first and second major surfaces (252, 254) of transparent protective layer 250, the predetermined topography of each being a substantial inverse image of the major surface of a corresponding web forming substrate. In some embodiments, the forming webs may comprise releasable liners (release liners). In some embodiments, the thermoformable substrate comprises one of the forming webs. In some embodiments, the thermoformable substrate and optional adhesive layer comprise one of the forming webs.
  • In certain embodiments, for example, if made according to methods of the present disclosure generally shown in FIG. 5, transparent protective layer 250 may be essentially free of visible surface defects.
  • Transparent protective layer 250 may have any desired appearance, for example, ranging from matte to glossy. If transparent protective layer 250 forms an exterior surface of the multilayer article it may be desirable that the second major surface of base layer 130 has a 60 degree gloss according to ASTM Test Method D2457-03 “Standard Test Method for Specular Gloss of Plastic Films and Solid Plastics” of at least about 60 gloss units, and typically at least about 80 gloss units, in substantially all areas of the second major surface of base layer 130, including those that have been permanently deformed (that is, strained). Similarly, if transparent protective layer 250 forms an exterior surface of the multilayer article it may be desirable that the second major surface of transparent protective layer 250 has a distinctness of image according to ASTM Test Method D5767-95 “Standard Test Methods for Instrumental Measurement of Distinctness-of-Image Gloss of Coating Surfaces” of at least about 60, and typically at least about 80, in substantially all areas of the second major surface of transparent protective layer 250, including those that have been permanently deformed.
  • Since it may have essentially the same composition as base layer 130, in some embodiments, the second major surface of transparent protective layer 250 likewise exhibits surface shape recovery.
  • Colorant
  • In certain embodiments of multilayer articles according to the present disclosure, at least one of the substrate and/or at least one layer of the multilayer article further comprises a colorant. Depending on the amount of colorant, and the thickness of any colored layer or substrate, the substrate, or affected layer may be transparent, translucent or opaque. For example, a combination of a base layer (for example, 130 or 240) and the thermoformable substrate may be opaque or translucent.
  • Examples of colorants include any colorants known in the automotive or graphic arts (for example, high performance or automotive grade pigments (whether colored, white, or black), pearlescent pigments, titanium dioxide, carbon black, metal flakes, dyes, and combinations thereof). Typically, the colorant is selected to have acceptable lightfastness and weathering characteristics for the intended use of the multilayer article as well as compatibility with the other components of the base layer. Combinations of more than one colorant may be used. Sufficient colorant should be used that base layer 130 in the multilayer article is opaque or translucent; however, excessive amounts of colorant may tend to degrade physical properties of base layer 130. Typically, the amount of colorant will be less than about 20, 15, 10, 7, or 5 percent of the total weight of base layer 130, but this is not a requirement.
  • Metal flake containing paints known as “metallic” paints are a highly specialized class of paint. They are widely used to provide glitz and glamour to automobile manufacturers' products. The special appearance of metallic paints results from the random orientation of the metal flakes within the paint coating. This random orientation results directly from the presence and evaporation of the solvent from the paint. Convection currents within the paint are established as the solvent evaporates from the surface of the paint which causes the paint surface to cool which then causes the surface paint to thermally sink within the paint where it can capture heat from the paint and rise back to the surface where more solvent evaporates, repeating the process. This circulates the metal flakes within the coating causing their orientation to randomize, thereby achieving the desired appearance. Extrusion processes orient pigments such as metal flake and are generally not able to achieve an excellent appearance. Advantageously, in some embodiments, methods according to the present disclosure are useful for preparing “metallic” multilayer articles that achieve an appearance comparable to that obtained by solvent coating techniques.
  • Method of Making Shaped Articles
  • FIG. 3 depicts a shaped article 300 formed by a method including thermoforming and optionally injection cladding multilayer article 200. While a simple deformation is shown, it will be recognized that complex three-dimensional shapes may also be formed.
  • Optional injection cladding 390 contacts and is permanently adhered to first major surface 112 of thermoformable substrate 110.
  • Optional Injection Cladding 390
  • If present, injection cladding 390 is produced through a process of injection cladding (discussed hereinbelow). Examples of materials suitable for use as injection cladding include filled or unfilled polymers such as high impact modified polystyrenes, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene copolymers, polyamides, polyesters, polypropylenes, polyethylenes, polyurethanes, polyether ether ketones, polyimides, polyetherimides, and combinations thereof.
  • Multilayer articles according to the present disclosure may be, for example, two dimensional sheets, rolls, or they may be permanently deformed into 3-dimensional simple or complex shapes.
  • Multilayer articles according to the present disclosure are typically thermoformable, although this not a requirement.
  • There are two general thermoforming process categories. Sheet thickness less than 1.5 mm (thin gauge) is usually delivered to a thermoforming press in rolls. Sheet thickness greater than 3 mm (0.120 inches) is usually delivered to a forming press cut to final dimensions and stacked on pallets. Heavy-gauge thermoforming typically uses convection oven heating of the sheet and draping of the sheet over male, female, or paired molds. Heavy-gauge parts may be useful, for example, as cosmetic surfaces on permanent structures such as automobiles, refrigerators, spas and shower enclosures, and electrical and electronic equipment.
  • Useful thermoforming techniques include, for example, vacuum forming, free forming, drape forming, plug and ring forming, vacuum snap-back forming, air slip forming, plug assist forming, twin-sheet forming, pressure forming, bend forming, billow forming, blow forming, and compression forming (for example, matched mold forming). The foregoing methods are well known in the thermoforming art.
  • After thermoforming, multilayer articles according to the present disclosure may be adhered to a panel (for example, an automotive body panel) by placing it into a mold and injecting a molten material that solidifies by cooling (injection molding) and or thermosetting (reaction injection molding) against the thermoformable substrate in a process known as injection cladding. The end result is a molded panel with a quality exterior finish.
  • Materials that can be used for injection cladding of multilayer films according to the present disclosure include, for example, filled or unfilled polymers such as high impact modified polystyrenes, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene copolymers, polyamides, polypropylenes, polyethylenes, polyurethanes, polyether ether ketones, polyimides, polyetherimides, and combinations thereof.
  • Advantageously, and surprisingly, multilayer articles according to the present disclosure can be formulated such that they can endure the stresses and temperatures of thermoforming and maintain a functional base layer and, if present, transparent protective layer, and provide aesthetically desirable appearance having a high quality appearance, comparable or better in appearance to a corresponding painted surface, and that is suitable for use “as is” in various applications such as, for example, vehicle body parts. Further, in some embodiments, the resultant article exhibits surface shape recovery, which facilitates maintenance of the surface appearance during normal use.
  • For example, multilayer articles according to the present disclosure may be capable of being permanently deformed by bending at an angle of at least 20, 30, 45, 60, 70, or even 90 degrees around a mandrel resulting in a radius of curvature of the bend angle of 1, 2, 3, 5, or 10 centimeters, or more, without cracking or splitting and while retaining at least 50, 60, 70, 80, or even 90 percent or more of gloss and distinctness of image prior to deformation.
  • The number of shaped articles formable from multilayer articles according to the present disclosure is virtually unlimited. Examples of shaped articles that can be formed by permanently deforming embodiments of multilayer articles according to the present disclosure include vehicle trim (interior trim and/or exterior trim), architectural trim, appliance (for example, a refrigerator, stove, washer, or dryer) housings or a portion thereof, and vehicle body parts.
  • Representative automobile body parts are shown in FIG. 4 on automobile 400, specifically roof 460, hood 430, quarter panels 440 and 450, and door 420. These and other vehicle body parts may be operatively adapted (that is, dimensioned and designed) for forming part of a land vehicle, aircraft, or watercraft. For example, the vehicle body part may be a body part of at least one vehicle selected from the group consisting of automobiles, trucks, bicycles, boats, snowmobiles, all-terrain vehicles, motorcycles, airplanes, helicopters, hovercraft, buses, trolleys, and railroad cars.
  • Representative examples of vehicle trim are also shown in FIG. 4, specifically bumper 415, mirror 425, grill 435, and wheel cover 445. Additional examples of vehicle trim include: interior trim components such as, for example, dashboard panels and consoles; and exterior components such as fender extensions, hub caps, trim rings for wheels, lamp housings, window lace (window surround), and other exterior facia components.
  • Methods of Making
  • FIG. 5 illustrates an exemplary process 500 for forming paint film composites according to the present invention and/or component layers thereof. Referring now to FIG. 5, reactive component(s) 503 is/are fed into dynamic mixer 510. The mixed components combine to form reactive composition 516 which is fed to rolling bank 515. While a typical method of forming reactive composition 516 is shown, it will be recognized that other suitable methods (for example, mechanical stirring) may also be used. Rolling bank 515 is disposed between first forming web 520 (which passes over roller 542) and second forming webs 521 which is unwound from feed roll 523, although other feed arrangements are also possible (especially if thermoformable substrate is used as one forming web). While the process depicted is typical for flexible forming webs, it will be recognized that individual sheets of thermoformable substrate may also be fed into the nip in like manner, but using a different feeding arrangement. First forming web 520 (after passing roller 542) and second forming web 521 advance toward and pass through nip 530.
  • As first and second forming webs 520, 521 pass through nip 530 formed by first metering element 540 (a platen) and second metering element 535 (a notch bar), entrapped air bubbles 517 are substantially or completely removed to give thin reactive film 550 sandwiched between first and second forming webs 520, 521. First and second metering elements 540, 535 define a nip gap 530.
  • After passing insulation barrier 560, thin reactive film 550 contacts heated platen 565 which facilitates curing of reactive composition 516 to form thin film 570 sandwiched between first and second forming webs 520, 521.
  • Multilayer articles according to the present disclosure can be made using exemplary process 500 in a variety of permutations. For example, in one embodiment thermoformable substrate stock may be one forming web and thin film 570 results in base layer 130.
  • In another exemplary embodiment, both forming webs may be release liners and thin film 570 results in base layer 130. After removing one of the forming webs adhesive is applied to the exposed surface of base layer 130, and the adhesive coated base layer is adhered to a thermoformable substrate stock.
  • In another exemplary embodiment, one forming webs may be thermoformable substrate with a base layer 240 contacting and permanently adhered thereto and the other forming web is a release liner. Thin film 570 results in transparent protective layer 250.
  • It will be at once apparent that numerous specific combinations are possible. Other forming webs include, for example, adhesive coated thermoformable substrate and adhesive coated protective liners.
  • Typically, reactive composition 516 generates heat as it reacts, the temperature of the rolling bank rises to a temperature above ambient. Hence, over time during a continuous process the temperature of rolling bank 515 rises until a steady state temperature is reached that balances heating and cooling effects on the rolling bank. Until the steady state is reached, the gap typically dynamically changes with time, which results in a thin film of varying thickness and profile. To mitigate this problem, at least a portion of at least one of first and second metering elements 540, 535, proximate the rolling bank is independently heated to a temperature, desirably at or above the contemporaneous temperature of the rolling bank, although less heating may also be used. As exemplified in FIG. 5, this may be accomplished using heating tape 585 secured to second metering element 535. This heating has the effect of reducing the time necessary to reach steady state operation and its attendant start up waste, and optionally thin film uniformity, especially in applications where uniform thickness of the thin film is important.
  • In some embodiments, (for example, those wherein one or both of the first and second forming webs 520, 521 are both release liners) one or both of the first and second forming webs 520, 521 is then removed to expose one or both surfaces of the thin film.
  • Suitable forming webs include those films which have sufficient integrity and flexibility to form and support the reactive thin film. The forming web may have any thickness as long as it has sufficient integrity and flexibility to be used in methods according to the present invention. In general, the films should be substantially continuous and nonporous, although in some cases, some porosity (for example, microporosity) may be acceptable. Examples of suitable forming webs include papers (including treated papers); foils; and polymeric films such as polyester films (for example, PET polyester films or polycaprolactone films), polycarbonate films, cellulosic films (for example, cellulose films), polyamide films, polyolefin films (for example, polyethylene films or polypropylene films), polyamide films, polyimide films, polyvinyl chloride films, or other polymer films; and combinations thereof.
  • If one or both of the forming webs is intended to function as a release liner, it may be treated with a release agent such as, for example, a silicone or a fluorochemical. A wide variety of suitable release liners are known in the art, and many are commercially available.
  • The first and second metering elements may have any suitable form. Exemplary metering elements include bars, notched bars, rolls, platens, slabs, doctor blades, knife edges, and combinations thereof. In general, they should be selected and positioned such that they form a substantially uniform gap prior to formation of the rolling bank.
  • The method depicted in FIG. 5 can be used to form thin films of a variety of thicknesses (for example, thicknesses up to one millimeter or more).
  • One or more of the metering elements may be heated directly or indirectly by any appropriate method including, for example, electrical heating (for example, by resistive heating coils or a heating tape), steam, infrared radiation, oil heating, thermal conduction, or induction heating. Heat may be supplied internally or externally to the first and/or second metering elements. Heating may be provided uniformly or non-uniformly along the length(s) of the first and/or second metering elements. For example, one or both of the ends of the metering element(s) may be independently heated more than the portion of the metering element(s) proximate to the rolling bank.
  • If heated the temperature of the first and/or second metering elements generally should not be sufficiently high that excessive curing of the rolling bank occurs.
  • Objects and advantages of this invention are further illustrated by the following non-limiting examples, but the particular materials and amounts thereof recited in these examples, as well as other conditions and details should not be construed to unduly limit this invention.
  • EXAMPLES
  • Unless otherwise noted, all parts, percentages, ratios, etc. in the Examples and the rest of the specification are by weight.
  • Table 1, below, lists materials used in the examples.
  • TABLE 1
    MATERIAL DESCRIPTION
    Alberdingk U 933 a water-based polyurethane available as Alberdingk U
    933 from Alberdingk Boley, Greensboro, NC.
    APU 1014 acrylic modified polyester-polyurethane dispersion
    available as Alberdingk APU 1014 from Alberdingk-
    Boley.
    Admex 770 medium-to-high molecular weight polymeric plasticizer
    based on adipic acid and phthalic acid available as
    Admex 770 from Velsicol Chemical Corporation,
    Rosemont, IL.
    AMP 95 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol available as AMP 95
    from Angus Chemical Co., Midland, MI.
    Bayhydrol 122 a water based polyurethane available as Bayhydrol 122 from
    Bayer Corp., Pittsburgh, PA.
    Black Polypropylene Sheet 508 micrometer impact modified polypropylene sheet,
    98% 9403 resin available from Huntsman Chemical,
    Salt Lake City, UT and 2% 1000110S black concentrate
    available from Clariant Corp., Holden, MA.
    Capa 2054 a linear polyester diol, molecular weight = 550 g/mole,
    available as Capa 2054 from Perstorp UK Limited,
    Warrington, Cheshire, UK.
    Capa 3031 a polycaprolactone polyester triol, molecular weight =
    300 g/mole, available as Capa 3031 from Perstorp UK
    Limited.
    Capa 3050 a polycaprolactone polyester triol, molecular weight =
    540 g/mol, available as Capa 3050 from Perstorp UK
    Limited.
    cellulose acetate butyrate- a leveling agent available as cellulose acetate butyrate-
    381-0.1 381-0.1 from Eastman Chemical Co. of Kingsport, TN.
    Cosorb MOH UV light absorber available as Cosorb MOH from 3M
    Company, St. Paul, MN.
    Cosorb OSG UV light absorber available as Cosorb OSG from 3M
    Company.
    Cromophtal Brown 5R azo condensate pigment available as Cromophtal
    Brown 5R from Ciba Specialty Chemicals Corporation,
    High Point, NC.
    Dabco T-12 urethane catalyst, dibutyltin dilaurate, available as
    Dabco T-12 from Air Products and Chemicals,
    Allentown, PA.
    Desmodur N 3300A aliphatic polyisocyanate based on hexamethylene
    diisocyanate, equivalent weight = 195 g/eq available as
    Desmodur N 3300A from Bayer Corp., Pittsburgh, PA
    Desmodur N 3390 aliphatic polyisocyanate based on hexamethylene
    diisocyanate, equivalent weight = 214 g/eq available as
    Desmodur N 3390 from Bayer Corp.
    Desmodur N 3600 aliphatic polyisocyanate based on hexamethylene
    diisocyanate, equivalent weight = 183 g/eq available as
    Desmodur N 3600 from Bayer Corp.
    Desmodur W bis(4-isocyanatocyclohexyl)methane diisocyanate
    available as Desmodur W from Bayer Corp.
    Disperplast P high molecular weight unsaturated polycarboxylic acid
    pigment dispersing agent available as Disperplast P
    from BYK-Chemie USA, Wallingford, CT.
    DMA N,N-dimethylacrylamide
    EC3960 epoxy primer available as Scotch-Weld Structural
    Adhesive Primer EC-3960 from 3M Company, St. Paul,
    MN.
    Edenol 9777 polymeric plasticizer based on 1,3-butanediyl
    polyadipate with 2-ethylhexanol available as Edenol
    9777 from Cognis Oleochemicals LLC, Cincinnati, OH.
    Ferro Black 15-40 weight percent carbon black dispersed in
    unsaturated polyester, available as Ferro Black (color
    no. 11-8805) from Ferro Corp., Edison, NJ.
    Fomrez 55-112 a polyester diol based on neopentyl glycol adipate,
    molecular weight = 1000 g/mole, available as Fomrez
    55-112 from Chemtura Corp., Middlebury, CT.
    Fomrez 55-225 a polyester diol based on neopentyl glycol adipate,
    molecular weight = 500 g/mole, available as Fomrez
    55-225 from Chemtura Corp., Middlebury, CT.
    HEA 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate available from Cognis,
    Cincinnati, OH.
    Irgacolor Yellow 2GLMA bismuth vanadate pigment available as Irgacolor
    Yellow 2GLMA from Ciba Specialty Chemicals
    Corporation, High Point, NC.
    Joncryl-578 an acrylic polyol available as Joncryl-578 from BASF
    Corp., Florham Park, NJ.
    Keyplast FL Yellow FPGN fluorescent dye available as Keyplast FL Yellow FPGN
    from Keystone Aniline Corporation, Chicago, IL.
    K-Flex 188 a polyester diol, molecular weight = 488 g/mole,
    available as K-Flex 188 from King Industries Inc.,
    Norwalk, CT.
    K-Flex XM-308 a linear, saturated polyester diol, molecular weight =
    432 g/mole, available as K-Flex XM-308 from King
    Industries Inc., Norwalk, CT.
    Krasol LBH 3000 hydrogenated hydroxyl-terminated butadiene supplied
    by Sartomer, Exton, PA.
    Macromelt 6240 polyamide polymer hot melt adhesive available as
    Macromelt MM-6240 from Henkel, Mississauga, ON,
    Canada.
    Macromelt MM-6240 polyamide polymer hot melt adhesive available as
    Macromelt MM-6240 from Henkel Adhesives, Elgin, IL.
    Metacure T-12 dibutyltin dilaurate catalyst available as Metacure T-12
    from Air Products and Chemicals, Allentown, PA.
    Monolite Green 674 copper phthalocyanine pigment available as Monolite
    Green 674 from Heucotech Ltd., Fairless Hills, PA.
    Neocryl CX-100 a polyaziridine crosslinker available as Neocryl CX-
    100 from DSM NeoResins of Wilmington, MA.
    Orange 11Y692 orange pigment dispersion available as Orange 11Y692
    from Penn Color, Doylestown, PA.
    Paraloid EXL2600 a methacrylate/styrene/butadiene core-shell polymer
    available as Paraloid EXL2600 from Rohm and Haas
    Co., Philadelphia, PA.
    PC-1667 a polycarbonate diol, molecular weight 860 g/mole,
    available as PC-1667 from Stahl USA, Peabody, MA.
    Raven 1200 Black black pigment dispersion, 10% Raven 1200 carbon
    black from Evonik-Degussa, Chester, PA, in 90%
    Fomrez 55-225.
    RD 2788 an automotive grade acrylic pressure-sensitive adhesive
    transfer tape.
    Reversacol Graphite photochromic dye available as Reversacol Graphite
    from Keystone Aniline Corporation, Chicago, IL.
    4298 UV Adhesion an adhesion promoter available as Scotch-Mount 4298
    Promoter UV Adhesion Promoter from 3M Company.
    Silberline GP 142 SV silver holographic flake pigment, 12 micrometers × 100
    micrometers × 50 micrometers, available as Silberline
    GP 142 SV from Silberline, Tamaqua, PA.
    T10 Release Liner a 2-mil (50-micrometer) single side release (silicone
    coated) polyester liner, available as Clearsil Release
    Liner T10 from CPFilms, Martinsville, VA.
    Tinuvin 123 bis-(1-octyloxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinyl) ester
    available as Tinuvin 123 from Ciba Specialty
    Chemicals, Tarrytown, NY.
    Tinuvin 292 bis(1,2,2,5,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidinyl) sebacate
    available as Tinuvin 292 from Ciba Specialty
    Chemicals.
    Tinuvin 328 a UV light absorber, 2-(2H-benzotriazol-2-yl)-4,6-
    ditertpentylphenol available as Tinuvin 328 from Ciba
    Specialty Chemicals.
    Tinuvin 405 UV light absorber, 2-[4-[(2-hydroxy-3-(2′-
    ethyl)hexyl)oxy]-2-hydroxyphenyl]-4,6-bis(2,4-
    dimethylphenyl)-1,3,5-triazine available as Tinuvin 405
    from Ciba Specialty Chemicals.
    TI-PURE R-960 titanium dioxide pigment available as TI-PURE R-960
    from E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Wilmington,
    DE.
    TMPTA trimethylolpropane triacrylate available from Sartomer
    Co., Exton, PA.
    Tone 2221 a linear polycaprolactone polyol, molecular weight =
    1000 g/mole, available as Tone 2221 from Dow
    Chemical Co., Midland, MI.
    Tone 301 a caprolactone triol, molecular weight = 300 g/mole,
    available as Tone 301 from Dow Chemical Co.
    Tone 305 a caprolactone triol, molecular weight = 550 g/mole,
    available as Tone 305 from Dow Chemical Co.
    Triton GR-7M a surfactant available as Triton GR-7M from Dow
    Chemical Co., Midland, MI.
    Unoxol Diol cycloaliphatic diol available as Unoxol Diol from Dow
    Chemical Co.
    Urethhall 4050-55 a polyester diol, molecular weight = 2040 g/mole,
    available as Urethhall 4050-55 from HallStar Co.,
    Chicago, IL.
    Uvitex OB optical brightener available as Uvitex OB from Ciba
    Specialty Chemicals Corporation, High Point, NC.
  • Series 100 Examples Preparative Example 101
  • A pigment dispersion paste was prepared that consisted of 19.8 parts of Cromophtal Brown 5R pigment, 0.99 part Disperplast P and 79.21 parts ADMEX 770. This mixture was first blended using a paddle mixer until a uniform consistent paste condition was reached, then ground using a 3-roll paint mill until a pigment grind of greater than or equal to 7.0 was reached according to ASTM D1210-05 “Standard Test Method for Fineness of Dispersion of Pigment-Vehicle Systems by Hegman-Type Gage”.
  • Preparative Example 102
  • A pigment dispersion paste was prepared as described in Preparative Example 101, except the mixture consisted of 22.87 parts Monolite Green 674, 0.91 part Disperplast P, and 76.22 parts ADMEX 770.
  • Preparative Example 103
  • A pigment dispersion paste was prepared as in Preparative Example 101 except the mixture consisted of 54.64 parts Irgacolor Yellow 2GLMA, 2.73 parts Disperplast P, and 42.63 parts ADMEX 770.
  • Preparative Example 104
  • A pigment dispersion paste was prepared as described in Preparative Example 101, except the mixture consisted of 57.8 parts TI-PURE R-960, 1.7 parts Disperplast P, and 40.5 parts Edenol 9777.
  • Preparative Example 105
  • A dye mixture was prepared by dissolving 1 part Reversacol Graphite dye into 99 parts K-Flex 188. The mixture was placed in a 70° C. oven for 24 hours which resulted in the dissolution of the dye in the K-Flex 188.
  • Preparative Example 106
  • A centrifugal resin mixer available as FlackTek Speedmixer DAC 150 FV from FlackTek Inc., Landrum, S.C., was used to mix 9.63 grams of K-Flex 188 with 8 grams of Desmodur N 3300A and 0.0368 grams of Dabco T-12 at a speed of 3450 rpm in a Max 40 mixing cup, available from FlackTek Inc. The mixture was then coated using a notched bar flatbed coating apparatus, as generally shown in FIG. 5, using a T10 silicone release coated, 63.5 micrometer thickness polyester release liner (CPFilms Inc., Martinsville, Va.) both above and below the coating mixture. The thickness of the gap between the notched bar and the flatbed was set at 127 micrometers. The mixture was poured onto the flatbed portion of the coating apparatus and the liners were pulled through the gap which created a rolling bank of the coating mixture. After going through the gap, the sample between the two liners was set aside and allowed to cure under ambient conditions for a minimum of 24 hours. The resulting film was a crosslinked polyurethane with a system functionality of 2.51 and with an isocyanate to polyol ratio of 1.05.
  • Preparative Examples 107-116
  • Preparative Example 106 was repeated for each example, except that the stoichiometric percentages of K-Flex 188 were replaced with 2-ethylhexanol for the purpose of reducing the system functionality, and hence the crosslink density of the polyurethane composition. The compositions of Examples 106-116 are reported in Table 101 below.
  • TABLE 101
    K- Desmodur System NCO/OH
    Preparative Flex 2-ethyl- Dabco N Func- equivalent
    Example 188 hexanol T-12 3300A tionality ratio
    106 9.63 0 0.0368 8.0 2.51 1.05
    107 9.15 0.26 0.0368 8.0 2.43 1.05
    108 8.67 0.51 0.0368 8.0 2.36 1.05
    109 8.19 0.77 0.0368 8.0 2.30 1.05
    110 7.71 1.03 0.0368 8.0 2.23 1.05
    111 7.22 1.28 0.0368 8.0 2.17 1.05
    112 6.74 1.54 0.0368 8.0 2.12 1.05
    113 6.26 1.8 0.0368 8.0 2.06 1.05
    114 5.78 2.05 0.0368 8.0 2.01 1.05
    115 5.3 2.31 0.0368 8.0 1.97 1.05
    116 4.82 2.57 0.0368 8.0 1.92 1.05
  • The films from Preparative Examples 106-116 were then cut into dog bone shaped samples in both the downweb or machine direction (MD, in the direction of coating) and crossweb or cross-direction (CD) orientations and tested according to ASTM D882-02 “Standard Test Method for Tensile Properties of Thin Plastic Sheeting”, with a 0.635 centimeter wide dog bone specimen, a crosshead gap setting of 5.1 cm and a crosshead speed of 25.4 centimeters per minute. The MD and CD tensile properties of the films are shown in Table 102 (below), wherein three replicates were tested and averaged for each film with the standard deviation shown in parentheses.
  • TABLE 102
    Peak Tensile Elongation at Young's Modulus,
    Strength, MPa Break, % MPa
    Preparative Thickness, Machine Crossweb Machine Crossweb Machine Crossweb
    Example micrometers Direction Direction Direction Direction Direction Direction
    106 127 33.1 (0.7) 29.6 (3.4)  85 (6)  78 (12) 490 (18) 442 (37)
    107 127 31.0 (2.8) 31.7 (3.4)  98 (2)  100 (13) 327 (46) 291 (43)
    108 127 28.3 (1.4) 22.8 (1.4) 107 (19)  84 (15)  128 (148) 248 (87)
    109 127 24.1 (0.7) 27.6 (2.1) 114 (5) 133 (8)  93 (106) 35 (3)
    110 127 22.1 (2.1) 26.2 (2.8) 154 (8) 157 (6) 30 (3) 36 (4)
    111 114 21.4 (2.1) 22.1 (1.4) 169 (8) 172 (6) 34 (3) 32 (4)
    112 114 14.5 (0.7) 39.3 (43) 178 (2)  137 (78) 23 (1)  475 (780)
    113 114  9.6 (0.7) 10.3 (0.7)  196 (10) 201 (4) 17 (2) 16 (4)
    114 114  5.5 (0.7)  5.5 (0.7) 218 (6) 222 (2)  7 (2)  9 (1)
    115 114  3.4 (0.0)  4.1 (0.7) 238 (6) 240 (8)   4 (0.3)  6 (2)
    116 102  1.4 (0.0)  2.1 (0.0)  245 (57)  272 (12)  6 (1)  1.5 (0.1)
  • The tensile properties of Preparative Examples 106-116 demonstrate that within experimental error there is no significant tensile property difference for any of the samples based on direction, indicating that the films of Preparative Examples 106-116 are mechanically isotropic with respect to length and width.
  • Preparative Examples 117-126
  • The procedure of Preparative Example 106 was repeated, except using compositions reported in Table 103 (below), wherein K-Flex 188 was replaced with Urethhall 4050-55, and glycerol was used as a means of increasing the system functionality of the composition, and hence the crosslink density, and Desmodur N 3300A was replaced with Desmodur W.
  • TABLE 103
    NCO/OH
    Preparative Urethhall Dabco System equivalent
    Example 4050-55 glycerol T-12 Desmodur W Functionality ratio
    117 14.83 0 0.0368 2 2.0 1.05
    118 13.35 0.04 0.0368 2 2.03 1.05
    119 11.86 0.09 0.0368 2 2.07 1.05
    120 10.38 0.13 0.0368 2 2.10 1.05
    121 13.35 0.27 0.0368 3 2.14 1.05
    122 11.12 0.33 0.0368 3 2.17 1.05
    123 11.86 0.54 0.0368 4 2.22 1.05
    124 11.12 0.78 0.0368 5 2.26 1.05
    125 8.9 1.07 0.0368 6 2.3 1.05
    126 5.19 1.41 0.0368 7 2.34 1.05
  • The tensile properties of Preparative Examples 117-126 were measured as in Preparative Examples 106-116 hereinabove with the results reported in Table 104 (below), wherein three replicates were tested and averaged for each film with the standard deviation shown in parentheses.
  • TABLE 104
    Peak Tensile Elongation Young's Modulus,
    Film of Strength, MPa at Break, % MPa
    Preparative Thickness, Machine Crossweb Machine Crossweb Machine Crossweb
    Example micrometers Direction Direction Direction Direction Direction Direction
    117 114 13.1 (0.7) 15.2 (4.9) 777 (22) 788 (64) 7.5 (1.2)  8.4 (2.0)
    118 114 22.8 (4)   17.9 (0.7) 740 (47) 698 (54) 12.9 (3.1)  10.5 (2.9)
    119 127 21.4 (4)   17.9 (3.4) 662 (32) 622 (11)  14 (3.2) 11.4 (1.8)
    120 114 22.1 (8)   15.9 (2.8) 578 (35) 549 (37) 16 (6)  12.1 (1.5)
    121 114 23.4 (12)  10.3 (8.3) 521 (3)   401 (113)  17 (8.5)  8.6 (7.6)
    122 102 25.5 (5.5) 32.4 (12)  421 (19) 454 (49)  20 (4.4)  26 (10)
    123 102 38.6 (2.1) 43.4 (4.1) 384 (12) 400 (12)  32 (7.1)   35 (3.8)
    124 102 44.8 (2.8) 33.1 (19)  298 (10) 244 (67)  33 (0.7)  29 (12)
    125 102 31.7 (8.3) 22.1 (2.8) 149 (39)  96 (25) 245 (11)  256 (13)
    126 102 35.8 (14)  44.1 (2.8)  7.3 (4.3)  7.4 (0.4) 780 (56)   869 (3.3)
  • The tensile properties of Preparative Examples 117-126 demonstrate that within experimental error there is no significant tensile property difference for any of the samples based on direction, indicating that the films of Preparative Examples 112-121 are mechanically isotropic with respect to length and width.
  • Preparative Example 122
  • Black Polypropylene Sheet was primed according to the following procedure. The film was air corona treated on both sides with 2.5 kiloWatts of energy and then fed to a gravure roll coater equipped with a 400 lines per inch quad patterned gravure cylinder and coated with a solution of 80% HEA and 20% TMPTA containing 0.01 part per hundred by weight (phr) of Keyplast FL Yellow FPGN at a line speed of 30.5 meters per minute. The web was then exposed to an electron beam source which delivered 5 Megarads of radiation at 175 kiloVolts accelerating voltage at 101 milliAmps of current. During and after exposure, the 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate was chemically grafted and polymerized to the polypropylene film and wound into rolls.
  • Preparative Example 123
  • Black Polypropylene Sheet was primed according to the following procedure. The uncoated side of the electron beam primed film from Preparative Example 22 was coated with a solution containing 0.01 phr Uvitex OB, in an 80/20 solution of DMA and TMPTA, using a 400 lines per inch quad patterned gravure cylinder at 30.5 meters per minute and sequentially exposed to 4 Megarads of electron beam radiation at an accelerating voltage of 175 kiloVolts and a current of 81 milliAmps.
  • Preparative Example 124
  • A 75 micrometer thick impact modified polypropylene film available as PP7035.E4 from ExxonMobil Corp., Irving, Tex., was primed according to the following procedure. The film was air corona treated on both sides with 2.5 kiloWatts of energy and then fed to a gravure roll coater equipped with a 400 lines per inch quad patterned gravure cylinder and coated with a solution of 80% HEA and 20% TMPTA containing 0.01 phr of Keyplast FL Yellow FPGN at a line speed of 30.5 meters per minute. The web was then exposed to an electron beam source which delivered 5 Megarads of radiation at 175 kiloVolts accelerating voltage at 101 milliAmps of current. During and after exposure, the 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate was chemically grafted and polymerized to the polypropylene film and wound into rolls.
  • Preparative Example 125
  • A 75 micrometer thick impact modified polypropylene film available as PP7035.E4 from ExxonMobil Corp., Irving, Tex., was primed according to the following procedure. The uncoated side of the electron beam primed film from Preparative Example 122 was coated with a solution containing 0.01 phr of Uvitex OB in an 80/20 solution of DMA and TMPTA, using a 400 lines per inch quad patterned gravure cylinder at 30.5 meters per minute and sequentially exposed to 4 Megarads of electron beam radiation at an accelerating voltage of 175 kiloVolts and a current of 81 milliAmps.
  • Example 101
  • The polyurethane composition of Preparative Example 106 was coated onto the 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate coated surface of the polypropylene sheetstock of Preparative Example 122 by replacing the bottom silicone release liner of Preparative Example 106 with the primed sheet of Preparative Example 122, which resulted in a crosslinked polyurethane coated polypropylene sheet. The sample was allowed to age for at least 24 hours under ambient conditions prior to testing. ASTM D3359-07 “Standard Test Methods for Measuring Adhesion by Tape Test”, Test Method B using a six cut lattice pattern, was performed on the sample using Scotch Premium Cellophane Tape 610 available from 3M Company, St. Paul, Minn. The adhesion of the polyurethane coating to the polypropylene sheet resulted in a classification of 5B, meaning 0% of the coating was removed, with 100% intercoat adhesion.
  • Example 102
  • The crosslinked polyurethane-coated polypropylene sheet of Example 101 was thermoformed using a pressure/vacuum thermoformer (Model 2024, produced by Labform Hydro-Trim Corporation, W. Nyack, N.Y.). An aluminum step mold was used to evaluate the thermoformable sheet's ability to conform to various geometric constraints. The mold, which had a width of 88 mm, had a cross-sectional surface profile from left to right as follows: 12 mm height for 14 mm horizontal (Area A), 3 mm height for 12 mm horizontal (Area B), 12 mm height for 19 mm horizontal (Area C), 6 mm height for 25 mm horizontal (Area D), 12 mm height for 19 mm horizontal (Area E), 25 mm height for 12 mm horizontal (Area F), 12 mm height for 19 mm horizontal (Area G), 25 mm height for 25 mm horizontal (Area H), and 16 mm height for 14 mm horizontal (Area I). The thermoforming conditions used consisted of exposing the sample to 400° F. (200° C.) top and bottom oven temperatures for 30 seconds with an 8 second forming time. The top pressure was 6.55 bar (655 kPa) and the bottom vacuum was 659 torr (87.9 kPa).
  • Area H was used to measure gloss after thermoforming. Preparative Example 124 exhibited a 0.71-cm radius of curvature at all inside corners and cracking of the polyurethane coating was noted on vertical surfaces adjacent to Areas D-I. The 60 degree gloss of the thermoformed surface was 85.6 gloss units as measured by a Gloss Meter manufactured by BYK-Gardner, Columbia, Md.
  • Examples 103-112
  • The coating compositions of Preparative Examples 107-117 were coated according to the procedure of Example 101 and thermoformed. Table 105 below reports the observed results of thermoforming.
  • TABLE 105
    Measured
    Corresponding 60 degree Areas Adjacent radius
    Preparative Gloss Which Vertical of curvature,
    Example Example in Area H Regions Cracked cm
    103 107 85.5 EFGHI 0.71
    104 108 84.6 DEFGHI 0.71
    105 109 83.7 DEFGHI 0.71
    106 110 85 DEFGHI 0.71
    107 111 81.5 DEFGHI 0.71
    108 112 76.4 FGH 0.71
    109 113 82.7 FGH 0.71
    110 114 79.4 FGH 0.71
    111 115 78.1 CDFGH 0.71
    112 116 71 GH 0.56
  • Examples 113-122
  • The coating compositions of Preparative Examples 106-116 were coated according to the procedure of Example 101 and thermoformed. Table 106 below reports the observed results of thermoforming.
  • TABLE 106
    Measured
    Corresponding 60 degree Areas Adjacent radius
    Preparative Gloss Which Vertical of curvature,
    Example Example in Area H Regions Cracked cm
    113 16 79.4 GH 0.635
    114 39 79.1 GH 0.610
    115 40 79.5 GH 0.622
    116 41 79.6 FGH 0.648
    117 42 81.5 FGH 0.635
    118 43 81.1 DEFGHI 0.660
    119 44 79.9 DEFGHI 0.660
    120 45 82.5 DEFGHI 0.660
    121 46 83.3 DEFGHI 0.660
    122 47 74.4 FGH 0.635
  • Example 123
  • Samples of the crosslinked polyurethane coated polypropylene sheet of Example 101 were prepared with increasing thicknesses of the polyurethane coating composition of Preparative Example 106. Each sample was evaluated for scratch resistance according to DaimlerChrysler specification LP-463DD-18-01 using a scratch and mar tester supplied by Taber Industries, Tonawanda, N.Y. The scratch resistance was determined by individual probes containing different weights that correspond to 5 Newtons, 7 Newtons, 10 Newtons, 15 Newtons, and 20 Newtons of force. The results are determined by specifying it on a scale of 1.0 to 5.0:1.0=no scratch; 2.0=very slight scratch; 3.0=slight scratch; 4.0=moderate scratch; 5.0=severe scratch. An example of the polypropylene sheet with no polyurethane coating was tested as a comparative example. The scratch test results are shown in Table 7 below.
  • TABLE 107
    Coating
    thickness, 5 7 10 15 20
    micrometers Newtons Newtons Newtons Newtons Newtons
    Immediately after Scratch and Mar Test
     51 2.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 5.0
    102 1.0 2.0 3.0 3.0 5.0
    254 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 3.0
    381 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0
    508 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.5
    uncoated 2.0 3.0 3.0 5.0 5.0
    Black
    Poly-
    propylene
    Sheet
    3 Months after Scratch and Mar Test
     51 1.5 2.0 3.0 3.0 5.0
    102 1.0 1.5 1.5 2.0 4.0
    254 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.5 2.0
    381 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.5
    508 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0
    uncoated 2.0 3.0 3.0 5.0 5.0
    Black
    Poly-
    propylene
    Sheet
  • The polyurethane film samples from Preparative Examples 106-126 were tested using a Differential Scanning calorimeter Model Q100 manufactured by TA Instruments, Newcastle, Del., to determine the glass transition temperature (Tg) in degrees Celsius of each film composition. The results are reported in Table 108 (below).
  • TABLE 108
    Film of
    Preparative
    Example Tg, ° C.
    106 32.60
    107 26.75
    108 30.33
    109 24.13
    110 17.74
    111 15.01
    112 13.3
    113 10.64
    114 6.94
    115 4.34
    116 1.48
    117 −47.05
    118 −46.48
    119 −46.08
    120 −46.33
    121 −46.44
    122 −46.28
    123 −46.53
    124 −47.81
    125 −49.44
    126 not measured
  • Example 124
  • A 29 micrometers thick multilayer optical film available from 3M Company was used as the bottom film to apply a polyurethane coating as in Preparative Example 106 with a gap setting of 76.2 micrometers. The coated optical film was then thermoformed as in Example 102, except using a cell phone as the mold.
  • Example 125
  • A 254 micrometers thick sheet of uncoated polycarbonate was substituted for the bottom liner to apply a polyurethane coating as in Preparative Example 106 with a gap setting of 50.8 micrometers. The coated polycarbonate was allowed to polymerize for at least 24 hours and thermoformed using the conditions of Example 102.
  • Example 126
  • A two-part epoxy composition (available as 3M Scotch-Weld Epoxy Adhesive DP105 Clear from 3M Company) was coated as in Preparative Example 106, except that a gap setting of 76.2 micrometers was used.
  • Example 127
  • A two-part silicone rubber compound (available as RTV664 from GE Silicones Waterford, N.Y.) was prepared by mixing ten parts by weight of Part A with one part by weight of Part B using a Flacktek Speedmixer DAC 150 FV as in Preparative Example 106. The mixture was then coated as in the procedure of Preparative Example 106 and the sample allowed to cure for 24 hours. The result was a highly flexible silicone film.
  • Example 128
  • A sample was prepared by adding 1.0 gram of Orange 11Y692 to the resin mixture of Preparative Example 119 and then coated onto a primed polypropylene sheet as in Example 101. The sample was aged at room temperature for at least 24 hours and then thermoformed as in Example 102. No cracking was observed in any areas of the polyurethane coating.
  • Series 200 Examples Film Coating Procedure 200
  • Polyurethane films were prepared using the coating apparatus as generally shown in FIG. 5 and the procedure described above in Preparative Example 106. The notched bar was heated using fluid heated at 120° F. (49° C.) circulated through the notched bar. Twelve-inch (30-cm) wide forming webs were used as both the top and bottom liners. The films were coated at a line speed of 5 feet per minute (1.5 m/min) The heated platen 565 had 5 zones, each 4 feet (1.2 m) long. The temperature of the first 4 zones was set to 180° F. (82.2° C.) while the last zone was at room temperature. The unwind tension for the top and bottom liners, and the rewind tension for the resultant coated film were all set to 20 lbs (89 N). The gap between the two liners at the nip formed by the notched bar and the flatbed was set to 4 mils (0.1 mm) After the film was coated and wound into a roll, it was conditioned at room temperature for at least 3 days prior to evaluation.
  • Film Preparation for Testing Procedure
  • For the determination of metal bending evaluation and Erichsenk scratch resistance, films of about 100 micrometer thickness were made according to Film Coating Procedure 200 with polyester film used as both the top and bottom liners.
  • For testing tensile and elongation properties, both liners were removed and 2.54 cm wide samples were prepared.
  • For metal bending, environmental cycling, accelerated weathering, and Erichsen scratch resistance tests, one of the liners was removed and the exposed side of the film was laminated to RD 2788 adhesive between two rolls with a nip pressure of 30 psi (130 N). The laminated samples were conditioned for one day before laminating the adhesive side to an unpainted sheet metal panel for metal bending and scratch resistance evaluation. The lamination of the film to the unpainted sheet metal was done between two rolls with a nip pressure of 30 psi (130 N). The laminate was conditioned at room temperature for one day and the top liner was removed before carrying out further tests.
  • Thermoforming Test
  • Thermoforming tests were done using a thermoformer available as a Hydro-trim Thermoformer, Labform Model 2024, from Hydro-trim Corporation of W. Nyack, N.Y. A 12 inches×12 inches (30 cm×30 cm) sheet was used in all the thermoforming experiments. The sheet to be thermoformed was softened by radiant heating panels above and below the sheet to provide controlled and uniform heating. The top and bottom radiant panels were set at 400° F. (204° C.). The softened plastic sheet was then formed using a combination of pressure forming and vacuum forming A vacuum of 25 in of Hg (85 kPa) and a forming pressure of 80 psi (0.56 MPa) were used in the forming operation. A heating time of 30 seconds and a forming time of 8 seconds were used in all the thermoforming experiments described.
  • The polyurethane composition to be tested was coated onto the grafted side of a polypropylene sheet made according to Preparative Example 122 using Film Coating Procedure 200. The polypropylene sheet was used as the bottom liner and a polyester film was used as the top liner. The film was always coated on the side with the 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate coating. After conditioning the coated roll for at least 3 days, it was cut into 12 inches×12 inches (30 cm×30 cm) sheets for thermoforming tests.
  • Three different molds were used in the thermoforming tests of the different samples:
      • 1. Dome-shaped mold—The inner diameter of the base of the dome was 3.5 inches (8.9 cm) and the height of the dome was 2.25 inches (5.8 cm). A sample was rated as “pass” if there was no cracking on the surface of the thermoformed dome and it was rated as “fail” if there was cracking on the surface of the thermoformed dome.
      • 2. Rectangular step mold—The dimensions of the rectangular step were 5.25 inches (13.3 cm)×3 inches (8 cm) by 0.75 inch (1.9 cm, height). The edges of the step were vertical. A sample was rated as “pass” if there was no cracking on the edge walls of the thermoformed rectangular step and it was rated as “fail” if there was cracking on the edge wall of the thermoformed rectangular step.
      • 3. Circular depth mold—The mold had a circular trough in a rectangular block 5.25 inches (13.3 cm)×3 inches (8 cm) by 0.75 inch (1.9 cm, height). The diameter of the circle was 19 mm and it was 2 mm deep. A sample was rated as “pass” if there was no cracking in the sample that was thermoformed into the circular trough and it was rated as “fail” if there was cracking in the sample that was thermoformed into the circular trough.
    Tensile and Elongation Properties Test
  • Tensile and elongation testing was performed on coated liner composite films after removing the top and bottom liners and was measured with a force measurement device available as MTS Renew Upgrade Instron, model 1122, from MTS Systems Corp., Eden Prairie, Minn., equipped with a 200 lb (890 N) load cell. The jaw gap between the crossheads was fixed at 4 inches (10 cm) and a crosshead speed of 20 in/min (50 cm/min) was used. Film samples of one inch (1.3 cm) width were used in the tensile and elongation tests.
  • Metal Bending Test
  • Metal bending evaluation was done on film laminated to metal. Cold rolled steel panels used for the metal bending test were obtained from ACT Laboratories, Hillsdale, Mich., as 4-inch×12-inch (10-cm×30-cm) panels with a thickness of 32 mils (0.81 mm) The steel had a primer (ED5100) e-coated on both sides. The steel panels were cut into 4-inch×1-inch (10-cm×1.3-cm) steel coupons for the metal bending test. The film/metal laminate was bent with a metal bender to form a shape that had an internal bending angle of 45 degrees and an internal bending radius of 0.031 inch (0.79 mm) The film was observed after one day for any crack formation. A film sample was rated as “pass” if there was no tear in the film (near the bend) through which the metal substrate underneath was visible. A film sample was rated as “fail” if there was even a slight visible tear in the film near the bend.
  • Environmental Cycling Test
  • The environmental cycling test was done on a film/metal laminate. The laminate was bent with a metal bender as described in the metal bending test above and the bent samples were aged in the environmental chamber for 1008 hrs. Each cycle in the environmental chamber had the following conditions and the cycles were repeated over a 1008 hour period.
  • Conditions during each cycle in the environmental chamber were:
      • 17 hours at −30° C.,
      • 72 hours at 80° C.,
      • 24 hours at 38° C. and 100% relative humidity,
      • 7 hours at −30° C.,
      • 17 hours at 38° C. and 100% relative humidity,
      • 7 hours at 80° C.,
      • 24 hours at 38° C. and 100% relative humidity.
        A film sample was rated as “pass” if there was no evidence of cracking, loss of adhesion or other mode of failure after 1008 hours in the environmental chamber.
  • Equations for terms used in Tables 202, 205, 206, and 207 are given below, wherein “wt %” means percent by weight based on the total weight of resin.

  • Crosslink Density(wt %)=(weight of short chain polyol+weight of polyisocyanate)/total weight of resin
  • wherein:
      • short chain polyols have an equivalent weight≦185 g/eq and a functionality>2; and
      • polyisocyanates have functionality>2.

  • Wt % of 1,4-Butanediol=(weight of 1,4-butanediol)/total weight of resin

  • Wt % of Caprolactonetriol=(weight of caprolactone triol)/total weight of resin

  • Wt % of High Molecular Weight Polyol=(Weight of high molecular weight polyol)/total weight of resin
      • wherein high molecular weight polyols have an equivalent weight>850 g/eq and a functionality≧2

  • Wt % of Low Molecular Weight Polyol=(Weight of low molecular weight polyol)/total weight of resin
  • wherein low molecular weight polyols have an equivalent weight≦850 g/eq, but >185 g/eq and a functionality≧2
  • Two-Part Urethane Formulations 201 to 205
  • Table 202 (below) shows Formulations 201 through 205 that were combined as Part A and Part B.
  • TABLE 202
    Formulation, parts
    Charge Material 201 202 203 204 205
    Part A 1 Fomrez 55-112 50.3 57.3 62.3 17.8 17.8
    2 Fomrez 55-225 0 0 0 7 36
    3 Capa 3031 0 0 0 31 31
    4 1,4-butanediol 23.5 16.5 11.5 0 0
    5 Tinuvin 292 3 3 3 6 6
    6 Tinuvin 405 3 3 3 6 6
    7 Tinuvin 328 0 0 0 3 3
    8 Dabco T-12 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
    9 34B662 Black 20 20 20 29 0
    Pigment
    Dispersion
    Part B 10 Desmodur W 95 82 68 0 0
    11 Fomrez 55-112 5 18 32 0 0
    12 Desmodur N 0 0 0 100 100
    3300 A
    Hard 59.3 49.3 39.8 65.5 66.5
    Segment,
    wt %
  • Preparation of Clear Coat 201
  • A solvent blend was prepared in a glass jar by adding 6.42 grams of methyl isobutyl ketone, 6.38 grams of n-butyl acetate, 37.6 grams of xylene, and 14.8 grams of propylene glycol methyl ether acetate. While the solvent blend was being agitated, 2 grams of cellulose acetate butyrate-381-0.1, 17.57 grams of Joncryl-578, 8.66 grams of Capa 2054, 1.33 grams of Tinuvin 292, 5.24 grams of Cosorb MOH, and 0.0024 grams of Metacure T-12 were added. The mixture was agitated for 20 minutes until it was homogeneous. Desmodur N 3390 (17 grams) was added into 100 grams of the solution mixture and the combined ingredients were then stirred for 10 minutes. The solution was coated on a melamine-acrylic coated releasable polyester carrier web at about 1 mil (0.03 mm) wet thickness to obtain a 0.4 mil (0.001 mm) dry thickness. The coating was dried and partially cured for 30 seconds at 150° F. (66° C.), 30 seconds at 225° F. (107° C.) and 30 seconds at 265° F. (129° C.).
  • Bayhydrol 122 (100 grams) was placed into a glass jar along with 0.2 grams of AMP 95, 1.6 grams of Cosorb OSG, 1.3 grams of Tinuvin 292, 8.0 grams of butyl carbitol, and 0.2 grams of Triton GR-7M. De-ionized water was added into the solution mixture to control the solution viscosity to between 100 centipoise (100 mPa-sec) and 200 centipoise (200 mPa-sec). Prior to coating, 3.0 grams of Neocryl CX-100 was added into 100 grams of the prepared solution mixture. The water-based solution was agitated for 10 minutes and was then coated onto the above partially cured solvent-based coating at a 50 micrometer wet thickness to obtain a 13 micrometer dry thickness. The coating was dried and cured for 30 seconds at 175° F. (79° C.), 30 seconds at 245° F. (118° C.) and 30 seconds at 285° F. (141° C.).
  • Preparation of Clear Coat 202
  • Alberdingk U 933 (83.78 grams) was placed into a glass jar along with 8.47 grams of butyl carbitol, 0.3 grams of Triton GR-7M, 0.03 grams of AMP 95, 1.08 grams of Cosorb OSG, and 0.45 grams of Tinuvin 123 and agitated for 10 minutes. The solution mixture was diluted with de-ionized water and its viscosity was kept to between 50 centipoise (50 mPa-sec) and 120 centipoise (120 mPa-sec). Neocryl CX-100 (1.78 grams) was added to 100 grams of the coating mixture solution prior to coating. The solution was coated at a 50-micrometer wet thickness on a standard polyester carrier web to obtain about a 13 micrometer dry thickness. The coating was dried and cured for 30 seconds at 175° F. (79° C.), 30 seconds at 245° F. (118° C.) and 30 seconds at 285° F. (141° C.).
  • Preparation of Clear Coat 203
  • Clear Coat 203 was prepared by mixing Part A and Part B of Formulation 205 (shown in Table 202) at a 1:1 ratio of Part A to Part B using an in-line static mixer, and coated according to Film Coating Procedure 200 above. The coating (38 micrometer thickness) was sandwiched between two T10 Release Liners, resulting in a partially cured transparent film. One of the liners was removed leaving an exposed polyurethane transparent layer.
  • Example 201
  • Part A of Formulation 201 was made using the following procedure. Charges 1 to 4 were added into a glass jar and agitated. The mixture was then heated to 100° C. Charges 5 to 8 were then added while the temperature was still at about 100° C., and then agitated thoroughly to make sure all the ingredients were well dissolved in the mixture. After all the ingredients were dissolved, charge 9 was added into the mixture and agitated for about 10 minutes to make sure the mixture was uniformly mixed. The resultant black resin mixture was vacuum-degassed at 60° C. for at least 12 hours.
  • Part B of Formulation 201 was prepared by mixing charges 10 to 12, and agitating the mixture for 1 hour at 70° C.
  • Part A was mixed with the Part B in a 1:1 ratio using an in-line static mixer, and coated at a thickness of 100 micrometers between the Clear Coat 201 and Black Polypropylene Sheet according to Film Coating Procedure 200 above.
  • The resulting opaque color layer/transparent clear layer multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing Procedure described above.
  • Example 202
  • Example 201 was repeated, except that Clear Coat 202 was used instead of Clear Coat 201. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203. The samples that were thermoformed with dome-shaped mold were subjected to environmental cycling test. The environmental cycling test results are reported in Table 204.
  • Example 203
  • Example 201 was repeated, except that Clear Coat 201 was replaced with T10 Release Liner. The resulting opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 204
  • Example 201 was repeated, except that the Black Polypropylene Sheet was replaced by a T10 Release Liner. The resulting opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 205
  • Example 201 was repeated, except that the Black Polypropylene Sheet was replaced by a T10 Release Liner, and Clear Coat 202 was used instead of Clear Coat 201. The resultant opaque multilayer article was evaluated by the Tensile Elongation Test procedure. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 206
  • Example 201 was repeated, except that Part A and Part B of Formulation 202 were used instead of those of Formulation 201. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203. The samples that were thermoformed with dome-shaped mold were subjected to environmental cycling test. The environmental cycling test results are reported in Table 204.
  • Example 207
  • Example 206 was repeated, except that Clear Coat 201 was replaced by Clear Coat 202. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203. The samples that were thermoformed with dome-shaped mold were subjected to environmental cycling test. The environmental cycling test results are reported in Table 204.
  • Example 208
  • Example 206 was repeated, except that no Clear Coat 201 was present. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 209
  • Example 206 was repeated except that Black Polypropylene Sheet was replaced by a T10 Release Liner. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 210
  • Example 206 was repeated, except that Black Polypropylene Sheet was replaced by a T10 Release Liner, and Clear Coat 202 was used in place of Clear Coat 201. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 211
  • Example 201 was repeated, except that Part A and Part B of Formulation 203 were used instead of those of Formulation 201. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203. The samples that were thermoformed with dome-shaped mold were subjected to environmental cycling test. The environmental cycling test results are reported in Table 204.
  • Example 212
  • Example 211 was repeated, except that Clear Coat 201 was replaced by Clear Coat 202. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203. The samples that were thermoformed with dome-shaped mold were subjected to environmental cycling test. The environmental cycling test results are reported in Table 204.
  • Example 213
  • Example 211 was repeated, except that no Clear Coat 201 was present. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 214
  • Example 211 was repeated, except that Black Polypropylene Sheet was replaced by a T10 Release Liner. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 215
  • Example 211 was repeated, except that Black Polypropylene Sheet was replaced by a T10 Release Liner, and Clear Coat 202 was used in place of Clear Coat 201. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 216
  • Example 201 was repeated, except that Part A and Part B of Formulation 204 were used instead of those of Formulation 201. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 217
  • Example 216 was repeated, except that Clear Coat 201 was replaced by Clear Coat 202. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 218
  • Example 216 was repeated, except that no Clear Coat 201 was present. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 219
  • Example 216 was repeated except that the Black Polypropylene Sheet was replaced by a T10 Release Liner. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 220
  • Example 211 was repeated, except that the Black Polypropylene Sheet was replaced by a T10 Release Liner, and Clear Coat 202 was used in place of Clear Coat 201. The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Preparative Example 201
  • Example 201 was repeated, except that Part A and Part B of Formulation 201 were mixed and coated between two T10 Release Liners. The resultant opaque polyurethane film was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure, and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Preparative Example 202
  • Preparative Example 201 was repeated, except that Part A and Part B of Formulation 201 were replaced by those of Formulation 202. The resultant opaque polyurethane film was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure, and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Preparative Example 203
  • Preparative Example 201 was repeated, except that Part A and Part B of Formulation 201 were replaced by those of Formulation 203. The resultant opaque polyurethane film was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure, and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Preparative Example 204
  • Preparative Example 201 was repeated, except that Part A and Part B of Formulation 201 were replaced by those of Formulation 204. The resultant opaque polyurethane film was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure, and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 221
  • Example 201 was repeated, except that Clear Coat 203 was used in place of Clear Coat 201, and Part A and Part B of Formulation 204 were used in place of those of Formulation 201, and the Black Polypropylene Sheet was replaced by a T10 Release Liner. The resultant opaque multilayer film was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure, and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 222
  • Example 221 was repeated, except that Part A and Part B of Formulation 202 were used instead of those of Formulation 204. The resultant opaque polyurethane film was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure, and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 223
  • Example 221 was repeated, except that after removal of the liner adjacent the opaque black polyurethane film the exposed film layer was laminated to RD 2788 at 6 feet per minute (1.8 m/min) and a pressure of 30 psi (1.4 kPa). The release liner on the RD 2788 was peeled away and the adhesive side was laminated to Black Polypropylene Sheet at 30 feet per minute (9.1 m/min) and at a pressure of 30 psi (1.4 kPa). The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • Example 224
  • Example 221 was repeated, except that after removal of the liner adjacent the opaque black polyurethane film the exposed film layer was laminated to RD 2788 at 6 feet per minute (1.8 m/min) and a pressure of 30 psi (1.4 kPa). The release liner on the RD 2788 was peeled away and the adhesive side was laminated to Black Polypropylene Sheet at 30 feet per minute (9.1 m/min) and at a pressure of 30 psi (1.4 kPa). The resultant opaque multilayer article was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure and tested according to the Thermoforming Test. Results are reported in Table 203.
  • In Table 203 (below),“NM” means not measured.
  • TABLE 203
    Thermoforming Test
    Percent Elongation Circular Rectangular Dome
    Example at Break Depth Mold Step Mold Mold
    201 NM pass pass pass
    202 NM pass pass pass
    203 NM pass pass pass
    204 very brittle NM NM NM
    205 very brittle NM NM NM
    206 NM pass pass pass
    207 NM pass pass pass
    208 NM pass pass pass
    209 213 NM NM NM
    210 303 NM NM NM
    211 NM pass pass pass
    212 NM pass pass pass
    213 NM pass pass pass
    214 188 NM NM NM
    215 323 NM NM NM
    216 NM pass fail fail
    217 NM pass fail fail
    218 NM pass fail fail
    219 167 NM NM NM
    220 153 NM NM NM
    Preparative very brittle NM NM NM
    Ex. 201
    Preparative 341 NM NM NM
    Ex. 202
    Preparative 829 NM NM NM
    Ex. 203
    Preparative  85 NM NM NM
    Ex. 204
    221 199 NM NM NM
    222 198 NM NM NM
    223 NM pass fail fail
    224 NM pass fail fail
  • TABLE 204
    Example Environmental Cycling Test
    201 pass
    202 pass
    206 pass
    207 pass
    211 pass
    212 pass
  • Example 225
  • The ingredients of Part A listed for Example 225 in Table 205, were placed (with agitation), into a glass jar. The mixture was degassed under vacuum at 60° C. for 12 hours. Part A was mixed with Part B listed for Example 225 in Table 205 and coated between two T10 Release Liners at a thickness of 100 micrometers, and also coated between a T10 release Liner as top liner and Black Polypropylene Sheet as the bottom liner at a 100 micrometer thickness. The coated polyurethane film was cured as described in Example 201. The resulting opaque polyurethane film (between liners) was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure, and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test and/or Thermoforming Test with the results shown in Table 205 below.
  • Examples 226-235
  • Examples 226-235 were prepared as in Example 225, except that the compositions of Part A and Part B were varied as shown in Tables 205, 206, and 207.
  • The resulting opaque polyurethane film (between liners) was prepared for testing according to the Film Preparation for Testing procedure, and tested according to the Tensile Elongation Test and/or Thermoforming Test with the results shown in Tables 205-207 below.
  • TABLE 205
    Example Example Example Example
    225 226 227 228
    Part A
    1,4-butanediol 0 9 g 16 g 22.5 g
    Fomrez 55-225 99.85 g 90.85 g 83.85 g 58.5 g
    Dabco T-12 0.15 g 0.15 g 0.15 g 0.1 g
    Part B
    Desmodur W 54.5 g 76.7 g 94.1 g 100 g
    Curing Ratio A/B 100/54.5 100/76.7 100/94.1 81.1/100
    Crosslink Density, 0 0 0 0
    Wt %
    Wt % 1,4-butanediol 0 5.10 8.24 12.40
    Wt % caprolactonetriol 0 0 0 0
    Wt % high MW Polyol 0 0 0 0
    Wt % of low MW 64.6 51.4 43.2 32.3
    Polyol
    Hard Segment Wt % 35.3 48.5 56.7 67.6
    Percent Elongation at 32 235 151 66
    Break
    Rectangular Step Mold pass pass pass fail
  • TABLE 206
    Example Example Example Example Example Example
    227 228 229 230 231 232
    Part A
    1,4-butanediol 16 g 22.5 g 0 0 22.5 g 16 g
    Fomrez 55-225 83.85 g 58.5 g 79.9 g 0 0 0
    Fomrez 55-112 0 0 0 79.85 g 58.45 g 83.85 g
    Capa 3031 0 0 20 g 20 g 0 0
    Dabco T-12 0.15 g 0.1 g 0.1 g 0.15 g 0.15 g 0.15 g
    Part B
    Desmodur W 94.1 g 100 g 70.8 g 49.1 g 84.1 g 71.4 g
    Curing Ratio A/B 100/94.1 81.1/100 100/70.8 100/49.1 81.1/84.1 100/71.4
    Crosslink Density, Wt % 0 0 11.71 13.41 0 0
    Wt % 1,4-butanediol 8.24 12.40 0 0 13.60 9.33
    Wt % caprolactone triol 0 0 11.71 13.41 0 0
    Wt % high MW Polyol 0 0 0 53.55 35.40 48.90
    Wt % of low MW Polyol 43.20 32.30 46.78 0 0 0
    Hard Segment Wt % 56.70 67.60 53.20 46.34 64.50 51.00
    Percent Elongation at Break 151 66 73 236 72 142
    Thermoforming Test, pass fail fail pass pass pass
    Rectangular Step mold
  • TABLE 207
    Example Example Example Example
    230 233 234 235
    Part A
    FOMREZ 55-112 79.85 g 94.85 g 63.85 g 49.9 g
    CAPA 3031 20 g 5 g 36 g 50 gm
    DABCO T-12 0.15 g 0.15 g 0.15 g 0.1 g
    Total 100 g 100 g 100 g 100 g
    Part B
    DESMODUR W 49.1 g 32.7 g 66.5 g 81.7 g
    Curing Ratio A/B 100/49.1 100/32.7 100/66.5 100/81.7
    Crosslink Density, Wt % 13.41 3.77 21.62 27.50
    Wt % 1,4-butanediol 0 0 0 0
    Wt % caprolactone triol 13.41 3.77 21.62 27.50
    Wt % high MW Polyol 53.55 71.47 38.35 27.46
    Wt % of low MW Polyol 0 0 0 0
    Hard Segment Wt % 46.34 28.40 61.56 72.50
    Percent Elongation 236 402 10 104
    at Break
    Thermoforming Test, pass pass pass fail
    Rectangular Step Mold
  • Series 300 Examples Preparative Example 301
  • Unoxol Diol (5.5 grams) was placed into a plastic beaker and degassed in a vacuum oven (30 in Hg vacuum, 101 kPa vacuum), for 30 minutes, at 80° C. The diol was then cooled to ambient temperature. Desmodur N 3300A (14.72 grams) was added and the reactants were then stirred by hand for approximately one minute. Dabco T-12 (0.030 grams) was added to the contents of the beaker, mixed by hand for 15 seconds, and then immediately coated between two silicone coated paper liners (from CPFilms Inc., Martinsville, Va.) using a conventional lab-scale knife coating apparatus, which was nominally gauged to provide for a film thickness of 0.3 mm.
  • The resultant transparent film was sandwiched between the liners. This construction was then placed in an 80° C. oven for 24 hours, removed, and placed at ambient temperature for an additional 2 weeks.
  • Thermoforming trials were performed on a Rotary Vacuum Former, manufactured by Custom Manufacturing Incorporated (CMI, Gladwin, Mich.). A 6-inch (15-cm) square film was cut from the sample prepared by the procedure above, placed onto a vacuum mold, and secured with masking tape. The top pre-heat temperature was set at 600° F. (316° C.). The stage of the vacuum former was raised, heated from the pre-heater above the mold for approximately 3 minutes, a vacuum (1 mm Hg, 133 Pa) was applied for a minute, and the mold was removed from the vacuum former and allowed to cool to below the glass transition of the polyurethane before removing the sample. A well-defined shape was produced from this film sample.
  • Example 301
  • K-Flex 188 (8.50 g), PC-1667 (8.50 g), and Ferro Black (0.34 g) were combined in a plastic beaker and degassed in a vacuum oven (1 mm Hg, 133 Pa), for 30 minutes, at 80° C. The diols were cooled to 50° C. and Desmodur N 3300 A (9.94 g) was added and stirred by hand for approximately one minute. Dabco T-12 (0.040 g) was added and the combined ingredients were mixed for 15 seconds, and immediately coated between a silicone coated PET liner and Makrofol (10 mil DE1-1 modified polycarbonate from Sheffield Plastics, Sheffield, Mass.) using a lab-scale knife coating station, which was nominally set for a topcoat thickness of 5 mil (0.13 mm) The coated sheet was placed in an oven at 80° C. for 24 hours prior to testing. Thermoforming trials were performed using a rotary vacuum-former. The films were automatically advanced through the pre-heat stages, with a dwell in the last pre-heat station of 47 seconds at 600° F. (316° C.). Sufficient temperature was reached for the construction to begin to sag. The stage of the vacuum former was raised as the stage was moved into position, and heated from the pre-heater above the mold for approximately 30 seconds. Vacuum (1 mm Hg vacuum, 133 Pa) was applied as soon as the construction was in contact with the mold. The mold was then removed from the film. A defined shape was observed with no evidence of delamination or cracking.
  • Example 302
  • The procedure for Example 301 was repeated, except that the reactive composition was coated on a 30 mils (0.8 mm) thick sheet of a modified poly(methyl methacrylate) resin (available as Acrylite ZK-6 from Cyro Industries, Parsippany, N.J.). Good adhesion was observed with direct application of the formulation to the poly(methyl methacrylate), as well as comparable results for the thermoformed part—no indication of delamination or cracking.
  • Characterization of Solvent-Based Paint-Film Polyurethanes as Prepared in a Pan
  • The following experiments demonstrate the effect of including solvent on the density and glass transition of paint film polyurethane compositions produced by reacting a polyester polyol and a polyisocyanate. The solvents used in this study include toluene, ethyl acetate, MIBK (methyl isobutyl ketone), and THF (tetrahydrofuran). The solvents were dried over 4 angstrom molecular sieves for 24 hours and water determination was performed by Karl Fischer titration prior to use.
  • The general method for preparing each trial was conducted as follows. K-FLEX 188 (100% active polyester polyol, King Industries, Norwalk, Conn.) was added to a plastic beaker and degassed in a vacuum oven (30 in. Hg vacuum, 0.76 m Hg vacuum) for 30 minutes at 80° C. The polyol was then cooled to ambient temperature. For the examples, which contained solvent, the polyol and solvent were blended with a stir stick until a homogeneous mixture was formed. The catalyst DABCO T12 (dibutyltin dilaurate, Air Products, Allentown, Pa.) was added to the cup, followed by mixing by hand. DESMODUR N3300 (HDI (1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate) trimer from Bayer Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pa.) was added at the desired level, mixed for 15 seconds by hand, and then mixed using the SPEED MIXER DAC 150 FVZ, (FlackTek Inc., Landrum, S.C.) for 15 seconds, at 3600 rpm. Note that DESMODUR W (dicyclohexylmethane-4,4′-diisocyanate from Bayer Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pa.) was used for selected samples in this study.
  • When mixing was completed, 12.0 g of each sample was poured into aluminum weighing dishes. The individual samples were placed in a fume hood with an inverted plastic beaker over the aluminum pan. The samples were left undisturbed for 48-60 hrs before analysis, or further conditioned at 70° C., or at 120° C. The data for density, glass transition temperature (Tg), and percent weight loss is recorded in Tables S2-S4.
  • TABLE S1
    K-FLEX DESMODUR DESMODUR
    SOLVENT, 188, N3300, W, DABCO
    SAMPLE SOLVENT parts parts parts parts T12, parts
    S1A control 0 12.80 11.61 0 0.04
    S1B control 0 13.16 11.24 0 0.04
    S1C  5% toluene 1.25 12.60 11.24 0 0.04
    S1D 10% 2.56 12.0 10.91 0 0.03
    toluene
    S1E 10% 2.56 12.51 10.38 0 0.03
    toluene
    S1F 30% 7.36 9.23 8.29 0 0.03
    toluene
    S1G 50% 12.41 6.47 5.93 0 0.03
    toluene
    S1H  5% ethyl 1.30 12.55 11.45 0 0.04
    acetate
    S1I 10% ethyl 2.56 12.07 11.01 0 0.03
    acetate
    S1J 10% ethyl 2.55 12.55 10.43 0 0.03
    acetate
    S1K 30% ethyl 7.43 9.07 8.25 0 0.03
    acetate
    S1L 50% ethyl 12.48 6.53 6.00 0 0.02
    acetate
    S1M  5% MIBK 1.28 12.55 11.44 0 0.04
    S1N 10% MIBK 2.60 12.03 10.92 0 0.03
    S1O 10% MIBK 2.55 12.50 10.45 0 0.03
    S1P 30% MIBK 7.40 9.02 8.24 0 0.03
    S1Q 50% MIBK 12.42 6.50 5.93 0 0.02
    S1R  5% THF 1.27 12.50 11.52 0 0.04
    S1S 10% THF 2.55 12.01 10.91 0 0.03
    S1T 10% THF 2.56 12.55 11.61 0 0.03
    S1U 30% THF 7.39 9.00 8.21 0 0.03
    S1V 50% THF 12.49 6.54 5.92 0 0.02
    S1W control 0 15.57 0 9.61 0.04
    S1X control 0 16.05 0 9.04 0.04
    S1Y 10% ethyl 2.53 14.08 0 8.72 0.03
    acetate
    S1Z 10% ethyl 2.52 14.57 0 8.22 0.03
    acetate
  • Tg measurements reported in Table S2 were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) using a TA Instruments differential scanning calorimeter Model Q100 using crimped aluminum sample pans. The following protocol was used for first and second cycle: First Cycle: ramp from room temp to −60° C. at 20° C./min; ramp from −60° C. to 80° C. at 20° C./min; and Second Cycle: ramp from 80° C. to −60° C. at 50° C./min; ramp from −60° C. to 80° C. at 20° C./min. The densities were determined using the Archimedes method. In Tables S2 and S3, * indicates a poor baseline from which to calculate data. In Table S4, ** indicates no data due to excessive foaming of sample.
  • TABLE S2
    Percent (%)
    weight loss,
    60 hrs at
    Room
    DENSITY, Tg by DSC, Temperature
    SAMPLE SOLVENT grams/mL ° C. (RT)
    S1A control 1.180 31.43 0.05
    S1B control 1.175 32.75 0.03
    S1C  5% toluene 1.160 14.07 0.01
    S1D 10% toluene 1.146 −1.47 −0.08
    S1E 10% toluene 1.141 −2.50 −0.02
    S1F 30% toluene 1.108 −18.87 −4.19
    S1G 50% toluene 1.105 −22.04 −16.60
    S1H  5% ethyl acetate 1.160 1.2 −0.01
    S1I 10% ethyl acetate 1.148 −12.67 −0.16
    S1J 10% ethyl acetate 1.150 −11.98 −0.08
    S1K 30% ethyl acetate 1.122 −8.43 −6.29
    S1L 50% ethyl acetate 1.126 −20.06 −17.11
    S1M  5% MIBK 1.154 8.08 −0.01
    S1N 10% MIBK 1.133 −8.95 −0.07
    S1O 10% MIBK 1.132 −8.88 −0.03
    S1P 30% MIBK 1.076 −15.72 −3.81
    S1Q 50% MIBK 1.064 −18.72 −15.87
    S1R  5% THF 1.158 6.96 −0.03
    S1S 10% THF 1.143 −5.07 −0.04
    S1T 10% THF 1.147 −2.39 −0.07
    S1U 30% THF 1.112 −22.79 −4.96
    S1V 50% THF 1.112 −26.78 −16.73
    S1W control 1.138 * 0.02
    S1X control 1.141 * 0.03
    S1Y 10% ethyl acetate 0.876 9.85 −0.27
    S1Z 10% ethyl acetate 0.937 7.12 −0.05
  • TABLE S3
    PERCENT
    WEIGHT
    Tg by LOSS, 36 hrs
    DENSITY, DSC, at RT, 24 hrs
    SAMPLE SOLVENT grams/mL ° C. at 70° C.
    S1A control 1.179 28.07 −0.01
    S1B control 1.178 * 0.01
    S1C  5% toluene 1.163 10.89 −0.26
    S1D 10% toluene 1.148 −2.41 −0.91
    S1E 10% toluene 1.146 −2.15 −0.57
    S1F 30% toluene 1.127 −5.86 −8.38
    S1G 50% toluene 1.122 −5.22 −20.47
    S1H  5% ethyl acetate 1.168 3.80 −0.17
    S1I 10% ethyl acetate 1.158 −2.00 −1.10
    S1J 10% ethyl acetate 1.154 −6.97 −1.00
    S1K 30% ethyl acetate 1.146 −9.04 −9.80
    S1L 50% ethyl acetate 1.153 −14.94 −20.48
    S1M  5% MIBK 1.154 9.46 −0.04
    S1N 10% MIBK 1.133 −4.71 −0.74
    S1O 10% MIBK 1.134 −8.36 −0.61
    S1P 30% MIBK 1.107 −22.68 −7.99
    S1Q 50% MIBK 1.108 −14.98 −21.10
    S1R  5% THF 1.160 9.30 −0.16
    S1S 10% THF 1.152 −5.22 −0.70
    S1T 10% THF 1.149 −4.32 −0.59
    S1U 30% THF 1.135 −8.31 −8.52
    S1V 50% THF 1.137 −18.42 −19.74
    S1W control 1.084 * −0.06
    S1X control 1.131 * −0.2
    S1Y 10% ethyl acetate 0.497 38.60 −0.91
    S1Z 10% ethyl acetate 0.837 10.99 −0.48
  • TABLE S4
    PERCENT
    WEIGHT
    LOSS, 60 hrs at
    DENSITY, Tg by DSC, RT, 24 hrs at
    SAMPLE SOLVENT grams/mL ° C. 120° C.
    S1A control 1.176 38.23 −0.05
    S1B control 1.177 * −0.02
    S1C  5% toluene 1.172 34.89 −1.20
    S1D 10% toluene 1.165 23.26 −2.86
    S1E 10% toluene 1.152 2.27 −1.39
    S1F 30% toluene 1.148 15.28 −12.91
    S1G 50% toluene 1.163 32.34 −23.65
    S1H  5% ethyl 1.167 16.14 −0.76
    acetate
    S1I 10% ethyl 1.166 22.74 −3.39
    acetate
    S1J 10% ethyl 1.152 16.50 −3.08
    acetate
    S1K 30% ethyl 1.152 33.10 −13.24
    acetate
    S1L 50% ethyl 1.170 23.99 −22.87
    acetate
    S1M  5% MIBK 1.162 18.51 −0.96
    S1N 10% MIBK 1.153 4.18 −2.25
    S1O 10% MIBK 1.143 10.58 −2.29
    S1P 30% MIBK 1.153 22.59 −13.82
    S1Q 50% MIBK 1.160 23.05 −23.55
    S1R  5% THF 1.173 22.44 −0.90
    S1S 10% THF 1.165 11.86 −2.38
    S1T 10% THF 1.153 6.98 −2.49
    S1U 30% THF 1.153 7.94 −12.39
    S1V 50% THF 1.164 16.17 −22.54
    S1W control 0.985 * −0.06
    S1X control 0.996 * −0.04
    S1Y 10% ethyl ** ** **
    acetate
    S1Z 10% ethyl ** ** **
    acetate

    Characterization of Solvent-Based Polyurethane Paint-Films when Cast on One Liner or Between Two Liners
  • This experiment demonstrates the influence of incorporating solvent on the surface topology of polyurethane paint films, when cast on one liner, or between two liners. The films were prepared according to the compositions reported in Table T1. K-FLEX 188, (100% active polyester polyol) was added to a plastic beaker and degassed in a vacuum oven (30 in. Hg vacuum, 0.76 m Hg vacuum) for 30 minutes at 80° C. The polyol was cooled to ambient temperature and solvent, if used, was added and blended with a stir stick until a homogeneous mixture was formed. The catalyst DABCO T12 (dibutyltin dilaurate) was added to the cup, followed by mixing by hand. DESMODUR N3300 (HDI trimer) was added at the desired level, mixed for 15 seconds by hand, and then mixed using the SPEED MIXER DAC 150 FVZ mixer for 15 seconds, at 3600 rpm. The reactive composition was then immediately coated between a top and bottom silicone poly-liner (2.5 mil (0.064 mm) polyester release liner supplied by CPFilms Inc., Martinsville, Va.) using a lab-scale knife coat station, which was nominally gauged for a film thickness of 0.3 mm; or coated on a silicone poly-liner with a no. 32 Meyer rod; or on PET.
  • TABLE T1
    Solvent 2
    K-FLEX Solvent 1 ethyl Solvent 3 DABCO DESMODUR
    188, toluene, acetate, water, T12, N3300,
    SAMPLE parts parts parts parts parts parts
    T1A 12.0 0 0 0 0.01 12.0
    T1B 12.0 0 0 0.02 0.01 12.0
    T1C 12.0 2.4 0 0 0.01 12.0
    T1D 12.0 0 2.4 0 0.01 12.0
  • The samples were dried at ambient temperature for 24 hours. Surface roughness was measured using a MITUTOYO SURFTEST SJ-401 stylus type profilometer (Mississauga, ON). Results are reported in Table T2.
  • TABLE T2
    Ra, Rz,
    NUMBER micrometers micrometers
    LINER OF MEASURED (average (average
    SAMPLE SOLVENT TYPE LINERS SIDE surface) deepest) OBSERVATIONS
    T1A none silicone 1 air 0.06 0.3 smooth
    poly-
    liner
    T1A none silicone 1 liner 0.10 0.5 smooth
    poly-
    liner
    T1A none silicone 2 liner 0.04 0.4 smooth
    poly-
    liner
    T1B water silicone 2 liner 0.04 0.4 some bubbles
    poly-
    liner
    T1C toluene silicone 1 air 0.25 2.0 rough to touch
    poly-
    liner
    T1C toluene silicone 1 liner 0.08 1.0 smooth
    poly-
    liner
    T1C toluene silicone 2 liner 0.35 3.3 bubbles trapped
    poly- between liners
    liner
    T1D ethyl pet 1 air 1.04 5.1 rough to touch
    acetate
    T1D ethyl silicone 2 liner 0.12 0.6 bubbles trapped
    acetate poly- between liners
    liner
  • Characterization of Solvent-Based Polyurethane Film Coated Between Two Liners
  • These experiments demonstrate the influence of incorporated solvent on both color and bubble defects for solvent-based, urethane paint film compositions. Toluene, the solvent used for these experiments, was first dried over molecular sieves to less than 10 ppm of water and was added to the formulations at levels ranging from 0.10%-50%, by weight of total formulation.
  • The general method of sample preparation Table U1 (A-L) was conducted as follows. K-Flex 188 (100% active polyester polyol) was added to a plastic beaker and degassed in a vacuum oven (30 in. Hg vacuum, 0.76 m Hg vacuum) for 30 minutes at 80° C. The polyol was then cooled to ambient temperature. For the examples, which contained solvent, the polyol and solvent were blended together with a stir stick until a homogeneous mixture was formed. The catalyst DABCO T12 (dibutyltin dilaurate) was added to the cup, followed by mixing by hand. DESMODUR N3300 (HDI trimer) was added at the desired level, mixed for 15 seconds by hand, and then mixed using the SPEED MIXER DAC 150 FVZ (FlackTek, Inc., Landrum, S.C.), for 15 seconds, at 3600 rpm. The reaction mixture was immediately coated between two silicone coated PET liners (2.5 mil (0.64 mm) polyester release liner supplied by CPFilms Inc.), which were prepared as follows. The bottom PET liner was lined with two strips of 6 mil 3M ACRYLIC PLUS TAPE PT 1100 (double-coated acrylic foam tape) to provide caliper control. The reactive composition was poured onto the bottom liner and the top liner was applied with a metal bar so as to provide for a rolling bank of material. The films prepared in this manner were dried at ambient temperature for 24 hours and then further cured at 80° C. for 24 hours. The film color rating is reported in Table U1 using the following rating scale: 0=clear, 1=very slight yellow, 2=noticeable yellow, 3=very yellow.
  • TABLE U1
    FILM
    COLOR
    K- RATING
    FLEX DABCO DESMODUR after
    SAM- 188, TOLUENE, T12, N3300, 80° C.
    PLE parts parts parts parts for 24 hr
    U1A 15.59 0 0.04 14.29 0
    U1B 15.50 0 0.04 12.92 0
    U1C 15.58 0 0.05 15.65 2
    U1D 15.60 0.04 0.04 14.26 0
    U1E 15.55 0.08 0.04 14.16 1
    U1F 15.58 0.16 0.04 14.26 2
    U1G 15.56 0.22 0.04 14.22 1
    U1H 15.56 0.30 0.04 14.23 2
    U1I 15.52 0.60 0.04 14.16 2
    U1J 15.57 1.56 0.04 14.24 3
    U1K 15.50 1.50 0.04 13.00 0
    U1L 15.54 1.63 0.04 15.51 3
  • The samples in Table U2 (U2A-U2J) were prepared as described above for samples U1A-U1L. The films were immediately cut into 3-equal pieces: one portion placed at ambient temperature, one portion placed into a 70° C. oven for 15 minutes, and one portion placed into a 120° C. oven for 15 minutes. Data for film formation and for the films conditioned at each temperature for 15 minutes is recorded in the following table. The effect of increased temperature caused pronounced defects with respect to bubble formation for all samples with the exception of sample U2A.
  • TABLE U2
    FILM FILM FILM
    AGING AGING AGING
    DABCO DESMODUR AFTER 15 AFTER 15 AFTER 15
    K-FLEX TOLUENE, T12, N3300, MINUTES MINUTES MINUTES
    SAMPLE 188, parts parts parts parts RT AT 70° C. AT 120° C.
    U2A 15.53 0 0.04 14.63 clear clear clear
    U2B 15.54 0.16 0.04 14.14 clear very, very large
    few tiny bubbles on
    bubbles tape; many
    tiny
    bubbles
    U2C 15.52 0.30 0.04 14.20 moderate many tiny large
    number of bubbles bubbles on
    tiny tape;
    bubbles moderate
    tiny
    bubbles
    U2D 15.51 0.61 0.04 14.20 moderate many tiny large
    number of bubbles bubbles on
    tiny tape; few
    bubbles tiny
    bubbles
    U2E 15.02 0.90 0.04 13.64 moderate some spots large
    number of on tape; bubbles on
    tiny many tiny tape and
    bubbles bubbles slightly
    foamy;
    many tiny
    bubbles
    U2F 15.05 1.52 0.04 13.61 moderate some spots large
    number of on tape; bubbles on
    tiny many tiny tape and
    bubbles bubbles slightly
    foamy;
    many,
    many tiny
    bubbles
    U2G 14.52 2.26 0.04 13.28 moderate some spots large
    number of on tape; bubbles on
    tiny many tiny tape and
    bubbles bubbles slightly
    foamy;
    many,
    many tiny
    bubbles
    U2H 14.41 2.98 0.04 12.70 moderate some spots large
    number of on tape; bubbles on
    tiny many tiny tape and
    bubbles bubbles slightly
    foamy;
    many,
    many tiny
    bubbles
    U2I 11.06 9.10 0.03 10.07 some tiny some spots spots on
    bubbles on tape; tape
    many tiny wrinkled
    bubbles and
    cracked
    U2J 7.86 14.92 0.02 7.23 huge few large spots on
    bubbles in bubbles; tape
    film some tiny wrinkled
    bubbles and
    cracked
  • Shape Memory Testing
  • Specimens of the material prepared in Preparative Example 106 were evaluated by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis using a TA Instruments model DMA Q800 dynamic mechanical testing apparatus. The material exhibited a tan delta peak temperature (Tg) of 38° C., had a tensile storage modulus (F) of 1900 megapascals (MPa) at Tg−40° C. (−2° C.), and had a tensile storage modulus (F) of 6 MPa at Tg+40° C. (78° C.). A specimen of the material (having the dimensions of length=7.2 mm, width 6.1 mm, and height=0.45 mm) was subjected to three strain-recovery cycles to measure the shape memory of the material. The specimen was heated to 40° C., then a tensile force increasing at 2 newtons (N) per minute to a maximum of 8 N was applied (maximum strain=63%). The maximum tensile force was maintained while the sample was cooled to −20° C., where it became glassy. The tensile force was then relaxed at −20° C. The specimen was then reheated to 40° C. (with negligible tensile force) and the strain returned to 3%. The shape memory of the specimen became evident at about 25° C. The cycle was then repeated twice more, each time returning to 3% strain as compared to the original specimen.
  • Various modifications and alterations of this invention may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of this invention, and it should be understood that this invention is not to be unduly limited to the illustrative embodiments set forth herein.

Claims (16)

  1. 1-38. (canceled)
  2. 39. A multilayer article comprising:
    a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite the first major surface;
    a base layer having a first major surface contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate, the base layer comprising a polymeric material and being substantially isotropic, wherein the polymeric material comprises a polyurethane, the polyurethane having hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight, and the first major surface of the base layer being permanently adhered and covalently bonded to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate.
  3. 40. A multilayer article comprising:
    a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
    a base layer having a first major surface contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate, the base layer comprising a polymeric material, wherein the polymeric material comprises a polyurethane, the polyurethane having hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight, and the base layer having a second major surface opposite its first major surface, each of the first and second major surfaces of the base layer being a substantial inverse image of a major surface of first and second respective corresponding forming webs, and the first major surface of the base layer being permanently adhered and covalently bonded to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate.
  4. 41. A multilayer article comprising:
    a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
    a base layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the base layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate, and the base layer comprising a first polymeric material;
    a transparent protective layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the transparent protective layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the base layer, and wherein the transparent protective layer comprises a second polymeric material the second polymeric material comprising a polyurethane, the polyurethane having hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight; and
    at least one of the base layer and the transparent protective layer being substantially isotropic, at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprising a colorant, and a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent.
  5. 42. A multilayer article comprising:
    a thermoformable substrate having first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
    a base layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the base layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface, and the base layer comprising a first polymeric material;
    a transparent protective layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the transparent protective layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the base layer, and the transparent protective layer comprising a second polymeric material, the second polymeric material comprising a polyurethane, the polyurethane having hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight; and
    at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprising a colorant, a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent, and:
    i) each of the first and second major surfaces of the base layer being a substantial inverse image of a major surface of first and second respective corresponding forming webs;
    ii) each of the first and second major surfaces of the transparent protective layer being a substantial inverse image of a major surface of third and fourth respective corresponding forming webs; or
    iii) both i) and ii).
  6. 43. A multilayer article comprising:
    a thermoformable substrate having first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
    an adhesive layer;
    a base layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the base layer being permanently adhered to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate by the adhesive layer, the base layer comprising a first polymeric material;
    a transparent protective layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the transparent protective layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the base layer, and the transparent protective layer comprising a second polymeric material and being substantially isotropic, the second polymeric material comprising a polyurethane, and the polyurethane having hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight; and
    at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprising a colorant, and a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent.
  7. 44. A multilayer article comprising:
    a thermoformable substrate having first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
    an adhesive layer;
    a base layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the base layer being permanently adhered to the second major surface by the adhesive layer, the base layer comprising a first polymeric material;
    a transparent protective layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the first major surface of the transparent protective layer contacting and permanently adhered to the second major surface of the base layer, the transparent protective layer comprising a second polymeric material, the second polymeric material comprising a polyurethane, the polyurethane having hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight; and
    at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprising a colorant, a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent, and:
    i) each of the first and second major surfaces of the base layer being a substantial inverse image of a major surface of first and second respective corresponding forming webs;
    ii) each of the first and second major surfaces of the transparent protective layer being a substantial inverse image of a major surface of third and fourth respective corresponding forming webs; or
    iii) both i) and ii).
  8. 45. A method of making a multilayer article, the method comprising:
    providing a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate comprising reactive groups;
    contacting a curable composition with the second major surface and a forming web to form a rolling bank of the curable composition disposed between the thermoformable substrate and the forming web, the curable composition comprising a curable polymeric material precursor, and the curable composition being covalently reactive with the reactive groups;
    passing at least a portion of each of the thermoformable substrate, the forming web, and the curable composition through a nip to provide a curable layer precursor while said at least a portion of the curable composition is sandwiched between the thermoformable substrate and the forming web; and
    at least partially curing the curable layer precursor to provide a base layer, the base layer comprising a polymeric material, and
    at least one of the thermoformable substrate and the base layer comprising a colorant, and a combination of the base layer and the thermoformable substrate being opaque or translucent.
  9. 46. The method of claim 45, at least one of the first polymeric material and the second polymeric material comprising a polyurethane.
  10. 47. The method of claim 46, the polyurethane having hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight.
  11. 48. A method of making a multilayer article, the method comprising:
    providing a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface, a base layer being adhered to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate, the base layer comprising a first polymeric material.
    contacting a curable composition with the base layer and a forming web to form a rolling bank of the curable composition disposed between the base layer and the forming web, the curable composition comprising a curable polymeric material precursor;
    passing at least a portion of each of the thermoformable substrate, the base layer, the forming web, and the curable composition through a nip to provide a curable layer precursor while said at least a portion of the curable composition is sandwiched between the base layer and the forming web; and
    at least partially curing the curable layer precursor to provide a transparent protective layer comprising a second polymeric material.
  12. 49. The method of claim 48, at least one of the first polymeric material and the second polymeric material comprising a polyurethane.
  13. 50. The method of claim 49, the polyurethane having hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight.
  14. 51. A method of making a multilayer article, the method comprising:
    providing a first forming web and a base layer releasably adhered to the first forming web, the base layer comprising a first polymeric material, and the base layer having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface;
    contacting a curable composition with the base layer and a second forming web to form a rolling bank of the curable composition disposed between the base layer and the second forming web, the curable composition comprising a curable polymeric material precursor;
    passing at least a portion of each of the first forming web, the base layer, the second forming web, and the curable composition through a nip to provide a curable layer precursor while said at least a portion of the curable composition is sandwiched between the base layer and the second forming web;
    at least partially curing the curable layer precursor to provide a transparent protective layer comprising a second polymeric material, at least one of the first polymeric material and the second polymeric material comprising a polyurethane, the polyurethane having hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight;
    separating the first forming web from the base layer;
    disposing a first adhesive layer on the first major surface of base layer;
    providing a thermoformable substrate having a first major surface and a second major surface opposite its first major surface; and
    permanently adhering the first adhesive layer to the second major surface of the thermoformable substrate.
  15. 52. The method of claim 51, at least one of the first polymeric material and the second polymeric material comprising a polyurethane.
  16. 53. The method of claim 52, the polyurethane having hard segments in an amount of from 35 to 65 percent by weight.
US12934088 2008-03-25 2009-03-18 Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same Active 2029-11-30 US8551279B2 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3920908 true 2008-03-25 2008-03-25
PCT/US2009/037470 WO2009120548A3 (en) 2008-03-25 2009-03-18 Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same
US12934088 US8551279B2 (en) 2008-03-25 2009-03-18 Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12934088 US8551279B2 (en) 2008-03-25 2009-03-18 Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
PCT/US2009/037470 A-371-Of-International WO2009120548A3 (en) 2008-03-25 2009-03-18 Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14016711 Division US8992718B2 (en) 2008-03-25 2013-09-03 Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110045306A1 true true US20110045306A1 (en) 2011-02-24
US8551279B2 US8551279B2 (en) 2013-10-08

Family

ID=40802065

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12934088 Active 2029-11-30 US8551279B2 (en) 2008-03-25 2009-03-18 Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same
US14016711 Active US8992718B2 (en) 2008-03-25 2013-09-03 Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same
US14603851 Pending US20150140290A1 (en) 2008-03-25 2015-01-23 Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same

Family Applications After (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14016711 Active US8992718B2 (en) 2008-03-25 2013-09-03 Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same
US14603851 Pending US20150140290A1 (en) 2008-03-25 2015-01-23 Multilayer articles and methods of making and using the same

Country Status (6)

Country Link
US (3) US8551279B2 (en)
EP (1) EP2268486A2 (en)
JP (2) JP5677933B2 (en)
KR (1) KR101512214B1 (en)
CN (1) CN102007000B (en)
WO (1) WO2009120548A3 (en)

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080261014A1 (en) * 2005-10-21 2008-10-23 Mcguire James E Composite Articles Comprising Protective Sheets and Related Methods
US20090186198A1 (en) * 2008-01-19 2009-07-23 Entrotech, Inc. Protected Graphics and Related Methods
US20100059167A1 (en) * 2007-09-25 2010-03-11 Mcguire Jr James E Paint Replacement Films, Composites Therefrom, and Related Methods
US20100068446A1 (en) * 2006-10-23 2010-03-18 Mcguire James E Articles Comprising Protective Sheets and Related Methods
US20110027594A1 (en) * 2008-03-25 2011-02-03 Johnson Michael A Paint film composites and methods of making and using the same
US20110116151A1 (en) * 2008-07-11 2011-05-19 Thales Multilayer structure having a photochromic host matrix and manufacturing method
US20110123786A1 (en) * 2008-07-25 2011-05-26 Johnson Michael A Elastic bonding films
US20130216827A1 (en) * 2010-10-25 2013-08-22 Markus Parusel Laminate with a color layer, and method for producing same
US20150020844A1 (en) * 2012-03-06 2015-01-22 Taiki Corp., Ltd. Cosmetics applicator
US20150075733A1 (en) * 2013-09-13 2015-03-19 Faurecia Innenraum Systeme Gmbh Roller shutter and storage compartment comprising said roller shutter
WO2015094792A1 (en) 2013-12-19 2015-06-25 3M Innovative Properties Company Viscoelastic medical article
WO2017011236A1 (en) * 2015-07-16 2017-01-19 Sun Chemical Corporation Water-based inks for thermoforming applications
WO2017105908A1 (en) * 2015-12-15 2017-06-22 3M Innovative Properties Company Thin protective display film
WO2017105850A1 (en) * 2015-12-15 2017-06-22 3M Innovative Properties Company Protective display film
US9840591B2 (en) 2010-08-04 2017-12-12 3M Innovative Properties Company Method of preparing benzoxazine-thiol polymers films
US9880332B2 (en) 2013-10-04 2018-01-30 3M Innovative Properties Company Decorative microsphere articles with information layer
WO2017214105A3 (en) * 2016-06-09 2018-02-08 3M Innovative Properties Company Polyurethane acrylate protective display film
WO2018005833A3 (en) * 2016-07-01 2018-02-22 3M Innovative Properties Company LOW Tg POLYURETHANE PROTECTIVE DISPLAY FILM
WO2018057774A1 (en) * 2016-09-21 2018-03-29 3M Innovative Properties Company Protective display film with glass
WO2018102607A1 (en) * 2016-12-01 2018-06-07 3M Innovative Properties Company Dual cure protective display film
WO2018112181A1 (en) * 2016-12-14 2018-06-21 3M Innovative Properties Company Segmented protective display film

Families Citing this family (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9808675B2 (en) 2012-09-13 2017-11-07 Acushnet Company Golf ball compositions
US9227109B2 (en) * 2012-09-13 2016-01-05 Acushnet Company Golf ball compositions
KR101475674B1 (en) * 2013-07-03 2014-12-23 현대다이모스(주) Multi layer slab and method for producing the same
US9999546B2 (en) 2014-06-16 2018-06-19 Illinois Tool Works Inc. Protective headwear with airflow
KR20170038005A (en) * 2014-07-31 2017-04-05 쓰리엠 이노베이티브 프로퍼티즈 컴파니 Thermoplastic polyurethane compositions, articles, and methods thereof
US10035043B2 (en) 2016-12-15 2018-07-31 Acushnet Company Golf ball incorporating highly crosslinked thermoset fluorescent microspheres and methods of making same

Citations (81)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3436359A (en) * 1965-10-14 1969-04-01 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Polyether polyprimary polyamines and elastomeric products thereof
US3551232A (en) * 1967-12-22 1970-12-29 Gen Motors Corp Method of vacuum forming laminated articles
US3728182A (en) * 1971-06-25 1973-04-17 Pandel Bradford Method of preparing resin-backed tufted carpet tiles
US4457797A (en) * 1982-03-08 1984-07-03 E. I. Dupont De Nemours And Company Process for thermoforming reinforced polymer sheets
US4522670A (en) * 1983-04-04 1985-06-11 American Hoechst Corporation Process for manufacture of tamper-resistant polyester credit cards
US4569885A (en) * 1981-08-20 1986-02-11 Nitto Electric Industrial Company, Limited Polyester film for forming printed circuit
US4590021A (en) * 1978-06-29 1986-05-20 Yoshino Kogyosho Co., Ltd. Method for producing polyester containers
US4642126A (en) * 1985-02-11 1987-02-10 Norton Company Coated abrasives with rapidly curable adhesives and controllable curvature
US4652274A (en) * 1985-08-07 1987-03-24 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Coated abrasive product having radiation curable binder
US4769100A (en) * 1986-09-22 1988-09-06 General Motors Corporation Method of applying carrier films prepainted with metallic paint to automobile body panels
US4810540A (en) * 1986-10-28 1989-03-07 Rexham Corporation Decorative sheet material simulating the appearance of a base coat/clear coat paint finish
US4824506A (en) * 1988-04-21 1989-04-25 General Motors Corporation Process for protecting thermoformed films
US4828637A (en) * 1986-07-02 1989-05-09 General Motors Corporation Method of applying painted carrier films to automobile body parts
US4833213A (en) * 1987-06-26 1989-05-23 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Method of making purely primary diamines from nitrogen containing nocleophile and terminally electrophilically active polyether
US4838973A (en) * 1986-07-02 1989-06-13 General Motors Corporation Method of applying painted carrier films to automobile body parts
US4902557A (en) * 1988-01-25 1990-02-20 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Thermoplastic polyolefin composite structure
US4913760A (en) * 1988-08-29 1990-04-03 Eastman Kodak Company Method of manufacturing a dried, thermoformable, paint-coated sheet material having gloss and smoothness
US5021981A (en) * 1988-12-22 1991-06-04 North Carolina State University Thermal memory cell and thermal system evaluation
US5034275A (en) * 1989-11-24 1991-07-23 Pearson James M Paint coated sheet material with adhesion promoting composition
US5037681A (en) * 1989-03-08 1991-08-06 Tokai Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Molding for use with an automobile and process for manufacturing the same
US5114789A (en) * 1987-11-03 1992-05-19 Eastman Kodak Company Protective and decorative sheet material having a transparent topcoat
US5128434A (en) * 1990-11-27 1992-07-07 Bausch & Lomb Incorporated Control of hard segment size in polyurethane formation
US5132148A (en) * 1987-11-03 1992-07-21 Eastman Kodak Company Flexible and stretchable sheet material useful in forming protective and decorative coatings
US5192609A (en) * 1988-11-07 1993-03-09 Eastman Kodak Company Thermoformable sheet material
US5201981A (en) * 1991-08-16 1993-04-13 Citadel Architectural Products, Inc. Method of forming synthetic plastic film-projected building siding
US5215811A (en) * 1988-04-28 1993-06-01 Eastman Kodak Company Protective and decorative sheet material having a transparent topcoat
US5252694A (en) * 1992-01-22 1993-10-12 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Energy-polymerization adhesive, coating, film and process for making the same
US5405675A (en) * 1992-12-10 1995-04-11 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Embossed multilayer film
US5410971A (en) * 1992-10-15 1995-05-02 Jeff Industries, Inc. Adjustable work station for the handicapped
US5410791A (en) * 1993-07-01 1995-05-02 General Electric Company Fabrication chuck
US5417726A (en) * 1991-12-20 1995-05-23 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Coated abrasive backing
US5449429A (en) * 1993-12-03 1995-09-12 Langenbrunner; James R. Apparatus for stretching and mounting films
US5468532A (en) * 1992-12-10 1995-11-21 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Multilayer graphic article with color layer
US5591527A (en) * 1994-11-02 1997-01-07 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Optical security articles and methods for making same
US5607536A (en) * 1992-10-30 1997-03-04 Tikka-System Oy Method and apparatus for coating objects with a plastic film
US5648136A (en) * 1995-07-11 1997-07-15 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Co. Component carrier tape
US5707697A (en) * 1987-03-27 1998-01-13 Avery Dennison Corporation Dry paint transfer product having high DOI automotive paint coat
US5798409A (en) * 1995-10-03 1998-08-25 Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company Reactive two-part polyurethane compositions and optionally self-healable and scratch-resistant coatings prepared therefrom
US5951939A (en) * 1997-07-30 1999-09-14 Ford Motor Company Method for heating films for thermoforming
US5960527A (en) * 1986-10-28 1999-10-05 Rexam Industries Corp. Method of injection molding plastic automobile body parts with integral weatherable pigmented film surface
US5968657A (en) * 1997-08-18 1999-10-19 3M Innovative Properties Company Paint film assembly with masking film and method of making same
US5972279A (en) * 1997-07-30 1999-10-26 Ford Motor Company Method of transferring a pre-molded film into a mold
US5985198A (en) * 1997-07-30 1999-11-16 Ford Motor Company Method for molding a film-covered article
US6012818A (en) * 1994-12-20 2000-01-11 3M Innovative Properties Company Retroreflective sheeting articles
US6143227A (en) * 1997-07-30 2000-11-07 Visteon Global Technologies, Inc. Method for injection molding an article having film covered flanges
US6164739A (en) * 1993-10-18 2000-12-26 The Dow Chemical Company Multilayer protective film
US6221304B1 (en) * 1997-07-30 2001-04-24 Visteon Global Technologies, Inc. Method of manufacturing a film coated article
US6254712B1 (en) * 1998-12-08 2001-07-03 Avery Dennison Corporation Extrusion coating process for making high transparency protective and decorative films
US6258918B1 (en) * 1998-04-22 2001-07-10 3M Innovative Properties Company Flexible polyurethane material
US6284183B1 (en) * 1998-06-08 2001-09-04 Avery Dennison Corporation Thick sheet laminating process for making exterior automotive body panels
US6336988B1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2002-01-08 Avery Dennison Corporation Extrusion coating process for making protective and decorative films
US6367361B1 (en) * 1997-07-30 2002-04-09 Ford Motor Company Method and apparatus for trimming thermoformed films
US6440546B1 (en) * 1999-10-13 2002-08-27 Ream Industries Corp. Gloss-adjusting mask layer with particulate filler
US6468643B1 (en) * 1999-04-14 2002-10-22 Mitsui Chemicals, Inc. Laminated product
US6492012B1 (en) * 2000-02-02 2002-12-10 Tilak M. Shah Polymer penetrated porous substrates
US6521145B1 (en) * 1998-01-30 2003-02-18 3M Innovative Properties Company Reflective particle display film and method of manufacture
US6607831B2 (en) * 2000-12-28 2003-08-19 3M Innovative Properties Company Multi-layer article
US6623667B2 (en) * 2001-02-28 2003-09-23 3M Innovative Properties Company Method for continuous fabrication of structured surface light guides
US6635314B1 (en) * 1999-03-17 2003-10-21 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company High solids clear coating composition
US6667101B2 (en) * 2000-01-26 2003-12-23 Atofina Thermoformable multilayer film for the protection of substrates and objects obtained
US6676754B1 (en) * 2000-06-30 2004-01-13 3M Innovative Properties Company Coating apparatus and methods of applying a polymer coating
US6723427B1 (en) * 1999-06-21 2004-04-20 Avery Dennison Corporation Fade printed decorative sheets and methods and apparatus for making the same
US20040076766A1 (en) * 2002-10-16 2004-04-22 Thomas Fey Process for the production of paint coating layers
US20040209057A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2004-10-21 Enlow Howard H. Extruded polymeric high transparency films
US20040224101A1 (en) * 2001-10-31 2004-11-11 Johnson Michael A. Cross-linked primer composition and use thereof in thermoformable films
US20040234771A1 (en) * 2001-10-31 2004-11-25 Meyer Daniel E. Methods of thermoforming non-self-supporting polymeric films and articles made therefrom
US6890685B2 (en) * 2001-03-27 2005-05-10 Nec Corporation Anode for secondary battery and secondary battery therewith
US6890658B2 (en) * 2000-09-29 2005-05-10 3M Innovative Properties Company Transparent resin-coated stainless steel article
US7132142B2 (en) * 2003-02-14 2006-11-07 Avery Dennison Corporation Dry paint transfer laminate for use as wall covering
US7144612B2 (en) * 2003-01-27 2006-12-05 Laminate Products, Inc. Decorative system composite and method
US20070034326A1 (en) * 2003-12-26 2007-02-15 Takashi Kikuchi Method for producing flexible laminate
US7195727B2 (en) * 1999-10-13 2007-03-27 Guardian Industries Corp. Extruded automotive trim and method of making same
US20070116903A1 (en) * 2005-11-18 2007-05-24 Solaint Llc Decorative Paint film laminate
US20070122630A1 (en) * 2005-11-08 2007-05-31 Worthen Industries Co-extrusion or tandem extrusion of surface protection films
US20070128365A1 (en) * 2004-06-16 2007-06-07 Matthias Koch Radiation-curable, electrically conductive coatiing mixture
US20070141264A1 (en) * 2003-12-17 2007-06-21 Dsm Ip Assets B.V. Stain resistant urethane-vinyl aqueous coating compositions
US20070256597A1 (en) * 2004-09-01 2007-11-08 Rukavina Thomas G Poly(ureaurethane)s, articles and coatings prepared therefrom and methods of making the same
US20080199704A1 (en) * 2005-04-29 2008-08-21 Ho Charlie C Multilayer Polyurethane Protective Films
US20080311349A1 (en) * 2005-03-24 2008-12-18 Johnson Michael A Metallized Films and Articles Containing the Same
US20100032082A1 (en) * 2006-10-04 2010-02-11 Ho Charlie C Method of making multilayer polyurethane protective film
US20110027594A1 (en) * 2008-03-25 2011-02-03 Johnson Michael A Paint film composites and methods of making and using the same

Family Cites Families (71)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1704840A1 (en) * 1967-07-25 1971-06-03 Hennecke Gmbh Maschf A device for the continuous manufacture of products from fast-reacting multi-component plastics, in particular polyurethane-based
JPS6126615Y2 (en) 1980-07-16 1986-08-09
JPH058728B2 (en) 1984-07-17 1993-02-03 Kuraray Co
JPH0377810B2 (en) 1984-07-17 1991-12-11 Kuraray Co
JPH0139605Y2 (en) 1984-07-24 1989-11-28
JPS6364739A (en) 1986-09-05 1988-03-23 Kawasaki Steel Co Colored polyurethane elastomer coated heavy-duty corrosion-resistant steel material
JPH0220193Y2 (en) 1986-10-16 1990-06-01
JPS63183838U (en) 1987-05-21 1988-11-25
WO1989004257A1 (en) 1987-11-03 1989-05-18 Eastman Kodak Company Flexible and stretchable sheet material useful in forming protective and decorative coatings
EP0403573B1 (en) * 1988-04-28 1992-07-15 Eastman Kodak Company Protective and decorative sheet material having a transparent topcoat
US4960558A (en) * 1988-08-17 1990-10-02 General Motors Corporation Process for thermoforming multihued laminate films
US4933237A (en) * 1989-02-17 1990-06-12 Eastman Kodak Company Paint coated sheet material with adhesion promoting composition
CA2014335C (en) 1989-04-12 1999-10-19 Jeffrey R. Janssen Molded article adapted to be adhered to a substrate and method for making same
US5268215A (en) * 1989-08-31 1993-12-07 Eastman Kodak Company Basecoat-clearcoat film
US5122560A (en) * 1989-12-12 1992-06-16 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Coating composition of polyesterurethane and polyisocyanate crosslinking agent
JP3201775B2 (en) * 1990-12-19 2001-08-27 大日本印刷株式会社 Method of manufacturing a decorative sheet
JPH05155976A (en) 1991-11-27 1993-06-22 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Co <3M> Polyurethane resin excellent in elongation physical property at high temperature
WO1993021014A1 (en) 1992-04-09 1993-10-28 Waylin Carpenter Direct-to-helmet vacuum forming process for helmet decorating
JP3142095B2 (en) * 1993-02-23 2001-03-07 大日本印刷株式会社 Method of manufacturing a suede decorative sheet
US6071621A (en) 1993-06-11 2000-06-06 3M Innovative Properties Company Metallized film and decorative articles made therewith
JP2970997B2 (en) * 1994-07-01 1999-11-02 株式会社クラレ Laminate having a polyurethane layer
JP3075963B2 (en) 1995-07-19 2000-08-14 東洋鋼鈑株式会社 Olefin resin-coated metal sheet
JP3786964B2 (en) 1995-12-06 2006-06-21 関西ペイント株式会社 Method for forming a coating film
JPH09168763A (en) 1995-12-19 1997-06-30 Basf Farben+Fasern Ag Coating film forming method and coated article
JPH09168764A (en) 1995-12-19 1997-06-30 Basf Farben+Fasern Ag Coating film forming method and coated article
US5750234A (en) 1996-06-07 1998-05-12 Avery Dennison Corporation Interior automotive laminate with thermoplastic low gloss coating
US5919537A (en) 1996-06-18 1999-07-06 Android Industries Of Michigan, L.L.C. Decorative films and laminated formable sheets with dual protective film layers
KR100589472B1 (en) * 1997-08-18 2006-06-14 미네소타 마이닝 앤드 매뉴팩춰링 캄파니 Paint film assembly with masking film
DE19844332A1 (en) 1998-09-28 2000-04-13 Basf Coatings Ag A paint film and their use for coating three-dimensional objects
WO2000032680A1 (en) 1998-12-01 2000-06-08 Toyo Kohan Co., Ltd. Colored resin film for metal sheet laminating and colored metal sheet containing the colored resin film
FR2790424B1 (en) 1999-03-04 2001-04-27 Nobel Plastiques Components manufacturing method having a decorative surface of metallic appearance
JP2001129927A (en) 1999-11-08 2001-05-15 Konica Corp Optical anisotropic film and liquid crystal display apparatus
JP4585639B2 (en) 1999-11-09 2010-11-24 関西ペイント株式会社 Plastic-coated metal plate
JP4316757B2 (en) 1999-12-28 2009-08-19 三井化学株式会社 Continuous coating method and manufacturing method of the thermoset polyurethane sheet of thermosetting polyurethane
JP2001219497A (en) 2000-02-10 2001-08-14 Kansai Paint Co Ltd Plastic coated steel panel for car
JP2001334796A (en) * 2000-05-25 2001-12-04 Dainippon Printing Co Ltd Decorating method
WO2002000448A3 (en) 2000-06-26 2003-03-13 Mark Alan Beard Paint film with protective extensible mask and parts made therefrom
JP2002103517A (en) 2000-09-29 2002-04-09 Three M Innovative Properties Co Transparent resin coated stainless steel member
JP5073131B2 (en) * 2000-10-24 2012-11-14 凸版印刷株式会社 Laminated sheet and manufacturing method thereof
JP4314442B2 (en) * 2001-04-06 2009-08-19 株式会社プライムポリマー Layered structure and a method of manufacturing
WO2003018284A1 (en) 2001-08-22 2003-03-06 Green Tokai, Co., Ltd. Light weight plastic trim parts and methods of making same
US8057903B2 (en) * 2001-11-30 2011-11-15 Sabic Innovative Plastics Ip B.V. Multilayer articles comprising resorcinol arylate polyester and method for making thereof
JP2003165930A (en) 2001-12-03 2003-06-10 Chemiprokasei Kaisha Ltd Photo-setting solventless painting composition and method for forming pattern by using the same
NL1019786C2 (en) 2002-01-18 2003-07-21 Akzo Nobel Nv Dyeing composition for a removable decorative layer.
CN1278874C (en) 2002-05-08 2006-10-11 雷恩哈德库兹两合公司 Method for decorating large plastic three-D objects
JP2004027084A (en) 2002-06-27 2004-01-29 Three M Innovative Properties Co Primer composition and adhesion structure
JP4192544B2 (en) 2002-09-27 2008-12-10 東洋インキ製造株式会社 Solventless adhesive composition and use thereof
JP2006517881A (en) 2003-02-14 2006-08-03 エーブリー デニソン コーポレイションAvery Dennison Corporation Dry paint movement laminate
JP2006520260A (en) 2003-02-14 2006-09-07 エーブリー デニソン コーポレイションAvery Dennison Corporation Extrusion molding method of making a dry paint movement laminate
WO2004089589A1 (en) 2003-04-11 2004-10-21 Amut S.P.A. A device for thermal treatment of plastic material
KR100568427B1 (en) 2003-05-20 2006-04-07 주식회사 디피아이 Hybrid polyurethane resin composition, method of preparing the same, and method of preparing paint having the same
US20050023729A1 (en) 2003-07-31 2005-02-03 Smith Leslie E. Formation of wide paint film parts
JP4873831B2 (en) 2003-10-31 2012-02-08 スリーエム イノベイティブ プロパティズ カンパニー Polyurethane compositions and urethane resin film
US7322593B2 (en) 2003-11-04 2008-01-29 Durakon Industries, Inc. Running board for vehicle having class A finish
JP2005179422A (en) 2003-12-17 2005-07-07 Dainippon Ink & Chem Inc Solventless moisture-curable polyurethane resin, laminate using the same, and method for producing the laminate
JP2006044192A (en) * 2004-08-09 2006-02-16 Mitsubishi Rayon Co Ltd Photosetting sheet and molded product using the same
JP4771110B2 (en) * 2004-09-14 2011-09-14 Dic株式会社 Method of forming the protective layer forming sheet and the protective layer
JP4335773B2 (en) * 2004-09-27 2009-09-30 日東電工株式会社 Method for producing a film laminate, and a manufacturing apparatus used therefor
WO2006069015A1 (en) 2004-12-22 2006-06-29 3M Innovative Properties Company Paint replacement film application tool and process
WO2006102581A1 (en) 2005-03-24 2006-09-28 3M Innovative Properties Company Corrosion resistant metallized films and methods of making the same
DE102005023728A1 (en) 2005-05-23 2006-11-30 Basf Coatings Ag Lacquer layer-forming corrosion inhibitors and methods of current-free application
JP4873933B2 (en) 2005-11-14 2012-02-08 スリーエム イノベイティブ プロパティズ カンパニー Method for producing a resin molded product
US20070196661A1 (en) 2005-12-09 2007-08-23 Ppg Industries Ohio, Inc. Methods for reducing the time to produce a mar and/or scratch resistant coating on a substrate
JP2007188045A (en) * 2005-12-16 2007-07-26 Mitsubishi Plastics Ind Ltd Antireflection transfer film and its manufacturing method
JP5112646B2 (en) 2006-05-08 2013-01-09 スリーエム イノベイティブ プロパティズ カンパニー Decorative layer forming film, method of manufacturing the decorative article and decorative articles
JP4779809B2 (en) * 2006-05-31 2011-09-28 東洋紡績株式会社 Conductive film for laminated polyester film
JP2008023854A (en) * 2006-07-21 2008-02-07 Adeka Corp Sheet-like laminate
WO2008039658A3 (en) 2006-09-27 2009-09-24 3M Innovative Properties Company Metallized films, articles, and methods of making the same
WO2008039659A3 (en) 2006-09-27 2009-08-27 3M Innovative Properties Company Corrosion resistant metallized films and methods of making the same
CN101344603B (en) 2007-07-13 2011-01-12 3M创新有限公司 Method for preparing sulfurated retroreflective sheet and retroreflective product
CN101342789A (en) 2007-07-13 2009-01-14 3M创新有限公司 Vulcanized rubber product and method of producing the same

Patent Citations (92)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3436359A (en) * 1965-10-14 1969-04-01 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Polyether polyprimary polyamines and elastomeric products thereof
US3551232A (en) * 1967-12-22 1970-12-29 Gen Motors Corp Method of vacuum forming laminated articles
US3728182A (en) * 1971-06-25 1973-04-17 Pandel Bradford Method of preparing resin-backed tufted carpet tiles
US4590021A (en) * 1978-06-29 1986-05-20 Yoshino Kogyosho Co., Ltd. Method for producing polyester containers
US4569885A (en) * 1981-08-20 1986-02-11 Nitto Electric Industrial Company, Limited Polyester film for forming printed circuit
US4457797A (en) * 1982-03-08 1984-07-03 E. I. Dupont De Nemours And Company Process for thermoforming reinforced polymer sheets
US4522670A (en) * 1983-04-04 1985-06-11 American Hoechst Corporation Process for manufacture of tamper-resistant polyester credit cards
US4642126A (en) * 1985-02-11 1987-02-10 Norton Company Coated abrasives with rapidly curable adhesives and controllable curvature
US4652274A (en) * 1985-08-07 1987-03-24 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Coated abrasive product having radiation curable binder
US4828637A (en) * 1986-07-02 1989-05-09 General Motors Corporation Method of applying painted carrier films to automobile body parts
US4838973A (en) * 1986-07-02 1989-06-13 General Motors Corporation Method of applying painted carrier films to automobile body parts
US4769100A (en) * 1986-09-22 1988-09-06 General Motors Corporation Method of applying carrier films prepainted with metallic paint to automobile body panels
US4810540A (en) * 1986-10-28 1989-03-07 Rexham Corporation Decorative sheet material simulating the appearance of a base coat/clear coat paint finish
US5960527A (en) * 1986-10-28 1999-10-05 Rexam Industries Corp. Method of injection molding plastic automobile body parts with integral weatherable pigmented film surface
US6966962B2 (en) * 1987-03-27 2005-11-22 Avery Dennison Corporation Dry paint transfer-lamination process for making high DOI automotive body panels
US6838130B1 (en) * 1987-03-27 2005-01-04 Avery Dennison Corporation Dry paint transfer process and product
US6984280B2 (en) * 1987-03-27 2006-01-10 Avery Dennison Coporation Dry paint transfer process for making deep-draw high doi automotive body panels
US5707697A (en) * 1987-03-27 1998-01-13 Avery Dennison Corporation Dry paint transfer product having high DOI automotive paint coat
US4833213A (en) * 1987-06-26 1989-05-23 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Method of making purely primary diamines from nitrogen containing nocleophile and terminally electrophilically active polyether
US5132148A (en) * 1987-11-03 1992-07-21 Eastman Kodak Company Flexible and stretchable sheet material useful in forming protective and decorative coatings
US5114789A (en) * 1987-11-03 1992-05-19 Eastman Kodak Company Protective and decorative sheet material having a transparent topcoat
US4902557A (en) * 1988-01-25 1990-02-20 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Thermoplastic polyolefin composite structure
US4824506A (en) * 1988-04-21 1989-04-25 General Motors Corporation Process for protecting thermoformed films
US5215811A (en) * 1988-04-28 1993-06-01 Eastman Kodak Company Protective and decorative sheet material having a transparent topcoat
US4913760A (en) * 1988-08-29 1990-04-03 Eastman Kodak Company Method of manufacturing a dried, thermoformable, paint-coated sheet material having gloss and smoothness
US5192609A (en) * 1988-11-07 1993-03-09 Eastman Kodak Company Thermoformable sheet material
US5021981A (en) * 1988-12-22 1991-06-04 North Carolina State University Thermal memory cell and thermal system evaluation
US5037681A (en) * 1989-03-08 1991-08-06 Tokai Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Molding for use with an automobile and process for manufacturing the same
US5034275A (en) * 1989-11-24 1991-07-23 Pearson James M Paint coated sheet material with adhesion promoting composition
US5128434A (en) * 1990-11-27 1992-07-07 Bausch & Lomb Incorporated Control of hard segment size in polyurethane formation
US5324382A (en) * 1991-08-16 1994-06-28 Citadel Architectural Products Apparatus for forming synthetic-plastic-covered exterior building siding
US5201981A (en) * 1991-08-16 1993-04-13 Citadel Architectural Products, Inc. Method of forming synthetic plastic film-projected building siding
US5417726A (en) * 1991-12-20 1995-05-23 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Coated abrasive backing
US5252694A (en) * 1992-01-22 1993-10-12 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Energy-polymerization adhesive, coating, film and process for making the same
US5410971A (en) * 1992-10-15 1995-05-02 Jeff Industries, Inc. Adjustable work station for the handicapped
US5607536A (en) * 1992-10-30 1997-03-04 Tikka-System Oy Method and apparatus for coating objects with a plastic film
US5468532A (en) * 1992-12-10 1995-11-21 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Multilayer graphic article with color layer
US5405675A (en) * 1992-12-10 1995-04-11 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Embossed multilayer film
US5410791A (en) * 1993-07-01 1995-05-02 General Electric Company Fabrication chuck
US6164739A (en) * 1993-10-18 2000-12-26 The Dow Chemical Company Multilayer protective film
US5449429A (en) * 1993-12-03 1995-09-12 Langenbrunner; James R. Apparatus for stretching and mounting films
US5900093A (en) * 1993-12-03 1999-05-04 Langenbrunner; James Roybal Method for stretching and mounting films
US5591527A (en) * 1994-11-02 1997-01-07 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Optical security articles and methods for making same
US6012818A (en) * 1994-12-20 2000-01-11 3M Innovative Properties Company Retroreflective sheeting articles
US20040209057A1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2004-10-21 Enlow Howard H. Extruded polymeric high transparency films
US6336988B1 (en) * 1995-06-07 2002-01-08 Avery Dennison Corporation Extrusion coating process for making protective and decorative films
US6547912B2 (en) * 1995-06-07 2003-04-15 Avery Dennison Corporation Extrusion coating process for making high transparency protective and decorative films
US5648136A (en) * 1995-07-11 1997-07-15 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Co. Component carrier tape
US5729963A (en) * 1995-07-11 1998-03-24 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Component carrier tape
US5798409A (en) * 1995-10-03 1998-08-25 Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company Reactive two-part polyurethane compositions and optionally self-healable and scratch-resistant coatings prepared therefrom
US6143227A (en) * 1997-07-30 2000-11-07 Visteon Global Technologies, Inc. Method for injection molding an article having film covered flanges
US5951939A (en) * 1997-07-30 1999-09-14 Ford Motor Company Method for heating films for thermoforming
US5972279A (en) * 1997-07-30 1999-10-26 Ford Motor Company Method of transferring a pre-molded film into a mold
US5985198A (en) * 1997-07-30 1999-11-16 Ford Motor Company Method for molding a film-covered article
US6367361B1 (en) * 1997-07-30 2002-04-09 Ford Motor Company Method and apparatus for trimming thermoformed films
US6221304B1 (en) * 1997-07-30 2001-04-24 Visteon Global Technologies, Inc. Method of manufacturing a film coated article
US6773804B2 (en) * 1997-08-06 2004-08-10 Avery Dennison Corporation Extruded polymeric high transparency films
US6083335A (en) * 1997-08-18 2000-07-04 3M Innovative Properties Company Paint film assembly with masking film and method of making same
US5968657A (en) * 1997-08-18 1999-10-19 3M Innovative Properties Company Paint film assembly with masking film and method of making same
US6521145B1 (en) * 1998-01-30 2003-02-18 3M Innovative Properties Company Reflective particle display film and method of manufacture
US6258918B1 (en) * 1998-04-22 2001-07-10 3M Innovative Properties Company Flexible polyurethane material
US6709748B1 (en) * 1998-04-22 2004-03-23 3M Innovative Properties Company Flexible polyurethane material
US6284183B1 (en) * 1998-06-08 2001-09-04 Avery Dennison Corporation Thick sheet laminating process for making exterior automotive body panels
US6709723B2 (en) * 1998-06-08 2004-03-23 Avery Dennison Corporation Thick sheet lamination product for use in exterior automotive body panels
US6254712B1 (en) * 1998-12-08 2001-07-03 Avery Dennison Corporation Extrusion coating process for making high transparency protective and decorative films
US6635314B1 (en) * 1999-03-17 2003-10-21 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company High solids clear coating composition
US6468643B1 (en) * 1999-04-14 2002-10-22 Mitsui Chemicals, Inc. Laminated product
US6723427B1 (en) * 1999-06-21 2004-04-20 Avery Dennison Corporation Fade printed decorative sheets and methods and apparatus for making the same
US7195727B2 (en) * 1999-10-13 2007-03-27 Guardian Industries Corp. Extruded automotive trim and method of making same
US6440546B1 (en) * 1999-10-13 2002-08-27 Ream Industries Corp. Gloss-adjusting mask layer with particulate filler
US6667101B2 (en) * 2000-01-26 2003-12-23 Atofina Thermoformable multilayer film for the protection of substrates and objects obtained
US6492012B1 (en) * 2000-02-02 2002-12-10 Tilak M. Shah Polymer penetrated porous substrates
US6676754B1 (en) * 2000-06-30 2004-01-13 3M Innovative Properties Company Coating apparatus and methods of applying a polymer coating
US6890658B2 (en) * 2000-09-29 2005-05-10 3M Innovative Properties Company Transparent resin-coated stainless steel article
US6607831B2 (en) * 2000-12-28 2003-08-19 3M Innovative Properties Company Multi-layer article
US6623667B2 (en) * 2001-02-28 2003-09-23 3M Innovative Properties Company Method for continuous fabrication of structured surface light guides
US6890685B2 (en) * 2001-03-27 2005-05-10 Nec Corporation Anode for secondary battery and secondary battery therewith
US20040234771A1 (en) * 2001-10-31 2004-11-25 Meyer Daniel E. Methods of thermoforming non-self-supporting polymeric films and articles made therefrom
US20040224101A1 (en) * 2001-10-31 2004-11-11 Johnson Michael A. Cross-linked primer composition and use thereof in thermoformable films
US20040076766A1 (en) * 2002-10-16 2004-04-22 Thomas Fey Process for the production of paint coating layers
US7144612B2 (en) * 2003-01-27 2006-12-05 Laminate Products, Inc. Decorative system composite and method
US7132142B2 (en) * 2003-02-14 2006-11-07 Avery Dennison Corporation Dry paint transfer laminate for use as wall covering
US20070141264A1 (en) * 2003-12-17 2007-06-21 Dsm Ip Assets B.V. Stain resistant urethane-vinyl aqueous coating compositions
US20070034326A1 (en) * 2003-12-26 2007-02-15 Takashi Kikuchi Method for producing flexible laminate
US20070128365A1 (en) * 2004-06-16 2007-06-07 Matthias Koch Radiation-curable, electrically conductive coatiing mixture
US20070256597A1 (en) * 2004-09-01 2007-11-08 Rukavina Thomas G Poly(ureaurethane)s, articles and coatings prepared therefrom and methods of making the same
US20080311349A1 (en) * 2005-03-24 2008-12-18 Johnson Michael A Metallized Films and Articles Containing the Same
US20080199704A1 (en) * 2005-04-29 2008-08-21 Ho Charlie C Multilayer Polyurethane Protective Films
US20070122630A1 (en) * 2005-11-08 2007-05-31 Worthen Industries Co-extrusion or tandem extrusion of surface protection films
US20070116903A1 (en) * 2005-11-18 2007-05-24 Solaint Llc Decorative Paint film laminate
US20100032082A1 (en) * 2006-10-04 2010-02-11 Ho Charlie C Method of making multilayer polyurethane protective film
US20110027594A1 (en) * 2008-03-25 2011-02-03 Johnson Michael A Paint film composites and methods of making and using the same

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8545959B2 (en) 2005-10-21 2013-10-01 Entrotech Composites, Llc Composite articles comprising protective sheets and related methods
US20080261014A1 (en) * 2005-10-21 2008-10-23 Mcguire James E Composite Articles Comprising Protective Sheets and Related Methods
US20100068446A1 (en) * 2006-10-23 2010-03-18 Mcguire James E Articles Comprising Protective Sheets and Related Methods
US8545960B2 (en) 2006-10-23 2013-10-01 Entrotech, Inc. Articles comprising protective sheets and related methods
US20100059167A1 (en) * 2007-09-25 2010-03-11 Mcguire Jr James E Paint Replacement Films, Composites Therefrom, and Related Methods
US10035932B2 (en) 2007-09-25 2018-07-31 Aero Advanced Paint Technology, Inc. Paint replacement films, composites therefrom, and related methods
US20090186198A1 (en) * 2008-01-19 2009-07-23 Entrotech, Inc. Protected Graphics and Related Methods
US20110027594A1 (en) * 2008-03-25 2011-02-03 Johnson Michael A Paint film composites and methods of making and using the same
US8932424B2 (en) 2008-03-25 2015-01-13 3M Innovative Properties Company Paint film composites and methods of making and using the same
US9656442B2 (en) 2008-03-25 2017-05-23 3M Innovative Properties Company Paint film composites and methods of making and using the same
US20110116151A1 (en) * 2008-07-11 2011-05-19 Thales Multilayer structure having a photochromic host matrix and manufacturing method
US8345342B2 (en) * 2008-07-11 2013-01-01 Thales Multilayer structure having a photochromic host matrix and manufacturing method
US8753736B2 (en) 2008-07-25 2014-06-17 3M Innovative Properties Company Elastic bonding films
US8420217B2 (en) * 2008-07-25 2013-04-16 3M Innovative Properties Company Elastic bonding films
US20110123786A1 (en) * 2008-07-25 2011-05-26 Johnson Michael A Elastic bonding films
US9840591B2 (en) 2010-08-04 2017-12-12 3M Innovative Properties Company Method of preparing benzoxazine-thiol polymers films
US20130216827A1 (en) * 2010-10-25 2013-08-22 Markus Parusel Laminate with a color layer, and method for producing same
US20150020844A1 (en) * 2012-03-06 2015-01-22 Taiki Corp., Ltd. Cosmetics applicator
US9498043B2 (en) * 2012-03-06 2016-11-22 Taiki Corp., Ltd. Cosmetics applicator
US10030441B2 (en) * 2013-09-13 2018-07-24 Faurecia Innenraum Systeme Gmbh Roller shutter and storage compartment comprising said roller shutter
US20150075733A1 (en) * 2013-09-13 2015-03-19 Faurecia Innenraum Systeme Gmbh Roller shutter and storage compartment comprising said roller shutter
US9880332B2 (en) 2013-10-04 2018-01-30 3M Innovative Properties Company Decorative microsphere articles with information layer
WO2015094792A1 (en) 2013-12-19 2015-06-25 3M Innovative Properties Company Viscoelastic medical article
WO2017011236A1 (en) * 2015-07-16 2017-01-19 Sun Chemical Corporation Water-based inks for thermoforming applications
WO2017105850A1 (en) * 2015-12-15 2017-06-22 3M Innovative Properties Company Protective display film
WO2017105908A1 (en) * 2015-12-15 2017-06-22 3M Innovative Properties Company Thin protective display film
WO2017214105A3 (en) * 2016-06-09 2018-02-08 3M Innovative Properties Company Polyurethane acrylate protective display film
WO2018005833A3 (en) * 2016-07-01 2018-02-22 3M Innovative Properties Company LOW Tg POLYURETHANE PROTECTIVE DISPLAY FILM
WO2018057774A1 (en) * 2016-09-21 2018-03-29 3M Innovative Properties Company Protective display film with glass
WO2018102607A1 (en) * 2016-12-01 2018-06-07 3M Innovative Properties Company Dual cure protective display film
WO2018112181A1 (en) * 2016-12-14 2018-06-21 3M Innovative Properties Company Segmented protective display film

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20140004315A1 (en) 2014-01-02 application
KR101512214B1 (en) 2015-04-14 grant
JP2011517630A (en) 2011-06-16 application
JP5677933B2 (en) 2015-02-25 grant
JP5806256B2 (en) 2015-11-10 grant
US20150140290A1 (en) 2015-05-21 application
US8992718B2 (en) 2015-03-31 grant
CN102007000B (en) 2014-07-16 grant
CN102007000A (en) 2011-04-06 application
WO2009120548A2 (en) 2009-10-01 application
WO2009120548A3 (en) 2010-09-23 application
EP2268486A2 (en) 2011-01-05 application
US8551279B2 (en) 2013-10-08 grant
JP2013177002A (en) 2013-09-09 application
KR20100127841A (en) 2010-12-06 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6296732B1 (en) Extrusion process for protective coatings for outdoor siding panels and the like
US6349754B1 (en) Process for making thermoformed low gloss decorative laminate
US6777089B1 (en) Radiation-curable composite layered sheet or film
US5942330A (en) Adhesive compositions and methods and articles of manufacture comprising same
US5114514A (en) Bonding of thermoplastic sheet material to roughened substrates
US5034269A (en) Process for the manufacture of paint-coated film and product produced therefrom
JP2009234009A (en) Laminated film
US6607831B2 (en) Multi-layer article
US20030211334A1 (en) Low gloss automotive interior laminates
US20060240246A1 (en) Laminated sheet for forming article
US20080286576A1 (en) Protective Sheets, Articles, and Methods
WO2008039658A2 (en) Metallized films, articles, and methods of making the same
EP1229090A1 (en) A polyurethane resin, a coating composition comprising a polyurethane resin, use of a polyurethane resin for printing plastic substrates, method of producing a polyurethane resin, a method of producing a laminate carrying a printed image
US20030003282A1 (en) Thick sheet lamination product and process
US20040234771A1 (en) Methods of thermoforming non-self-supporting polymeric films and articles made therefrom
US6440546B1 (en) Gloss-adjusting mask layer with particulate filler
US20070116903A1 (en) Decorative Paint film laminate
WO2000051799A1 (en) Migratory additives for mask layer of decorative sheet material
US20040208998A1 (en) Films coated with paint
US20040224101A1 (en) Cross-linked primer composition and use thereof in thermoformable films
US20080008885A1 (en) Method for laminating plastic films with wood-base substrates, in particular for producing high-gloss surfaces
US20100239868A1 (en) Laminated Film
US8128779B2 (en) Method of making multilayer polyurethane protective film
US20080220250A1 (en) Flexible Layer Composite Comprising a Support and a Layer of Curable Surface Coating Composition Applied Thereto
US20090022957A1 (en) Decorative sheet and method for producing the same

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: 3M INNOVATIVE PROPERTIES COMPANY, MINNESOTA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:JOHNSON, MICHAEL A.;BRANDYS, FRANK A.;NIELSEN, KENT E.;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20100910 TO 20100921;REEL/FRAME:025071/0816

CC Certificate of correction
FPAY Fee payment

Year of fee payment: 4