US20110030511A1 - Roofing Material Removing Apparatus - Google Patents

Roofing Material Removing Apparatus Download PDF

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Publication number
US20110030511A1
US20110030511A1 US12537538 US53753809A US2011030511A1 US 20110030511 A1 US20110030511 A1 US 20110030511A1 US 12537538 US12537538 US 12537538 US 53753809 A US53753809 A US 53753809A US 2011030511 A1 US2011030511 A1 US 2011030511A1
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Prior art keywords
apparatus
chassis frame
assembly
adjustable guide
coupled
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12537538
Inventor
Keith Schmidt
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Keith Schmidt
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D15/00Apparatus or tools for roof working
    • E04D15/02Apparatus or tools for roof working for roof coverings comprising tiles, shingles, or like roofing elements
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D15/00Apparatus or tools for roof working
    • E04D15/003Apparatus or tools for roof working for removing roof material

Abstract

Roofing material removing apparatus are provided. More particularly, roofing material removing apparatuses with an adjustable guide assembly wherein the adjustable guide assembly provides for continual forward motion and continuous control of the flow of roofing material are presented. The adjustable guide assembly is adaptable to various tool assemblies and applications.

Description

    FIELD
  • The present invention relates to the field of construction equipment and more particularly to a pneumatic roofing material removing apparatus for detaching various types of shingles, roofing material, or other related material.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Several attempts have been made to automate or assist in the job of removing roofing material. In general apparatus are known to consist of familiar and generally similar configurations, notwithstanding the myriad of designs. In many cases, known machines are impracticable due to their size, shape, and weight. Further, many known machines have many moving parts and systems that all have to work together to achieve the desired outcome. Many machines require a start/stop process and setting up and using these machine is often time consuming. Prior art machines have inherent control challenges with cables, cutting ends and other moving parts. In some instances, it is difficult to control the collection of the shingles, especially in machines where the trap must be continuously emptied.
  • Due to the problems with the current machines, a roof material removing apparatus which allows not only for continuous motion and removal of material for maximum efficiency, but also operator comfort and ergonomics, is needed.
  • SUMMARY
  • Roofing material removing apparatus are provided. One embodiment is comprised of a chassis frame, a handle assembly coupled with the chassis frame, an actuator connected with the chassis frame, a tool assembly reversibly connected with the actuator; and an adjustable guide assembly pivotally and adjustably connected with the chassis frame. Many embodiments also include a pair of wheels connected with the chassis frame. Vertically oriented members of the chassis frame provide mounting for the handle assembly, wheels, guide assembly and shields/body panels/aesthetic pieces and decals. The actuator connects with the chassis frame and provides a power source for driving the tool assembly. In many embodiments, the actuator is a pneumatic cylinder, and has a front portion which accommodates multiple different types of tool assemblies.
  • In one example, the tool assembly has multiple teeth of a curved angular shape, which are substantially parallel to each other and substantially equally spaced apart on the toolbar. Generally in these embodiments, the front portion of the teeth have an acute angle.
  • The handle assembly commonly consists of a top and bottom section whereby the handle assembly generally extends from the chassis frame rearward at an inclining angle and can be folded for transport and storage.
  • In one aspect, the adjustable guide assembly is adjustably connected with the chassis frame and consists of multiple curved guide rods which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. In this embodiment, the guide rods are pivotally and adjustably coupled with a lower and an upper pivot support member. The lower pivot support member can position each guide rod relative to the tool assembly both proximately and vertically below the trailing end of the tool assembly toolbar. The lower pivot support member offers a point of rotation for the guide rods. In many configurations, the upper pivot support member positions the upper part of each guide rod. In this case, the upper pivot support member has multiple length adjustment settings, which enable the guide rods to be positioned selectively and independently fore and aft at multiple angles for desired roofing material direction and flow. The entire adjustable guide assembly is removable, allowing different guide assembly combinations such as curved rods, straight rods, solid section guide plate, rods plus solid guide plate, and the like to be installed for optimum performance based upon the environmental conditions and different materials being removed
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • There are shown in the drawings certain exemplary embodiments. It should be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and to the arrangements of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. Other embodiments and variations are within the scope of the appended claims. In the drawings:
  • FIG. 1 is a pictorial view of an embodiment in use on a pitched roof.
  • FIG. 2 is a partial side view demonstrating the motion of the tool assembly.
  • FIG. 3 demonstrates a partial side view of an embodiment in use.
  • FIG. 4 is partial front view of an embodiment in use.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a front view.
  • FIG. 6 is a top view.
  • FIG. 7 is an exploded view of the components of one embodiment.
  • FIG. 8 is an isolated view of an embodiment with the handle assembly folded.
  • FIG. 9 shows a partial side view of potential multiple adjustable guide assembly positions.
  • FIG. 10 is an isolated view of a handle assembly.
  • FIG. 11 is an isolated view of an alternative embodiment of the handle assembly.
  • FIG. 12 is an isolated view of a tool assembly.
  • FIG. 13 is an isolated view of an alternative embodiment of the tool assembly.
  • FIG. 14 is an isolated view of guide rods.
  • FIG. 15 is an isolated view of alternative embodiments of the adjustable guide assembly.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • With reference now to the drawings, and in particular, to FIGS. 1 through 15 thereof, an embodiment of the roofing material removing apparatus generally designated by the reference number 10 will be described.
  • One embodiment is comprised of a chassis frame 12, an actuator 26, a handle assembly 18, a tool assembly 38, an adjustable guide assembly 22, and a pair of wheels 20. The chassis frame 12, having two structural, vertically orientated members 14 which are connected to each other by a cross-beam support 16. The vertical members 14 of the chassis frame 12 also provide mounting for the handle assembly 18, wheels 20, adjustable guide assembly 22 and any shields/body panels/aesthetic pieces/decals 24. The wheels 20 attach to the lower rear, outboard portion of the chassis frame vertical members 14. Alternatively, skid plates or other means of enabling motion across a roof could be used in place of the wheels 20 shown in the embodiment demonstrated by FIG. 7.
  • The actuator 26 provides a power source for the tool assembly 38, and could be in the form of an electric motor, small engine, manual mechanism or pneumatic cylinder. Another alternate power source could be powered wheels 20 to drive and engage the tool assembly 38. The actuator 26, shown as a pneumatic cylinder, mounts to the chassis frame cross-beam support 16, which connect the vertical members 14. When the actuator 26 is a pneumatic cylinder, the pneumatic cylinder 26 has a front portion 28 which accommodates multiple tool assemblies. The pneumatic cylinder 26 has a rear portion 34 and has an air supply hose 36 extending outward therefrom.
  • The tool assembly 38 has a shaft 32 at the rear end which inserts and is captured by the front portion 28 of the pneumatic cylinder 26. The front end of the shaft 32, connects and attaches to a toolbar 40 which positions and secures tool assembly engaging teeth 42. In one embodiment, the tool assembly engaging teeth 42, are a curved angular shape 44, are parallel to each other, and are equally spaced apart 46 (approximately 3″ apart) on the toolbar, with the front portion of the tool assembly engaging teeth 42 having an acute angle 48. Depending on environmental conditions and material, the spacing of the teeth could be reduced, i.e. more teeth per inch, or increased, i.e. less teeth per inch to optimize performance. The shape of the teeth could also vary. Optimal performance teeth shape and pattern examples may include, but are not limited to, a “V” shaped teeth pattern, longer teeth, i.e. teeth with a smaller angle, shorter teeth, i.e. teeth with a steeper angle, and the like. The skilled artisan will be able to choose the appropriate spacing and shape of the teeth without undue experimentation.
  • The adjustable guide assembly 22 connects to the chassis frame 12 and is comprised of guide rods 50 which are spaced apart 52 and parallel to each other. In many embodiments, the guide rods 50 are pivotally 54 and adjustably 56 coupled to a lower 58 and upper 60 pivot support members. The lower pivot support member 58 positions a lower portion 62 of the guide rod 50 relative to the tool assembly 38 proximately and vertically below a trailing end 41 of the tool assembly and offers the point of rotation 54 for the guide rods 50. The upper pivot support member 60 positions the upper end 68 of the guide rods and has multiple length adjustment settings 70 enabling the guide rods to be positioned selectively and independently fore 70 and aft 72 at multiple angles for the desired material direction and flow. The lower pivot support member 58 couples to the lower, front portion 74 of the chassis frame 12 vertical members 14. The upper pivot support member 60 adjustably 56 couples to the chassis frame 12 vertical members 14. The lower portion 62 of the guide rod 50 are positioned vertically just above the toolbar 46, laterally in-between the teeth 76 and within the fore/aft side profile of the tool assembly engaging teeth 42 and toolbar motion 120 so material doesn't get caught on them and stop movement. The entire adjustable guide assembly 22 is removable, allowing different guide assembly combinations to be installed depending upon environmental conditions and different materials being removed. Optimal performing guide assembly combination examples may include curved rods, straight rods, solid section guide plate, rods plus solid guide plate, and the like.
  • The handle assembly 18 is comprised of a top section 78 and a bottom section 80, which extends from the chassis frame 12 rearward at an inclining angle. The bottom section of the handle assembly 80 is pivotally 82 and adjustably 56 coupled to the chassis frame 12 vertical members 14. The top section of the handle assembly 78 is pivotally coupled 82 to the bottom section handle assembly 80. The handle assembly 18 provides mounting and positive routing points 86 for the air supply hose 36 which connects to the rear portion 34 of the pneumatic cylinder 26, mounting points for an operation control valve assembly 88 at the upper end of the top section of the handle assembly 78, and an ergonomic height and shape to reduce fatigue on an operator. The operation control valve assembly 88 offers a lever 90 extending inwardly from the operation control valve assembly 88, parallel to lateral top section of the handle assembly 78, such lever 90, which can be depressed by the operator's hand to activate and enable air to flow to the pneumatic cylinder 26, making it operational. The operation control valve assembly 88 offers a connection point for the air supply 92 at the rear portion of the valve. In many embodiments, the air supply 92 is an air compressor.
  • The operation of the roofing material removing apparatus begins first with an operator grabbing the top handle section 78 and engaging the control valve assembly lever 90 which opens the valve and sends compressed air to the pneumatic cylinder 26. Said compressed air causes a piston with within the pneumatic cylinder 26 to rapidly move back and forth 120, engaging the shaft 32 of the tool assembly 38. The tool assembly 38 as a result extends and retracts back and forth 120. The apparatus 10 is maneuvered and positioned as desired to engage the tool assembly teeth 42 underneath the shingles or desired material 98 for removal. The roofing material removing apparatus can operate in any direction to remove material (vertically, horizontally, diagonally or other path), but in many embodiments a vertical motion starting at the roof peak and working down the roof is most advantageous.
  • Once the roofing material removing apparatus is in a desired operating position, the leading teeth 42 of the tool assembly 38 engage and come in contact with shingles and roofing material 96. The teeth's inclined, acute curved shape 44 and penetrating toolbar motion 120 thrust between the shingles/roofing material 96 and parent material 98 (typically plywood 100), causing shingles, nails, and roofing material to be lifted up, separating from the parent material 98. As the apparatus continues across the roof, the shingles 96 and nails progress up the teeth 42, disengaging fully from the parent material 98, allowing the teeth to continue their motion and contact the guide assembly rods 50 which direct the material upward and forward in the desired path, eventually turning over in front of the roofing material removing apparatus (shingles upside down with nails facing up), finding their way to the edge of the roof or where directed. The position of the adjustable guide assembly 22 can be adjusted fore 70 and aft 72 to get the most desired positioning to remove material. A steeper angle, as illustrated with the guide rods 50 in the forward position 70, may be more desired for material like wood shingles, which turn over easily. Shingles with nails facing up slide easier down the roof, as the nails are less likely to catch, aiding the removal of material and overall performance.
  • Additionally, the chassis frame 12 and pneumatic cylinder 26 are disposed relative above the tool assembly engaging teeth 42 to give height and clearance 110 for nails still fixed to the parent material 98, or shingles 96 still fixed to the parent material 98, or loosen nails 112 or the like; to freely pass underneath the chassis without disrupting the performance of the tool assembly 38 and overall performance of the apparatus 10. Furthermore, the roofing material removing apparatus can be pivoted about the wheels 20 to lift shingles 96 or other material over desired roof edges or bumps or buildups, giving it further versatility.
  • Once operation has ceased, the roofing material removing apparatus has the ability to fold 114 the top section of the handle assembly 78. by loosening knobs 116 to maximize moving and transporting the apparatus in a compact, efficient manner. In many embodiments, the top section of the handle assembly 78 will be folded forward.
  • In one embodiment, the roofing material removing apparatus provides continual forward motion and flow of roofing material, thereby controlling the roofing material and keeping it in front of the apparatus. In many embodiments, the roofing material removing apparatus is comprised of a minimum number of moving parts and highly engineered for (a) maximum performance, (b) ease of construction/assembly, (c) ergonomics, (d) durability, and (e) ease of service.
  • In certain embodiments, the roofing material removing apparatus is made light in weight, easy to control, and easy to maneuver. In these embodiments, the roofing material removing apparatus is often commonly portable, adjustable, and easy to transport.
  • In exemplary embodiments, the tool assembly is optimized to engage for maximum effectiveness and shingle removal speed. Use of tool assemblies which differ from those shown in the embodiments in the figures are contemplated.
  • An alternative embodiment of the handle assembly is a fixed handle 118 as shown in FIG. 11. Yet another alternative embodiment of the handle assembly is a “T” handle 128 as shown in FIG. 11. Additionally, another alternative of the handle assembly is to integrate the handle with the chassis frame and combinations thereof.
  • An alternative embodiment of the tool assembly as shown in FIG. 13 is a tool assembly 126 comprised of three teeth and equally spaced for optimized performance based on material removing and conditions. In other embodiments, the teeth of the tool assembly 126 will not be equally spaced. Further alternative embodiments of the tool assembly are increases or decreasing the number teeth, thus decreasing or increasing the space between each tooth. Other alternative embodiments include the tool assembly in the shape of the toolbar with teeth (v-shaped fore/aft, v-shaped vertically, curved, and the like). Yet another alternative embodiment of the tool assembly is a one piece, instead of a multiple piece assembly. Additionally, a further alternative embodiment is the shape of the shaft thereof (round, triangle, square, and so forth). Further alternative embodiments of the tool assembly include varying materials manufacturing and heat treating processes to achieve desired performance.
  • An alternative embodiment of the guide rods is a solid guide plate 122 or combination rod and plate 124 as shown in FIG. 15. Other alternative embodiments of the guide rods include alternative shapes such as straight, oval, elliptical, and so forth. Additionally, in another alternative embodiment, the guide rods comprise guide bars instead of rods. Furthermore, the guide rods can be configured to have adjustable widths and be individually replaceable for service.
  • An alternative embodiment of the guide assembly is a rigid, non-adjustable guide assembly. Additionally, another alternative embodiment is to integrate the guide assembly with the chassis frame and combinations thereof.
  • Alternative embodiments of the wheels incorporate suspended wheels, which offer a range of motion. Additionally, another alternative embodiment of the wheels comprises powered wheels which turn and assist in moving the apparatus in desired motion.
  • An alternative embodiment of the actuator is to integrate it into the chassis frame (one-piece assembly) and combinations thereof.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A roofing material removing apparatus for detaching and removing various types of roofing material comprising:
    a chassis frame;
    a handle assembly coupled with the chassis frame;
    an actuator connected with the chassis frame;
    a tool assembly reversibly connected with the actuator;
    and
    an adjustable guide assembly pivotally and adjustably connected with the chassis frame.
  2. 2. The apparatus in claim 1 wherein the adjustable guide assembly has one or more adjustable guide rods.
  3. 3. The apparatus in claim 2 wherein the adjustable guide rods are curved in shape, substantially parallel to each other, and spaced apart from each other.
  4. 4. The apparatus in claim 2 wherein the guide rods are pivotally and adjustably coupled with at least one support member, whereby the at least one support member supports and variably positions the guide rods relative to the tool assembly.
  5. 5. The apparatus in claim 4 further comprising at least two support members, wherein the at least two support members comprise a lower pivot support member coupled with the chassis frame and an upper pivot support member adjustably coupled with the chassis frame.
  6. 6. The apparatus in claim 5 wherein the upper pivot support member comprises multiple adjustment settings, whereby the adjustment settings enable each guide rod to be positioned selectively and independently fore and aft in multiple angles.
  7. 7. The apparatus in claim 5 wherein the lower pivot support member positions a lower end of each guide rod proximately and vertically below a trailing end of the tool assembly.
  8. 8. The apparatus in claim 5 wherein the guide rods are removable.
  9. 9. The apparatus in claim 1 wherein the handle assembly is pivotally and adjustably coupled with the chassis frame.
  10. 10. The apparatus in claim 1 wherein the handle assembly comprises a bottom section and top section, and further wherein the handle assembly is foldable.
  11. 11. The apparatus in claim 1 further comprising a control valve coupled with the handle assembly.
  12. 12. The apparatus in claim 1 wherein the tool assembly comprises a toolbar coupled with a shaft that interfaces with the actuator, wherein the toolbar comprises teeth.
  13. 13. The apparatus in claim 12 wherein the teeth are a curved angular shape, substantially parallel to each other, and substantially equally spaced apart on the toolbar, further wherein a front portion of the teeth have an acute angle.
  14. 14. The apparatus in claim 1 wherein the actuator is a pneumatic cylinder.
  15. 15. The apparatus in claim 14 wherein the pneumatic cylinder is removable.
  16. 16. The apparatus in claim 1 further comprising at least one wheel is coupled with the chassis frame.
  17. 17. A roofing material removing apparatus for detaching and removing various types of roofing material comprising:
    a chassis frame;
    a handle assembly coupled with the chassis frame;
    an actuator connected with the chassis frame;
    a tool assembly reversibly connected with the actuator;
    and
    an adjustable guide assembly pivotally and adjustably connected with the chassis frame, wherein the adjustable guide assembly has at least one adjustable guide rod.
  18. 18. The apparatus in claim 17 wherein each adjustable guide rod is adapted to be positioned selectively and independently fore and aft in multiple angles.
  19. 19. The apparatus in claim 17 wherein a lower end of each adjustable guide rod is disposed proximately and vertically below a trailing end of the tool assembly.
  20. 20. The apparatus in claim 17 wherein the adjustable guide rods are removable.
US12537538 2009-08-07 2009-08-07 Roofing Material Removing Apparatus Abandoned US20110030511A1 (en)

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US12537538 US20110030511A1 (en) 2009-08-07 2009-08-07 Roofing Material Removing Apparatus

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Citations (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2519138A (en) * 1947-12-06 1950-08-15 Katz Joseph Roof scraping machine
US3542433A (en) * 1969-06-11 1970-11-24 Pal Dev Corp Apparatus for removing roofing
US3628833A (en) * 1970-06-04 1971-12-21 Daniel P Crispino Ripping machine
US3779605A (en) * 1972-07-28 1973-12-18 J Nieman Roofing removal apparatus
US4091535A (en) * 1977-06-23 1978-05-30 The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc. Shingle stripper
US4699430A (en) * 1986-05-01 1987-10-13 Rex Nichols Material stripping apparatus
US4709479A (en) * 1986-09-22 1987-12-01 Lavelette William J Shingle removing machine
US4756578A (en) * 1987-04-13 1988-07-12 Mims Clay W Apparatus for removing shingles and the like
US4763547A (en) * 1987-07-21 1988-08-16 Dike Equipment Co. Shingle removing apparatus
US4880491A (en) * 1988-08-01 1989-11-14 Jacobs James L Guided roofing materials removal apparatus
US5001946A (en) * 1990-02-12 1991-03-26 Jack W Shirlin Roof shingle stripping apparatus
US5218766A (en) * 1992-02-10 1993-06-15 Himebaugh Forrest K Roofing removal apparatus
US5741047A (en) * 1996-04-09 1998-04-21 Ordonez; Rudy Roofing material stripping machine
US5800021A (en) * 1996-06-19 1998-09-01 J. Best Company Shingle remover and method of removing
US5863100A (en) * 1997-04-03 1999-01-26 Martin; Jeremy Michael Pneumatic roofing material removing apparatus
US5921155A (en) * 1997-04-04 1999-07-13 Faller; Craig A. Shingle removing apparatus
US6711971B1 (en) * 2002-02-08 2004-03-30 Guil B. Morin Roofing removal apparatus
US7013758B1 (en) * 2004-10-13 2006-03-21 Stephane Gendron Apparatus for removing shingles and shingle fasteners from a roof
US7252021B1 (en) * 2004-06-03 2007-08-07 Herbert Garfield Linscott Roof shingle and nail remover
US7318364B1 (en) * 2006-05-05 2008-01-15 Nickolas Jerry L Shingle removing machine
US7360473B1 (en) * 2007-02-24 2008-04-22 Terrill Holt Shingle removal tool
US7373859B1 (en) * 2005-12-05 2008-05-20 Samantha Kaiser, legal representative Roof shingle stripping apparatus
US7685909B1 (en) * 2008-05-30 2010-03-30 Jones Ryan S Powered shingle ripper

Patent Citations (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2519138A (en) * 1947-12-06 1950-08-15 Katz Joseph Roof scraping machine
US3542433A (en) * 1969-06-11 1970-11-24 Pal Dev Corp Apparatus for removing roofing
US3628833A (en) * 1970-06-04 1971-12-21 Daniel P Crispino Ripping machine
US3779605A (en) * 1972-07-28 1973-12-18 J Nieman Roofing removal apparatus
US4091535A (en) * 1977-06-23 1978-05-30 The Raymond Lee Organization, Inc. Shingle stripper
US4699430A (en) * 1986-05-01 1987-10-13 Rex Nichols Material stripping apparatus
US4709479A (en) * 1986-09-22 1987-12-01 Lavelette William J Shingle removing machine
US4756578A (en) * 1987-04-13 1988-07-12 Mims Clay W Apparatus for removing shingles and the like
US4763547A (en) * 1987-07-21 1988-08-16 Dike Equipment Co. Shingle removing apparatus
US4880491A (en) * 1988-08-01 1989-11-14 Jacobs James L Guided roofing materials removal apparatus
US5001946A (en) * 1990-02-12 1991-03-26 Jack W Shirlin Roof shingle stripping apparatus
US5218766A (en) * 1992-02-10 1993-06-15 Himebaugh Forrest K Roofing removal apparatus
US5741047A (en) * 1996-04-09 1998-04-21 Ordonez; Rudy Roofing material stripping machine
US5800021A (en) * 1996-06-19 1998-09-01 J. Best Company Shingle remover and method of removing
US5863100A (en) * 1997-04-03 1999-01-26 Martin; Jeremy Michael Pneumatic roofing material removing apparatus
US5921155A (en) * 1997-04-04 1999-07-13 Faller; Craig A. Shingle removing apparatus
US6711971B1 (en) * 2002-02-08 2004-03-30 Guil B. Morin Roofing removal apparatus
US7252021B1 (en) * 2004-06-03 2007-08-07 Herbert Garfield Linscott Roof shingle and nail remover
US7013758B1 (en) * 2004-10-13 2006-03-21 Stephane Gendron Apparatus for removing shingles and shingle fasteners from a roof
US7373859B1 (en) * 2005-12-05 2008-05-20 Samantha Kaiser, legal representative Roof shingle stripping apparatus
US7318364B1 (en) * 2006-05-05 2008-01-15 Nickolas Jerry L Shingle removing machine
US7360473B1 (en) * 2007-02-24 2008-04-22 Terrill Holt Shingle removal tool
US7685909B1 (en) * 2008-05-30 2010-03-30 Jones Ryan S Powered shingle ripper

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