US20110028195A1 - Fantasy sports leagues comprising historical players and/or historical results - Google Patents

Fantasy sports leagues comprising historical players and/or historical results Download PDF

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US20110028195A1
US20110028195A1 US12/846,445 US84644510A US2011028195A1 US 20110028195 A1 US20110028195 A1 US 20110028195A1 US 84644510 A US84644510 A US 84644510A US 2011028195 A1 US2011028195 A1 US 2011028195A1
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game
real
life
players
historical
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US12/846,445
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Emory James Pennington
David A. Cook
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GLORY DAYS FANTASY d/b/a YESTERYEAR FANTASY SPORTS LLC
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GLORY DAYS FANTASY d/b/a YESTERYEAR FANTASY SPORTS LLC
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Priority to US12/846,445 priority patent/US20110028195A1/en
Assigned to GLORY DAYS FANTASY, LLC d/b/a YESTERYEAR FANTASY SPORTS reassignment GLORY DAYS FANTASY, LLC d/b/a YESTERYEAR FANTASY SPORTS ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: PENNINGTON, EMORY JAMES, COOK, DAVID A.
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/60Generating or modifying game content before or while executing the game program, e.g. authoring tools specially adapted for game development or game-integrated level editor
    • A63F13/65Generating or modifying game content before or while executing the game program, e.g. authoring tools specially adapted for game development or game-integrated level editor automatically by game devices or servers from real world data, e.g. measurement in live racing competition
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F13/00Video games, i.e. games using an electronically generated display having two or more dimensions
    • A63F13/80Special adaptations for executing a specific game genre or game mode
    • A63F13/828Managing virtual sport teams

Abstract

Computer-based fantasy sports leagues portraying games between historical players with contest outcomes based in part on the performance of those players in historical games and game results, typically with related network and user interfaces. The fantasy sports game can be a fantasy football game. In one embodiment, the historical data includes statistical information related to previous, historical real-life athletes and specific, real-life actual games played by those players. The games can be structured such that specified time periods of the athletes are incorporated into the operational considerations, and can include a fantasy drafting process by the human players wherein selections of the available real-life historical athletes are made. The historical fantasy game comprises methods, systems, programming, etc., comprising associated instructions and operations for displaying the sports video game characters for the fantasy game.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application claims the benefit of copending U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/229,663, filed Jul. 29, 2009, which application is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND
  • In the past, fantasy sports leagues have arisen wherein human participants select real-life, real-time current players for virtual teams that compete against each other in virtual leagues. Typically, these leagues are conducted online using the World Wide Web or other suitable network. The popularity of these leagues has grown dramatically. However, these leagues have been limited to virtual games with outcomes based on the actual performances of current players in contemporaneous real world games.
  • Thus, there has gone unmet a need for fantasy sports leagues comprising historical players and/or historical results. The present systems and methods, etc., provide these and/or other advantages.
  • SUMMARY
  • The present games, system, methods, etc., comprise computer-based fantasy sports leagues portraying games between historical players with contest outcomes based at least in part on the performance of those players in historical games and historical game results. The games typically comprise related network and user interfaces. The fantasy sports game can be based on any desired sport such as a fantasy football game. In one embodiment, the historical data includes statistical information related to previous, historical real-life athletes and specific, real-life actual games played by those players. The games can be structured such that specified time periods of the athletes are incorporated into the operational considerations, and can include a fantasy drafting process by the human players wherein selections of the available real-life historical athletes are made. The historical fantasy game comprises methods, systems, programming, etc., comprising associated instructions and operations for displaying the sports video game characters for the fantasy game.
  • The present systems and methods can comprise a computer-based fantasy sports game based on a real-life sport wherein the computer-based fantasy sports game can comprise at least one virtual game played in a virtual fantasy sports league comprised of multiple virtual teams each can comprise at least one different real-life player, wherein the virtual teams can be allotted points in the virtual game based on game statistics achieved by their respective real-life players in real-life games played by the real-life players, and wherein the game statistics comprise historical results for at least some of the real-life players.
  • The real-life players can be all historical players, or the virtual fantasy sports game can comprise both historical players and current players. In some embodiments, the game statistics consist only of historical results, or the game statistics can comprise or consist only of actual game statistics from real-life games played by the real-life players. The game statistics comprise normalized statistics derived from actual game statistics from real-life games played by the real-life players, wherein the normalized statistics can be consistent with the average of, and do not exceed the variability of, the actual results for the real-life players throughout a specified time segment.
  • In some embodiments, at least some of the real-life games can be selected from a specified time segment of historical games, which can be for example one year, two years, three years, five years, or 10 years. The specified time segment can be a time era such as an era consisting of one of the 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, or 2000s. The real-life players can be selected from different specified time segments such that different time eras are represented and such that each virtual team includes at least one historical real-life player from each of the different time eras.
  • The statistics for at least one (up to all) category of game statistics can be normalized, for example such that the total number of points in the category for a first time segment can be equal to the total number of points in the category for a second time segment. The game further can comprise at least one of real-life preseason or real-life playoff games to provide a season-within-a-season.
  • The fantasy sports game herein can be played during an off-season for the real-life sport.
  • The fantasy sports game further can comprise an administrator for the league that approves or denies trades of real-life players between the virtual teams, sets the scoring for each category. The fantasy sports game further can comprise a waiver wire and wherein the administrator sets the waiver wire for the league, and can comprise a salary cap based on the salaries of the real-life players such that the salary cap prevents the virtual teams from buying more than a predetermined number of high-priced players.
  • The game further can comprise an iterative process wherein points can be allotted to the virtual teams over a period of time based on multiple, sequential iterations of the virtual game. The multiple, sequential iterations of the virtual game can, for example, comprise at least two or three iterations per day over the course of a weekend, one iteration per day over the course of a week, or one iteration per week over the course of one, two or three months.
  • In another aspect, the systems, etc., are directed to a computer-implemented method can comprise playing the computer-implemented games as discussed herein. The computer-implemented method can be played using a computer network and user interfaces for human participants to interact with the game.
  • In a further aspect, the systems, etc., are directed to a method comprising making a computer-readable memory containing computer-readable programming configured to implement the games discussed herein.
  • In still another aspect, the systems, etc., are directed to a computer-readable memory containing computer-readable programming configured to implement the games discussed herein.
  • In still yet another aspect, the systems, etc., are directed to a computer comprising computer-readable memory containing computer-readable programming configured to implement the game discussed herein. The computer can be part of a network of computers each containing computer-readable programming configured to implement the game.
  • These and other aspects, features and embodiments are set forth within this application, including the following Detailed Description and attached drawings. In addition, various references are set forth herein, including in the Cross-Reference To Related Applications, that discuss certain systems, apparatus, methods and other information; all such references are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety and for all their teachings and disclosures, regardless of where the references may appear in this application.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Exemplary embodiments of the present disclosure are shown in the drawings:
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a high level overview of certain processes and how they interact according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 2 is a flow diagram of the sequence of events from the start of a league until first week of play according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 3 is a diagram illustrating the logging in procedure according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 4 is a diagram illustrating team statistics according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 5 is a diagram illustrating an exemplary roster according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 6 is a diagram illustrating a league according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 7 is a flow diagram of the drafting process according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 8 is a flow diagram illustrating team player trading processing according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 9 is a diagram illustrating league administrative operations according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 10 is a diagram illustrating further league administrative operations according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 11 is a diagram illustrating scheduling administrative operations according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 12 is a diagram illustrating category scoring administrative operations according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 13 is a diagram illustrating player list administrative operations according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • One aspect of the current disclosure is the provision of fantasy sports leagues wherein all, most or some of the players on the teams comprise players no longer playing in the given sport, herein referred to as “historical players.” Such players (or groups of players) can be from any desired sport, such as football, basketball, baseball, soccer, golf, hockey, auto racing, surfing; skateboarding, snowboarding, wakeboarding, motorcycle racing, BMX, bicycle racing (e.g., Tour De France), cricket, rugby, bass fishing, and track and field.
  • One difficulty with the use of historical players is how to determine the results for such historical players. In one embodiment, such difficulty is resolved by segmenting historical years of results, then randomly selecting the results of a specific game (or set of games, if multiple games are included in the weekly results for the fantasy league) from that time segment for the player. For example, to use football and the NFL as an example, the historical years can be segmented into a desired span of time such as three years (e.g., 1971-1973). This provides a matrix of 14 games per year multiplied by the three years for a total of 42 games for each of the historical players that played in that time period (later, the number increased to 16 games per year). Upon “play” of a virtual game in the historical fantasy league, usually once a week, the computer or other selector then chooses for a drafted historical player one game from the pool of 42 games. Such selection is typically done randomly, but can be structured if desired. Then, the player's statistics for that game are used to allot points to the team that has him on its roster (e.g., for a running back, number of carries, yards gained, yards per carry, touchdowns, first downs gained, etc.; the specific stats used to allot points amongst the fantasy teams can be chosen as desired, either by the league, the players or both). Such “play” of the virtual game can be an iterative process wherein multiple iterations of the virtual game are played sequentially over a period of time, for example (as noted above) once a week, or alternatively, for example, two or three times a day over the course of a weekend, once a day over the course of a week, once a week over the course of one, two or three months, etc.
  • Thus, the statistics of historical players can be based on actual results from actual games played. If desired, the statistics of historical players can instead or also be provided virtually, using for example random or semi-random number generators configured to generate numbers as desired, for example, consistent with the average and variability of the statistics for the historical player over a given time segment. For example, if Johnny Unitas averaged “X” completions per game during the years 1971-1973, with a low of “X−n” and a high of “X+n1”, then the number generator could generate a number for his completions between these low and high numbers, and more likely near his average.
  • The span of the time segment can be the same for all players in the fantasy league (e.g., the league would be limited to players that played all three of the years 1971-1973). The length of the time segment can be selected as desired, e.g., one year, two years, five years, 10 years, or even entire careers. For example, for football, time segments of greater span, e.g., three or five years, may be preferred due to the relatively low number of games per year. Conversely, for sports like hockey, basketball or baseball with many games per year, the time segment might preferably be only a single year. Playoff and/or preseason games can be used or ignored as desired. Further, if desired, such playoff or preseason games can be used to create a season-within-a-season within the fantasy league herein, perhaps with interim prizes for teams winning such sub-seasons. In addition, the fantasy league can “play” at any desired time of year, including the off-season for the given sport (e.g., historical fantasy league participants can play historical fantasy football in May and June despite there being no active games, indeed not even training camp, during that time period).
  • If desired, the fantasy leagues herein can be limited only to players within a specified time segment. Conversely, if desired, the fantasy leagues herein can comprise players from different time periods. For example, a roster could include historical players from different time eras in any desired numbers. For example, the rosters could permit selection of historical players from the 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. If desired, a set number of players could be required from each of the time segments, e.g., each roster would have at least two players from each of the cited decades. If desired, a normalization process can be applied to normalize the categories of virtual-scoring game statistics such as average yards gained, average points scored, etc., from time segment to time segment (e.g., after normalization, the total number of points scored per game by players in the 1940s would equal the total number of points scored by players from the 1990s.).
  • The historical fantasy leagues herein can include “historical results” of either or both historical players or current players, wherein such “historical results” indicates that the results are derived from past performances by such players. For example, Peyton Manning is currently a player in the NFL, and provides new results every week. However, Mr. Manning has also played previously in the NFL, and thus provides a set of historical results from which performances can be selected for use in a league according to the methods, systems, etc., herein. Thus, such historical results can be derived from current players, not just historical players.
  • Further, the historical fantasy leagues herein can comprise contemporaneous results of current players. For example, Mr. Manning provides a new set of results each week he currently plays. These results can then be used to allot points amongst the virtual teams in the historical fantasy leagues herein, along with results from historical players.
  • In one embodiment, the historical fantasy leagues herein are able to accept and process credit card payments, PayPal™ payments, or any other desired payment system. This can be done via a third party provider if desired, for example to reduce the liability of the league company in processing credit card transactions. The fees associated with the league can include entry fees, betting fees between participants where permitted by law, maintenance fees, transaction fees, etc.
  • In certain embodiments, there is an administrator for each league that can approve or deny trades, set the scoring for each category, etc. The administrator can also set the waiver wire for each league. The waiver wire allows all released players to go onto the waiver wire for two days (as an example, to be picked up by another team). If a participant team wants that player it can then select him/her via the pick up a player operation. In certain embodiments, the team with the “lowest waiver wire order” will win the player and the player will then be placed on its team. For example, the waiver wire order can be established such that the team that selected last in the draft is first (lowest) on the waiver wire order, while the team that first in the draft with be highest in the waiver wire order. The waiver wire order will be changed as events happen, for example, every time a team selects via the waiver wire it then takes the highest position and the teams above its previous position move down. If desired, the historical fantasy leagues herein can include salary cap and other restrictions or guidelines affecting the drafting, trading, etc., of the players. For example, the salary cap can be based on the salaries of the real-life players such that the salary cap prevents the virtual teams from buying more than a predetermined number of high-priced players. In still a further embodiment, if desired, the methods, systems, etc., for playing fantasy sports using at least some historical figures can be provided to participants from a central management and/or databank, with the participants themselves providing the administrator of their own leagues, selecting specific scoring criteria, selecting specific sports, selecting specific years of historical games or results, specific draft orders, trade criteria and processes, etc.
  • Scoring within the games herein (i.e., the virtual game) can be performed as desired. For a football example, on Sunday of each week the league administrator(s) process the games for each league. The league administrator(s) typically randomly selects the game that applies for each roster player for that week from the matrix of available games for that player. If the statistics are broken down by quarter, then in one embodiment, the games can process the 1st quarter from 1:00 pm Eastern to 1:30 pm; and the 2nd quarter from 2:00-2:30 pm; the 3rd quarter from 3:00-3:30 p; and 4th quarter from 4-4:30 pm. All final scores will then be included and all results will be provided to the leagues and teams.
  • These and other aspects and embodiments of the methods, systems, computer programming, programmed computers, etc., herein are shown in exemplary fashion in the figures hereto.
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a high level overview 100 of how a group of leagues can be set up. The overall fantasy league 126 includes a number of leagues 128, 130, 132 which in turn each comprise a number of named virtual teams 102-124 (i.e., teams in the virtual fantasy sport league that each represents a participant such as a human individual, a group of individuals, a company, etc.). The number of named virtual teams, leagues, real-life players allocated per virtual team, etc., can be set and varied as desired according to the sport for which the league is established. For example, in a fantasy football league as shown, the league can comprise 12 teams and each team can comprise 15 players. In a fantasy basketball league, as another example, there could be, e.g., 10 teams each having seven (7) players.
  • FIG. 2 is a flow diagram 200 of an exemplary sequence of events from the start of a league until first week of play. In the flow diagram 200, as a first step 202 a league is formed, followed by adding virtual teams 204. A limit on the number of teams in the league can be set 206. Once the members of the league are determined, a live or automatic draft of real-life players 208 is held. In one embodiment a manual draft comprises determining a time for the draft and sending out notices such as emails to the participants in the league of such draft 210. This is then followed by the manual draft 212. In the embodiment depicted, each virtual team gets 3 minutes to select a real-life player. If no player is chosen, then the virtual team may forfeit the choice, lose it turn, or as shown be automatically given a real-life player selected by the computer or administrator. In an alternative embodiment, an automatic draft 214 takes place which automatically allots real-life players to the virtual teams. The result is that the real-life players in the virtual teams are then determined 216.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the draft can be automated and/or manual. Further, the draft can be an iterative process, and if desired more than one draft can be held over the course of a season. There can also be an option to set the draft order or to have the drafting of players done randomly.
  • FIG. 3 is a diagram illustrating a log-in page 300 for a logging-in procedure 308 that can be used if desired. In the process, each virtual team and/or participant is provided a username 302 and password 304. Such login can be useful to limit access to only selected persons or entities, to facilitate payments if desired, to permit entities to login to select their team and to set the roster for the draft and weekly games, or for a variety of other activities and actions related to the league. Unique usernames and passwords can be provided, for example, for all members of a given league and/or for each team within a league. The log-in page 300 can also comprise a logo 306, which if desired can identify a sponsoring or owning party 312 and the type of sport such as football 310.
  • FIG. 4 is a diagram illustrating a format 400 for displaying exemplary virtual team statistics that can be shown once a user (virtual team and/or participant) logs in or otherwise accesses the system. The computer programming and the computer screen 402 can be configured to show any desired information such as the league to which the user belongs, the stats up to that week, etc. For example, as in FIG. 4, the first screen can show the virtual teams 404 and the wins 406, losses 408 and ties 410 are shown. Also shown are win % 412, total points 414 and average 416 scored by each virtual team 404.
  • FIG. 5 is a diagram illustrating a format 500 for displaying an exemplary roster 502. This can be advantageous because, when a user selects roster members for a virtual team as described in FIG. 1, the display screen should show the real-life players on that roster 502. As shown by the roster 502 in FIG. 5, one aspect of the current disclosure is the provision of a fantasy leagues wherein all, most or some of the players on the teams comprise either players no longer playing in the given sport, referred to herein as “historical players,” but can also include current players as in the case of the two players shown as of the filing of this application.
  • FIG. 6 is a diagram similar to FIG. 4 illustrating a format 600 for displaying exemplary virtual team statistics. In this figure, the format 600 further shows how virtual team names 604 and 606 can be shown in a display field 602. The format 600 also shows exemplary locations for specific virtual team statistics 608.
  • FIG. 7 is a flow diagram illustrating a format 700 for an exemplary drafting process wherein the order of drafting is reversed round-by-round. Other drafting orders can also be used as desired. In FIG. 7, four virtual teams A-D, 702-708, are depicted but the example can be used for as many virtual teams as desired. During the actual drafting process 710, as can be seen by the arrows, the order of drafting is reversed in each round of the draft. If desired, the opportunity to make a choice can be time limited. If desired, if no player is chosen, then the virtual team may forfeit the choice, lose it turn, or as shown be automatically given a real-life player selected by the computer or administrator. FIG. 7 shows 4 rounds of a draft but as many rounds as desired can be implemented, for example 2, 4, 10 or 16 rounds. Trades of real-life players by the virtual teams can be made during and/or after the draft can also be permitted within the virtual fantasy games herein.
  • FIG. 8 is a flow diagram illustrating a format 800 for exemplary player trading by the virtual teams 802, 804. The flow chart outlines how the trade protest can work within the system. In a straight trade 806, team A 802 decides 808 it wants to initiate a trade with team B 804, to exchange real-life player 1A for real-life player 3B 810. Team B 804 receives notice of the trade offer 812, decides 814 it wants to accept the trade, and the trade is consummated 816. The league administrator receives notice of the trade 818. In some embodiments, the administrator can then accept or reject 820 the trade. If rejected, then the teams 802, 804 receive notice 822 of the rejection. If accepted, then the teams 802, 804 receive notice 824 of the acceptance and the rosters of the teams 802, 804 are changed. In some embodiments, the game can also include a protest procedure 826. In this protest procedure 826, the trade is posted to other virtual teams in the league 828. If no protest, then the rosters of the teams 802, 804 are changed 830. If there is a protest, then the protest is communicated to the administrator who can sustain or deny the protest 8332. If the protest is accepted, the trade is recalled 834 and the real-life players are returned to their original teams.
  • FIG. 9 is a diagram illustrating a format 900 for administrative operations according to certain embodiments of the present disclosure. As depicted, the format 900 includes a menu 902 identifying various available functions and an action box 904 where administrative actions can be exercised. Typically, the ultimate (highest-level) administration of the system typically has access over every virtual league in case there is a need to edit teams/leagues, etc.
  • FIG. 10 is also a diagram illustrating a format 1000 for further league administrative operations. As depicted, the format 1000 includes a menu 1002 identifying various available functions and an action box 1004 where the league administrator will be able to set draft order, scoring, and teams in the league.
  • FIG. 11 is a diagram illustrating a format 1100 for scheduling administrative operations. As depicted, the format 1100 includes a menu 1102 identifying various available functions and an action box 1104 where the league administrator will be able to view the week to week schedule of who plays which team.
  • FIG. 12 is also a diagram illustrating a format 1200 for category scoring administrative operations. As depicted, the format 1200 includes a menu 1202 identifying various available functions and an action box 1204 where the league administrator, typically before the season, can identify the format, categories, etc., for the league scoring and how each category is virtually scored on the selected iterative basis (e.g., week to week).
  • FIG. 13 is a diagram illustrating a format 1300 for player list (roster) identification and/or administrative operations. As depicted, the format 1300 includes a menu 1302 identifying various available functions and an action box 1304 where, for example, the available players for a desired time period, era or segment, such as a three-year period, are listed as available to draft and to be placed on a team's roster. If desired, a player that only played for one year during the time period will not be eligible on the player list or draft.
  • The present systems, methods, etc., can include draft administrative operations. In certain embodiments, the draft is a real time draft set for a certain time period. The system controls this draft. The draft order is usually set before hand. The administrator of the league can set the time of each draft selection. For example, round one would be three minutes per selection, rounds five through twelve, two minutes for each selection. Once a player is selected that player is not longer available for adding to a team.
  • The present systems, methods, etc., can also include player draft administrative operations and suitable player database configurations. For example, at the start of the database, the players can have the years played listed (e.g., 1970-1978).
  • The present application is further directed to methods of making the various elements of the systems, programming and apparatus herein, including making the systems and apparatus themselves from such elements, as well as to methods of using the same, or otherwise as desired. The present application is also directed to computers, computer systems, etc., containing, and/or configured to run and/or execute the programming described herein.
  • All terms used herein are used in accordance with their ordinary meanings unless the context or definition clearly indicates otherwise. Also unless expressly indicated otherwise, the use of “or” includes “and” and vice-versa. Non-limiting terms are not to be construed as limiting unless expressly stated, or the context clearly indicates, otherwise (for example, “including,” “having,” and “comprising” typically indicate “including without limitation”). Singular forms, including in the claims, such as “a,” “an,” and “the” include the plural reference unless expressly stated, or the context clearly indicates, otherwise.
  • The scope of the present devices, systems and methods, etc., includes both means plus function and step plus function concepts. However, the claims are not to be interpreted as indicating a “means plus function” relationship unless the word “means” is specifically recited in a claim, and are to be interpreted as indicating a “means plus function” relationship where the word “means” is specifically recited in a claim. Similarly, the claims are not to be interpreted as indicating a “step plus function” relationship unless the word “step” is specifically recited in a claim, and are to be interpreted as indicating a “step plus function” relationship where the word “step” is specifically recited in a claim.
  • From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that, although specific embodiments have been discussed herein for purposes of illustration, various modifications may be made without deviating from the spirit and scope of the discussion herein. Unless expressly stated otherwise, all embodiments, aspects, features, etc., can be mixed and matched, combined and permuted in any desired manner. Accordingly, the systems and methods, etc., include such modifications as well as all permutations and combinations of the subject matter set forth herein and are not limited except as by the appended claims or other claim having adequate support in the discussion herein.

Claims (25)

1. A computer-based fantasy sports game based on a real-life sport wherein the computer-based fantasy sports game comprises at least one virtual game played in a virtual fantasy sports league comprised of multiple virtual teams each comprising at least one different real-life player, wherein the virtual teams are allotted points in the virtual game based on historical game statistics achieved by their respective real-life players in real-life games played by the real-life players, and wherein the game statistics comprise only historical results for all of the real-life players.
2-4. (canceled)
5. The game of claim 1 wherein the game statistics comprise actual game statistics from real-life games played by the real-life players.
6. The game of claim 1 wherein the game statistics consist only of actual statistics from real-life games played by the real-life players.
7. The game of claim 1 wherein the game statistics comprise normalized statistics derived from actual game statistics from real-life games played by the real-life players, wherein the normalized statistics are consistent with the average of, and do not exceed the variability of, the actual results for the real-life players throughout a specified time segment.
8. The game of claim 1 wherein at least some of the real-life games are selected from a specified time segment of historical games.
9. The game of claim 8 wherein the time segment is one year, two years, three years, five years, or 10 years.
10. The game of claim 8 wherein specified time segment is a time era consisting of one of the 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, or 2000s.
11. The game of claim 1 wherein the real-life players are selected from different specified time segments that are different time eras and each virtual team includes at least one historical real-life player from each of the different time eras.
12. The game of claim 11 wherein statistics for at least one category of game statistics is normalized such that the total number of points in the category for a first time segment is equal to the total number of points in the category for a second time segment.
13. The game of claim 1 wherein the game further comprises at least one of a real-life preseason or real-life playoff game to provide a season-within-a-season.
14. The game of claim 1 wherein the fantasy sports game is played during an off-season for the real-life sport.
15. The game of claim 1 wherein the fantasy sports game further comprises an administrator for the league that approves or denies trades of real-life players between the virtual teams, sets the scoring for each category.
16. The game of claim 15 wherein the fantasy sports game further comprises a waiver wire and wherein the administrator sets the waiver wire for the league.
17. The game of claim 1 wherein the game further comprises a salary cap based on the salaries of the real-life players such that the salary cap prevents the virtual teams from buying more than a predetermined number of high-priced players.
18. The game of claim 1 wherein the game further comprises an iterative process wherein points are allotted to the virtual teams over a period of time based on multiple, sequential iterations of the virtual game.
19. The game of claim 18 wherein the multiple, sequential iterations of the virtual game comprise at least two iterations per day over the course of a weekend.
20. The game of claim 19 wherein the multiple, sequential iterations of the virtual game comprise one iteration per day over the course of a week.
21. The game of claim 19 wherein the multiple, sequential iterations of the virtual game comprise one iteration per week over the course of one, two or three months.
22. A computer-implemented method comprising playing the computer-implemented game according to claim 1.
23. The computer-implemented method according to claim 22 wherein the game is played using a computer network and user interfaces for human participants to interact with the game.
24. A method comprising making a computer-readable memory containing computer-readable programming configured to implement the game according to claim 1.
25. A computer-readable memory containing computer-readable programming configured to implement the game according to claim 1.
26. A computer comprising computer-readable memory containing computer-readable programming configured to implement the game according to claim 1.
27. The computer according to claim 26 wherein the computer is part of a network of computers each containing computer-readable programming configured to implement the game.
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