US20110009178A1 - System for Incorporating Chance Into Interactive Games Requiring the Application of Intellectual or Motor Skills - Google Patents

System for Incorporating Chance Into Interactive Games Requiring the Application of Intellectual or Motor Skills Download PDF

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US20110009178A1
US20110009178A1 US12/918,813 US91881309A US2011009178A1 US 20110009178 A1 US20110009178 A1 US 20110009178A1 US 91881309 A US91881309 A US 91881309A US 2011009178 A1 US2011009178 A1 US 2011009178A1
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system
chance
lottery
incorporating
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Ignacio Gerson
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IPARK ENTRETENIMIENTOS SLU
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IPARK ENTRETENIMIENTOS SLU
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Priority to PCT/ES2009/000092 priority patent/WO2009103834A2/en
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3286Type of games
    • G07F17/3295Games involving skill, e.g. dexterity, memory, thinking

Abstract

The invention refers to digital interactive games operable from specific terminals, video game consoles, personal computers, cell phones, digital interactive television, even when they include an initial bit of chance for their usual development, in order to incorporate the possibility to get a prize (including cash payments), besides of simply diversion. It comprises the incorporation of at least one random resource capable of sustaining a mathematical balance between winners and losers equivalent to that governing games of pure chance, keeping the condition that, for the resolution of each game, it requires the participation of the person, his/her with and his/her visual, motor, spatial, and linguistic skills, besides to his/her knowledge. The incorporated random resource is managed by a probabilistic balance system that ensures the proper ratio between winners and losers in terms of the predetermined “payout”. The incorporated random resource could be either a lottery of maximum results including the previous draw of the maximum result the player can reach (although he/she plays it perfectly), or a lottery of levels of difficulty that draws the level of difficulty set for each game between a maximum level (virtually impossible to overcome) and a minimum level (very easy to overcome), or a combination of both of them.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention is within the field of digital interactive games. This is operative on different devices such as terminals with “touch screen” screens, video game consoles, cabinets or slot machines, personal computers, cell phones, digital interactive television, and offers the possibility of participating in skill games either for diversion, for prizes or for money.
  • The invention applies essentially to resolution of games with motor or intellectual skill, such as in the case in which they also include a bit of chance within their development, although the resolution necessarily depends on the intellectual or motor skill of the player.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to a novel system from which chance and the player's skill influence the result of the game, in such a degree that allows for the incorporation of prizes (including money payments), besides of simply diversion.
  • Thus, different schemes are used, including some which dynamically fit the difficulty or level of the game by giving incentives in accordance to said skill.
  • As known, many skill games contain, in a higher or lower measure, a degree of chance which result may be saved, improved or worsened by the participation of the skill of each player.
  • For example, games with dice (Generala, Backgammon, TEG), cards (Solitaire, One), although they are essentially chance games, have a component of intellectual skill and strategy.
  • The same happens in games where letters are drawn to form words (Scrabble, Boggle, Letter Soup), or also where there are options to choose questions (multiple choice, Trivia), chance and intellectual skill take part.
  • On the contrary there are some games which do not include chance at all and which only depend on the skill or knowledge of the player: Chess, Checkers, Crosswords.
  • The present invention provides a system for skill games (either intellectual or motor skill) in which chance does not take part, as well as those in which chance is part, in a higher or a lower degree, to be played such that, besides the intrinsic attraction supplied by each game, they include an additional incentive including access to a prize (including money).
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Slot Machines
  • Only chance games with no challenge, no participation of skill and no possibilities to change fate. Gambling systems are designed to call the attention of players to an entertainment experience. Games generally call the attention through the use of lights, colors, sounds, music themes, new subjects, various bonus and prizes. Likewise, they incorporate more and new paying combinations.
  • However, when the player intervenes in these games, the experience offered by this type of systems is highly repetitive. The functioning of the systems after said games is always the same. They are made of a set of wheels containing very varying symbols which spin randomly through a result which may consist, or not, of one or more paying combinations.
  • It is known for these systems, that if they continuously offer the same type of game, they cause boredom of the player and his/her loss of interest.
  • This loss of interest manifests the need for the appearance of new gaming systems offering a varied and stimulating experience for the player, increasing the interest and stimulating him to go on playing while performing a bet.
  • Precisely, the system of the present patent of invention is a clear solution to the present problem, since it allows definition of wagering games where different levels of difficulty are included to challenge the intellectual or motor skill of the player, meaning new experiences of entertainment, higher, always new, and attractive.
  • In traditional “slots” the game is stable all along the session, being that the activity required by the player is always the same and the results obtained are totally random and absolutely independent of any kind of skill by the player.
  • These games do not show any intellectual or motor challenge to the player.
  • On the other hand, there are “slot” games, such as the one detailed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,193,696, offering the possibility of responding to a trivia question while playing to the slot.
  • The player who responds correctly to the question is able to access the slot game with a higher prize pay table. In any case, the probability of winning or losing is still random and the fact of obtaining a determinate combination of symbols in the slot game, which combination, once achieved, grants the prize, is beyond any skill of the player.
  • It is again noted that, beyond the possibility to increase or reduce the value of the prize to be accessed by means of the “Trivia” question, the player has no chance to influence the resolution of the “slot” game.
  • The system of the present patent of invention incorporates, as novelty, besides the random component, which exists in any betting game, the need to put into the game the intellectual or motor skills of the player in the resolution of same. Thus, his intellectual or motor skill may change the fate of the game session.
  • Current “Arcade” Video Games
  • In current video games or games of “arcade” the player is overcoming obstacles and solving tasks, progressing towards increasing levels of difficulty. This is always the same, so that the player knows and incorporates the dynamics, knows that a more difficult level is coming, may exercise the required skills and can generally learn to solve all the levels of difficulty shown by the game. This is because ultimately all levels of difficulty, even the most difficult ones, depend almost entirely on the player's skill.
  • While this kind of game shows many challenges, it is not possible to establish a mechanism for payment of prizes or a “payout”, as the chance of winning or losing depends directly on the player's skill and never on chance. That is, a very skillful player in a particular game would win consistently.
  • With the additional incentive system of the present patent of invention, a draw of random and varied levels of difficulty, which may even include unattainable levels of resolution, is performed, making it impossible that practice or learning allow a player to win consistently. Thus, it is ensured that there will be players who win and players who lose, making it possible to establish a specific mathematics that allows development of a game where granting of prizes is feasible, including cash payment.
  • Another remarkable problem that can be seen in current video games is that the number of levels of difficulty is limited and that they occur according to a fixed sequence, from lowest to highest. In such games an extremely skilled player can play for hours, which is not economically profitable.
  • With the system of the present invention, it is possible to incorporate the draw of a lot of levels of difficulty, creating a game session with a predetermined amount of these levels. In this way, you can set the duration of a session, and thereby ensure that a significant number of players will go through a particular machine, where a percentage of them will win and another percentage will lose, in compliance with a predetermined “payout”.
  • Console Games
  • With regard to console games such as “Sony Playstation”, “Nintendo”, “Xbox”, etc., while they incorporate a much more sophisticated multimedia over those “arcade” video games, they have a similar structure regarding to the fixed succession of levels of difficulty, from easiest to hardest.
  • Although there are a lot of very varied levels, the following of a fixed sequence involves, in the same way that “arcade” games, very long sessions where the success of the task is directly related to the skill of the player, so that it would be impossible to establish a mathematics enabling the offer of a determined “payout” because the expense in prizes would be extremely high. There is no guarantee that the balance between the players winning and losing is kept at a certain level to calculate a “payout”.
  • With the incentive application system of the present invention, it is possible to incorporate levels of insurmountable difficulty, similar in probability of resolution to obtaining the “Jackpot” in a slot machine, ensuring a balance that allows funds to be raised to deliver prizes on the basis of an appropriate predetermined “payout”.
  • Games of Chance for Money
  • Games of chance for money when there is a bank are based on the study of the probability of the various winning combinations from the total possible combinations.
  • Usually, a pay table based on that probability is established. Over time, (i.e., given a sufficiently large number of plays to total possible combinations), a determined pay table generates a certain payout (or percentage of money that the game—the bank-returns to bettors). If the payout is less than 100%, then the bank does not lose money.
  • Take, for example, a wheel with 37 individual boxes (numbered from 0 to 36) and a layout in which the player can only bet on what number will come out (straight-up bet), where the pay table establishes that the bank will pay the gambler getting the right number to go out at the wheel at 35 to 1 (i.e., for every dollar the player bets, the bank will pay $35 if he/she gets right, and if the player loses, the bank keeps his/her bet). If the wheel is well-balanced, the probability of getting any of the numbers is 1/37, as the pay table is $1-$35 (for any of the 37 numbers), eventually (after thousands of plays), the payout for this game will be
  • 35 + 1 37
  • (because when the player wins, he/she gets the dollar he/she bet, plus the 35 paid by the bank), i.e., nearly 97.3%.
  • This establishes that after a sufficiently large number of games, the bank will have a net gain of about $0.70 for every $100 bet.
  • All games of chance for money that are fair, are based on a probabilistic study and work in the same way, i.e. use a pay table that defines a certain “payout”.
  • Games of Skill for Money
  • Traditionally, games of skill (both intellectual and/or motor skill) only can be played for money when it is done between pairs, where two or more players challenge each other by betting money and setting out how money will be divided according the result of the game (for example, the winner takes all or the money is distributed proportionally to the final score of each player.)
  • The gamblers do not necessarily have to be the same players; there can also be mere gamblers who bet on one or another player. In fact, the player himself might not be a gambler.
  • The only place where there is a bank for this type of games is when the bank is a mere mediator (or broker) of mutual trust. If there is such a broker, its profit can be defined either as a small percentage of each bet, regardless of which player wins, or through the management of probabilistic payment schemes leaving a consistent margin for the bank.
  • General Considerations about Chance Resources
  • Chance in Games
  • There were two widely used mechanisms to generate randomness in games of chance:
  • a) Extraction lottery (or drum lottery)
  • b) Combinatorial probability chance.
  • Depending on how both are implemented, they could be equivalent in some cases.
  • Extraction Lottery
  • The extraction lottery or drum lottery is that wherein one among n items within a bag or a lottery drum is randomly chosen.
  • Typically, the n elements are different from each other (e.g., numbered from 1 to n) and the probability of choosing any of them is equal (the shape, size and weight of the n elements are equal). In fact, in this case the probability of choosing any one of them is exactly 1/n.
  • When more than one item is going to be successively extracted, there are two traditional ways of doing this:
  • a) with replacement
  • b) without replacement.
  • Extraction with Replacement
  • In the first way, the item, once collected and checked, is replaced into the bag or lottery drum, so that it will take part in the following extraction, thus, the probability of getting out any of the n objects in the second extraction remains 1/n.
  • Extraction without Replacement
  • In the second way, the item, once collected and checked, is left out of the bag or lottery drum, so that it is not possible to choose it again. In this case, there will remain n-1 items in the bag and the probability to choose any of them in the second extraction would be
  • 1 n - 1 .
  • For the third extraction, there will remain n-2 items in the bag and the probability to choose any one of them would be
  • 1 n - 2
  • and so on. If more items are extracted without replacement, the nth extraction would be made with a single item in the bag (the only one not chosen in the previous n-1 extractions), whose selection is certain (i.e., the probability of choosing that single item is exactly 1).
  • Extraction with Partial Replacement—Replacement Window
  • There is the possibility of using a mixed system where extracted tickets are not replaced immediately, but to prevent “the bag being empty”, so that the probability of extracting a specific ticket is never exactly 1.
  • Given K elements, a number i such as 0<i<n is defined, and it is established that the amount of tickets in the bag can never be less than i.
  • One possible way of implementation would be that each n-i extractions (i.e., when the number of items left into the bag or the lottery drum is exactly i) the n-i items already used are replaced. Another possibility is to replace only a part of the n-i items.
  • In fact, if we allow the chosen number i to fulfill 0≦i≦n, then the extraction with replacement and without replacement become the specific cases of the limits of i in the overall mechanism of partial replacement (i=0 is without replacement and i=n is with replacement).
  • Non-Equiprobable Variants
  • In the cases described herein, equiprobable items were always used (i.e., the probability of choosing anyone into the bag is equal to choosing anyone of the others). If a different probability is desired, it could be done in various ways: the physical properties of the items (such as, heavier or smaller balls will most likely leave a lottery drum that lighter or larger ones) could be changed, or the number of items of each value (i.e., using n items with different k-values with k<n, so that some items are repeated one or more times, thus increasing the probability of being chosen) could be changed.
  • Combinatorial Probability Chance
  • The combinatorial probability chance is one in which you use one or more items that generate chance (flipping a coin, a die, a spinner, etc).
  • For example, if you throw a die of k faces n times, the number of possible combinations (in which the order they left out is respected) is nk, i.e., the probability of each of the combinations is
  • 1 n k .
  • These probabilities can be modified without distinguishing the order or repeating values in different faces of the die.
  • Equivalence of Mechanisms
  • In some cases, it is possible to simulate the combinatorial probability chance using an extraction lottery.
  • For example: All possible combinations of two 6-sided dice result in 36 (62) assuming we distinguish the combination 1-2 from 2-1 (otherwise it can be as well implemented.)
  • If you want to simulate this event of combinatorial probability chance using extraction lottery, you simply need to put 36 tickets into the bag, each accounting for a possible combination of the two dice. The extraction must be with replacement, as throwing two dice once and again never depends on the previous result.
  • The following drawing shows both ways to depict the same game:
  • In the United States, laws among states are different, requiring in some of them the draw in a slot machine to be random strip by strip, where the final combination is a random probability of each strip (Combinatorial probability chance model).
  • Other states, however, require that draw is done firstly defining ALL possible combinations, putting them all in a bag and drawing one (Extraction lottery model). The condition for such draw is fair to every player even requires that once the combination is drawn, it should be put again into the bag for the next drawing and not discarded (Extraction lottery with replacement).
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Philosophy
  • The philosophy which this system is based on, considers games an essential activity of human beings, and a development factor of their potential; a cultural enrichment to fostering new interests, and an incentive for socialization.
  • Games of pure chance, by not engaging the player with his/her intelligence and skills, are likely to develop habits of mechanization and compulsion, which often results into more or less serious gambling.
  • The system of the present invention involves the use of skills and knowledge. It requires the engagement of the whole person, with his/her wit, visual, motor, spatial, linguistic skills, coupled with his/her knowledge.
  • With its implementation, games which favor the reinforcement of the human being identity and prevent the mechanization in his/her behavior are obtained, thus decreasing the propensity for compulsive behaviors.
  • Based on as indicated in the preceding paragraphs, it can be said that the system to implement additional incentives into interactive games which the present invention is in general referred to, represents a true innovation in the field of entertainment because cultural incentives are incorporated, replacing craving for an actual challenge in the testing of acquired knowledge.
  • Operating Principle
  • The system of the present invention devises a way to make games of skill keep a mathematical balance, equivalent to that shown in games of chance, with a probability that allows the game to maintain a balance between winners and losers, and according to this, provide prizes as an additional incentive to the game itself.
  • Based on the concept set forth, it can be said that the operating principle of the invented incentive system is the incorporation of different engines or resources that can be applied to the implementation of each game, thus incorporating a random component to the existing game.
  • These resources may be used alone or in combination according to the type of game the invented system is applied.
  • These resources can be named as follows:
  • 1) Lottery of maximum results;
  • 1a) Lottery of maximum results with statistical compensation;
  • 1b) Lottery of maximum results with skill imbalance compensation by pure chance;
  • 2) Lottery of levels of difficulty;
  • 3) Probabilistic balance system;
  • 4) Multi-level jackpot system
  • 1) Lottery of Maximum Results
  • A first applicable resource to incorporate chance within a particular game is the so-called lottery of maximum results, which is based on the concept of establishing in advance the prizes to be delivered and thus to know its mathematical results. That is, 10,000 tickets are sold at $1 each, a first prize of $5,000; a second prize of $2,000; a third prize of $1,000; and fourth prize of $500 are given. It is known in advance that the calculation will result in a certain value which will allow distribution of the prizes.
  • The Lottery of maximum results is one in which a number of conditions that will limit the maximum result the player can reach in a given play is drawn by chance.
  • The draw can be performed with any variant of Extraction lottery.
  • The performed draw (the part of chance involved in the game) is done on a maximum result that may reach a previously defined set of combinations of cards, dice, letters, spatial arrangements, or anything determined for a specific game.
  • Once the draw is made, the player's skill will determine if the player can make use of 100% of that set of randomly selected combinations or if he/she uses a lesser part.
  • The prize will be obtained on what the player was actually able to use (and not on the possible maximum for such combination), thus his/her skill will also influence the received prize.
  • Thus, both an intelligent selection of combinations associated with maximum results and a pay table associated with the results generate a bounded payout for the game, allowing the game to be played for money with a bank, just as traditional slot machines.
  • Problems Inherent in Lottery of Maximum Results
  • Lottery of maximum results allows control of the maximum level of payout taking, as the only reference, a perfect player in a particular game. While this can be used so the bank does not lose money (by defining a maximum payout strictly lower than 100% for that perfect player), this may not be desirable. If most of the players have a much lower skill than the hypothetical perfect player, the effective payout will be far below the maximum payout leaving the player feeling that he/she never wins or the game underpays.
  • 1a) Lottery of Maximum Results with Statistical Compensation
  • One possible solution to this is to have statistical data of the game for a given population and adjust the pay table so that the statistic payout has the desired value, although the maximum payout is above 100%. If the statistical data are based on a sufficiently large number of plays and all the players that generated this statistics are significantly representative of all the players using the game, this solution will be feasible.
  • In fact, if you make a pay table as if all players were perfect, the bank consistently would lose money; however, if you make a statistical study of the behavior of the players, it may provide an appropriate “payout” so that the imbalance that may arise favoring the bank when the players have a little skill is reserved for use in payments to skilled players.
  • Although this mechanism can provide satisfactory results, it is true that this is something certainly empirical and involves a double risk for the bank: If for a long period the skill distribution of the players is consistently higher than expected, the bank will lose money. If, conversely, it is lower than expected, the bank could make money in excess, which never is convenient because it ends up creating unhappy customers. A “payout” is established lower than the desired one.
  • For the above reason, another resource is incorporated to definitely ensure that if the “payout” is not the best one, the bank invariably will pay compensation prizes.
  • 1b) Lottery of Maximum Results with Skill Imbalance Compensation by Pure Chance
  • A possible solution is to compensate a skill imbalance favorable to the bank using only a resource governed entirely by chance.
  • Such compensation resource includes to leave the pay table based on the maximum payout (i.e., considering the maximum use of the skill of the player), in which case the amount of imbalance that is produced in favor of the bank will be drawn in prizes applied to the same game (mystery prizes, multi-level jackpots, etc).
  • The proposal is to make a pay table that gives the desired “payout” based on the hypothesis (almost certainly false) that all players are perfect. That is, a proportion of maximum results are drawn as the combinations into a slot machine and this ratio generates a desired “payout” in the long term.
  • As it is supposed that the probability that the players are not perfect is very high, we know that an imbalance favoring the bank is necessarily created, i.e., the “payout” ends up being lower than the configured one.
  • Taking the above into account, the invention considers that all such amounts that are unfairly in favor of the bank will be used for draws during the games generating surprise prizes for players in a totally random fashion, regardless the player's skill, in other words, by pure chance.
  • Thus, this new draw, by pure chance, which is incorporated using the mentioned imbalance favoring the bank as a jackpot to pay the prizes regardless of the player's skill, ensures that the “payout” established by the pay table is always the best.
  • 2) Lottery of Levels of Difficulty
  • This second resource to incorporate chance that may be used by the system of the present invention is based on the draw of Levels of difficulty within a given game.
  • Where information, questions or combinations involved in a game can be assigned the concept of level of difficulty, a level of difficulty is firstly drawn and then an item, question, or combination associated with that level of difficulty is used.
  • When it can be determined in advance that there are items, questions, or combinations that result from such a high level of difficulty that it is virtually impossible to solve, it is possible to achieve a distribution of these items to control the payout of the game.
  • Problems Inherent in the Lottery of Levels of Difficulty
  • The only way the Lottery of levels of difficulty can control the maximum level of payout is by abusing the highest (or virtually impossible) levels. While this can be used so the bank does not lose money, this may not be desirable. If most of the players do not have a skill so high, the effective payout will be far below that level, leaving the player the feeling of he/she always loses the game or the game underpays.
  • One possible solution to this is to have statistical data of the game for a given population and adjust the levels of difficulty so that the statistical payout approaches the desired value.
  • If the statistical data are based on a sufficiently large number of plays and all the players that generated these statistics are significantly representative of all the players using the game, this solution will be feasible.
  • Variations of Lottery of Maximum Results and Lottery of Levels of Difficulty
  • Now the Lottery of maximum results and the Lottery of levels of difficulty have, in turn, two possible scenarios: a) with ticket replacement or b) without ticket replacement (by discarding).
  • As explained above in the section of general considerations about chance resources, in the first case, the ticket extracted (drawn) is returned into the bag for the next play providing equal conditions among the players, i.e., all the players play the same draw, with the same number of tickets and with the same chance of winning.
  • The second case proposes that the ticket extracted (drawn) of the whole bag of tickets of results is discarded, and the next play a ticket is extracted but with one less ticket and so on until all the tickets are extracted, at which time the bag is renewed.
  • The difference between these two scenarios is that the second one (without replacement) is managed through accurate prizes, i.e., if a bag containing 10,000 tickets has only one major prize, you know exactly that a prize among 10,000 tickets will be given, no more and no less, while the first form (with replacement) proposes only a probability and not an accurate knowledge of the prizes to be distributed, that is, by replacing the ticket the draw keeps being on 10,000 tickets.
  • Now, in this second case, it is only the probability that says that the prize should go out at an average of 1 in 10,000, but in this case there is no guarantee that this prize goes out exactly once every 10,000, it can be variable and go out at 12,000; 15,000; or even 20,000; and even go out more than once in 10,000 consecutive extractions. The reality is that it is not accurate, which makes it more natural.
  • However, various games require the use of either of these two ways according to their functionality.
  • 3) Probabilistic Balance System
  • A third resource that the incentive system of the present invention can use to incorporate chance in a particular game, is the so-called Probabilistic balance system, (PBS) that functions as a corrector of the payout, allowing both lotteries (maximum results and levels of difficulty) to be balanced based on the more or less local or temporary deviation of the effective payout with respect to the desired payout.
  • For Lottery of maximum results, the Probabilistic balance system changes dynamically the ratio of items, questions, or combinations with high and low maximum results.
  • That is, if it detects that the effective payout is far below the desired payout, the Probabilistic balance system will increase the probability of choosing objects with high maximum results.
  • If, on the contrary, the effective payout is far above the desired payout, the Probabilistic balance system will decrease the probability of choosing items with high maximum results (but without eliminating it).
  • For Lottery of levels of difficulty, the Probabilistic balance system changes dynamically the ratio of low, medium, high and virtually impossible levels of difficulty.
  • That is, if it detects that the effective payout is far below the desired payout, the Probabilistic balance system will increase the ratio of objects with low or medium level of difficulty.
  • If, on the contrary, the effective payout is far above the desired payout, the Probabilistic balance system will increase the ratio of objects with high or virtually impossible level of difficulty.
  • Frequency, Discretionality and Location of PBS
  • The Probabilistic balance system can be applied continuously or with different frequencies, either every certain time interval, every certain number of plays, or a combination of both.
  • Moreover, large adjustments or narrowing of the difference between the prior and the subsequent status of the system may be allowed, so that the player will not notice that the game is suddenly much easier or more difficult.
  • Finally, the adjustment can be made on an individual player or a set of players (either those who are in a specific region or location or other profile that could be identified).
  • Effect of PBS
  • From a bag full of items or combinations with a certain amount of levels of difficulty and selecting randomly one of them, the game proposes a challenge to the player more or less complex depending on the level of difficulty drawn.
  • Such way that involves challenging the player with different levels of difficulty, can result in different scenarios depending on the skill of each player. That is, a medium level of difficulty can be solved successfully by a skilled person and not solved by a person without the same skill and/or knowledge.
  • In this case, the Probabilistic balance system is responsible, in sessions executed each a certain time, as the game requires it, to level the lottery bag in order to reach again a mathematical balance.
  • Then, such Balance system balances the payout when a draw of levels of difficulty yields unexpected results. For example, if the system drew a high level of difficulty almost impossible to solve for a session and, thanks to the skill of the player, it could be resolved, then the system can balance this session with more draws of high levels of difficulty.
  • Exemplification of PBS
  • The system of the invention allows to select levels of difficulty in two different ways: 1) in a random way (by various methods) and 2) in an artificially intelligent way according to the performance of the player (or set of players) by PBS. The same payout can be reach through both ways. The two above explained examples are shown as follows:
  • APPLICATION EXAMPLES Example 1 Without PBS
  • If we have three levels of difficulty A, B and C, wherein A is the easy level, B is one of the intermediate levels, and C is the impossible level, a player J who is sitting in a terminal will receive by draw one of three levels of difficulty.
  • Then, the player places his bet and the game draws the levels of difficulty. The drawn level is shown to the player who gives his/her answer, which is evaluated by the system.
  • If the answer is correct, the game performs again the draw for the levels of difficulty, get one and shows it again to the player, and so on.
  • If the answer is wrong, the game proceeds exactly in the same way. It makes again the draw of levels of difficulty. Obtaining an easy, intermediate or difficult level by the player is completely by chance and the prize depends on the performance.
  • Example 2 With PBS
  • The player sits down to play and the system defines a starting Proportional distribution of levels of difficulty (PDLD), related to the ratio accounting for each of the levels of difficulty (easy), B (intermediate), and C (practically impossible.)
  • The draw is made and the resulting level of difficulty is shown to the player through different game structures. The player gives an answer that is sent to the system for testing and for evaluating the balance among the three defined levels.
  • At each certain time (or a certain number of plays), the Probabilistic balance system controls the system status. If the responses are the expected ones, i.e., the user successfully resolved most of the easy levels, some of the intermediates, and incorrectly the impossible levels, PBS maintains the status.
  • If, otherwise, the status was changed because the user answered correctly an impossible level or the user answered incorrectly several easy levels, the system executes PBS to amend intelligently the Proportional distribution of levels of difficulty to be drawn.
  • Simple use of PBS Cases
  • Four very simple cases to understand the operation may be used. As an example, we will start with an initial PDLD with 10 Levels of minimum difficulty (MIN) and 9 Levels of maximum difficulty (MAX):
  • The system draws an Impossible level (MAX) and the player returns a winning answer. The system runs PBS which results in a new balance consisting now in 13 Impossible levels (MAX) and 9 Easy levels (MIN), increasing the probability of an Impossible level (MAX) being drawn again.
  • The system draws an Impossible level (MAX) and the player returns an unsuccessful answer (P). The balance does not change so that the system maintains the status. The system draws an Easy level (MIN) and the player returns an unsuccessful answer. The system runs PBS which results in a new balance consisting now in 9 Impossible levels (MAX) and 13 Easy levels (MIN), increasing the probability of an Easy level (MIN) is now drawn. The system draws an Easy level (MIN) and the player returns a winning answer. The balance does not change so that the system maintains the status.
  • Process Description
  • The player starts a game session in the system;
  • The system defines an initial PDLD according to the selected game;
  • The system performs the draw for the levels of difficulty;
  • The system shows the level of difficulty drawn in the form of a game;
  • An “input” from the player is received and the system performs the corresponding test;
  • The system compares the new status (easy levels versus impossible levels) against the initial status and either maintains the same status or run PBS;
  • PBS balances the status of the system according to the received “input”.
  • Based on the explanation above, it can be said that the system of the present patent of invention stands out because it defines a first stage in which through the lottery of maximum results or the lottery of levels of difficulty, it draws (chooses) maximum results or levels of difficulty, which are shown to the user in the form that is most appropriate for each game.
  • The Probabilistic balance system, the second stage, will be carried out, if necessary, within a certain time or every certain number of plays, which may be stipulated in each of the games or more generally, and will be responsible for balancing prizes in order to maintain a balanced payout.
  • Payout
  • In order to reach a probability on the model of Lottery of maximum results or Lottery of levels of difficulty, with or without replacement, it is necessary to define an hypothesis about the player's skill level; we assume that this hypothesis is demanding and a perfect player (i.e., the one that meets the roofs raised by the maximum result or level of difficulty) is used as a reference (this requires that such player could be modeled).
  • This establishes the maximum possible skill. It is clear that the actual player will have a lower (or, at most, equal) performance than the perfect player. This makes it possible to establish a probability and to predict a payout which is approximate and close to the desired one through a simulation.
  • Another possible variant is to use accrued amounts due to the imbalance between the skill of the actual player and the perfect player, for the payment of prizes given by pure chance, so that to fulfill with the predetermined payout.
  • 4) Multi-Level Jackpot System
  • A completely different approach, included within the same operating principle, possible to use, includes the payment of the skill through a jackpot system, so that the pay table is dynamic and is based on the current level of accrual in a series of jackpots associated with the payable levels.
  • 4a) Single Multi-Level Jackpot System
  • This scheme rewards only skill.
  • The possible scores could be achieved are divided into a series of discrete levels, wherein from a certain level it is defined that the game will pay those reaching that level or a higher one.
  • The levels are defined based on the game in question, but this may be a certain trajectory, a number of items collected, reached places, full screens, score ranges, etc.
  • A jackpot for each prized level will be made, that is, for all the levels between the defined minimum prized level and the highest possible level of the game. Thus, there will be as many jackpots as paying prize levels.
  • From the amount that each player pays to play, a part is intended to the profit of the company and the rest is divided into as many parts as jackpots should be maintained. The ratio that each jackpot is provided should be set for each instance of game (they could be the same or different from each other).
  • In turn, each jackpot is divided into two parts (not necessarily equal, but in fixed ratios to each game): an immediate part and a reserve part.
  • When a player reaches a level which pays a prize, then the jackpot corresponding to that level, plus the sum of a predetermined percentage of the immediate parts of all the jackpots of levels below that, is given to him/her. For example, if levels 6-10 pay a prize and the player reaches the level 8, then he/she will receive the immediate part of the level 8 jackpot and the sum of the predefined percentages of the immediate parts of the jackpots 6 and 7.
  • When the immediate part of a jackpot is given as a prize, the reserve part is divided into the same fixed ratio, being a new immediate part and a smaller reserve part.
  • Then, if the jackpots were not arranged so that the higher the level, the bigger the jackpot, they are rearranged to make it occur. In the trivial case where the predetermined percentage that comes from the jackpots of the lower level is 100%, this rearrangement never occurs.
  • The game does not have a pay table as all the prizes are dynamically given by jackpots.
  • These jackpots may have upper limits so that to avoid the unlimited growth of them. Once a jackpot reaches the amount of its limit, the new contributions that would correspond to this will be distributed to the remaining jackpots in the same ratio that the original distribution is made, but excluding jackpots that have already reached their respective limits.
  • Also, a minimum level for each jackpot can be defined, wherein the bank would be responsible for covering the difference between the minimum level and the current level whenever the amount of the jackpot is below that threshold.
  • Dynamic adjustment of contributions to the jackpots Given the upper limit of the jackpots, it may be the case (especially in the higher levels with low frequency of occurrence) that these limits are reached and the jackpots do not grow for a long time (until the jackpot is used to pay a prize).
  • One way to avoid this is to make the contribution rates for each jackpot proportional to the differences between the upper limit of the jackpot and the current value of the jackpot, instead of being fixed predefined values, so that, as the value of the jackpot close to the limit, the contribution decreases (and increases at levels that are further from their limit).
  • A mixed technique may be used wherein the dynamic way starts to be used after the amount of the jackpot reaches a predetermined level.
  • 4b) Mixed Multi-Level Jackpot System with Chance
  • This scheme allows addition of a chance percentage for giving prizes.
  • From the amount that each player pays to play, a part is intended to the profit of the company, other part is intended for the payment of random prizes, and the rest is divided into as many parts as jackpots should be maintained. The ratio that each jackpot is provided should be set for each instance of game (they could be the same or different from each other), the same is for the ratio intended for random prizes.
  • The mechanism is the same as in the case of the single multi-level jackpot system, but in addition, at any time in the match a random prize is drawn using any type of extraction lottery or using a combinatorial probability chance.
  • These prizes are governed by the same mechanisms as a bonus or a motivator in a traditional slot machine and the payout is defined similarly. If it is desired that the whole of the ratio intended for random prizes is distributed (so that the profit of the bank comes only from the ratio already separated for this purpose), then the payout of these prizes will be adjusted at 100%.
  • The proportion allocated to the random part of the game depends on the weight given to the player's skill with regard to the chance.
  • 4c) Multi-Level Jackpot System with Random Multiplier
  • This scheme allows addition of the draw of a multiplier to any of the previous schemes of multi-level jackpots. The multiplier is applied exclusively to the part of multi-level jackpots by skill.
  • A set of possible multipliers with their frequency of occurrence (wherein normally the most frequent is 1x, equivalent to not using a multiplier) is selected. The higher multiplier in the table is taken and its value is doubled, and a z-factor is obtained (i.e., whether the higher multiplier is 10x, then the z-factor is 20). This factor is used to define the ratio between the immediate part and the reserve part from each jackpot so that the immediate part is 1/z and the reserve part is
  • z - 1 z .
  • Thus although large multipliers are obtained by drawn, the reserves will be enough to cover them.
  • It clearly arises from the above that it is an invention that defines a new combination of means designed to achieve superior results, being the same unpredictable and surprising even for an expert in the field. Consequently, besides being new, its constituent and functional design shows great inventiveness, so that it meets the conditions required by the law to be considered a patent of invention.
  • Inventive Activity
  • No interactive game that is known today proposes, even suggested, the solution that arises from the preceding paragraphs, which is why it is a proposal that in addition to be novel has a clear inventive activity.
  • Description of Application Examples
  • To realize the advantages thus briefly discussed, to which users and experts in the field can add many more, and to facilitate the understanding of the incentive system invented, preferred examples of embodiments are described below, with the express clarification that, precisely because they are examples, it is not proper to assign them an exclusive or limitative character to the scope of protection of the present patent of invention, but simply have an intention merely explicative of the basic concept underlying the same.
  • Example 1 Trivia
  • As it is well-known, Trivia is a game of questions and answers that relate to a specific subject or topic, or general culture matters.
  • There are many versions of this kind of games, from traditional board games (Trivial Pursuit, Carrera de Mente, etc.) to versions in mass media (Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?, Odol Pregunta, Jeopardy, etc.).
  • Possible Implementation
  • A possible implementation is to design a database of questions and answers of multiple-choice type, associated with a level of difficulty between 1 and 10, where 1 is very easy and 10 is virtually impossible to solve.
  • One mode can be implemented to perform ten consecutive questions where the player can choose, after answering each one, if he keeps playing or withdraws.
  • If the player answers a question incorrectly (or do not respond within predetermined 30 seconds), the player loses.
  • When the game starts, the player makes his/her bet (which can be fixed or variable) and the first question is shown. As he/she answers correctly new questions occurs.
  • If ten questions are correctly answered successively, the player will win the Jackpot.
  • Using of the Invention
  • The mechanisms of the invention are applicable at various levels in this game. You can use the Lottery of Levels of difficulty for each question. At the same time, a simple Extraction lottery (with or without replacement) could be used to draw the ratio of levels of difficulty corresponding to the series of questions shown.
  • Finally, the Probabilistic balance system could be used to increase the probability that the proportional distribution of levels of difficulty includes more or less questions of a higher level of difficulty based on the historical performance of the game (for example, if during the last time most of the people lost in the first three questions, PBS may cause the probability of the PDLD of each play includes a greater ratio of questions of level 1-3.
  • Pay Tables
  • The pay tables will be based on probabilistic study on the levels of difficulty and incorporate payments from a particular question (probably between the first and the fourth question), so that in any correct answer (possibly between the fourth and the sixth question), the player recovers his bet and, from there, gets a growing profit for each obtained answer.
  • Example 2 Memory Test
  • As it is known, the memory test is a set of chips, all of them with the same back and with different images on the front. Normally the front images are repeated in pairs.
  • The game starts with all the chips face down and the player must turn up pairs of chips. If the chips have the same front, they are removed, if not, the player should leave them upside down as he/she found them.
  • Usually two or more players play the game taking turns to choose the chips. The game ends when there are no more chips face down and the player who removed more pairs wins.
  • Possible Implementation
  • The game can be implemented for a player to play alone against the computer and can be finished when there are no more chips (traditional version) or after a certain amount of moves.
  • In the first case, it would be paid for the amount of moves (the smaller the number, the more it is paid), in the second case, it could be paid for number of pairs found.
  • The level of difficulty of the game is normally associated with the initial amount of chips and the images on the chips (it could have chips similar to each other, yet different; it could be a theme version, for example with Renaissance paintings, where the knowledge of this particular subject would be an added advantage for the player).
  • The level of difficulty could also be lowered showing more than a pair with the same image.
  • Using of the Invention
  • The Lottery of levels of difficulty can be used to define the number of repeated pairs to be shown. It could also be used to enlarge or shrink the distance on the board between both chips of a pair.
  • Finally, the game also could be implemented so that the initial position of the chips is not fully established at the beginning of the match, but it is established as the player discovers chips (obviously, once a chip is discovered, it will be fixed). Thus, the Lottery of maximum results can be used to prevent the player to find a pair in P first plays (where P can be any number less than or equal to the amount of different pairs).
  • The Probabilistic balance system can be applied to change the probability distribution of the different maximum results and/or levels of difficulty.
  • Pay Tables
  • The pay tables will depend on various parameters relating to the actual implementation of the game. One possibility is to set the maximum amount of moves in a number greater than or equal to the amount of pairs and pay by pair found.
  • Another possibility is to play up to the board is completed and pay by amount of moves (the least amount of moves, the greater the payment).
  • Example 3 Generala
  • Another known game is the so-called “Generala”, it is played using five dice and a cup. Each move consists in throwing the dice once to three times (choosing the dice to be placed again into the cup from the second throw) and completing a series of special combinations: straight (five consecutive numbers), full (two dice with a number and three with other number), poker (four dice with the same number), generala (five dice with the same number), and double-generala (a second general in the same match), and a series of moves with specific numbers (amount of 1, amount of 12, etc).
  • Usually, the special combinations have a specific value (straight: 20, full: 30, poker: 40 generala: 50, and double-generala: 100) and in the plays of specific numbers the points of the equal dice are added (if three 12 go out it scored 6 points (3×2) in the box corresponding to the number 2, if two 5 go out it scored 10 points (2×5) in the box corresponding to the number 5).
  • In total, a match has eleven moves.
  • The special combinations, if they go out in the first of the three throws, are called “served” and their score is 5 points higher than normal, except for generala which simply “wins the game.”
  • The strategy of the player is how he scores the results of each move (if the player gets four 6, it would be better to score 24 to 6 or poker of 40?, if the player does not get any combination to score, would he score 0 to generala, to a number, or to straight?
  • Possible Implementation
  • The game can be played in the traditional way in which after each move the player chooses what to score. It can also be played so that the machine shows the player what kind of play he/she must score in the next move. A global bet for a whole play or a bet for each move can be implemented.
  • Using of the Invention
  • The Lottery of maximum results can be used in order to control the go out of the dice in a match or move on the basis of such Lottery.
  • The Probabilistic balance system can be applied to change the probability distribution of the different maximum results.
  • Pay Tables
  • Payment can be made based on the traditional score of the game, either in a linear fashion or increasing the higher prizes so that they become more attractive. Payments can be implemented for reaching certain thresholds of points. Specific prizes can be implemented for special games or if they are reached at some determined point.
  • As noted above, it is possible to use the Multi-level jackpot system so that the players contributes to a series of staggered jackpots according to the level reached (when a bet for a whole match is made) and the players who reach these levels obtain the corresponding parts.
  • Examples of Forms of Payment by Jackpots
  • Scores are given according to the traditional form of the game and jackpots are generated (as an example) as follows:
  • Jackpot Prize (for those who get served generala)
  • Jackpot 4 (300 points level or more)
  • Jackpot 3 (220-299 points level)
  • Jackpot 2 (150-219 points level)
  • Jackpot 1 (100-149 points level)
  • It is defined that at each level the immediate part of the jackpot will be 40% and the reserve part of the jackpot will be 60%.
  • The amount of the bet of a player is distributed as follows:
  • Bank Profit: 10%
  • Contribution to jackpot 1: 25%
  • Contribution to jackpot 2: 20%
  • Contribution to jackpot 3: 20%
  • Contribution to jackpot 4: 15%
  • Contribution to Jackpot Prize: 10%
  • At a given time, the jackpots may be configured as follows:
  • Immediate Reserve
    Jackpot Total Jackpot Part Part
    Level 1 $2,931 $1,173 $1,758
    Level 2 $4,311 $1,725 $2,586
    Level 3 $25,315 $10,126 $15,189
    Level 4 $310,091 $124,037 $186,054
    Jackpot Prize $593,007 $237,203 $355,804
  • Alternative: To give only the immediate part of the jackpot corresponding to the level
  • Suppose that a player with this configuration of jackpots gets 178 points. Then, he/she reached level 2.
  • The player is only paid the immediate part of this jackpot ($1,725) and the reserve part ($2,586) is divided again into 40% for the immediate part and 60% for the reserve part, it is $1,035 and $1,551, respectively.
  • But this jackpot is now smaller than the level 1 jackpot and this must not occur, then the jackpots are rearranged by their amounts and the following table results:
  • Total Immediate Reserve
    Jackpot Payment Jackpot Part Part
    Level 1 $1,035 $2,586 $1,035 $1,551
    Level 2 $1,173 $2,931 $1,173 $1,758
    Level 3 $10,126 $25,315 $10,126 $15,189
    Level 4 $124,037 $310,091 $124,037 $186,054
    Jackpot $237,203 $593,007 $237,203 $355,804
    Prize
  • Now if a player gets 246 points, the immediate part of the level 3 jackpot ($25,315) corresponds to him/her; the corresponding reserve part ($15,189) is divided again into 40%/60% being the new immediate part $6,076 and the new reserve part $9,113; as this jackpot is still larger than the level 2 jackpot, the jackpots are not rearranged and the following table results:
  • Total Immediate Reserve
    Jackpot Payment Jackpot Part Part
    Level 1 $1,035 $2,586 $1,035 $1,551
    Level 2 $1,173 $2,931 $1,173 $1,758
    Level 3 $6,076 $15,189 $6,076 $9,113
    Level 4 $124,037 $310,091 $124,037 $186,054
    Jackpot $237,203 $593,007 $237,203 $355,804
    Prize
  • Note: To simplify the explanation, the constant contributions to the jackpots by all the players starting a game are not considered.
  • Alternative: To give the immediate part of the jackpot corresponding to the level plus the sum of 100% of all the jackpots in the lower levels
  • Given the same original table, it is supposed again that a player gets 178 points. The player reached Level 2.
  • Now, the player will be paid the immediately part of level 2 jackpot ($1,725) plus the immediate part of the level 1 jackpot ($1,173): $2,898 in total. The reserve parts from both jackpots are then divided into 40% /60% and the configuration of the jackpots is as follows:
  • Total Immediate Reserve
    Jackpot Payment Jackpot Part Part
    Level 1 $704 $704 $1,758 $1,054
    Level 2 $1,739 $2,586 $1,035 $1,551
    Level 3 $11,865 $25,315 $10,126 $15,189
    Level 4 $135,902 $310,091 $124,037 $186,054
    Jackpot $373,105 $593,007 $237,203 $355,804
    Prize
  • Now, if a player gets 246 points (level 3), he/she will be paid the sum of the immediate parts of the level 1, level 2, and level 3 jackpots: $11,865 in total. The reserve parts of the three jackpots are divided and the results are as follows:
  • Total Immediate Reserve
    Jackpot Payment Jackpot Part Part
    Level 1 $422 $1,054 $422 $632
    Level 2 $1,043 $1,551 $621 $930
    Level 3 $7,119 $15,189 $6,076 $9,113
    Level 4 $135,902 $310,091 $124,037 $186,054
    Jackpot $373,105 $593,007 $237,203 $355,804
    Prize
  • Note that in this alternative, it is never necessary to rearrange the jackpots because all the lower jackpots are emptied at the same time the jackpot in the right level.
  • Note: To simplify the explanation, the constant contributions to the jackpots by all the players starting a game are not considered.
  • Intermediate Alternatives
  • The two previous examples were extreme cases in which only the immediate part of the corresponding level (and 0% of the lower levels) was taken, and the immediate part of the corresponding level plus the total sum of 100% of the immediate parts of the lower levels was taken.
  • Percentages different from the percentages of the lower levels could be established and different payment scenarios could be generated.
  • Effect of the Payment Contribution of the Players
  • If it is considered that given the initial original table ten users began to play putting each $10 ($100 in total), $10 would pass to the bank profit and the rest is added to the respective jackpots in the ratio indicated at the top (Level 1: 25%; Level 2: 20%; Level 3: 20%; Level 4: 15%; Jackpot Prize: 10%), resulting a new table as follows:
  • Immediate Reserve
    Jackpot Total Jackpot Part Part
    Level 1 $2,956 $1,183 $1,773
    Level 2 $4,331 $1,733 $2,598
    Level 3 $25,335 $10,134 $15,201
    Level 4 $310,106 $124,043 $186,063
    Jackpot Prize $593,017 $237,207 $355,810
  • GLOSSARY OF TERMS
  • Terms Associated with Games
  • Game
  • Game is defined as a specific implementation of a particular game with its conditions of initiation, completion and prizes.
  • Example: “Generala by a total score of 11 moves” is a game; “Memory test of 10 different chips on a 5×4 board by number of moves to find all the pairs” is another game.
  • Match
  • A match (or a play) is defined as a specific instance of a game. The match begins with a bet and ends when the player wins, loses, or retires. Once a match is over, the player must bet again if he/she wants to start another match.
  • A complete specific run of generala is a match. A specific session of trivia (from the first question until the player loses or answers correctly the 10th question) is a match.
  • Move
  • A move is defined as a specific action of the player within a match.
  • A throw of one to three turns of generala is a move. A selection of a pair in the memory test is a move. An answer to a specific question in a trivia game is a move. Depending on how the game is defined, a move could also have a bet and a possible payment.
  • Note that there may be games where the match is by definition a single move (not only for the player quickly loses) such as the crux of one question per time or a traditional slot match.
  • Payout
  • The amount of prizes, both in various objects and money, delivered by a machine or a set of machines. The level of “payout” is measured proportionally to the amount of resources or money collected by the corresponding machines. That is, the percentage of money the game—the bank-returns to bettors. If the payout is less than 100%, then the bank does not lose money.
  • Generic Mechanisms of Chance
  • Extraction Lottery (Drum Lottery)
  • Random choice of one among n tickets (or balls) from a bag or a lottery drum. The probability of choosing any one (if all the tickets are different) is 1/n.
  • If it is desired to increase the probability of some tickets over others, it can be repeated (i.e., n tickets with different k-values where k<n are put in the bag). Probabilities are managed using various amounts.
  • Extraction Lottery with Replacement
  • Once a ticket is extracted, it is replaced into the bag. The probability of each extraction from the bag is independent of the previous event.
  • Extraction Lottery without Replacement
  • Once a ticket is extracted, it is left out of the bag and does not play more (at least until the bag is empty). The probability of extraction of each item depends on the previous extractions.
  • Extraction Lottery with Partial Replacement (Window Replacement)
  • It is a mixed system in which tickets are not replaced immediately, but after a certain time (usually when there are k tickets into the bag (with k<n). It can be implemented in different ways: once the replacement is started, it is carried out continuously (either the ticket earlier extracted or a random one), or all the tickets are replaced at once and n-k plays are expected to replace again.
  • Combinatorial Probability Chance
  • One or more items (dice, coins, spinners, wheels, etc.) which can take different values are thrown.
  • Specific Mechanisms of the Invention
  • Lottery of Maximum Results
  • It can be used for games wherein starting conditions (chips on a board, order of cards in a deck, etc) or preset control conditions (order in which chips should be shown once they are discovered, combinations of chips or dice that will appear, etc) can be defined for the development of the game, so that they ensure that a player could not exceed the maximum result (roof) when such conditions for a determined match are given.
  • In these games, a certain proportion of the maximum results are put into the bag and before each match which one will be used is selected using an extraction lottery with replacement, without replacement, or with partial replacement.
  • Once this is done, the starting conditions (or control conditions as appropriate to the specific game) fulfilling the maximum selected result are chosen (possibly using an extraction lottery with replacement, without replacement, or with partial replacement).
  • Observation: Please note that, in principle, maximum results are drawn on one side and specific matches are drawn on the other side.
  • Proportional Distribution of Maximum Results (PDMR)
  • The proportional distribution of maximum results (PDMR) is the distribution of the various maximum results there are into the bag at a given time when the lottery of maximum results is used.
  • Lottery of Levels of Difficulty
  • In games in which different levels of difficulty for either the full match or for each move can be defined, a certain proportion of each level of difficulty are put into the bag, and before the match or the move (as applicable) the level of difficulty to be used is chosen using an extraction lottery with replacement, without replacement, or with partial replacement.
  • Note that the lottery of levels of difficulty can be applied both to the match as a whole and to a single move (depending on the game in question).
  • Please note that this lottery of levels of difficulty can be combined (if the game allows it) with the lottery of maximum results. For example, a match (board) of word-search may be drawn by lottery of maximum results, so that it contains only five words, and also the level of difficulty may be drawn selecting a medium difficulty (there are boards with five words easier than others). Finally, one among the boards with 5 words of medium difficulty is selected and shown to the player.
  • Proportional Distribution of Levels of Difficulty (PDLD)
  • The proportional distribution of levels of difficulty (PDLD) is the distribution of the various levels of difficulty occurring at a given time into the bag when lottery of levels of difficulty is used.
  • Probabilistic Balance System (PBS)
  • The Probabilistic balance system (PBS) is the mechanism that dynamically modifies ratios into the bag; it could be either the maximum results bag, or the levels of difficulty bag, or both of them, based on the previous behavior.
  • PBS allows to increase (or decrease) the probabilities of winning or get good results based on what has been happening. The mechanism is general and could apply to a set of players, a set of games, or a combination of both.
  • In short, PBS allows dynamic change of the proportional distribution of maximum results, or the proportional distribution of levels of difficulty into the corresponding bags in case the effective behavior of the players differs from that expected for the distribution that was being used.

Claims (43)

1. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO RESOLUTION INTERACTIVE GAMES BY MOTOR OR INTELLECTUAL SKILLS, such as digital interactive games operable from specific terminals, video game consoles, personal computers, cell phones, digital interactive television, even when they include an initial bit of chance for their usual development, in order to incorporate the possibility to get a prize (including cash payments), besides of simply diversion wherein the incorporation comprises at least one random resource capable of sustaining a mathematical balance between winners and losers equivalent to that governing games of pure chance, keeping the condition that, for the resolution of each game, it requires the participation of the person, his/her with and his/her visual, motor, spatial, and linguistic skills, together with his/her knowledge.
2. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 1, wherein the incorporated random resource is managed by a probabilistic balance system that ensures the proper ratio between winners and losers in terms of the predetermined “payout”.
3. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 1, wherein the incorporated random resource is a lottery of maximum results including the previous drawing of the maximum result the player can reach (although he/she plays it perfectly).
4. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 3, wherein the lottery of maximum results is an extraction lottery with replacement.
5. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 3, wherein the lottery of maximum results is an extraction lottery without replacement.
6. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 3, wherein the lottery of maximum results is an extraction lottery with partial replacement.
7. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 1, wherein the incorporated random resource is a lottery of levels of difficulty that draws the level of difficulty set for each game between a maximum level (virtually impossible to overcome) and a minimum level (very easy to overcome).
8. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 7, wherein the lottery of levels of difficulty is an extraction lottery with replacement.
9. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 7, wherein the lottery of levels of difficulty is an extraction lottery without replacement.
10. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 7, wherein the lottery of levels of difficulty is an extraction lottery with partial replacement.
11. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 7, wherein the lottery of levels of difficulty is run to establish the level of difficulty of a full game.
12. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 7, wherein the lottery of levels of difficulty is run to establish the level of difficulty of each game events.
13. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 1, wherein the incorporated random resource is the combination of a lottery of maximum results and a lottery of levels of difficulty.
14. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 2, wherein the probabilistic balance system is the resource that change the ratios of maximum, minimum and intermediate levels to be drawn in a lottery of levels of difficulty, based on previous behaviors.
15. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 2, wherein the probabilistic balance system is the resource that change the ratios of maximum results which are drawn in a lottery of maximum results, based on previous behaviors.
16. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 2, wherein the probabilistic balance system is continuously applied.
17. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 2, wherein the probabilistic balance system is applied every certain time interval.
18. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 2, wherein the probabilistic balance system is applied every certain amount of moves.
19. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 3, wherein the probabilistic balance system is applied combining time intervals with amount of moves.
20. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 2, wherein the probabilistic balance system is applied to each participating player.
21. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 2, wherein the probabilistic balance system is applied to groups of participating players.
22. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 1, wherein the resource enabling to establish a predetermined payout and share out prizes proportionally to skill is a multi-level jackpot system.
23. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 2, wherein the skill is rewarded based on the single multi-level jackpot system.
24. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 22, wherein the skill is rewarded based on the mixed multi-level jackpot system with chance.
25. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 22, wherein the skill is rewarded based on the multi-level jackpot system with random multiplier.
26. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 22, wherein the jackpots that make up the system are built based on predetermined ratios.
27. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 22, wherein the jackpots that make up the system are established based on functions related to the number of prizes in each jackpot and the minimum and maximum amounts of each of them.
28. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 22, wherein each jackpot is formed with a immediate delivery ratio and a reserve ratio.
29. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 22, wherein the prizes for each level are composed by all the immediate delivery portion for that level plus the sum of a predetermined ratio of each one of the jackpots corresponding to lower levels.
30. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 1, wherein the amounts accumulated due to the imbalance between the skill of the actual player and the perfect player, which involve obtaining a payout less than the predetermined one, is used to pay prizes randomly share out so that to fulfill with the predetermined payout.
31. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 30, wherein the incorporated random resource is a combination of a lottery of maximum results and a lottery of levels of difficulty and wherein the imbalance favoring the bank is delivered to players as random prizes.
32. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 1, wherein prizes are given randomly from a fixed ratio of the contribution of the players, in addition to prizes given for the skill of the players.
33. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 1, wherein a multiplier is randomly drawn to be applied to the prize for skill.
34. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 1, wherein the prize for skill is combined to the multiplier randomly and the random prize.
35. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 34, wherein the random multiplier and the random prize are obtained by an extraction lottery without replacement.
36. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 34, wherein the random multiplier and the random prize are obtained by an extraction lottery with replacement.
37. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 34, wherein the random multiplier and the random prize are obtained by an extraction lottery with partial replacement.
38. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 34, wherein the random multiplier is obtained by an extraction lottery without replacement and the random prize is obtained by an extraction lottery with replacement.
39. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 34, wherein the random multiplier is obtained by an extraction lottery without replacement and the random prize is obtained by an extraction lottery with partial replacement.
40. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 34, wherein the random multiplier is obtained by an extraction lottery with replacement and the random prize is obtained by an extraction lottery without replacement.
41. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 34, wherein the random multiplier is obtained by an extraction lottery with replacement and the random prize is obtained by an extraction lottery with partial replacement.
42. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 34, wherein the random multiplier is obtained by an extraction lottery with partial replacement and the random prize is obtained by an extraction lottery without replacement.
43. SYSTEM FOR INCORPORATING CHANCE TO INTERACTIVE GAMES, according to claim 34, wherein the random multiplier is obtained by an extraction lottery with partial replacement and the random prize is obtained by an extraction lottery with replacement.
US12/918,813 2008-02-21 2009-02-19 System for Incorporating Chance Into Interactive Games Requiring the Application of Intellectual or Motor Skills Abandoned US20110009178A1 (en)

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