US20110000492A1 - Foam respiratory mask - Google Patents

Foam respiratory mask Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20110000492A1
US20110000492A1 US12735977 US73597709A US2011000492A1 US 20110000492 A1 US20110000492 A1 US 20110000492A1 US 12735977 US12735977 US 12735977 US 73597709 A US73597709 A US 73597709A US 2011000492 A1 US2011000492 A1 US 2011000492A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
foam
patient interface
patient
interface according
interfacing portion
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
US12735977
Inventor
Lee James VELISS
Alicia Kristianne Wells
Fiona Catherine Carroll
Gerard Michael Rummery
David Anthony Pidcock
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
ResMed Ltd
Original Assignee
ResMed Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/06Respiratory or anaesthetic masks
    • A61M16/0683Holding devices therefor
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/06Respiratory or anaesthetic masks
    • A61M16/0605Means for improving the adaptation of the mask to the patient
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/06Respiratory or anaesthetic masks
    • A61M16/0666Nasal cannulas or tubing
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M16/00Devices for influencing the respiratory system of patients by gas treatment, e.g. mouth-to-mouth respiration; Tracheal tubes
    • A61M16/06Respiratory or anaesthetic masks
    • A61M16/0605Means for improving the adaptation of the mask to the patient
    • A61M16/0611Means for improving the adaptation of the mask to the patient with a gusset portion

Abstract

A patient interface for delivering breathable gas to a patient includes a foam interfacing portion adapted to provide a nasal interface to contact under and around the patient's nose in use and including an orifice adapted to surround both the patient's nares in use, and a positioning and stabilizing structure to support the foam interfacing portion in an operative position on the patient's face. The positioning and stabilizing structure is structured to provide a range of rotational, axial, and/or lateral movement to the foam interfacing portion while maintaining a sufficient interface and resisting the application of tube drag and/or headgear tension to the foam interfacing portion.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims the benefit of Australian Provisional Application No. AU 2008901057, filed Mar. 4, 2008, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to a respiratory mask used for treatment, e.g., of Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB) with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) or Non-Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation (NIPPV). In particular, the present invention relates to a respiratory mask with a foam contacting portion. Also, the present invention relates to a respiratory mask that is comfortable, easy to use and requires little maintenance.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Typically, respiratory therapy is delivered in the form of a respiratory mask or mask system positioned between a patient and apparatus providing a supply of pressurized air or breathing gas. Mask systems in the field of the invention differ from mask systems used in other applications such as aviation and safety in particular because of their emphasis on comfort. This high level of comfort is desired because patients must sleep wearing the masks for hours, possibly every night for the rest of their lives. In addition, therapy compliance can be improved if the patient's bed partner is not adversely affected by the patient's therapy and wearing of the mask generally.
  • Mask systems typically have a highly clinical aesthetic (as will be described below). This may lead to patients becoming embarrassed about their therapy since the clinical aesthetic serves as a blatant reminder that they are ill and consequently can leave a negative perception of the patient in the mind of an observer.
  • Mask systems typically, although not always, comprise (i) a rigid or semi-rigid portion often referred to as a shell or frame, (ii) a soft, patient contacting portion often referred to as a cushion, and (iii) some form of headgear to hold the frame and cushion in position. If the mask system does include multiple components, at least some assembly and adjustment may be required, which can be difficult for patients who may suffer from lack of dexterity, etc. Further, mask systems often include a mechanism for connecting an air delivery conduit. The air delivery conduit may preferably be connected to a blower or flow generator.
  • Patient contacting portions, e.g., cushions, are typically constructed of a silicone material, but patient contacting portions including foam are known. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,429,683 (Le Mitouard) discloses a lining for a mask made of a polyurethane foam covered with skin (e.g., latex or silicone). However, skinned foam does not allow the portion in contact with the face to breathe, which can lead to skin irritation, and the sealing portion may be subject to creasing which may cause discomfort and lead to leak. The skin can also feel too hard for some patients, depending on the thickness and support structure. The skin also does not allow a high degree of local deformation and may be subject to tension transfer across its surface, which can result in shifting of the mask on the face and loss of seal/comfort.
  • A range of mask systems are known including nasal masks, nose & mouth masks, full face masks and nasal prongs, pillows, nozzles & cannulae. Masks typically cover more of the face than nasal prongs, pillows, nozzles and cannulae.
  • There is a continuous need in the art to provide mask systems with a high level of comfort and usability and a newly perceived need to provide mask systems having improved aesthetics.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • One aspect of the invention is to provide an attachable interfacing portion for a respiratory mask.
  • Another aspect of the invention is to provide a removably attachable interfacing portion for a respiratory mask.
  • In an embodiment, the respiratory mask is a nasal mask, and the interfacing portion is a foam contacting portion that is arranged in use between the nose of the patient and the mask system. The foam contacting portion provides a seal between the nares of the patient and the mask system so as to deliver pressurized gas to the patient. The mask system may include a cushion, gusset and/or frame.
  • In one form, the nasal mask system may be provided with a releasable and replaceable foam contacting portion that it connected to the mask system by at least one connector.
  • In embodiments, the foam contacting portion may be connected to the mask system (e.g., connected to the frame, decoupling element, and/or headgear) by male and female connectors, a hook and loop arrangement, a press stud arrangement, hook and loop material, a clip arrangement, and/or an adhesive. In another embodiment, the foam contacting portion may be connected or otherwise provided to the mask system using existing structure on the frame, decoupling element, and/or headgear, e.g., without connectors and/or adhesive.
  • In another form, the nasal mask system may be provided with a removable foam contacting potion that adjoins to the mask system by wrapping about or around the mask system.
  • In one form, the foam contacting portion may be retrofitted to an existing nasal mask.
  • In another form, the foam contacting portion includes a foam sleeve that that may be slidingly positioned over a support structure. The foam sleeve may be removably positionable. In one form, the foam sleeve is sock-like.
  • Another aspect of the invention relates to a patient interface for delivering breathable gas to a patient including a foam interfacing portion adapted to provide a nasal interface to contact under and around the patient's nose in use and including an orifice adapted to surround both the patient's nares in use, and a positioning and stabilizing structure to support the foam interfacing portion in an operative position on the patient's face. The positioning and stabilizing structure is structured to provide a range of rotational, axial, and/or lateral movement to the foam interfacing portion while maintaining a sufficient interface and resisting the application of tube drag and/or headgear tension to the foam interfacing portion.
  • Other aspects, features, and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which are a part of this disclosure and which illustrate, by way of example, principles of this invention.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The accompanying drawings facilitate an understanding of the various embodiments of this invention. In such drawings:
  • FIG. 1 depicts a side view of a nasal mask with a foam contacting portion in use according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 depicts a top view of the nasal mask of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 3 depicts a front view of the nasal mask of FIG. 1;
  • FIGS. 4 and 5 depict isometric views of a nasal mask with a foam contacting portion assembled according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 6 depicts a side view of the nasal mask of FIGS. 4 and 5;
  • FIG. 7 depicts a front view of the nasal mask of FIGS. 4 and 5;
  • FIG. 8 depicts a top view of the nasal mask of FIGS. 4 and 5;
  • FIG. 9 depicts a rear view of the nasal mask of FIGS. 4 and 5;
  • FIG. 10 depicts a side view of a foam contacting portion according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 11 depicts a side view of an unassembled foam contacting portion and mask system according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 12 depicts a side view of an assembled foam contacting portion and mask system according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 13 depicts front and rear views of an assembled foam contacting portion and mask system in use according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 14 depicts a top view of a foam contacting portion with an intermediate connecting structure according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIGS. 15A, 15B, 15C, and 15D depict top views of foam contacting portions according to embodiments of the present invention;
  • FIG. 16 depicts an isometric view of a foam contacting portion according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 17 depicts a rear view of the foam contacting portion of FIG. 16;
  • FIG. 18 depicts a top view of the foam contacting portion of FIG. 16;
  • FIGS. 19, 20 and 21 depict various views of a foam contacting portion reconnecting to itself about a mask system according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 22 depicts a side view of an unassembled foam contacting portion and mask system with a hook and loop connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIGS. 23 and 24 depict a side view of a hook and loop connection in assembly according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 25 depicts a rear view of a hook and loop connection in assembly according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIGS. 26, 27 and 28 depict various views of an assembled foam contacting portion and mask system with a hook and loop connection using headgear connectors according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIGS. 29 and 30 depict a side view of an unassembled foam contacting portion and mask system with a hook and loop connection using a detent according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 31 depicts a side view of an unassembled foam contacting portion and mask system with a stud connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 32 depicts a front view of an assembled foam contacting portion and mask system with a clipped connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 33 depicts a back view of an assembled foam contacting portion and mask system with a clipped connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 34 depicts a side view of an assembled foam contacting portion and mask system with a clipped connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 35 depicts a top view of an assembled foam contacting portion and mask system with a clipped connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 36 depicts a rear view of an assembled foam contacting portion and mask system with a clipped connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 37 depicts a front view of a foam contacting portion with a clip connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 38 depicts a back view of a foam contacting portion with a clip connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 39 depicts a side view of a foam contacting portion with a clip connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 40 depicts a top view of a foam contacting portion with a clip connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 41 depicts a rear view of a foam contacting portion with a clip connection according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIGS. 42 and 43 depict the naris region of a patient;
  • FIG. 44 depicts a top view of a foam contacting portion according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 45 depicts a side view of the foam contacting portion of FIG. 44;
  • FIG. 46 depicts a side view of a locking pin according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 47 depicts a side view of a mask system according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 48 depicts a side view of a mask system according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 49 depicts an isometric view of a support structure according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 50 depicts a bottom view of the support structure of FIG. 49;
  • FIG. 51 depicts a top view of the support structure of FIG. 49;
  • FIG. 52 depicts a front view of the support structure of FIG. 49;
  • FIG. 53 depicts a rear view of the support structure of FIG. 49;
  • FIG. 54 depicts a side view of the support structure of FIG. 49;
  • FIG. 55 depicts an isometric view of a mask system according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 56 depicts a top view of the mask system of FIG. 55;.
  • FIG. 57 depicts a side view of the mask system of FIG. 55;
  • FIG. 58 depicts a bottom view of the mask system of FIG. 55; and
  • FIG. 59 depicts a front view of the mask system of FIG. 55.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS
  • The following description is provided in relation to several embodiments which may share common characteristics and features. It is to be understood that one or more features of any one embodiment may be combinable with one or more features of the other embodiments. In addition, any single feature or combination of features in any of the embodiments may constitute additional embodiments.
  • In this specification, the word “comprising” is to be understood in its “open” sense, that is, in the sense of “including”, and thus not limited to its “closed” sense, that is the sense of “consisting only of”. A corresponding meaning is to be attributed to the corresponding words “comprise”, “comprised” and “comprises” where they appear.
  • The term “air” will be taken to include breathable gases, for example air with supplemental oxygen. It is also acknowledged that the positive airway pressure (PAP) devices or flow generators described herein may be designed to pump fluids other than air.
  • In broad terms, a patient interface in accordance with an embodiment of the invention may comprise three functional aspects: (i) interfacing, (ii) positioning and stabilizing, and (iii) air delivery. These three functional aspects may be constructed from one or more structural components, with a given structural component potentially fulfilling more than one function. For example, a mask frame may serve as part of a positioning and stabilizing function and allow the supply of air.
  • In an embodiment, as shown in FIGS. 1-3, the patient interface 10 may include a mask system 100, a positioning and stabilizing structure 30, and an air delivery system 130. Mask system 100 may include an interfacing portion 200. Positioning and stabilizing structure 30 may include a frame 110 and/or decoupling element 170 and/or a headgear 50 (that may include top straps 60, a back strap 70, one or more side straps 80 and rigidizers 90). Air delivery system 130 may include: an elbow 140 and a tube 150.
  • In addition, a patient interface 10 in accordance with an embodiment of the invention may perform other functions including venting of exhaled gases, decoupling of potentially seal disruptive forces and adjustment for different sized faces. Venting may be performed by different structures, e.g., such as the frame 110, the elbow 140 and/or the tube 150.
  • 1. Interfacing 1.1 Introduction
  • In an embodiment, the interfacing function is provided by a nasal cushion (or “nasal cradle”) that is placed at an entrance to the patient's nares. The nasal cushion is structured to form an interface with the nares and is shaped, oriented, sized and constructed so as provide a fit with a range of differently shaped and located nares.
  • The nasal cushion may be formed of foam (also referred to as a foam contacting portion). As shown generally in FIGS. 1-3, nasal cushion or foam contacting portion 200 may be positioned at the nares or under the nose. Foam contacting portion 200 may cushion the nares of the patient to increase comfort. Foam contacting portion 200 may also seal with the nares of the patient, e.g., if the foam is a closed cell foam. Alternatively, foam contacting portion 200 may be constructed from an open cell foam or a foam with some open cells, such that it allows a certain degree of leak while delivering sufficient pressure to the patient in the intended therapeutic effect. Instead, such a foam will allow some air to pass through the foam and leak gases into the atmosphere. This may be desirable to assist in venting.
  • In an embodiment, the foam contacting portion 200 may be maintained in position using stabilizing portions or rigidizers 90 attached to, or formed as part of headgear 50. In this form, the mask system 100 may be generally arranged per ResMed's MIRAGE SWIFT™ nasal pillows and as described in PCT Publication No. WO 2004/073778 (Gunaratnam et al), the contents of which are hereby expressly incorporated by cross-reference.
  • 1.2 Foam
  • The foam used for the foam contacting portion 200 may be the same as that disclosed in PCT Publication No. WO 2008/070929 (Veliss et al), filed 14 Dec. 2007, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. Alternatively, any suitable foam may be used, for example skinned foam.
  • In another embodiment, the cushion or foam contacting portion 200 of the mask system 100 may be the cushion disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/219,852 (Guney et al), filed 11 Jan. 2008, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • The foam contacting portion 200 may be a single piece of foam. In another form, the foam contacting portion 200 may be multiple pieces of foam joined together by any suitable means, for example gluing or insert molding.
  • As shown in the embodiment of FIGS. 4-9, the foam contacting portion 200 may have an orifice 250 for delivery of pressurized air. In one form, the orifice 250 provided to the foam contacting portion 200 will align with an orifice or aperture 175 or orifices in the decoupling element 170 (e.g., see FIGS. 11 and 12) and/or aperture 115 on frame 110 (e.g., see FIGS. 8 and 9) which is connected to elbow 140 and tube 150, so as to deliver pressurized gas to the patient. The orifice 250 or orifices provided to the foam contacting portion 200 may be the same size, smaller or larger than the aperture 175 and/or aperture 115.
  • In an embodiment, the thickness of foam contacting portion 200 may be 0.5-50 mm. For example, the thickness of foam contacting portion 200 may be 7-15 mm. In an exemplary embodiment, the thickness of foam contacting portion 200 may be 11 mm.
  • In an embodiment, the length of foam contacting portion 200 may be 10 mm-200 mm (or its largest length if it is not square). For example, the length of foam contacting portion 200 may be 40-120 mm. In an exemplary embodiment, the length of foam contacting portion 200 may be 105 mm. In an embodiment, the width of foam contacting portion 200 may be 10 mm-100 mm (or its largest width if it is not square). For example, the width of foam contacting portion 200 may be 30-70 mm. In an exemplary embodiment, the width of foam contacting portion 200 may be 50 mm.
  • As disclosed in PCT Publication No. WO 2008/070929 (Veliss et al), the foam contacting portion may be impermeable or air permeable. Air permeability may give the foam interface a unique breathability, which acts to increase the comfort at the interface with the user's nose and skin. All air permeability aspects of PCT Publication No. WO 2008/070929 (Veliss et al) are incorporated herein by reference, and all embodiments in this disclosure may contain foam that is air permeable.
  • In another embodiment, the foam contacting portion 200 may be retrofitted to existing mask designs, for example ResMed's MIRAGE SWIFT™ as disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 7,318,437 (Gunaratnam et al) and U.S. Patent Publication No. 2005/0241644 (Lynch et al), each of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • 1.3 Interface Attachment
  • Desirable features of an attachment mechanism of the foam contacting portion 200 to the positioning and stabilizing structure may include: satisfactory comfort, effective position of the interfacing portion and/or being easy to use. Due to the softness of foam, hard connecting pieces may in some forms be felt by the patient's face through the foam. Thus, attachment mechanisms that avoid such patient contact may be desired.
  • In another embodiment, the foam contacting portion 200 may be connected to a positioning and stabilizing structure such as a frame 110 and/or a decoupling element 170 or any other part of the mask system 100 by connecting elements such as hook and loop connectors, press studs, etc. Exemplary connecting elements are described below.
  • 1.3.1 Wrap
  • In an embodiment, as shown in FIG. 4-13, the foam contacting portion 200 may be connected to a mask system 100 by wrapping the foam over or around the mask system 100. The foam contacting portion 200 may be secured in its wrapped position on the mask system 100 by a male connector 300 and female connector 310 or series of connectors 300, for example see FIGS. 9, 10-11, 13, 16 and 17. In the illustrated embodiment, the male connector 300 is provided to the foam contacting portion 200 and the female connector 310 is provided to the frame 110 and/or decoupling element 170. However, it should be appreciated that the reverse arrangement is possible, i.e., male connector may be provided to the frame and/or decoupling element and the female connector may be provided to the foam contacting portion.
  • The foam contacting portion 200 may be any shape such as generally rectangular (see FIG. 15A), oval (see FIGS. 15C and 16-18) or hexagonal (see FIG. 15B). Additionally, the foam contacting portion 200 may be any irregular shape, e.g., Y-shaped (see FIG. 15D).
  • As shown in FIG. 11, the foam contacting portion 200 may have male connectors 300 that engage with opposing female connectors 310 on the mask system 100. The female connectors 310 on the mask system 100 may be on a flexible component (for example, decoupling element 170). Alternatively, the female connectors 310 on the mask system 100 may be on a less flexible component (for example, frame 110).
  • The male connectors 300 may be fixed to the foam contacting portion 200 by a range of techniques, for example glue. The female connectors 310 may be fixed to the mask system 100 by a range of techniques, for example glue. In another form, the female connectors 310 may be co-molded to the mask system 100. However, the male and female connectors may be permanently or removably attached in other suitable manners.
  • In a further embodiment, the foam contacting portion 200 may not connect to the mask system 100 by male connectors 300 on the foam contacting portion 200 and female connectors 310 on the mask system 100, e.g., instead the foam contacting portion 200 may reconnect to itself. For example, as shown in FIG. 19-21, the male connectors 300 will be placed at one end of the foam contacting portion 200 with the female connectors 310 at the other end of the foam contacting portion 200, which can then be wrapped around the mask system 100 and connected together at connection points 320.
  • In another embodiment, the foam contacting portion may include a stretchable foam structured to expand or stretch to fit over the frame, decoupling element, etc., and then return to its original shape to tightly grasp the intended surface.
  • In a further embodiment, the connection mechanism may be via a hook 330 and loop 340 system, as shown in FIGS. 22-25. The male connectors 300 on the foam contacting portion 200 may take the form of hook 330. The female connectors 310 on the mask system 100 may take the form of loop 340. The loop 340 may be an additional piece attached to the mask system 100 or it may be a hole or aperture in the mask system 100 to allow engagement of the hook 330 (e.g., see FIGS. 23-25).
  • Alternatively, the reverse arrangement is possible (i.e., loop 340 or hole on the foam contacting portion 200 and hook 330 on the mask system 100). In this form, the loop 340 may be a hole in the foam contacting portion 200, and the hook 330 on the mask system 100 may be an attached or co-molded hook 330 or may be a pre-existing structure on the mask system 100. For example, FIGS. 26-28 illustrate an embodiment in which connectors 350 on the frame 110 (e.g., headgear connecting portions for attaching headgear) extend through respective openings 340 provided to ends of the foam contacting portion. In yet another form, the hook 330 may have a detent 335 to ensure retention of the loop 340, as shown in FIGS. 29-30. The hook 330 and loop 340 may be made from a range of different materials or combination of materials, including but not limited to: wire, silicone, polycarbonate, polypropylene, TPE, polyethylene or any other suitable material.
  • In a further embodiment, the connection mechanism may be achieved by a press stud 360 as shown in FIG. 31. The male connectors 300 on the foam contacting portion 200 may take the form of a stud 360. The female connectors 310 on the mask system 100 (e.g., frame 110 or decoupling element 170) may take the form of a hole or recess 370. Alternatively, the reverse arrangement is possible (i.e., hole 370 on the foam contacting portion 200 and stud 360 on the mask system 100). The press stud 360 may be made from materials such as metals, polymers or any other suitable material.
  • In a further embodiment, as shown in FIGS. 44-47, the foam contacting portion 200 may be provided with apertures 380 that are intended to be positioned adjacent alignment holes 180 on the mask system 100. A pin or anchor 390 may be used to secure foam contacting portion 200 onto mask system 100 by inserting the anchor 390 through apertures 380 and alignment holes 180 (see FIG. 47). Anchor 390 may have one or more locking portions 395 so that once in position, the foam contacting portion 200 remains in its position on the mask system 100.
  • In a further embodiment, the foam contacting portion 200 may be wrapped onto or around the mask system 100 and connected by other type of mechanisms, including but not limited to hook and loop material (e.g., Velcro™ or magnets.
  • In a further embodiment, the wrapped foam contacting portion 200 may be permanently connected to the mask system 100, for example, by gluing, welding or co-molding. For example, the mask system 100 may be made from a foam that can be co-molded with another foam to form the foam contacting portion 200. In yet another embodiment, the foam may be a flocking foam that is provided to (e.g., sprayed onto) the frame, decoupling element, etc.
  • Exemplary benefits of the wrapped foam contacting portion 200 may include: the ease of sealing the foam contacting portion with the patient and the mask system, continuity of feel, top lip comfort, retro-fitability, intuitiveness of assembly and mass production capability. Other benefits of the wrapped foam may include: if the intention is to replace the foam contacting portion on a regular basis (e.g., daily, weekly or monthly—as disclosed in PCT Publication WO 2008/070929 (Veliss et al)), the portion that is disposed of is small compared to the mask system. This embodiment therefore minimizes waste and maximizes efficiencies around the packaging, storage and transportation of the replacement foam contacting portions.
  • 1.3.2 Clip
  • In another form, the foam contacting portion 200 may be connected to a mask system 100 by clipping the foam into the mask system 100. The foam contacting portion 200 may be secured in its clipped position on the mask system 100, e.g., by an interference fit.
  • FIGS. 32-36 show foam contacting portion 200 clipped into the mask system 100 by a clip 400. Clip 400 is slidably engaged with mask system 100 and secures by an interference fit with a portion (e.g., frame 110) of the mask system 100. In an embodiment, clip 400 may be interference fit via locking bumps 410 with step 120 on mask system 100 (see FIG. 48). In an alternative embodiment, clip 400 may be secured in place by another other means, including but not limited to: screw type mechanism. In another alternative embodiment, the clip 400 may be permanently secured to mask system 100, for example, by adhesive. In another alternative embodiment, clip 400 may be co-molded or be continuous with the mask system 100.
  • The clip 400 may be fixed to the foam contacting portion 200 permanently, for example by adhesive or co-molding. Alternatively, clip 400 may be releasably connected to foam contacting portion 200, including but not limited to: hook and loop material (e.g., Velcro™).
  • In an embodiment, clip 400 may have a support structure 420 that may have a generally elliptical cross section (e.g., see FIGS. 33, 34, 37-39, and 41). Support structure 420 may engage with mask system 100 to secure the foam contacting portion 200 in place. Support structure 420 may also assist in presenting the foam contacting structure 200 at a desirable orientation to the patient's nose. Support structure 420 may be hollow to allow the flow of pressurized gas from air delivery tube 150 to orifice 250 of foam contacting portion 200.
  • In an embodiment, clip 400 may comprise an upper surface 440 that engages with foam contacting portion 200 (e.g., see FIGS. 33, 34, 39, and 41). Upper surface 440 may be generally planar. In an exemplary embodiment, upper surface 440 may be curved to conform to the contours of the patient's face to improve comfort and seal of the mask. Upper surface 440 may be as wide as the foam contacting portion 200. Alternatively, upper surface 440 may be smaller or less wide than the foam contacting portion 200 such that the outer edge of foam contacting portion 200 is able to overhang the upper surface 440 and thus flex at its edge. This arrangement may allow the foam contacting portion to better conform to the patient's face.
  • 1.3.3 Other
  • In a further embodiment, the foam contacting portion 200 need not be connected to the mask system 100 via connecting elements. Rather, the foam contacting portion 200 may be placed on the mask system 100 by other means such as pulled over (e.g., like a sock). For example, as shown in FIGS. 55-59, contacting portion 200 may be a cylindrical or continuous portion of foam with an opening 800 to receive the frame 110 and headgear connecting portions 112. Foam contacting portion 200 may also have orifice 250 for interfacing with aperture 175 in decoupling portion 170 to allow the delivery of breathable gas to the patient. Foam contacting portion 200 may also have opening 260 for interfacing with aperture 115 of frame 110.
  • In another embodiment, the foam contacting portion 200 may be connected to an intermediate connecting structure 315 (see FIG. 14). This intermediate connecting structure 315 may connect to the foam contacting portion 200 on one side and connect to the mask system 100 on the other side. This may include but is not limited to: the foam contacting portion 200 may be connected to a piece of flexible fabric material (e.g., Breath-O-Prene™ by Accumed) which is then connected to the mask system 100 (or part(s) of the mask system 100). Alternatively, the intermediate connecting structure 315 shown in FIG. 14 may not connect to the mask system 100, instead it may wrap around the mask system and the left and right intermediate connecting structures 315 may connect to each other.
  • In a further embodiment, the foam may be fixed (e.g., using an adhesive) to an adaptor or clipping mechanism, which in turn connects via an interference fit onto the mask frame.
  • 1.4 Interface Size
  • In a further embodiment, the foam may be provided in various sizes to accommodate varying anthropometric requirements. Typical nasal pillow designs have sizes based on the nostrils of the population as these pillows seal around the nares. However, the same sizing may not be ideal for the foam contacting portion 200 as it does not seal on the edge of, or inside the nares. Instead sizing may be based on sealing against the area around the nares (as indicated by the dashed line dl around the nares in FIG. 42).
  • FIG. 42 presents a two-dimensional view of the underside of the nose and defines the areas that may be considered for sealing the nostrils. The orifice 250 on the foam contacting portion 200 should be within the bounds of the area of the nose (shown by the dashed line d2 in FIG. 42) so that the mask can sealingly engage with the nose. Should the orifice 250 be any larger than the region of the nose (dashed line d2), the mask may leak. In an embodiment, the orifice 250 should not be any smaller than the region within the nares (shown by the dashed line d1) so as to occlude the patient's airway. The orifice in the foam may encroach on the nostril openings on some noses and some degree of partial occlusion may be acceptable.
  • In a further embodiment, there may be one orifice 250 in the foam contacting portion 200. In one form, the orifice 250 in the foam contacting portion 200 may be generally trapezoidal or ‘D’ shaped as shown in FIGS. 8, and 16-18. In another form, the orifice 250 may be circular or oval (as shown in FIGS. 14 and 15A-15D), square (not shown) or any other shape fitting within the aforementioned limits.
  • In a further embodiment and referring to FIG. 43, the orifice 250 in the foam contacting portion 200 may be 15-50 mm wide (indicated in FIG. 43 by dimension 500). In an exemplary embodiment, the orifice 250 in the foam contacting portion 200 may be about 22 mm wide. In another exemplary embodiment, the orifice 250 in the foam contacting portion 200 may be about 31 mm wide. In an embodiment, the orifice 250 in the foam contacting portion 200 may be 5-30 mm high (indicated in FIG. 43 by dimension 600). In an exemplary embodiment, the orifice 250 in the foam contacting portion 200 may be about 11 mm high. In another exemplary embodiment, the orifice 250 in the foam contacting portion 200 may be about 16 mm high.
  • In a further embodiment, the orifice 250 in the foam contacting portion 200 may have an angle of 10-80° (indicated in FIG. 43 by dimension 700). In an exemplary embodiment, angle 700 is about 67° . In another exemplary embodiment, angle 700 is about 50° .
  • In a further embodiment, there may be more than one orifice 250 in the foam contacting portion 200. In one form, there may be two orifices 250, e.g., each generally oval in shape. In another form, there may be a plurality of orifices 250 (for example, 3, 4, 5, 10 or more), e.g., each that are generally round. In another form, there may be multiple orifices 250 of any shape, within the limits shown above (indicated by the dashed lines d1 and d2 in FIG. 42).
  • 2. Positioning and Stabilizing Structure 2.1 Introduction
  • A patient interface 10 provides a structure for suitable positioning, suspension and stabilizing of the interfacing portion 200 of the patient interface 10 at an entrance to the airways of the patient. This structure includes: the decoupling element 170, the frame 110 and headgear 50 with rigidizers 90. The decoupling element 170 acts as a form of suspension system or force insulation system whereby it isolates forces from one portion of the patient interface 10 from another portion of the patient interface 10. The headgear 50 and rigidizers 90 form a structure that may resist bending in one or more directions (and/or from tube drag) and yet is flexible to conform to different facial geometries, or to move in response to other potentially disruptive forces. In combination with the suspension system, a greater range of movement of a mask system in accordance with an embodiment of the invention can be accommodated without disrupting the seal than in prior art mask systems.
  • 2.2 Frame
  • A frame 110 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention as shown in FIGS. 49-54, serves a number of functions, including: a connection point to decoupling element 170, headgear rigidizers 90 and elbow 140. A given functional feature may reside in different structures. For example, the stabilizing portion of headgear 50 may be formed as part of a frame 110 either additionally or alternatively.
  • Frame 110 may connect to the elbow 140 via aperture 115, whereby the elbow clips into the aperture 115, or interfaces with the aperture 115 by any such means so as to join the elbow 140 to the frame 110. Frame 110 may be generally rectangular or any other desired shape, for example see FIGS. 49-54. Frame 110 is intended to support the decoupling element 170 and foam contacting portion 200 and connect the mask system 100 to the headgear 50, thereby securing the mask system 100 on the patient's face. Frame 110 connects to the headgear 50 by connecting portions 112, where rigidizers 90 removably connect to connecting portions 112 (e.g., see FIG. 7). Such a connection is described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/219,852 (Guney), which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. Frame 110 may be at least partially constructed from a resilient material such as silicone, polycarbonate, polypropylene, nylon, or any other desired material.
  • 2.3 Decoupling Element
  • Decoupling element 170 may be generally oval as shown in FIGS. 11 and 49-54 with orifice 175 adapted to align with opening in foam contacting portion 200. Decoupling element 170 may absorb some of the forces from the frame, headgear and tube by flexing and compressing (e.g., like a gusset or suspension system) so as to prevent misalignment of the foam contacting portion 200 with the nares of the patient. Decoupling element 170 may be formed from a flexible material such as silicone. Decoupling element 170 may be connected to frame 110 by an interference fit. Alternatively, decoupling element 170 may be permanently fixed or formed with the frame 110 by co-molding or glue. Decoupling element 170 may also be attached to the foam contacting portion. In one form, the foam contacting portion 200 is a layer of foam that is wrapped, connected, slid or otherwise positioned on a supporting structure.
  • In a further embodiment, the decoupling element 170 of the support structure may be the decoupling element disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/219,852 (Guney), which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. In an embodiment, the frame 110 of the mask system 100 may be the frame disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/219,852 (Guney).
  • The particularly soft mechanical properties of an exemplary foam (as disclosed in PCT Publication No. WO 2008/070929 (Veliss et al)) means that the foam contacting portion may be provided with support and reinforcement to perform its function with the nasal air passages. The frame 110 and decoupling element 170 may be suitable structures to provide this supporting mechanism, providing appropriate balance between shape and support for positioning the foam contacting portion 200, structural compliance and resilience for comfort on the nose (e.g., allow rotational, axial, and/or lateral movement to resist tube drag and headgear tension).
  • 2.4 Headgear
  • Headgear 50 may include three main strap sections: top straps 60, back strap 70 and side straps 80. Top straps 60 may be placed over the top of the patient's head and may be one continuous piece of material or multiple pieces of material joined together by a buckle 95 as shown in FIGS. 1-3.
  • Back strap 70 may be placed around the back of the patient's head and may be one piece of continuous material or multiple pieces of material joined together by a buckle.
  • Top strap 60 and back strap 70 may be adjusted using hook and loop fasteners (such as Velcro™) or with the buckle 95. Buckle 95 may also have a lock that prevents the top strap 60 from loosening off. Such a buckle 95 with lock is described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,318,437 (Gunaratnam et al), which is incorporate herein by reference in its entirety.
  • Side straps 80 are generally positioned on the sides of the patient's face, from above or near the ear, passing under the eyes and ending at the nose of the patient. Side straps 80 may be reinforced with rigidizers 90 that may assist in supporting the mask system 100 in position. Rigidizers 90 may be attached to side straps at: the patient contacting side of side straps 80 (not shown), within side straps 80 by co-molding or other such technique (not shown), or on the exterior non-patient contacting side of side straps 80 (see FIGS. 1 and 3). Rigidizers 90 may be connected to side straps 80 by: gluing, stitching, co-molding, or any other suitable means.
  • Side straps 80 may also include cheek supports 85 that lie generally horizontally on the cheeks of the patient, generally at the cheek bone region, to better position the mask system 100 on the face of the user. Such an arrangement is shown in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/219,852 (Guney).
  • 3. Air Delivery 3.1 Introduction
  • The mask system 100 may be connected to a supply of pressurized breathable gas to deliver therapy to the patient. The air delivery system 130 may include: an elbow 140 and a tube 150 as shown in FIGS. 1-3.
  • 3.2 Elbow
  • Elbow 140 is generally an L-shaped, hollow cylinder and may be constructed of a generally rigid material such as polycarbonate or polypropylene. Elbow 140 may also include one or more vent holes 160 (see FIG. 3) to allow exhaust gases from the patient to expel into the atmosphere. Elbow 140 may also include a one way anti-asphyxia valve.
  • In a further embodiment, the elbow 140 may be the same as that disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/219,852 (Guney).
  • 3.3 Tube
  • Tube 150 is generally a hollow, cylinder with a reinforcing member 155 (see FIGS. 1 and 3) integrally molded into tube 150. The reinforcing member 155 may include a generally helical shape so as to allow the tube 150 to flex without occluding. Tube 150 may be flexible, resilient and stretchable in a longitudinal direction.
  • Tube 150 may be constructed of a polymer or fabric, e.g., Hytrel™. Such a tube is disclosed in U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/031,407 (Henry et al), filed 26 Feb. 2008, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • Tube 150 may connect to the elbow 140 so as to deliver breathable gas to the patient through the patient interface 10. The tube 150 may connect to elbow 140 by any reasonable means, such as a clip, interference fit, etc.
  • In a further embodiment, the tube 150 may be the same as that disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/219,852 (Guney).
  • In the illustrated forms of the invention, the mask system 100 of which the foam interfacing portion forms a part is generally configured under the nose of the patient. However, in other forms, the mask system 100 may be a nasal or full-face mask, or an oro-nasal mask. For example, in one form, a foam-based under-the-nose configuration may be combined with a gel, silicone or rubber portion, for example a silicone mouth cushion.
  • While the invention has been described in connection with what are presently considered to be the most practical and preferred embodiments, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the disclosed embodiments, but on the contrary, is intended to cover various modifications and equivalent arrangements included within the spirit and scope of the invention. Also, the various embodiments described above may be implemented in conjunction with other embodiments, e.g., aspects of one embodiment may be combined with aspects of another embodiment to realize yet other embodiments. Further, each independent feature or component of any given assembly may constitute an additional embodiment. Furthermore, each individual component of any given assembly, one or more portions of an individual component of any given assembly, and various combinations of components from one or more embodiments may include one or more ornamental design features. In addition, while the invention has particular application to patients who suffer from OSA, it is to be appreciated that patients who suffer from other illnesses (e.g., congestive heart failure, diabetes, morbid obesity, stroke, bariatric surgery, etc.) can derive benefit from the above teachings. Moreover, the above teachings have applicability with patients and non-patients alike in non-medical applications.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A patient interface for delivering breathable gas to a patient, the patient interface comprising:
    a foam interfacing portion adapted to provide a nasal interface to contact under and around the patient's nose in use, and the foam interfacing portion including an orifice adapted to surround both the patient's nares in use; and
    a positioning and stabilizing structure to support the foam interfacing portion in an operative position on the patient's face, wherein the positioning and stabilizing structure is structured to provide a range of rotational, axial, and/or lateral movement to the foam interfacing portion while maintaining a sufficient interface and resisting the application of tube drag and/or headgear tension to the foam interfacing portion.
  2. 2. A patient interface according to claim 1, wherein the positioning and stabilizing structure includes a decoupling element, a frame, and/or headgear.
  3. 3. A patient interface according to claim 2, wherein the foam interfacing portion is provided to an exterior surface of the decoupling element.
  4. 4. A patient interface according to claim 2, wherein the foam interfacing portion is wrapped around the frame and the decoupling element.
  5. 5. A patient interface according to claim 4, wherein the foam interfacing portion is secured in its wrapped position by one or more connectors.
  6. 6. A patient interface according to claim 5, wherein the connectors includes a male connector and a female connector.
  7. 7. A patient interface according to claim 6, wherein the foam interfacing portion includes the male connector and the frame and/or decoupling element includes the female connector.
  8. 8. A patient interface according to claim 5, wherein the connectors includes a hook and loop arrangement.
  9. 9. A patient interface according to claim 5, wherein the connectors includes a press stud arrangement.
  10. 10. A patient interface according to claim 5, wherein the connectors includes a hook and loop material.
  11. 11. A patient interface according to claim 5, wherein the connectors includes a clip arrangement.
  12. 12. A patient interface according to claim 2, wherein the decoupling element is formed from silicone.
  13. 13. A patient interface according to claim 2, wherein the foam interfacing portion is secured in position using existing structure on the decoupling element, frame, and/or headgear.
  14. 14. A patient interface according to claim 2, wherein the orifice is structured to align with an orifice provided to the frame and/or decoupling element.
  15. 15. A patient interface according to claim 1, wherein the orifice of the foam interfacing portion is D-shaped.
  16. 16. A patient interface according to claim 1, wherein the orifice of the foam interfacing portion includes a width of about 15-50 mm.
  17. 17. A patient interface according to claim 1, wherein the orifice of the foam interfacing portion includes a height of about 5-30 mm.
  18. 18. A patient interface according to claim 1, wherein the foam interfacing portion includes a thickness of about 0.5-50 mm.
  19. 19. A patient interface according to claim 1, wherein the foam interfacing portion includes a length of about 10-200 mm and a width of about 10-100 mm.
  20. 20. A patient interface according to claim 1, wherein the foam interfacing portion is structured to form a seal with the patient's nares.
US12735977 2008-03-04 2009-02-27 Foam respiratory mask Pending US20110000492A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
AU2008901057 2008-03-04
AU2008901057 2008-03-04
PCT/AU2009/000240 WO2009108994A1 (en) 2008-03-04 2009-02-27 A foam respiratory mask

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20110000492A1 true true US20110000492A1 (en) 2011-01-06

Family

ID=41055473

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12735977 Pending US20110000492A1 (en) 2008-03-04 2009-02-27 Foam respiratory mask

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US20110000492A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2259827A4 (en)
WO (1) WO2009108994A1 (en)

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2014533185A (en) * 2011-11-15 2014-12-11 レスメド・リミテッドResMedLimited Nasal mask system
US20150182719A1 (en) * 2012-07-16 2015-07-02 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Cradle cushion having side stabilizers
US9095673B2 (en) 2008-12-15 2015-08-04 Resmed Limited Unobtrusive nasal mask
USD746436S1 (en) * 2008-01-11 2015-12-29 Redmed Limited Cushion for a mask
US20160022944A1 (en) * 2013-03-13 2016-01-28 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Subnasal sealing cushion and patient interface device employing same
USD749205S1 (en) * 2013-03-08 2016-02-09 Fresca Medical, Inc. Sleep apnea device
USD770036S1 (en) * 2013-11-27 2016-10-25 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing interface assembly
USD771239S1 (en) * 2014-05-08 2016-11-08 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Crown strap of a headgear assembly for a breathing interface
USD797921S1 (en) * 2014-11-07 2017-09-19 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing apparatus
US9872966B2 (en) 2012-04-17 2018-01-23 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Gas delivery conduit for a respiratory therapy system
USD823454S1 (en) 2017-02-23 2018-07-17 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Cushion assembly for breathing mask assembly
USD823455S1 (en) 2017-02-23 2018-07-17 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Cushion assembly for breathing mask assembly
USD824020S1 (en) 2017-02-23 2018-07-24 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Cushion assembly for breathing mask assembly
US10039894B2 (en) 2013-11-27 2018-08-07 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Headgear assembly for breathing interface

Families Citing this family (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP4570966B2 (en) 2002-09-06 2010-10-27 レスメド・リミテッドResmed Ltd Cushion for a respiratory mask assembly
EP1701759B1 (en) 2003-12-31 2015-01-21 ResMed Limited Nozzle for an oronasal patient interface
USD542912S1 (en) * 2004-05-28 2007-05-15 Resmed Limited Mask
EP1755719B1 (en) 2004-06-03 2016-07-27 ResMed Limited Cushion for a patient interface
DE202006021257U1 (en) 2005-01-12 2014-05-05 Resmed Limited Cushion for patient interface
US8397728B2 (en) 2005-10-14 2013-03-19 Resmed Limited Cushion to frame assembly mechanism
US20090126739A1 (en) 2005-10-25 2009-05-21 Resmed Limited Interchangeable Mask Assembly
US9162034B2 (en) 2006-07-28 2015-10-20 Resmed Limited Delivery of respiratory therapy
ES2458618T3 (en) 2006-07-28 2014-05-06 Resmed Limited Patient Interface
US8517023B2 (en) 2007-01-30 2013-08-27 Resmed Limited Mask system with interchangeable headgear connectors
US8869797B2 (en) 2007-04-19 2014-10-28 Resmed Limited Cushion and cushion to frame assembly mechanism for patient interface
EP3326676A1 (en) 2007-07-30 2018-05-30 Resmed Limited Patient interface
EP2708258B1 (en) 2008-03-04 2016-06-22 ResMed Ltd. Mask system
JP5518748B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2014-06-11 レスメド・リミテッドResMed Limited Interface including a foam cushion element
US8905031B2 (en) 2008-06-04 2014-12-09 Resmed Limited Patient interface systems
JP5844958B2 (en) 2008-06-04 2016-01-20 レスメド・リミテッドResMedLimited Patient interface system
JP5554334B2 (en) 2008-09-12 2014-07-23 レスメド・リミテッドResMed Limited The methods and apparatus of the foam-based interfacing structure
EP2379148B1 (en) * 2008-12-22 2016-10-19 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Respiratory interface device with flexible cover
EP2490744A1 (en) * 2009-10-23 2012-08-29 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Patient interface device with adjustable cheek support
WO2012143822A1 (en) * 2011-04-18 2012-10-26 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Adjustment mechanism for headgear for use in patient interface system
CN102903397B (en) 2011-07-29 2015-07-22 深圳光启高等理工研究院 Artificial broadband absorbing electromagnetic material
EP2679266B1 (en) 2012-06-29 2016-06-08 Air Liquide Medical Systems Coupling system for securing a nasal cushion to a respiratory mask
EP2679267A1 (en) 2012-06-29 2014-01-01 Air Liquide Medical Systems Nasal cushion with pivotable prongs for a respiratory nasal mask
CN203227175U (en) * 2012-12-10 2013-10-09 贝斯美德股份有限公司 Anti-skid mask for medical use
US10004867B2 (en) 2013-02-04 2018-06-26 Resmed Limited Respiratory apparatus
WO2015092723A1 (en) * 2013-12-18 2015-06-25 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Patient interface device fabric support sleeve
USD809131S1 (en) 2014-08-04 2018-01-30 Resmed Limited Respiratory mask assembly
US20170281894A1 (en) * 2014-09-16 2017-10-05 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Headgear for a respiratory mask

Citations (104)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US781516A (en) * 1904-02-03 1905-01-31 George N Guthrie Jr Respirator and inhaler.
US1125542A (en) * 1914-03-11 1915-01-19 Aubrey Humphries Apparatus for use in administering anesthetics.
US1445010A (en) * 1920-11-15 1923-02-13 William S Feinberg Breathing apparatus for swimmers
US2415846A (en) * 1944-10-23 1947-02-18 Randall Francis Eugene Oronasal mask
US2625155A (en) * 1950-12-11 1953-01-13 Arthur E Engelder Face mask
US2706983A (en) * 1951-09-15 1955-04-26 Willson Products Inc Flexible construction in respirator mask facepiece
US2931356A (en) * 1958-08-25 1960-04-05 Puritan Compressed Gas Corp Oxygen mask having detachable face seal cushion
US3827433A (en) * 1972-03-07 1974-08-06 Massachusetts Inst Technology Respiratory device and procedure
US3861385A (en) * 1972-08-25 1975-01-21 Edward Carden Anaesthetist{3 s ventilation
US3938614A (en) * 1972-06-20 1976-02-17 Aktiebolaget Lennartsfors Mekaniska Verkstad Cushion member for sound-proof sealing
US4006744A (en) * 1974-06-24 1977-02-08 Abbott Laboratories Locking cannula mount
US4142527A (en) * 1977-02-07 1979-03-06 Garcia Nelson C Endotracheal tube holder
US4248218A (en) * 1978-09-22 1981-02-03 Fischer Charles M Gas administration scavenging mask
US4263908A (en) * 1979-07-25 1981-04-28 Mizerak Vladimir S Nasal cannula mask
US4264743A (en) * 1979-04-23 1981-04-28 Nhk Spring Co., Ltd. Polyurethane foam sealing material and process for producing the same
US4312359A (en) * 1980-02-19 1982-01-26 Life Care Systems, Inc. Noninvasive blood pressure measuring system
US4367816A (en) * 1981-06-10 1983-01-11 Wilkes Kenneth R Tear strip for gas sterilizable package and package
US4367735A (en) * 1979-12-31 1983-01-11 Novametrix Medical Systems, Inc. Nasal cannula
US4493614A (en) * 1982-10-08 1985-01-15 Lifecare Services, Inc. Pump for a portable ventilator
US4572323A (en) * 1983-03-28 1986-02-25 Racal Safety Limited Hearing protectors
US4641647A (en) * 1985-02-08 1987-02-10 Sheryl L. Taylor Device for securing respiratory appliance during respiratory therapy
US4660555A (en) * 1984-09-21 1987-04-28 Payton Hugh W Oxygen delivery and administration system
USD293613S (en) * 1985-11-18 1988-01-05 Anesthesia Respiratory Technology, Inc. Anesthesia and respiratory face mask
US4802857A (en) * 1987-11-23 1989-02-07 Laughlin Patrick E CPR mask
US4803981A (en) * 1981-09-22 1989-02-14 Vickery Ian M Anaesthesia mask
US4811730A (en) * 1988-07-18 1989-03-14 Seitz Corporation CPR face mask and method of using same
US4899740A (en) * 1989-01-17 1990-02-13 E. D. Bullard Company Respirator system for use with a hood or face mask
US4907584A (en) * 1988-03-03 1990-03-13 Mcginnis Gerald E Respiratory mask
US4915105A (en) * 1988-10-28 1990-04-10 Lee Tien Chu Miniature respiratory apparatus
US4919128A (en) * 1988-08-26 1990-04-24 University Technologies International Inc. Nasal adaptor device and seal
US4919654A (en) * 1988-08-03 1990-04-24 Kalt Medical Corporation IV clamp with membrane
US4989599A (en) * 1989-01-26 1991-02-05 Puritan-Bennett Corporation Dual lumen cannula
US4996983A (en) * 1989-01-31 1991-03-05 Amrhein Floyd E Inhaler filtration device with housing supportable by spectacle temple
US5000173A (en) * 1987-11-19 1991-03-19 Daniel Zalkin Respiratory aid device
US5385141A (en) * 1992-04-16 1995-01-31 Siebe North, Inc. Speech diaphragm and exhalation valve
US5394568A (en) * 1993-01-28 1995-03-07 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Molded head harness
US5396885A (en) * 1992-07-31 1995-03-14 Nelson; Joseph M. Mobile air supply cart having dual tanks and connections allowing simultaneous filling of tank and delivery of air to a user
US5398676A (en) * 1993-09-30 1995-03-21 Press; Roman J. Portable emergency respirator
US5400776A (en) * 1993-07-09 1995-03-28 Proprietary Technology, Inc. Apparatus for maintaining a bend in a medical insufflation tube
US5488948A (en) * 1993-09-23 1996-02-06 Intertechnique Fast donning respiratory protection equipment
US5526806A (en) * 1995-04-04 1996-06-18 Sansoni; Jean Non-invasive nasal cannula
US5592938A (en) * 1992-06-08 1997-01-14 Respironics Inc. Mask apparatus
US5704345A (en) * 1993-11-05 1998-01-06 Resmed Limited Detection of apnea and obstruction of the airway in the respiratory system
US5707342A (en) * 1995-11-24 1998-01-13 Fuji Photo Optical Co., Ltd. Protector girdle for endoscopic insertion instrument
US5724965A (en) * 1995-06-06 1998-03-10 Respironics Inc. Nasal mask
US5921239A (en) * 1997-01-07 1999-07-13 Sunrise Medical Hhg Inc. Face mask for patient breathing
US6012455A (en) * 1996-11-14 2000-01-11 Goldstein; Joseph Nasal air delivery apparatus
US6019101A (en) * 1996-10-31 2000-02-01 Sleepnet Corporation Nasal air mask
US6026811A (en) * 1998-03-12 2000-02-22 Settle; Romaine A. Protective cover for nasal air supply hose
US6119694A (en) * 1997-07-24 2000-09-19 Respironics Georgia, Inc. Nasal mask and headgear
US6193914B1 (en) * 1995-11-30 2001-02-27 Ubertech Texas, Inc. Molding thermosetting polymers onto substrates
US6196223B1 (en) * 1998-04-10 2001-03-06 William A. Belfer Strapless respiratory facial mask for customizing to the wearer's face
US6338340B1 (en) * 1999-11-02 2002-01-15 Xcaper Industries Llc Filter mask
US20020005198A1 (en) * 1996-07-26 2002-01-17 Philip Rodney Kwok Full-face mask and mask cushion therefor
US6341606B1 (en) * 1999-05-19 2002-01-29 Mallinckrodt, Inc. Disposable respiratory mask with adhesive skin interface
US6347631B1 (en) * 1999-11-09 2002-02-19 Mallinckrodt, Inc. Cantilever device and method for breathing devices and the like
US20020029780A1 (en) * 2000-06-22 2002-03-14 Frater Robert H. Mask with gusset
US6357441B1 (en) * 1996-07-26 2002-03-19 Resmed Limited Nasal mask and mask cushion therefor
US6412847B2 (en) * 2000-04-10 2002-07-02 Webasto Vehicle Systems International Gmbh Motor vehicle with a displaceable cargo area
US6412487B1 (en) * 1997-01-31 2002-07-02 Resmed Limited Mask cushion and frame assembly
US6467483B1 (en) * 1999-07-28 2002-10-22 Respironics, Inc. Respiratory mask
US20030000526A1 (en) * 2001-03-30 2003-01-02 Fred Gobel Method for controlling a ventilator, and system therefor
US20030019495A1 (en) * 2001-05-18 2003-01-30 Palkon David J. Mask cushion and method of using same
US6530373B1 (en) * 2000-08-04 2003-03-11 Mallinckrodt Inc. Respirator mask
US6532961B1 (en) * 1999-06-18 2003-03-18 Resmed Limited Forehead support for facial mask
US6536435B1 (en) * 1999-02-22 2003-03-25 Cabot Safety Intermediate Corporation Respirator headpiece and release mechanism
US6679265B2 (en) * 2001-10-25 2004-01-20 Worldwide Medical Technologies Nasal cannula
US6679257B1 (en) * 1998-08-13 2004-01-20 Fisher & Paykel Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
USD485905S1 (en) * 2002-08-09 2004-01-27 Resmed Limited Nasal mask
US20040025882A1 (en) * 2000-07-21 2004-02-12 Stefan Madaus Holding device for a respiratory mask
US20040025885A1 (en) * 2002-08-09 2004-02-12 Payne, Charles E. Headwear for use by a sleep apnea patient
US20040045551A1 (en) * 2002-09-06 2004-03-11 Ric Investments, Inc. Patient interface with forehead support system
US6710099B2 (en) * 1999-02-02 2004-03-23 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable absorbent articles with improved adhesive for attachment to the skin to facilitate water adhesion stability with low pain level removal
US6817362B2 (en) * 2001-08-10 2004-11-16 North Safety Products Inc. Respirator
US6826783B1 (en) * 2003-01-30 2004-12-07 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Chemical/biological helmet
US20050011523A1 (en) * 2003-07-18 2005-01-20 Acoba, Llc Method and system of Individually controlling airway pressure of a patient's nares
US20050028822A1 (en) * 2003-08-08 2005-02-10 Tiara Medical Systems, Inc. Sealing nasal cannula
US20050033247A1 (en) * 2003-08-06 2005-02-10 Thompson Paul S. Nasal cannula assembly
US20050039757A1 (en) * 1999-03-13 2005-02-24 Wood Thomas J. Ventilation interface for sleep apnea therapy
US6860270B2 (en) * 2001-08-02 2005-03-01 Joseph A. Sniadach Double barrel ventilation mask for a patient
US20050051176A1 (en) * 2001-06-18 2005-03-10 Riggins Michael Allen Nasal and oral cannula apnea detection device
US20050051171A1 (en) * 2003-09-10 2005-03-10 Booth Jamie Lee Nose breathing mask for a medical patient; and method
US20050056286A1 (en) * 2003-09-17 2005-03-17 Huddart Brett John Breathable respiratory mask
US20050061326A1 (en) * 2002-08-09 2005-03-24 Payne Charles E. Headwear for use by a sleep apnea patient
US20050066976A1 (en) * 2003-08-18 2005-03-31 Wondka Anthony D. Method and device for non-invasive ventilation with nasal interface
US7011090B2 (en) * 2001-09-07 2006-03-14 Resmed Limited Elbow for mask assembly
US20060060200A1 (en) * 2004-09-21 2006-03-23 Ric Investments, Llc Cheek-mounted patient interface
US7018362B2 (en) * 2000-08-03 2006-03-28 Venetec International, Inc. Dialysis catheter anchoring system
US20060201514A1 (en) * 2003-05-02 2006-09-14 Jones Michael A Mask system
US20070023044A1 (en) * 2005-07-29 2007-02-01 Resmed Limited Life style flow generator and mask system
US7178525B2 (en) * 2004-02-06 2007-02-20 Ric Investments, Llc Patient interface assembly supported under the mandible
US7191781B2 (en) * 2003-08-05 2007-03-20 Innomed Technologies, Inc. Nasal ventilation interface and system
US20070267017A1 (en) * 2004-04-02 2007-11-22 Edwin Mcauley Alastair Breathing Assistance Apparatus
US20080004573A1 (en) * 2006-05-19 2008-01-03 Heiner Kaufmann Adapter for Affixing a Medical Appliance
US20080006277A1 (en) * 2004-06-03 2008-01-10 Resmed Limited Cushion for a Patient Interface
US7318437B2 (en) * 2003-02-21 2008-01-15 Resmed Limited Nasal assembly
US7331348B1 (en) * 2003-09-22 2008-02-19 Beevers Timothy R Infant CPAP nasal cannula seal
US20080047560A1 (en) * 2006-07-28 2008-02-28 Resmed Limited Delivery of respiratory therapy
US20080065022A1 (en) * 2006-09-08 2008-03-13 Kurt Kyvik Catheter anchor
US20080060649A1 (en) * 2006-07-28 2008-03-13 Resmed Limited Delivery of respiratory therapy
US20090044808A1 (en) * 2007-07-30 2009-02-19 Resmed Limited Patient interface
US20100000534A1 (en) * 2008-06-04 2010-01-07 Resmed Limited Patient interface systems
US20100018534A1 (en) * 2006-12-15 2010-01-28 Veliss Lee James Delivery of respiratory therapy
US7658189B2 (en) * 2003-12-31 2010-02-09 Resmed Limited Compact oronasal patient interface

Family Cites Families (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5243971A (en) * 1990-05-21 1993-09-14 The University Of Sydney Nasal mask for CPAP having ballooning/moulding seal with wearer's nose and facial contours
US20030051732A1 (en) * 2001-08-20 2003-03-20 Smith Nicholas Charles Alan Headgear for nasal masks
GB0204161D0 (en) * 2002-02-22 2002-04-10 Smiths Group Plc Mask apparatus
US7743767B2 (en) * 2002-04-23 2010-06-29 Resmed Limited Ergonomic and adjustable respiratory mask assembly with frame
US7762254B2 (en) * 2005-08-02 2010-07-27 Ric Investments, Llc Mask mounting mechanism

Patent Citations (110)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US781516A (en) * 1904-02-03 1905-01-31 George N Guthrie Jr Respirator and inhaler.
US1125542A (en) * 1914-03-11 1915-01-19 Aubrey Humphries Apparatus for use in administering anesthetics.
US1445010A (en) * 1920-11-15 1923-02-13 William S Feinberg Breathing apparatus for swimmers
US2415846A (en) * 1944-10-23 1947-02-18 Randall Francis Eugene Oronasal mask
US2625155A (en) * 1950-12-11 1953-01-13 Arthur E Engelder Face mask
US2706983A (en) * 1951-09-15 1955-04-26 Willson Products Inc Flexible construction in respirator mask facepiece
US2931356A (en) * 1958-08-25 1960-04-05 Puritan Compressed Gas Corp Oxygen mask having detachable face seal cushion
US3827433A (en) * 1972-03-07 1974-08-06 Massachusetts Inst Technology Respiratory device and procedure
US3938614A (en) * 1972-06-20 1976-02-17 Aktiebolaget Lennartsfors Mekaniska Verkstad Cushion member for sound-proof sealing
US3861385A (en) * 1972-08-25 1975-01-21 Edward Carden Anaesthetist{3 s ventilation
US4006744A (en) * 1974-06-24 1977-02-08 Abbott Laboratories Locking cannula mount
US4142527A (en) * 1977-02-07 1979-03-06 Garcia Nelson C Endotracheal tube holder
US4248218A (en) * 1978-09-22 1981-02-03 Fischer Charles M Gas administration scavenging mask
US4264743A (en) * 1979-04-23 1981-04-28 Nhk Spring Co., Ltd. Polyurethane foam sealing material and process for producing the same
US4263908A (en) * 1979-07-25 1981-04-28 Mizerak Vladimir S Nasal cannula mask
US4367735A (en) * 1979-12-31 1983-01-11 Novametrix Medical Systems, Inc. Nasal cannula
US4312359A (en) * 1980-02-19 1982-01-26 Life Care Systems, Inc. Noninvasive blood pressure measuring system
US4367816A (en) * 1981-06-10 1983-01-11 Wilkes Kenneth R Tear strip for gas sterilizable package and package
US4803981A (en) * 1981-09-22 1989-02-14 Vickery Ian M Anaesthesia mask
US4493614A (en) * 1982-10-08 1985-01-15 Lifecare Services, Inc. Pump for a portable ventilator
US4572323A (en) * 1983-03-28 1986-02-25 Racal Safety Limited Hearing protectors
US4660555A (en) * 1984-09-21 1987-04-28 Payton Hugh W Oxygen delivery and administration system
US4641647A (en) * 1985-02-08 1987-02-10 Sheryl L. Taylor Device for securing respiratory appliance during respiratory therapy
USD293613S (en) * 1985-11-18 1988-01-05 Anesthesia Respiratory Technology, Inc. Anesthesia and respiratory face mask
US5000173A (en) * 1987-11-19 1991-03-19 Daniel Zalkin Respiratory aid device
US4802857A (en) * 1987-11-23 1989-02-07 Laughlin Patrick E CPR mask
US4907584A (en) * 1988-03-03 1990-03-13 Mcginnis Gerald E Respiratory mask
US4811730A (en) * 1988-07-18 1989-03-14 Seitz Corporation CPR face mask and method of using same
US4919654A (en) * 1988-08-03 1990-04-24 Kalt Medical Corporation IV clamp with membrane
US4919128A (en) * 1988-08-26 1990-04-24 University Technologies International Inc. Nasal adaptor device and seal
US4915105A (en) * 1988-10-28 1990-04-10 Lee Tien Chu Miniature respiratory apparatus
US4899740A (en) * 1989-01-17 1990-02-13 E. D. Bullard Company Respirator system for use with a hood or face mask
US4989599A (en) * 1989-01-26 1991-02-05 Puritan-Bennett Corporation Dual lumen cannula
US4996983A (en) * 1989-01-31 1991-03-05 Amrhein Floyd E Inhaler filtration device with housing supportable by spectacle temple
USD333015S (en) * 1991-12-02 1993-02-02 Lifecare International, Inc. Nasal mask
US5385141A (en) * 1992-04-16 1995-01-31 Siebe North, Inc. Speech diaphragm and exhalation valve
US5592938A (en) * 1992-06-08 1997-01-14 Respironics Inc. Mask apparatus
US5396885A (en) * 1992-07-31 1995-03-14 Nelson; Joseph M. Mobile air supply cart having dual tanks and connections allowing simultaneous filling of tank and delivery of air to a user
US5394568A (en) * 1993-01-28 1995-03-07 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Molded head harness
US5400776A (en) * 1993-07-09 1995-03-28 Proprietary Technology, Inc. Apparatus for maintaining a bend in a medical insufflation tube
US5488948A (en) * 1993-09-23 1996-02-06 Intertechnique Fast donning respiratory protection equipment
US5398676A (en) * 1993-09-30 1995-03-21 Press; Roman J. Portable emergency respirator
US5704345A (en) * 1993-11-05 1998-01-06 Resmed Limited Detection of apnea and obstruction of the airway in the respiratory system
US5526806A (en) * 1995-04-04 1996-06-18 Sansoni; Jean Non-invasive nasal cannula
US5724965A (en) * 1995-06-06 1998-03-10 Respironics Inc. Nasal mask
US5707342A (en) * 1995-11-24 1998-01-13 Fuji Photo Optical Co., Ltd. Protector girdle for endoscopic insertion instrument
US6193914B1 (en) * 1995-11-30 2001-02-27 Ubertech Texas, Inc. Molding thermosetting polymers onto substrates
US6513526B2 (en) * 1996-07-26 2003-02-04 Resmed Limited Full-face mask and mask cushion therefor
US6357441B1 (en) * 1996-07-26 2002-03-19 Resmed Limited Nasal mask and mask cushion therefor
US6701927B2 (en) * 1996-07-26 2004-03-09 Resmed Limited Full-face mask and mask cushion therefor
US20020005198A1 (en) * 1996-07-26 2002-01-17 Philip Rodney Kwok Full-face mask and mask cushion therefor
US6019101A (en) * 1996-10-31 2000-02-01 Sleepnet Corporation Nasal air mask
US6012455A (en) * 1996-11-14 2000-01-11 Goldstein; Joseph Nasal air delivery apparatus
US5921239A (en) * 1997-01-07 1999-07-13 Sunrise Medical Hhg Inc. Face mask for patient breathing
US6412487B1 (en) * 1997-01-31 2002-07-02 Resmed Limited Mask cushion and frame assembly
US6119694A (en) * 1997-07-24 2000-09-19 Respironics Georgia, Inc. Nasal mask and headgear
US6026811A (en) * 1998-03-12 2000-02-22 Settle; Romaine A. Protective cover for nasal air supply hose
US6196223B1 (en) * 1998-04-10 2001-03-06 William A. Belfer Strapless respiratory facial mask for customizing to the wearer's face
US6679257B1 (en) * 1998-08-13 2004-01-20 Fisher & Paykel Limited Breathing assistance apparatus
US6710099B2 (en) * 1999-02-02 2004-03-23 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable absorbent articles with improved adhesive for attachment to the skin to facilitate water adhesion stability with low pain level removal
US6536435B1 (en) * 1999-02-22 2003-03-25 Cabot Safety Intermediate Corporation Respirator headpiece and release mechanism
US6997177B2 (en) * 1999-03-13 2006-02-14 Inno Med Technologies, Inc. Ventilation interface for sleep apnea therapy
US20050039757A1 (en) * 1999-03-13 2005-02-24 Wood Thomas J. Ventilation interface for sleep apnea therapy
US6341606B1 (en) * 1999-05-19 2002-01-29 Mallinckrodt, Inc. Disposable respiratory mask with adhesive skin interface
US6532961B1 (en) * 1999-06-18 2003-03-18 Resmed Limited Forehead support for facial mask
US6467483B1 (en) * 1999-07-28 2002-10-22 Respironics, Inc. Respiratory mask
US20030019496A1 (en) * 1999-07-28 2003-01-30 Respironics, Inc. Respiratory mask
US6338340B1 (en) * 1999-11-02 2002-01-15 Xcaper Industries Llc Filter mask
US6347631B1 (en) * 1999-11-09 2002-02-19 Mallinckrodt, Inc. Cantilever device and method for breathing devices and the like
US6412847B2 (en) * 2000-04-10 2002-07-02 Webasto Vehicle Systems International Gmbh Motor vehicle with a displaceable cargo area
US20020029780A1 (en) * 2000-06-22 2002-03-14 Frater Robert H. Mask with gusset
US6986352B2 (en) * 2000-06-22 2006-01-17 Resmed Limited Mask with gusset
US20040025882A1 (en) * 2000-07-21 2004-02-12 Stefan Madaus Holding device for a respiratory mask
US7018362B2 (en) * 2000-08-03 2006-03-28 Venetec International, Inc. Dialysis catheter anchoring system
US6530373B1 (en) * 2000-08-04 2003-03-11 Mallinckrodt Inc. Respirator mask
US20030000526A1 (en) * 2001-03-30 2003-01-02 Fred Gobel Method for controlling a ventilator, and system therefor
US20030019495A1 (en) * 2001-05-18 2003-01-30 Palkon David J. Mask cushion and method of using same
US20050051176A1 (en) * 2001-06-18 2005-03-10 Riggins Michael Allen Nasal and oral cannula apnea detection device
US6860270B2 (en) * 2001-08-02 2005-03-01 Joseph A. Sniadach Double barrel ventilation mask for a patient
US6817362B2 (en) * 2001-08-10 2004-11-16 North Safety Products Inc. Respirator
US7011090B2 (en) * 2001-09-07 2006-03-14 Resmed Limited Elbow for mask assembly
US6679265B2 (en) * 2001-10-25 2004-01-20 Worldwide Medical Technologies Nasal cannula
USD485905S1 (en) * 2002-08-09 2004-01-27 Resmed Limited Nasal mask
US20040025885A1 (en) * 2002-08-09 2004-02-12 Payne, Charles E. Headwear for use by a sleep apnea patient
US20050061326A1 (en) * 2002-08-09 2005-03-24 Payne Charles E. Headwear for use by a sleep apnea patient
US20040045551A1 (en) * 2002-09-06 2004-03-11 Ric Investments, Inc. Patient interface with forehead support system
US6826783B1 (en) * 2003-01-30 2004-12-07 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Chemical/biological helmet
US7318437B2 (en) * 2003-02-21 2008-01-15 Resmed Limited Nasal assembly
US20060201514A1 (en) * 2003-05-02 2006-09-14 Jones Michael A Mask system
US20050011523A1 (en) * 2003-07-18 2005-01-20 Acoba, Llc Method and system of Individually controlling airway pressure of a patient's nares
US7191781B2 (en) * 2003-08-05 2007-03-20 Innomed Technologies, Inc. Nasal ventilation interface and system
US20050033247A1 (en) * 2003-08-06 2005-02-10 Thompson Paul S. Nasal cannula assembly
US20050028822A1 (en) * 2003-08-08 2005-02-10 Tiara Medical Systems, Inc. Sealing nasal cannula
US20050066976A1 (en) * 2003-08-18 2005-03-31 Wondka Anthony D. Method and device for non-invasive ventilation with nasal interface
US20050051171A1 (en) * 2003-09-10 2005-03-10 Booth Jamie Lee Nose breathing mask for a medical patient; and method
US20050056286A1 (en) * 2003-09-17 2005-03-17 Huddart Brett John Breathable respiratory mask
US7331348B1 (en) * 2003-09-22 2008-02-19 Beevers Timothy R Infant CPAP nasal cannula seal
US7658189B2 (en) * 2003-12-31 2010-02-09 Resmed Limited Compact oronasal patient interface
US7178525B2 (en) * 2004-02-06 2007-02-20 Ric Investments, Llc Patient interface assembly supported under the mandible
US20070267017A1 (en) * 2004-04-02 2007-11-22 Edwin Mcauley Alastair Breathing Assistance Apparatus
US20080006277A1 (en) * 2004-06-03 2008-01-10 Resmed Limited Cushion for a Patient Interface
US20060060200A1 (en) * 2004-09-21 2006-03-23 Ric Investments, Llc Cheek-mounted patient interface
US20070023044A1 (en) * 2005-07-29 2007-02-01 Resmed Limited Life style flow generator and mask system
US20080004573A1 (en) * 2006-05-19 2008-01-03 Heiner Kaufmann Adapter for Affixing a Medical Appliance
US20080047560A1 (en) * 2006-07-28 2008-02-28 Resmed Limited Delivery of respiratory therapy
US20080060649A1 (en) * 2006-07-28 2008-03-13 Resmed Limited Delivery of respiratory therapy
US20080065022A1 (en) * 2006-09-08 2008-03-13 Kurt Kyvik Catheter anchor
US20100018534A1 (en) * 2006-12-15 2010-01-28 Veliss Lee James Delivery of respiratory therapy
US20090044808A1 (en) * 2007-07-30 2009-02-19 Resmed Limited Patient interface
US20100000534A1 (en) * 2008-06-04 2010-01-07 Resmed Limited Patient interface systems

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USD787662S1 (en) 2008-01-11 2017-05-23 Resmed Limited Respiratory mask
USD746436S1 (en) * 2008-01-11 2015-12-29 Redmed Limited Cushion for a mask
US9095673B2 (en) 2008-12-15 2015-08-04 Resmed Limited Unobtrusive nasal mask
JP2014533185A (en) * 2011-11-15 2014-12-11 レスメド・リミテッドResMedLimited Nasal mask system
US9872966B2 (en) 2012-04-17 2018-01-23 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Gas delivery conduit for a respiratory therapy system
US20150182719A1 (en) * 2012-07-16 2015-07-02 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Cradle cushion having side stabilizers
US9764107B2 (en) * 2012-07-16 2017-09-19 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Cradle cushion having side stabilizers
USD749205S1 (en) * 2013-03-08 2016-02-09 Fresca Medical, Inc. Sleep apnea device
US20160022944A1 (en) * 2013-03-13 2016-01-28 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Subnasal sealing cushion and patient interface device employing same
USD770036S1 (en) * 2013-11-27 2016-10-25 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing interface assembly
USD815728S1 (en) * 2013-11-27 2018-04-17 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing interface assembly
US10039894B2 (en) 2013-11-27 2018-08-07 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Headgear assembly for breathing interface
USD771239S1 (en) * 2014-05-08 2016-11-08 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Crown strap of a headgear assembly for a breathing interface
USD822194S1 (en) 2014-05-08 2018-07-03 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Headgear assembly for breathing interface
USD797921S1 (en) * 2014-11-07 2017-09-19 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Breathing apparatus
USD823454S1 (en) 2017-02-23 2018-07-17 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Cushion assembly for breathing mask assembly
USD823455S1 (en) 2017-02-23 2018-07-17 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Cushion assembly for breathing mask assembly
USD824020S1 (en) 2017-02-23 2018-07-24 Fisher & Paykel Healthcare Limited Cushion assembly for breathing mask assembly

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
WO2009108994A1 (en) 2009-09-11 application
EP2259827A1 (en) 2010-12-15 application
EP2259827A4 (en) 2014-03-05 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US7357136B2 (en) Patient interface assembly and system using same
US7779832B1 (en) Headgear for use with a patient interface device
US7874293B2 (en) Nasal assembly
US20060196511A1 (en) Headgear for noninvasive ventilation interface
US20070163594A1 (en) Patient interface device with dampening cushion
US20060060200A1 (en) Cheek-mounted patient interface
US7942150B2 (en) Nasal assembly
US7708017B2 (en) Compact oronasal patient interface
US20040065330A1 (en) Dynamic infant nasal CPAP system and method
US7188620B2 (en) Headgear
US20050066976A1 (en) Method and device for non-invasive ventilation with nasal interface
US20110056497A1 (en) Cushion for mask system
US20100319700A1 (en) Mask system
US20100307502A1 (en) Patient interface systems
US20120204881A1 (en) Pad for a mask
US8136525B2 (en) Mask system
US20070125385A1 (en) Full face respiratory mask with integrated nasal interface
US20100313891A1 (en) Respiratory mask
US20120138063A1 (en) Mask system
US20110005524A1 (en) Pad for a mask
US20080178875A1 (en) Mask system with interchangeable headgear connectors
US7178525B2 (en) Patient interface assembly supported under the mandible
US20120132209A1 (en) Patient interface systems
US20090044808A1 (en) Patient interface
US20130199537A1 (en) Mask system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: RESMED LIMITED, AUSTRALIA

Free format text: PCT CONFIRMATION OF ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNORS:VELISS, LEE JAMES;WELLS, ALICIA KRISTIANNE;CARROLL, FIONA CATHERINE;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:024910/0748

Effective date: 20090401