US20110012392A1 - Highly portable table and seats with quickly able legs - Google Patents

Highly portable table and seats with quickly able legs Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110012392A1
US20110012392A1 US12/799,884 US79988410A US2011012392A1 US 20110012392 A1 US20110012392 A1 US 20110012392A1 US 79988410 A US79988410 A US 79988410A US 2011012392 A1 US2011012392 A1 US 2011012392A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
leg
receptacle
recess
wedge
peg
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/799,884
Inventor
Matthew Ballard Herschler
Original Assignee
Matthew Ballard Herschler
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US21508609P priority Critical
Application filed by Matthew Ballard Herschler filed Critical Matthew Ballard Herschler
Priority to US12/799,884 priority patent/US20110012392A1/en
Publication of US20110012392A1 publication Critical patent/US20110012392A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B83/00Combinations comprising two or more pieces of furniture of different kinds
    • A47B83/02Tables combined with seats
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B13/00Details of tables or desks
    • A47B13/02Underframes
    • A47B13/021Fastening devices of the feet
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B3/00Folding or stowable tables
    • A47B3/06Folding or stowable tables with separable parts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B3/00Folding or stowable tables
    • A47B3/10Travelling or trunk tables
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B3/00Folding or stowable tables
    • A47B3/12Stowable tables with detachable top leaves

Abstract

an especially useful and usable portable table and at least two seats all with detaching legs that store beneath their respective supported surfaces, the seats then fitting into the back of the table top, said table top forming the case in which all is carried. Also several means of attaching and detaching the legs, including a detachable leg with single peg twist locking into a specially modified leg receptacle, a detachable leg with recess and groove twist locking into a specially modified leg receptacle, a detachable leg with recess held by wedge into a specially modified leg receptacle. Both the individual tables, seats and table and seat sets, for added convenience, are boxlike and stackable.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of provisional application Ser. No. 61/215,086 filed May 1, 2009 by present inventor.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECT OF THE INVENTION
  • Portable furniture is meant to be convenient, yet much portable furniture is difficult to assemble, cumbersome to transport, and awkward to store. Why is this? Portability is considered a novelty, and as such has been afforded great leniency. People do not expect a high degree of performance from portable furniture. Indeed, because of novelty, people are quick to excuse poor function, structural inadequacy, difficult carryability and awkward storability, though these weigh greatly against its actual function and usefulness.
  • On the inventors side of this, portable furniture is challenging to even imagine, as there are a number of concerns that must be balanced for portable furniture to be successful. Portable furniture must be stable, but not heavy. It must be folding or otherwise disassembleable and still be solid and reliable. Portable furniture must also be more easily carried, and sized and possibly even shaped for convenient storage. Add to this market driving forces that demand such furniture be economically manufactured, and you begin to perceive the gauntlet through which portable furniture must pass to be more viable. Balancing these concerns however proves difficult. Typically where stability is won, portability is sacrificed. And conversely, where portability is won stability is sacrificed. Economic concerns can also whittle at the quality and reliability of the final product. Indeed as if this weren't enough, given the rough history of portable family furniture, people have become resigned to the inadequacies of such furniture, its general flimsiness, instability, difficulty of assembly, awkwardness in transport, and bulkiness. As such, portable furniture is resigned to infrequent and even occasional use, and tends to be stored in out of the way places, taking up more space than we'd like, or getting buried in the basement or garage, making it even less convenient, less useful. This said, let us turn to specifics.
  • Drawbacks of Hinge Folding Furniture.
  • In the history of invention, the vast majority of portable tables and chairs have been folding. While this is indeed convenient to have ever attached so folding leg members, in practice folding tables and chairs are notorious for developing sticky hinges or button and press catches near impossible to release. Angled leg support folding hinges are even dangerous when they get sticky. I for one have been quite distressingly pinched struggling to manage such hinges, resulting in making assembly a somewhat daunting proposition. Still, despite the challenges of assembly and dis-assembly, such difficulty is accepted as standard procedure, and tables and chairs with folding members have remained the standard in portable furniture.
  • Drawbacks of Scissor Folding Furniture Legs.
  • Another method by which tables and chairs are made to fold is the scissor fold. In this method the legs are in pairs and hinged at a mid point in the legs, much like scissors. As such, these hinges require no metal parts that might catch or pinch the skin and so are in this way simpler and safer than their counterparts. Still the scissor fold also has its drawbacks, obvious drawbacks if we look, though we tend to overlook or ignore the drawbacks of any object we have need for. Such chairs are very light, easy to inadvertently kick out from under us. With a cloth seat as in Orear (#1457041, 1923), they can even be inadvertently collapsed with kicking. The other drawback with the scissor fold is that, in the case of the chair, the weight of the user is concentrated at two points in the already tensile stressed legs. An even intuitive awareness of this can be quite unsettling to the sitter, regarding his own welfare or the welfare of his companions. Yes in playfulness we can use the set, and marvel at its novelty and convenience, but once the shine of novelty wears off, the chairs are discovered to be toyish and unsettling. Something we can overlook but should be careful not to forget.
  • Edward J. Drost's patent #4229038 1980 conveniently sets the four chairs settle into the folded table for storage and portability. However in Drosts design both table and chairs are scissor folding. The stability of the seat top diminishes the risk of inadvertent collapse which the Orear's cloth seat suffered from, but experience again teaches us to sit carefully on such seats as they are very light and easily kicked out from under us even by our own feet. Also and importantly, as articulated above, the angle of the seat leg requires its having tensile strength and not just compression strength as does a vertical leg. Furthermore, the weight of a seated person concentrates at swivel joint usually midway down the leg, where it is connected to a second leg so that the two can swivel or scissor. Because of the intrusion of the swivel joint, this connection is structurally compromised. We can imagine to easily break it. Despite its excellent design features, the scissor fold technology compromises the tensile strength of the already torqued stressed leg member, making it a situation we are intuitively wary of, and right to be.
  • Drawbacks of Slip Lock Detachable Legs
  • Slip lock mechanisms have tended to be wobbly (Neal #4011821), or meant only for single assembly (Kreizel #3730109). And in these cases for tables, never chairs—speaking to the instability of such mechanisms, and the undesirability of added weight on already unstable joints. An exception to the rule is Stascheit patent #5074224 platform device with releaseable supporting legs. Such is far more stable. but his solution is meant for scaffolding, is massive in its hardware requirements and neither designed nor suitable for portable family furniture. Another version uses a secondary screw adjust expanding washer to stabilize the slip lock leg. This is an entirely satisfactory solution as regards lightness and stability, yet it requires a double mechanism, much more hardware and assembly time. A more ideal solution would have a singular mechanism, and a more singular motion.
  • Difficulties with Earlier Twist Lock Mechanisms
  • Earliest incarnations of twist lock mechanisms are used with reinforcing screws (Edson and Armstrong, #135655, Smith #271143) or latches (Gardner #1762776). Note re Smith: stressing wood along the grain is not ideal for frequent conversion. Two fold mechanisms, and the need for tools are also a hindrance to easy assemble-ability. One twist lock design suited to table legs required strength in thin members that would easily bend if not heavy metal or possibly cast iron (again Gardner #1762776). Such a mechanism is, because of its weight, problematic for highly portably furniture. Another slip lock mechanism intended for plastic manufacture tightens in both directions (Morris #3966340). But here, besides the confusion of knowing which way to turn to disassemble, any elasticity in the central element could result in sticking, further confusing the operant and complicating disassembly. There are also some slip lock mechanisms applied presumably well in other applications, specifically Morrison #3640576 to plastic furniture horizontals, and Flick #3661411 to scaffold coupling.
  • To date, what absolutely all twist lock mechanisms have in their embodiments is two protrusions or extensions of some kind that fit into a sympathetically shaped female member and turn to tighten or release. Typically these said protrusions are on opposing sides of the legs and so win names like butterfly catches, or ears or pin.
  • Again, similar to all versions, the twist lock mechanism has doubled protrusions i.e. a pin (i.e. two pegs), ledges, or ears that are opposed each other and meet doubled recesses in the leg receptacle designed to accommodate said protrusions. In all cases legs, once inserted into their fixtures, the legs are fixed or released inside their leg receptacles by partial turning or rotation of the leg in said block. Except for Gardner #1762776, all twist lock assemblies related to furniture are meant to facilitate shipping and one time assembly or for extremely occasional use. Those double winged or pinned mechanisms that are meant for more regular use (Gardner #1762776, or Flick #3661411) are in the case of Gardner, thin and wide, suitable only to cast iron or expensive alloy fabrication. Flick also double pinned, is also heavy, intended for exclusively for tubular elements , and meant for scaffolding.
  • Usability
  • Concerning the principle of usability: where usefulness speaks to the utility of the assembled object, usability speaks to the ease and attractiveness of use. This has been a long felt principle, but it has eluded naming and so explication. Simply put, as regards portable furniture, the easy and peacefulness of assembly though disputably affecting its usefulness, directly affects its usability. Once this distinction is made, it is far easier to see the connection between usability and usefulness. Another way to see this: Two products can have the exact same result, but one is simple to use, the other is complex. Both are equally useful in the sense that they both accomplish the task at hand, but they are of entirely distinct usability. And ultimately usability does weigh on usefulness. Where there is confusion, or complexity regarding assembly, or anxiety as in the case of treacherously hingery, such, though invisible, stands as an obstacle to use. Where the means of assembly are simple and attractive, the usability and so usefulness of portable furniture is improved greatly.
  • Nesting
  • Finally, to make the elements truly convenient and portable, seats and table must be able to travel and store in combination. A number of table and seat combinations exist in which the table and the seats are connected and fold together, some of them elegantly.
  • Only a few have seats that are separate from the table top but store within it. Orear's #1457041, Drost #4229038, Boyajian #2827352, Nye #6109687, 6443521 B1, and Zhurong 6905166 B2 are examples. All of them are folding, not dis-assembleable.
  • Of these, Nye and Zhurong are folding style picnic or banquet tables with benches that nest inside the table top, but again, they are folding.
  • Stackability
  • Finally, to be more conveniently portable, an item must be conveniently storable and so fit comfortably in the back or trunk of a car, in a closet, not be too uniquely shaped and so fit with other things. As such, typically sized folding tables have always been too big for small closets, and to wide for 2 foot storage shelves. So being, they require storage in the corners of storage compartments, becoming awkward to retrieve or leaning against a wall somewhere, easily disturbed and so a nuisance. Orear, as an example addresses this problem, by nesting the seats inside a folding table top, the folded table top being narrower in one dimension and so better suited to small closet storage. Still it's being long and flat relegates it to long ways storage on a 2 foot wide storage shelf which means again it is either infront or behind, above or underneath, and so either in the way of reaching other things, or with other things in the way of reaching it.
  • To be more easily storable, and so more easily reachable, a table with nested seats would be of proportions more sympathetic to limited space storage requirements.
  • Nowhere in the field of invention is there yet represented a portable table and seats set that avoids the hazards of folding tables and folding seating members. Nor is there a table and seats set so easy to assemble or disassemble, so easily carried and compact, so convenient to transport and store, even stackable, until now:
  • The Highly Portable Table and Seats with Quickly Detachable Legs
  • FIG. 1: table and seats assembled and dimensionally drawn.
  • FIG. 2: interior of seat compartment with legs
  • FIG. 3: leg
  • FIG. 4: leg receptacle,
  • FIG. 5: directions for operation
  • FIG. 6: interior of table compartment dimensionally drawn
  • FIG. 6 a: retainer bar close up
  • FIG. 7: Seat catch assembly
  • FIG. 8: table compartment with seats in stored position
  • FIG. 9: stacked seats and tables
  • FIG. 10: alternate leg receptacle (alternate slant)
  • FIG. 11: alternate leg receptacle (parallel recess)
  • FIG. 12: alternate leg receptacle (one piece)
  • FIG. 13: pipe style leg receptacle
  • FIG. 14: half block leg receptacle
  • FIG. 15: pipe style leg receptacle seen in compartment with legs
  • FIG. 16: ledged leg receptacle AND LEG
  • FIG. 17: wedged leg receptacle
  • FIG. 18: pinned wedged leg receptacle and leg
  • FIG. 19 pinned double wedged leg receptacle
  • FIG. 20: four seats in a single unit table
  • FIG. 20 a: detail
  • FIG. 21: four seats in a folding table
  • FIG. 21 a: detail
  • FIG. 22: altered peg ledge and wedge style legs
  • FIG. 22: bulged peg, ledge, and wedge styled legs
  • FIG. 23: peg, ledge and wedge tenoned legs
  • While there are any number of embodiments specific to the materials of which they are made, what follows here directly is a full description of an embodiment comprised entirely of wood, glue, screws and bolts.
  • Specifically:
  • As regards the table and referring to FIGS. 1 & 6
  • The table 1 is comprised of a top rectangular surface 3, two long sides 5 and two shorter sides 4 that support the table top 3 and box in the table compartment 34. In this particular embodiment, the handle 8 is hole cut midway through a long side 5 opposite the table leg compartment 30 of the table top so facilitating single handed carrying. The table compartment 34 is described in more detail below.
  • Beneath the table top and so inside said table compartment 34, in each of the four corners of the table compartment, is a leg block receptacle 7. These table leg blocks or receptacles are attached inside said table compartment such that legs 6 may be inserted, one into each said table leg block receptacle perpendicular to the table top. Once inserted, each said leg is turned to tighten. How these work specifically is described in the leg block receptacle section to follow.
  • As regards the seats and referring to FIGS. 1 & 2,
  • In this embodiment, there are two seats 2. Each of the seats is similarly fashioned, like said table, with a seat top 9 supported by four sides 10 which together form the seat compartment 13. Seat leg blocks 11 are attached, again similar to the table leg blocks, underneath the seat seat in each of the four corners of the seat compartment 13. These seat leg blocks 11 are attached such that four legs 10 may be inserted, one into each seat leg block receptacle perpendicular to the seat top. Again with slight turning, each leg becomes fixed in its particular block, the four legs together working to fully support each seat. Again, see leg block receptacle section below for more details.
  • As regards the legs and referring to FIG. 3,
  • Each leg 14 whether for the seats or table top is fitted at one end, coming out the side of said leg, with a leg peg or protrusion 15. This peg is set a short distance from the end of the leg that enters the leg block receptacle here termed the leg top 16. This peg, while close to said leg top, is far enough from the end of the leg so that it is structurally sound. In the case of wood, this peg must be far enough from the end so as not to split the wood when stressed.
  • A peg groove 23 recessed into the side of the leg hole 20 in the leg block receptacle 17 allows the leg with its peg to enter the corner block much like an old style key enters a lock, with the peg like the key blade first fitting the lock hole, then turning in the lock hole. In this case turning the leg not only catches the leg in the leg hole like a key turned in a lock. Turning actually tightens the leg in its leg hole. Specifically:
  • As regards the leg block receptacle and referring to FIG. 4,
  • In this embodiment there are 12 leg blocks or receptacles, 4 table leg blocks or receptacles and 8 seat leg blocks or receptacles all fashioned similarly and renumbered 17 in FIG. 4 to ease explication. Facilitating manufacture each said leg block receptacle is comprised of two leg block receptacle halves 18,19, held together by four screws 28. The two halves together form the leg block receptacle 17. Each said leg block receptacle has a leg hole 20 the width of a leg, centered and running between said halves 18,19 of said leg block 17. These leg holes 20 run deep into their leg blocks 17 but not all the way through. The remaining portion of leg block receptacle, on the here termed closed side of the block 22 has enough thickness, combined with the table or seat top to keep the leg from distressing the top of the seat or table when said table or seat are in use or pushed upon. The side of the leg block receptacle with the opening of the leg hole is here called the leg hole side or hole side of the block 21. In addition to the leg hole 20, there is a peg groove 23 that runs along the side of the leg hole inside the block. This groove runs deep enough into the block to allow that the leg 14 with its peg 15 fully enters the leg hole. Importantly, the view of the leg hole side 21 of the leg block receptacle very much resembles the classic key hole with the leg hole like the spindle hole and the the peg groove like the key blade slot. Such makes operation completely intuitive. Once fully inserted, a slight twist, in this embodiment a right turn, tightens the leg inside the leg block receptacle and works to instruct younger assemblers in the international conventions around standard screw threads and so tightening and loosening. FIG. 5 illustrates.
  • To restate and clarify, for ease of manufacture each leg block receptacle 17 is made in two parts. One half here termed the simple half 18 has recessed into it one half of the leg hole 20 and also one half of the peg groove 23. The other half, here termed recess half 19, has the other half the leg hole 20 and the other half the peg groove 23. It also harbors the peg lock recess 24 detailed below. Such division facilitates cutting said peg lock recess from the inside of the leg receptacle, or molding and casting it.
  • More specifically regarding the peg lock recess and referring again to FIG. 4,
  • In the side wall of the leg hole 20, in the recess half of the block 19 there is a peg lock recess 24 made to accept the peg 15 on the leg 14 once said leg 14 is fully inserted into said leg hole. Again, this is very much like a key turns once it is inserted into its lock. The difference is that this peg cavity is cut at an angle 25 so that when the leg is turned and the peg enters the cavity, the peg 14 is pulled ever slightly deeper into the leg receptacle, pressing the top of the leg 16 against the inside top or roof of the closed side 22 of the leg receptacle 17. importantly this angle of recess 25 is slight so that the friction on the peg lock is improved. Importantly also it is precisely placed in the leg block receptacle 17 so that when leg is turned in said leg block receptacle, the peg does not more so far as to reach the other end of the recess 26. While there are a number of possible effective shapes for this peg cavity, some of which are described in alternate embodiments below, what is important is the placement and angle of the roof of the peg lock recess 25. Precise placement allows a slighter angle 25, and a slighter angle improves the friction of the lock. In this embodiment the peg cavity is wedge shaped with the wide side 27 at the peg groove 23, and the narrow side 26 away from said peg groove. Again, inserting the leg completely into the leg hole and turning it with a single and partial motion of the wrist, and so minimally, moves the peg along the interior descending block hole side of the recess cavity, by means of said peg, in this way securing said leg 14 inside said leg block receptacle 17.
  • Each of the twelve legs, four table legs and eight seat legs are secured in this manner. Also to be noted regarding this embodiment that, like the legs, the leg blocks for the table are taller than the leg blocks for the seats. There is reason also, material costs permitting, to make said table blocks also wider, though such is not here represented.
  • Dis-Assembly of the Highly Portable Table and Seats with Quickly Detachable Legs for Transport and Storage
  • As Concerns Leg Removal:
  • Each leg is easily removed from its by turning it the opposite direction of tightening, in this case left. Again referring to FIG. 4,5, once the peg reaches the peg groove 23 it stops turning, and with the peg 15 realigned with the peg groove 23, each leg then slips from its leg receptacle 17.
  • As concerns seat leg storage, and referring to FIG. 2,
  • Seat legs 12, once removed from their leg blocks 11 store inside their respective seat compartments 13. There are two identical lengths of foam here termed foam seat leg retainers 29, each with troughs cut to securely hold each of the four seat legs 12 separately and in place inside each seat compartment 13. Said lengths of foam are attached to the bottom of said seat compartment spanning the distance between leg blocks 11 and parallel to each other. Said seat legs 12, once settled in said leg retainers 29 lay inside the seat compartment 13, spanning the distance between two opposite sides 10 of said seat compartment, and running parallel to the bottom of said seat compartment.
  • As concerns table leg storage and referring to FIG. 6,6 a.
  • The table legs 6, once removed from their respective table leg blocks 7, store in the table leg compartment 30. This table leg compartment is situated in the table compartment 34 opposite the handle 8. This table leg compartment 31 is a six sided containment formed by two leg blocks 7, one on each end, the back of the table top 3, and a long table side 5. A fifth side or outside of the table leg compartment is mounted onto to top and outside facing edges of the two leg blocks that make the table leg compartment ends. This fifth side is comprised of two table leg compartment leg block receptacle ledges 33 attached to the so said top outside facing edges of said leg blocks 7 and a table leg retainer bar 30 that runs the distance between said ledges, connecting to them. Table legs 6, once removed from their leg receptacles 7 can be slid into the table leg compartment 31. Afterwards, the two seats 2 now settled into the table compartment 34, making the sixth side or lid of the table leg compartment 30 keeping table legs secure until the said seats are removed.
  • More specifically as concerns storing seats inside the table and referring to FIGS. 6,8,
  • With the four table legs 6 placed inside the table leg compartment 31, the two seats 2, with their legs 12 set firmly into their seat leg retainers 29, said seats are now placed flatly side by side against the back of the table compartment 34. Two ridges here termed the top seat guides 35 are fixed to the back of the table compartment a seat's width from table leg compartment 31. These seat guides 35 work to place the two seats firmly against that table leg compartment inside the case. A lip protruding top seat side edge of the table leg retainer rod 30 and running the length said rod reaches over the side wall of the two seats on the seat side of the table leg compartment. This lip is called the retainer rod catch lip 32, and works to hold the abutting edge of said seats firmly to the back of the table top.
  • Resembling the top seat guides 35, is a central seat guide 36 fixed also to the back of the table top to lay between the seats when they are placed inside the case. This central seat guide 36 works to further fix the two seats inside the table compartment and to reduce chafing resulting from possible looseness and rough handling. Once the seats 2 are settled in place, adjusting catch blocks 37 can be slipped down against the seat side 10 with the catch block lip 42 extended over said seat side the width of that side. details follow directly.
  • More specifically as concerns the adjusting catch block and referring to FIG. 7, an adjusting catch block 37 is fixed to each of two table leg receptacles 7 at the handle side of the case. These two adjusting catch blocks 37 slide along the bottom of the case, and along their respective leg receptacle 7, and when in use butt also against the seat side 10. A lip on each adjusting catch block 37 called here the catch block lip 42 reaches over the edge of the seat in the same manner as the retainer rod catch lip 32 so working in conjunction with said retainer bar catch lip 32 to hold each said seat firmly to the back of the table compartment 34.
  • To enable the sliding of the adjusting catch blocks 37 there is a long narrow slot in each catch block. This catch block slot 38 is long in the direction of the sliding, parallel to the table top, and wide enough for the catch block holding bolt 39 to fit through and allow the block to slide between the long side of the table top and the seat, meeting each firmly. In this embodiment said catch block bolt 39 feeds through the recess side of the leg receptacle 17 from the inside. There is a recess 43 on the interior side of said leg receptacle half that the head of the catch block holding bolt 39 recesses into.
  • The catch block holding bolt 39 has a wing nut 40 so that the catch blocks 39 can be tightened in position against their respective seats 2. In this way each of the two seats are secured for transport and storage. Again, there are two catch blocks 39, one secured to each of the two handle side corner blocks 7. Each seat 2 is held between a catch block 39, the back of the table top 3, the sides of two short sides of the table top 4, and the table leg retainer bar 30 and its catch lip 32.
  • With all legs stored and said seats fixed inside said table compartment, the Highly Portable Table and Seats with Detachable Legs is roughly briefcase sized and proportioned, easily carried by it's handle, and easily and efficiently stored when not in use.
  • More specifically regarding storability,
  • Said tables and seats are box like and stackable, and of a size that stores comfortably and easily in small closets and on standard storage shelves generally 18″ to 2′ in width. The dimension and size of said portable table and seats averts the problems that arise from larger and more awkwardly shaped portable furniture sets that end up, because of the increasing premium placed on storage space in our lives, either buried or in the way of other things. Its size and dimension make a single unit convenient to store and more easily accessible when required. Such size and dimension also makes multiple seat and table units as well as the individual seats and tables stackable or aligning, and so also easy and efficient to store. See FIG. 9 for illustration.
  • Conclusion, Ramifications, and Scope:
  • The Highly Useable Portable Table and Seats with Quickly Detachable Legs has clear improvements from previous art in both function and usability. Specifically, said embodiment is easily and intuitively assembled and dis-assembled, with no folding parts in which fingers and such might get caught, that due to its compactness of its disassembled state travels easily, and stores efficiently.
  • Being more conveniently portable, they will go both further and more easily into places that earlier more cumbersome solutions reached only with difficulty, if at all, and not frequently.
  • Given the detachable leg technology, said embodiment is also highly stable.
  • The mechanism of twist lock in the improved portable table and seats is also an excellent improvement, utterly simple, economical to manufacture, requiring no additional work or reinforcement, adding no weight. Neither is it at all cumbersome. Nowhere in prior art has twist lock technology been applied to chair legs. Distinct from also previous art which delineates always a butterfly catch mechanism, the improved portable table and seats uses only a single peg or protrusion to effect the lock, dispensing with the unnecessarily but traditional doubling of such mechanism. In addition, disclosed invention also uses no secondary means of securing said twist lock. The slightness of the angle of the peg lock recess improves the grabability of twist lock mechanism, and that the leg does not hit the far wall of the recess. so improving the friction that locks the leg.
  • Also distinct from previous art, the leg hole in the leg receptacle of the Highly Portable Table and Seats with Quickly Detachable Legs exactly resembles the classic key hole, the one we see in old houses and furniture, in cartoons, and literature, with a round center hole and a slender single groove along the side of the leg hole, making assembly completely self explanatory and intuitive, again improving its usability.
  • Also improving usability, Highly Portable Table and Seats with Quickly Detachable Legs is of a size compatible with convenient storage, fitting easily in closets, efficiently with other items, and so averting the problems that arise from larger or more awkwardly shaped objects that typically end up either buried or in the way of other things. Its size and dimension make a single unit very convenient to store and more easily accessible. Adding advantage, the individual seats when disassembled are boxlike and stackable, able to sit flatly or on end, as are the tables with and without the seats inside, making the Highly Portable Table and Seats with Quickly Detachable Legs even more usable and so convenient not just to their own use, but to the use of other things in storage.
  • Variations and Alternate Embodiments:
  • Please note that in the following alternate embodiments, there is much that is born out of the above disclosure. Should confusion arise, a reference to similar elements in original embodiment and their descriptions should clarify. Also in alternate embodiments, there are groups of embodiments that are of a family, sharing characteristics, and parts, and working within said families similarly. Should confusion arise, referring to similar elements in alternate embodiments should also serve to clarify,
  • Specifically as regards the peg lock recess,
  • there are perhaps many ways to effective shape the peg lock recess. Two are offered here. FIG. 10 shows a leg block receptacle 45 identical to the original leg block receptacle 17 with the exception the peg lock recess 47. Said alternate peg lock recess 47 is angled from the peg groove 49 toward the back of the block 50 instead of across the back of the block. For said embodiment, no change is necessary in the leg 14 FIG. 3, which still fits into the block and tightens with slight turning. FIG. 11 illustrates another alternate embodiment of the leg block recess. In this embodiment, the peg lock recess 53 has parallel sides and cuts across the back of the block from the leg hole side at an angle 54 from the peg groove again so that the leg 14 locks in the leg receptacle when said leg is inserted into the leg hole 52 and turned. Yet another alternate embodiment of the peg lock recess, enables the peg style leg receptacle to be solid and not split. Shown in FIG. 12, the leg receptacle 56 is a single unit and not split into two halves like previous embodiments. The recess is shaped in relation to the leg hole 57 at an angle identical to the recess in FIG. 11 with the important exception that this recess can be cut from the outside of the block. Again, all so far described embodiments work with the original leg as described above and seen in FIG. 3. FIGS. 13, 14 are identical in function to above original and alternate embodiments. Their difference is not just the product of materials used. In taking us less space inside the table and especially the seat compartments, they allow for the storage of longer legs. Should confusion arise, referring to similar elements in figures and description above should clarify.
  • FIG. 13 shows a pipe style leg receptacle made up of two joined parts consisting of a pipe section 62 and a pipe mount 63. The pipe section 62 is at least a doubled section of pipe, the inner pipe section or sections 64, and the outer pipe section 65. The leg 60 is of a diameter that slips inside the least of said inner pipe section or sections 64 fitting snugly. Said inner pipe section or sections 64 is of an outside diameter that fits the inner diameter of the exterior pipe section 65 also snugly. Said inner pipe section 64 has a slot running vertically from the top of the pipe far enough down along the pipe length that the peg side of the leg can enter near completely, said slot here termed the primary peg slot 66. Said inner pipe section 64 also has a secondary slot 67 running from the primary slot across the width of the pipe. Said secondary slot is angled as in other leg blocks and receptacles such that the leg tightens effectively when turned. In this embodiment such tightening occurs as the leg is forced up against the closed side of the leg hole 68. Said inner pipe section 64 is of a thickness that accommodates the peg or protrusion 61 on the leg 60. Said inner pipe has enough pipe wall thickness to make the depth on the primary slot 66 to comfortably accommodate the peg 61 when leg 60 is inserted. Fitting snugly over said inner pipe section 64 is an outer pipe section 65 which may be spot welded or glued or otherwise fixed depending on material to the inner pipe section 64. Said outer pipe section serves to reinforce said inner pipe and slots, keeping the inner pipe from suffering deformation with use. The pipe mount 63 consists of two side mounts 69 and a bottom mount 70. The two side mounts are connected along one edge at a 90 degree angle from each other. The receiving pipe lays between them and is connected to both. The bottom mount 70 connects to the closed side of the pipe section 68 and along an edge to each of the side mounts 69, said three together making a box shaped corner. As such, said pipe mount 63 fits snugly into any of the four interior corners of the seat and table compartments with the bottom mount against the back of the case to as to hold the legs in position to support the planar surface.
  • Similar to pipe style leg receptacle embodiment in its outward shape is the diagonal block leg receptacle 140 shown in FIG. 14. Such receptacle 140 benefits from being a singular piece, or depending on molding, two pieces joined. in its essential structure said embodiment 71 works identically to the pipe style leg receptacle FIG. 13. Note that n this embodiment the primary and secondary peg slot 72,73 are set facing the deep corner of the diagonal block receptacle 140, so better supporting this more stressed part of the block, said block 140 also being reinforced but the side walls and of the table or seat compartment to which it is joined.
  • Importantly, said half block leg receptacle FIG. 14, like the pipe receptacle FIG. 13 interferes less into the compartment of the case than square shaped receptacles. This allows for longer legs to be stored inside the seats and tables and so taller seats and tables. FIG. 15 shows a seat compartment with a diagonal leg block receptacles 70. While said seat compartment is in many ways similar to the original seat compartment described above and figured in FIG. 2, the difference is that the leg receptacles are triangular shaped, fitting the corner exactly on the two sides at right angles to each other, with the longer third side crossing the corner. Longer legs 76 then store diagonally inside the seat compartment. In this embodiment, two sets of two legs 76 are shown crossing each other, held in place by foam leg retainers 77.
  • An entirely alternate embodiment of the leg receptacle inverts the mechanics of leg peg lock mechanism. In this embodiment, here termed the ledge block, and illustrated in FIG. 16, the ledge block 78 is of a single piece with a leg hole 79. The peg groove is lost, and a peg recess is replaced by a ledge 81 that protrudes into the side of the leg hole at a slight angle, said angle similar to the angle of the peg lock recess as shown in FIGS. 4,11,12, or the angle of the secondary peg slot in FIG. 13 or 14 , only in this embodiment, it is a protruding ledge or shelf and not a recess. Such ledge 81 is fashioned separately and inserted into the ledge recess 80 and fixed there, flush to the outsides of the block. This ledge may be round i.e. doweled, or rectangular. In this embodiment said ledge 81 is rectangular and wins added strength and support along the gripping part of said ledge for so being.
  • The leg for this inverted leg receptacle, shown also in FIG. 16, similarly inverts the principles of the peg leg. Said leg 84 has a primary recess 85 at the end of the leg that enters the hole, here termed top of the leg 87 down to a distance to accommodate above said ledge 81 as it interrupts the afore stated leg hole 79. Said primary recess 85 is shaped so as to allow the leg 84 to fully enter the leg hole 79, and so pass the ledge 81. Said leg has also a secondary recess 86, like a trough, that partly circles the leg at a slight angle from the angle of the leg top. Said angle is similar and works with similar effect as other said angles of said recesses. This secondary recess 86 accommodates the ledge 81 when said leg 84 is turned in its leg hole 79. Further turning fixes said ledge leg in said ledge block.
  • As in all previous mentioned embodiments, once said leg is fixed in said leg hole, a reverse action looses it and allows withdrawal. Again see FIG. 5, directions for operation.
  • The final group of alternate leg block receptacles use a wedge or wedges to secure the legs in their respective leg receptacles. These embodiments termed wedge blocks and their legs are illustrated in FIGS. 17,18, & 19.
  • Specifically, FIG. 17 shows a leg block receptacle that uses a wedge to fix and release the leg. Like the embodiments of previously stated peg style leg block receptacles, this wedge style block is of similar dimension. Also like the embodiments of previously stated peg style leg block receptacles, the wedge style block is child friendly and intuitive. Specifically, the leg receptacle 88 has a leg hole 89 closer to one side of the primary block. 88. A wedge recess 90 recessed into short side 98 of the wedge block is recessed deep enough into the block 88 that it exposes a section the leg hole 89. A wedge 92 is shaped to fit the wedge recess 90, and is tied to the block by a chord 94, said chord being knotted at both ends, with one end held in the chord recess 91 at the edge of the so termed short side 98 of the block where the wedge block 88 abuts the closed side of the block 101. The other end of the chord 94 threads through the a wedge hole 93 on the wide end of the wedge 92. Finally, a wedge cap 96 fixes to the wedge block via 4 cap screws 97. Fit to the so termed short side 98 of the wedge block 88, the wedge cap 98 completes wedge block 88. Fixing the wedge cap in place, encloses the wedge recess 90. It also, in conjunction with the back of the seat or table compartment works to enclose the chord recess 91, so fixing the chord to the block.
  • The leg 102 for said wedge block 88 also in FIG. 17 has a wedge recess at one end 90. This wedge recess is shaped so when said leg 102 is inserted fully into said wedge block, said wedge 92 is allowed ever so slightly less than full entry into its wedge block 105. This situation gives the full force of the wedge to pressing said leg 102 to its full extent inside said wedge block 105 so maximizing the friction with which the wedge and the leg are held. Accomplishing this, the wedge recess is placed slightly further from the top of leg 103 than the wedge recess 90 is from the opening of the leg hole 89. With the leg 102 inserted into the leg hole, such displacement of the wedge recess in the leg 104 means the wedge finds the slant side of the leg recess 104 a before it reaches the slanted lower side wall of the wedge recess 90. Again, given said displacement of leg recess, pressing the wedge 92 into the wedge recess 90 locks the leg.
  • A variation of the wedge block 88 figured in FIG. 17 is the pinned wedge block of FIG. 18. In this embodiment the wedge block 105 and wedge 107 are identical to the the wedge block of FIG. 17 with the following three exceptions: there is no chord 94, nor chord recess 91 in the block, nor chord hole 93 in the wedge. These are replaced by a wedge slot 108 in the wedge 107 to allow said wedge to slide in and out of the wedge recess 106 along a wedge pin 109 that enters through the wedge cap and crosses through the wide side of said wedge recess 106. Said wedge pin 109 is placed midway between top and bottom of said wedge recess 109 and as close to the wedge side of the block 111 as is structurally sound. Said wedge slot 110 in said wedge 107 is also centered between the top and bottom of the wedge. Said wedge 107 when fully inserted into said wedge hole 106 still protrudes out the wedge side of the block 111 enough to be easily reached and manipulated. While said wedge 107 is retained in said wedge recess 106 with said wedge pin 109, said wedge removes from said wedge recess enough to fully release the leg. Though retained by said wedge pin 109, said wedge 107 can also fully enter said wedge recess 105 so locking the leg.
  • In yet another variation of the wedge block illustrated in FIG. 19, the wedge block 112 is identical to that in FIG. 18 with the following addition: a secondary wedge recess 114 is recessed from the primary wedge recess 113. This secondary wedge recess 114 has top and bottom parallel sides, but is wider at the wedge side of the block 117, and tapers as it approaches of the leg hole 118. A secondary wedge 115 slides on the same wedge pin 119 as the primary wedge. Like the primary wedge 120, the secondary wedge 115 has a slot 116 midway between top side and bottom side of said secondary wedge, extending far enough in the widening direction of the wedge to allow, once said primary wedge is inserted and set either against the leg of the primary wedge recess walls, the insertion of secondary wedge 115 into the secondary wedge recess 114. When pressed into its secondary wedge slot 116, said secondary wedge 115 fixes the primary wedge 120 in place. Important to add is that both the primary and secondary wedges 120,115 when extended fully into the wedge block 112, have a remainder showing outside the block. This remainder is shaped on both the primary and the secondary wedges 115,120 to facilitate manipulation of the wedges. The primary wedges represented in FIGS. 17,18 also protrude out the side of same said wedge block and are shaped to facilitate operation.
  • Again note that the leg for all wedge style leg receptacles, seen in FIGS. 17,18,19 is identical, described in FIG. 17 and numbered 102.
  • As regards the table and seats there are a number of possible embodiments involving 4 seats. FIG. 20 shows a table compartment 122 holding four seats 128. Also inside the table compartment 122 are four leg receptacles 131, these as described in the original embodiment and figured in FIG. 4. All four leg receptacles have catch blocks attached. See FIG. 7 for explication. Running between the short sides of the table case 123, are leg compartment sides 126. These leg compartment sides 126 work also to support the expanse of table top. Said leg compartment sides 126 also make the leg compartment 133 in which the table legs will store. Leg retainers placed inside the leg compartment 133 help to hole the legs in place. Crossing the seat compartment and settled midway between the long sides 124 of the table compartment 122 is a central support wall 125. Running along the top edge of said central support wall 125 is the central seat catch 127. Said seat catch 127 runs the length of the central support wall 125 the full length between the two long sides so connecting the two sections of the central support wall and reinforcing them where they break to meet the seat compartment sides 126 and allow the seat compartment 133. Said central seat catch is wider that the central support wall and so protrudes over either side of said wall forming a lip so as to catch and hold the seats when they are p[ to the wall. An adjustable catch block 132 mounted to each leg receptacle 131 works to hold said seats 128 in position against the central support wall 125.
  • FIG. 21 shows two hinged table compartment 134 that fold together and latch 143 to make a case 135. Said case 135 holds the four seats 136, two in table compartment 134. In each said table compartment there are two leg blocks or receptacles 137. Attached to each of these leg receptacles are catch blocks 138. Importantly, there are only two leg receptacles and two catch blocks per table compartment. A table leg compartment wall 139 is fixed parallel to the hinged side of the case 140. Along the top edge of this table compartment wall 139 is a catch lip 145 that runs the length of the case, said catch lip resembling the catch lip FIG. 6, number 32. Said catch lip 145 works in conjunction with said catch blocks 138 to hold the seats 136 securely inside the table compartment 134. A table leg compartment is formed between the back of the table compartment 134, the table leg compartment wall 139, and the hinged side of the case 140 opposite the catch blocks 138. Foam table leg retainers 141, two fixed into the corners of each table leg compartment against hinged side of the case 140. Said foam table leg retainers work to secure the table legs 142 that the case might be easily closed and quietly carried. Once closed, and latched 143, rope handles 144 on each of the outside two table compartments come together to forms a single soft handle by which to carry the case 135.
  • FIG. 22 addresses the alteration of peg, ledge and wedge style legs so to make more effective contact with their appropriate leg receptacles. Regarding the peg style leg 153, while it is convenient to install a peg, the shape of such peg could be made to conform more to the peg lock recess by being oval or otherwise elongated in the direction of the the angle of said recess. Depicted in FIG. 22, the protrusion 154 is more ledge like, narrow enough to enter a wide style recess, and placed so that turning works to lock said leg in its leg block. Such protrusion is bulged at the top 155, said bulging having the effect of said oval, working to increase contact between surface, given the slight softness of certain materials and so improve the friction lock between between said leg 153 and its leg receptacle. In the case of the ledge block leg 156, the bulge 157 intrudes on the secondary wedge recess. In the case of the wedge block leg 158, the bulge 159 intrudes on the wedge recess 160, on the angled upper side of said wedge recess 160.
  • As regards the leg, any of the afore mentioned legs may be tenoned or otherwise reduced at the end that enters the leg receptacle. in alternate embodiment. In such embodiment FIG. 23, the actual leg 146 is wider than the portion of the leg that enters the leg block or other receptacle. Said reduced leg end 147 is also the end that enters the leg blocks or other receptacle and is here termed the tenoned end of the leg 147. There is a lip 148 a between the tenoned end 147 and the wider portion 148 of said leg 146. Also different, the tenoned end is a bit shorter than non tenon style legs. This allows space inside the block between the tenoned end of the leg and the closed side of the leg block or other receptacle. With all other things regarding leg blocks and recesses being similar, this space allow said lip 148 a on said leg 146 to snug up to the leg block or other receptacle when the leg 146 is turned in its leg hole. Important again to note, such embodiment shifts the locking tension originally seated between the peg 150 and the top of the leg 149, to the peg and the wider lip of the tenon 148 a. Such tenoning of the leg end can be applied to above disclosed ledge style and wedge style legs, in addition to all peg style legs. Importantly however, while in either case the tension formed by turning the leg in the leg block or other receptacle locks the leg, the choice of tenoning a leg depends on requirements of the embodiment and material of manufacture.
  • Finally, as illustrated in FIG. 24, should additional friction be wanted to counter inadvertent loosening given the wide variety of manufacturing materials, the cap of each leg 151 or the inside top of the leg hole 150 may be roughed, or a gripping surface 152 or texture applied.

Claims (20)

1-23. (canceled)
24. a portable table and seat set such that the table forms a case which securely holds the seats and in which at least some if not all of the legs for said table and seats are detachable.
25. a portable table and seats as in claim 24 which is sized to be carried comfortably in one hand by one handle.
26. a portable table and seats as in claim 24 that in its disassembled and portable state stores comfortably on standard sized storage shelves or in smaller closets
27. a portable table and/or seats that are together and/or separately boxlike and stackable and so able to rest comfortably and balance on any one side, and so also able to store in stacks and/or rows.
28. a general means by which a table or seat leg may be quickly attached or released from table top or seat top.
29. a means as in claim 28 whereby a round leg has a peg or otherly shaped protrusion much like the bit of a key, such that when said leg is inserted into a leg receptacle, turning the leg works via its peg or protrusion to fix said leg inside said leg receptacle, or once fixed, to release it.
30. a means as is claim 29 in which the opening of the leg cavity in said leg receptacle resembles in appearance a traditional key hole with a primary hole for the leg itself and a secondary slot along the side of the hole, said slot resembling the part of the key hole designed to accommodate the key tooth or bit.
31. a means as is claim 29 whereby
a) the part of the leg that enters the leg receptacle is rounded so as to enter leg receptacle and to turn in said receptacle once inserted. Said leg has a peg or other protrusion coming off the leg to catch inside a secondary recess in said leg receptacle, such that less than a single rotation locks the leg in said leg receptacle.
b) the leg receptacle has a leg hole to receive said leg and a secondary recess to accommodate the peg or protrusion. Said additional recess is shaped so as to allow the near full or full insertion of said leg into said leg receptacle. Said additional recess is also shaped such that when said leg is inserted into said leg receptacle and then turned, such turning works to fix said leg in said leg receptacle, or, once fixed, to unfix and allow the release of said leg from said leg receptacle.
32. a means as is claim 31 whereby the peg catch part of said secondary peg recess is set at a least possible pitch from the peg slot, so to effect the tightening of the leg with the least change in the amount of insertion. (thereby decreasing the effect of tortional forces to release the leg, and decreasing the strain on components.)
33. a means as in claim 31 whereby the grip between the leg via its peg or protrusion and the leg receptacle is improved by elongating the peg or protrusion or otherwise increasing the surface area of the frictional contact point between peg or protrusion and the additional or secondary recess.
34. a means as in claim 28 whereby
a) the leg receptacle has a leg hole in it shaped to receive the leg
b) said leg receptacle has an interior ridge protruding into the leg hole and crossing said leg hole at an angle slightly shy of perpendicular.
c) a leg is shaped at one end with a recess such that said leg can pass said ridge so as to completely or near completely enter said leg receptacle.
d) a secondary recess also in the leg head is positioned to allow the turning of said leg in said leg receptacle, said secondary recess being positioned and shaped so as to effectively capture and fix and once fixed to release said leg in said leg receptacle via the grip between the ridge in the leg receptacle and the secondary recess in the leg.
35. a means as is claim 34 whereby the angle of the secondary recess is slight but sufficient so minimizing the effect of torsional forces on the leg to leg receptacle connection.
36. a means as in claim 34 whereby the shape of the secondary leg recess and said ledge in said leg receptacle maximizes the contact surface area between said secondary leg recess and said ledge, such that when said leg is turned inside said leg receptacle, the grip between leg and leg receptacle is improved.
37. a means as in claim 28 where by the leg is quickly attached and detached by means of an independently operated wedge.
38. a leg and leg receptacle as in claim 37 whereby
a) said leg receptacle has a primary recess in it shaped to receive the leg head
b) said leg receptacle has a secondary recess to allow a wedge exterior to the receptacle to enter said receptacle and intrude on one side of the primary recess also called leg hole in said leg receptacle.
c) A recess on the side of said leg head is positioned to accommodate said wedge and to frictionally engage said leg and said leg receptacle.
d) removal of said wedge allows the release and complete removal of said leg from said leg receptacle.
39. A means as in claim 38 whereby the leg receptacle wedge is held to said leg receptacle via a chord, cable, string, thread, or line of some sort.
40. A means as in claim 37 whereby said wedge is movable inside said leg receptacle, but not removable.
41. A means as in claim 40 whereby the wedge has a slot in it so to accommodate a pin fixed to the leg receptacle and passing through said slot such that said wedge slides into and out of the leg hole in said leg receptacle so as to fix said leg in said leg receptacle and, once fixed to release it.
42. a means as in claim 41 whereby a secondary wedge also with a slot and sliding on the same pin, and also with its own wedge recess in said leg receptacle works as a fail safe to catch and to fix the position of the primary wedge in the leg receptacle.
US12/799,884 2009-05-01 2010-05-03 Highly portable table and seats with quickly able legs Abandoned US20110012392A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US21508609P true 2009-05-01 2009-05-01
US12/799,884 US20110012392A1 (en) 2009-05-01 2010-05-03 Highly portable table and seats with quickly able legs

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/799,884 US20110012392A1 (en) 2009-05-01 2010-05-03 Highly portable table and seats with quickly able legs

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110012392A1 true US20110012392A1 (en) 2011-01-20

Family

ID=43464741

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/799,884 Abandoned US20110012392A1 (en) 2009-05-01 2010-05-03 Highly portable table and seats with quickly able legs

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20110012392A1 (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120079963A1 (en) * 2009-07-27 2012-04-05 Matthew Ballard Herschler Briefcase Workstation
US20140263136A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Centrex Plastics, LLC Shelving System and Shelf for Same
US9622571B1 (en) 2015-02-25 2017-04-18 Edward J Wassel Collapsible outdoor table
USD827339S1 (en) 2017-05-30 2018-09-04 Target Brands, Inc. Display unit
US10757908B2 (en) 2016-04-19 2020-09-01 Amity Technology, Llc Modular livestock stall

Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US135655A (en) * 1873-02-11 Improvement in tables
US271143A (en) * 1883-01-23 smith
US1457041A (en) * 1921-06-30 1923-05-29 Benjamin F Orear Folding camp table and stool set
US1747691A (en) * 1924-06-21 1930-02-18 Warren S Bellows Folding table
US1762776A (en) * 1927-12-22 1930-06-10 Charles W Gardner Furniture leg
US3661411A (en) * 1970-11-16 1972-05-09 Jewell Mfg Co Joint construction
US3730109A (en) * 1971-01-04 1973-05-01 Armstrong Cork Co Knock-down table structure
US3932047A (en) * 1975-03-03 1976-01-13 James Crossan Connecting systems
US3966340A (en) * 1975-02-27 1976-06-29 Morris Max O Twist lock connector
US4011821A (en) * 1975-10-29 1977-03-15 Cosco, Inc. Table
US4229038A (en) * 1978-08-16 1980-10-21 Drost Edward J Portable folding table and chairs
US4925140A (en) * 1989-03-20 1990-05-15 Itc Incorporated Detachable leg assembly
US5026010A (en) * 1990-05-04 1991-06-25 Itc Incorporated Latched detachable leg assembly
US5074224A (en) * 1989-12-09 1991-12-24 Hans Jochen Eisenberg Platform device with releasable supporting legs
US6109687A (en) * 1998-09-09 2000-08-29 Lifetime Products, Inc. Nested, independently deployable bench and table apparatus and method

Patent Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US135655A (en) * 1873-02-11 Improvement in tables
US271143A (en) * 1883-01-23 smith
US1457041A (en) * 1921-06-30 1923-05-29 Benjamin F Orear Folding camp table and stool set
US1747691A (en) * 1924-06-21 1930-02-18 Warren S Bellows Folding table
US1762776A (en) * 1927-12-22 1930-06-10 Charles W Gardner Furniture leg
US3661411A (en) * 1970-11-16 1972-05-09 Jewell Mfg Co Joint construction
US3730109A (en) * 1971-01-04 1973-05-01 Armstrong Cork Co Knock-down table structure
US3966340A (en) * 1975-02-27 1976-06-29 Morris Max O Twist lock connector
US3932047A (en) * 1975-03-03 1976-01-13 James Crossan Connecting systems
US4011821A (en) * 1975-10-29 1977-03-15 Cosco, Inc. Table
US4229038A (en) * 1978-08-16 1980-10-21 Drost Edward J Portable folding table and chairs
US4925140A (en) * 1989-03-20 1990-05-15 Itc Incorporated Detachable leg assembly
US5074224A (en) * 1989-12-09 1991-12-24 Hans Jochen Eisenberg Platform device with releasable supporting legs
US5026010A (en) * 1990-05-04 1991-06-25 Itc Incorporated Latched detachable leg assembly
US6109687A (en) * 1998-09-09 2000-08-29 Lifetime Products, Inc. Nested, independently deployable bench and table apparatus and method
US6443521B1 (en) * 1998-09-09 2002-09-03 Lifetime Products, Inc. Collapsible table having nested seat members

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20120079963A1 (en) * 2009-07-27 2012-04-05 Matthew Ballard Herschler Briefcase Workstation
US8459734B2 (en) * 2009-07-27 2013-06-11 Matthew Ballard Herschler Briefcase workstation
US20140263136A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Centrex Plastics, LLC Shelving System and Shelf for Same
US9538846B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2017-01-10 Continental Commercial Products, Llc Shelving system and shelf for same
US9622571B1 (en) 2015-02-25 2017-04-18 Edward J Wassel Collapsible outdoor table
US10757908B2 (en) 2016-04-19 2020-09-01 Amity Technology, Llc Modular livestock stall
USD827339S1 (en) 2017-05-30 2018-09-04 Target Brands, Inc. Display unit

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9770095B2 (en) Foldable table
AU737345B2 (en) Collapsible container
US6832397B2 (en) Bed foundation
US6845991B1 (en) Folding wagon/cart
US4998023A (en) Portable utility cart
CA2449395C (en) Pop-up mechanism to raise the top of pieces of furniture
CA2703293C (en) Grip latch and hinge mechanism for a flip table
US8850638B1 (en) Modular folding bed frame set
US6814010B2 (en) Interlocking knockdown furniture with upright locking protrusions
US6371034B1 (en) Folding table
US7752982B2 (en) Latching mechanism for foldable table
US7055899B2 (en) Picnic table
US20160324316A1 (en) Table with molded plastic table top
US7231740B2 (en) Modular stage prop
US7784122B2 (en) Mattress-supporting base
US8881661B2 (en) Foldable table
US20030233718A1 (en) Twist-lock handle assembly
US8622007B2 (en) Table with molded plastic table top
US6564903B2 (en) Collapsable sawhorse bracket with interleaving legs
US10517402B2 (en) Blow molded resin furniture having a stabilizing box structure
US7452035B2 (en) Chair
US20030079284A1 (en) Leg and bracket assembly for a bed foundation
US7263932B2 (en) Personal table
JP2007503932A (en) Multipurpose cleaning equipment
US9642459B2 (en) Table

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION