US20100327300A1 - Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device - Google Patents

Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100327300A1
US20100327300A1 US12/491,976 US49197609A US2010327300A1 US 20100327300 A1 US20100327300 A1 US 20100327300A1 US 49197609 A US49197609 A US 49197609A US 2010327300 A1 US2010327300 A1 US 2010327300A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
device
layer
transparent conductive
conductive material
type region
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/491,976
Inventor
John E. Epler
Aurelien J.F. David
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Lumileds LLC
Original Assignee
Koninklijke Philips NV
Lumileds LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Koninklijke Philips NV, Lumileds LLC filed Critical Koninklijke Philips NV
Priority to US12/491,976 priority Critical patent/US20100327300A1/en
Assigned to PHILIPS LUMILEDS LIGHTING COMPANY, LLC, KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS ELECTRONICS N V reassignment PHILIPS LUMILEDS LIGHTING COMPANY, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: DAVID, AURELIEN J.F., EPLER, JOHN E.
Publication of US20100327300A1 publication Critical patent/US20100327300A1/en
Assigned to KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS N.V. reassignment KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS N.V. CHANGE OF NAME (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS ELECTRONICS N.V.
Assigned to LUMILEDS LLC reassignment LUMILEDS LLC CHANGE OF NAME (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: PHILIPS LUMILEDS LIGHTING COMPANY LLC
Assigned to LUMILEDS LLC reassignment LUMILEDS LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS N.V.
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L33/00Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L33/36Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof characterised by the electrodes
    • H01L33/40Materials therefor
    • H01L33/42Transparent materials
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L33/00Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L33/36Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof characterised by the electrodes
    • H01L33/40Materials therefor
    • H01L33/405Reflective materials

Abstract

Embodiments of the invention include a semiconductor structure comprising a III-nitride light emitting layer disposed between an n-type region and a p-type region. A contact disposed on the p-type region includes a transparent conductive material in direct contact with the p-type region, a reflective metal layer, and a transparent insulating material disposed between the transparent conductive layer and the reflective metal layer. In a plurality of openings in the transparent insulating material, the transparent conductive material is in direct contact with the reflective metal layer.

Description

    FIELD OF INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to a reflective contact for a III-nitride light emitting device.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Semiconductor light-emitting devices including light emitting diodes (LEDs), resonant cavity light emitting diodes (RCLEDs), vertical cavity laser diodes (VCSELs), and edge emitting lasers are among the most efficient light sources currently available. Materials systems currently of interest in the manufacture of high-brightness light emitting devices capable of operation across the visible spectrum include Group III-V semiconductors, particularly binary, ternary, and quaternary alloys of gallium, aluminum, indium, and nitrogen, also referred to as III-nitride materials. Typically, III-nitride light emitting devices are fabricated by epitaxially growing a stack of semiconductor layers of different compositions and dopant concentrations on a sapphire, silicon carbide, III-nitride, composite, or other suitable substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), or other epitaxial techniques. The stack often includes one or more n-type layers doped with, for example, Si, formed over the substrate, one or more light emitting layers in an active region formed over the n-type layer or layers, and one or more p-type layers doped with, for example, Mg, formed over the active region. Electrical contacts are formed on the n- and p-type regions. III-nitride devices are often formed as inverted or flip chip devices, where both the n- and p-contacts formed on the same side of the semiconductor structure, and light is extracted from the side of the semiconductor structure opposite the contacts.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 6,514,782 describes III-nitride flip chip LEDs. “Because of the high resistivity of p-type III-nitride layers, LED designs employ metallization along the p-type layers to provide p-side current spreading . . . For an inverted design, using highly reflective electrode metallizations is critical to improve the extraction efficiency . . . The p electrode is the dominant factor for light extraction because it extends almost completely across the active area to provide uniform current injection into the p-n junction.
  • “The combination of low optical absorption and low contact resistivity in a manufacturable process are difficult to achieve for III-nitride devices. For example, Ag makes a good p-type Ohmic contact and is very reflective, but suffers from poor adhesion to III-nitride layers and from susceptibility to electro-migration in humid environments which can lead to catastrophic device failure. Al is reasonably reflective but does not make good Ohmic contact to p-type III-nitride materials, while other elemental metals are fairly absorbing (>25% absorption per pass in the visible wavelength regime). A possible solution is to use a multi-layer contact which includes a very thin semi-transparent Ohmic contact in conjunction with a thick reflective layer which acts as a current spreading layer. An optional barrier layer is included between the Ohmic layer and the reflective layer. One example of a p-type multi-layer contact is Au/NiOx/Al. Typical thicknesses for this metallization scheme are 30/100/1500 Å. Similarly, a suitable n-type GaN multi-layer contact is Ti/Al with typical thicknesses of 30/1500 Å. Since the p-electrode reflectivity is a dominant factor in extraction efficiency, it must not be compromised in designing for manufacturability.”
  • SUMMARY
  • It is an object of the present invention to include in a reflective contact a thin, transparent current spreading layer and a transparent insulating material. In some embodiments, reflectivity of the contact may be improved over a device with a reflective metal contact.
  • Embodiments of the invention include a semiconductor structure comprising a III-nitride light emitting layer disposed between an n-type region and a p-type region. A contact disposed on the p-type region includes a transparent conductive material in direct contact with the p-type region, a reflective metal layer, and a transparent insulating material disposed between the transparent conductive layer and the reflective metal layer. In a plurality of openings in the transparent insulating material, the transparent conductive material is in direct contact with the reflective metal layer.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a contact including a conductive layer, a transparent insulating or low-loss layer, and a reflective layer, formed on a III-nitride semiconductor structure.
  • FIG. 2 is a plan view of a portion of a contact including a low-loss layer with openings.
  • FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of an LED bonded to a mount.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a contact with openings in the transparent insulating material that extend into the transparent conductive material, and have angled sidewalls.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The performance of an LED may be improved by reducing optical loss associated with the p-contact, without increasing the forward voltage Vf required to forward bias the LED. A contact including a dielectric layer, which reflects by total internal reflection, may be more reflective than a contact where the sole reflective material is a metal reflector, such as the contacts described above in U.S. Pat. No. 6,514,782.
  • A conductive dielectric layer such as indium tin oxide (ITO) may be disposed between the p-type material and the silver p-contact. In such a bilayer, the ITO need not contribute to current spreading and the thickness may be optimized for highest reflectance; for example, the ITO may be 200 nm thick. However, ITO has an index of refraction higher than optimum for optical reflectivity and may absorb a significant amount of light at thicknesses required for high conductivity.
  • Alternatively, a nonconductive dielectric such as SiO2 may be disposed between the p-type material and the silver p-contact. Openings must be formed in the nonconductive dielectric to electrically connect the silver to the p-type material. The openings must be spaced close enough together to prevent current crowding in the poorly conductive p-type material. For example, the openings may be sub-micron size, which may require expensive and difficult techniques such as holographic or e-beam exposure of resist, or the use of a nano-imprinting tool. In addition, etching openings in the dielectric may damage the exposed p-type material, which may reduce the efficiency of an Ohmic contact formed on the damaged material.
  • In embodiments of the invention, the p-contact of a III-nitride LED includes three layers: a thin conductive layer in direct contact with the p-type semiconductor, a low-optical-loss dielectric layer disposed over the thin conductive layer with openings to facilitate electrical contact, and a reflective metal layer over the transparent dielectric layer.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a portion of a III-nitride device according to embodiments of the invention. In FIG. 1, a semiconductor structure including an n-type region, a light emitting or active region, and a p-type region is grown over a growth substrate (not shown in FIG. 1), which may be any suitable growth substrate and which is typically sapphire or SiC. An n-type region 22 is grown first over the substrate. N-type region 22 may include multiple layers of different compositions and dopant concentration including, for example, preparation layers such as buffer layers or nucleation layers, which may be n-type or not intentionally doped, release layers designed to facilitate later release of the growth substrate or thinning of the semiconductor structure after substrate removal, and n- or even p-type device layers designed for particular optical or electrical properties desirable for the light emitting region to efficiently emit light.
  • A light emitting or active region 24 is grown over n-type region 22. Examples of suitable light emitting regions include a single thick or thin light emitting layer, or a multiple quantum well light emitting region including multiple thin or thick quantum well light emitting layers separated by barrier layers. For example, a multiple quantum well light emitting region may include multiple light emitting layers, each with a thickness of 25 Å or less, separated by barriers, each with a thickness of 100 Å or less. In some embodiments, the thickness of each of the light emitting layers in the device is thicker than 50 Å.
  • A p-type region 26 is grown over light emitting region 24. Like the n-type region, the p-type region may include multiple layers of different composition, thickness, and dopant concentration, including layers that are not intentionally doped, or n-type layers.
  • A thin conductive layer 28 is formed over p-type region 26. Thin conductive layer 28 may be, for example, silver, aluminum, or a conductive dielectric such as ITO, nickel oxide, ZnO, or any other suitable semitransparent conductive material. A silver conductive layer 28 may be, for example, between 0.5 and 2 nm thick in some embodiments, between 2 and 8 nm thick in some embodiments, and 10 nm thick in some embodiments. A conductive layer 28 that is a transparent conductive oxide may be thicker. For example, the resistivity of an ITO conductive layer 28 may be 100 times greater than silver, requiring an ITO conductive layer 28 that is 100 times thicker than a silver conductive layer 28. To spread current several microns may require, for example, an ITO conductive layer 28 that is 200 nm thick. The material and thickness of conductive layer 28 may be selected such that current spreads in conductive layer 28 for 10 microns, for example.
  • In some embodiments, thin conductive layer 28 is formed as a group of small regions, rather than as a single, uninterrupted, continuous layer. In some embodiments, a thin layer of silver is evaporated on the surface of the p-type region 26, then annealed. During the anneal, the silver tends to agglomerate from a continuous, planar layer into a network of thicker, discrete regions. For example, ten Angstroms of silver may be evaporated on to the p-type region 26. After annealing, the silver regions may be, for example, about 200 Angstroms long and about 200 Angstroms thick. The silver regions may be, for example, up to 1 micron apart in some embodiments and up to 500 nm apart in some embodiments, such that less than 10% of the surface of the p-type region 26 is covered with silver in some embodiments. In some embodiments, a planar thin conductive layer 28 may be formed, then etched to form a group of small regions. In some embodiments, during silver deposition the structure is heated to encourage migration and agglomeration of silver into a network of thicker, discrete regions.
  • A low optical loss material 30 is formed over conductive layer 28. Low-loss material 30 may be, for example, SiOx, SiNx, MgF2, Al2O3, or any other suitable highly transparent dielectric that is reflective, manufacturable, and readily adheres to the conductive layer 28. In some embodiments, low-loss material 30 has a low index of refraction, so the change in index of refraction between the low-loss material and the conductive layer 28 and p-type region 26 is as large as possible. Low-loss material 30 may be, for example, between 200 and 500 nm thick in some embodiments, between 250 and 350 nm thick in some embodiments, and 250 nm thick in some embodiments.
  • Openings 32 are then formed in the low-loss material 30, for example by conventional masking and etching steps. In some embodiments, endpoint detection is used to avoid etching the underlying conductive layer 28. In some embodiments, the low-loss material 30 is etched to near the endpoint with a dry etch, then a wet etch is used to etch the remaining thickness. FIG. 2 is a plan view of the structure of FIG. 1 after forming openings 32 in low-loss material 30. Though round openings formed in a triangular lattice are illustrated, any suitably-shaped openings in any suitable lattice may be used. Openings 32 may be, for example, less than 100 microns in diameter in some embodiments, between 1 and 5 microns in diameter in some embodiments, between 2 and 15 microns in diameter in some embodiments, between 2 and 4 microns in diameter in some embodiments, and 3 microns in diameter in some embodiments. The openings may be spaced, for example, between 20 and 200 microns apart, on centers between 5 and 20 microns apart in some embodiments, between 10 and 15 microns apart in some embodiments, 6 microns apart in some embodiments, and 12 microns apart in some embodiments.
  • The size and spacing of the openings may be related to the resistivity and thickness of conductive layer 28. For example, a 150 nm thick layer of ITO has about the same sheet resistance as a 2 micron thick layer of n-GaN. In a device with a conventional contact formed on n-GaN, nearest neighbor n-contacts may be spaced about 150 microns apart. Accordingly, in a device according to embodiments of the invention with a 150 nm thick ITO conductive layer 28, the distance between openings 32 may be 150 microns. In a device according to embodiments of the invention with a 30 nm thick ITO conductive layer 28, the distance between openings 32 may be 30 microns. If the openings 32 are 3 microns in diameter spaced 30 microns apart, the surface coverage of openings 32 is about 1%.
  • The thickness of conductive layer 28 and low-loss material 30 depend on the individual materials used, as well as on the combination of materials.
  • A reflective conductive layer 34 is formed over the remaining low-loss material 30 and openings 32. Reflective layer 34 electrically connects to the p-type region 26 through openings 32 and conductive layer 28. Reflective layer 34 may be, for example, silver. Reflective layer 34 may be a multi-layer stack and may include, for example, one or more reflective metals, on or more Ohmic contact metals, and one or more guard metals or other guard materials. One example of a reflective layer 34 is a stack of silver, nickel, silver, then a guard metal such as TiWN, which may prevent or reduce electromigration of the silver.
  • The light extraction and hence performance of the LED may be improved by adding lossless scattering to the contact. In some embodiments, p-type region 26 is grown under conditions which create a rough surface, which may improve scattering over a smooth surface. Conductive layer 28 may be formed over the rough surface as a conformal layer, which would therefore also have a rough surface. A transparent low-loss layer 30 is then formed, for example by spin-coating, to cover the roughness and create a smooth surface. Openings are formed in the low-loss material and a reflective layer 34 is then formed, as described above. The roughness of the p-type region 26/conductive layer 28 interface may cause increased loss as compared to a smooth interface, but increased extraction may result in an overall improved performance. In some embodiments, scattering is increased by making low-loss layer 30 and/or conductive layer 28 porous or columnar in structure, for example by forming an ITO conductive layer 28 and/or a SiOx low-loss layer by oblique-angle deposition. The increase in porosity is accompanied by a reduction in refractive index which increases the reflectance of the contact. The porosity may be controlled by controlling the deposition angle, as described in “Quantification of porosity and deposition rate of nanoporous films grown by oblique-angle deposition,” Applied Physics Letters 93, 101914 (2008), which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • In one example, an Al-doped ZnO conductive layer 28 is applied to a rough p-type GaN layer grown as the top layer of the p-type region 26. A low index SiOx layer 30 is spin-coated over the ZnO to provide scattering at the ZnO/SiOx interface and to planarize the rough ZnO layer. Openings 32 are formed, then a silver reflective layer 34 is deposited.
  • In some embodiments, low-loss material 30 is a multi-layer dielectric stack. The layers closest to the conductive layer 28 and the reflective layer 34 are chosen for good adhesion. The inner layers are chosen for minimum refractive index. Multiple layers may be formed, for example, in a single processing step. A multi-layer low-loss structure 30 may be more reliable and more reflective than a single layer. In addition, the difference in index of refraction between the layers in a multi-layer stack may provide scattering, particularly when a multi-layer stack is applied to a rough surface, as described above.
  • In some embodiments, the etch depth of the openings 32 in the low-loss material 30 is increased to include removal of some of the underlying conductive layer 28, as illustrated in FIG. 4, which may improve the electrical contact and may increase scattering. In some embodiments, the sidewalls 33 of openings 32 are angled to provide for more optimal scattering of high angle light towards the extraction surface (i.e. the surface of the device opposite reflective material 34). The sidewall angle θ may be, for example, between 5 and 50 degrees with respect to the surface normal.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates an LED 42 connected to a mount 40. Before or after forming the p-contact 48, which includes conductive layer 28, low loss material 30 and reflective material 34, as described above, portions of the n-type region are exposed by etching away portions of the p-type region and the light emitting region. The semiconductor structure, including the n-type region 22, light emitting region 24, and p-type region 26 is represented by structure 44 in FIG. 3. N-contact 46 is formed on the exposed portions of the n-type region.
  • LED 42 is bonded to mount 40 by n- and p-interconnects 56 and 58. Interconnects 56 and 58 may be any suitable material, such as solder or other metals, and may include multiple layers of materials. In some embodiments, interconnects include at least one gold layer and the bond between LED 42 and mount 40 is formed by ultrasonic bonding.
  • During ultrasonic bonding, the LED die 42 is positioned on a mount 40. A bond head is positioned on the top surface of the LED die, often the top surface of a sapphire growth substrate in the case of a III-nitride device grown on sapphire. The bond head is connected to an ultrasonic transducer. The ultrasonic transducer may be, for example, a stack of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) layers. When a voltage is applied to the transducer at a frequency that causes the system to resonate harmonically (often a frequency on the order of tens or hundreds of kHz), the transducer begins to vibrate, which in turn causes the bond head and the LED die to vibrate, often at an amplitude on the order of microns. The vibration causes atoms in the metal lattice of a structure on the LED 42 to interdiffuse with a structure on mount 40, resulting in a metallurgically continuous joint. Heat and/or pressure may be added during bonding.
  • After bonding LED die 42 to mount 40, the growth substrate on which the semiconductor layers were grown may be removed, for example by laser lift off, etching, or any other technique suitable to a particular growth substrate. After removing the growth substrate, the semiconductor structure may be thinned, for example by photoelectrochemical etching, and/or the surface may be roughened or patterned, for example with a photonic crystal structure. A lens, wavelength converting material, or other structure known in the art may be disposed over LED 42 after substrate removal.
  • Having described the invention in detail, those skilled in the art will appreciate that, given the present disclosure, modifications may be made to the invention without departing from the spirit of the inventive concept described herein. Therefore, it is not intended that the scope of the invention be limited to the specific embodiments illustrated and described.

Claims (17)

1. A device comprising:
a semiconductor structure comprising a III-nitride light emitting layer disposed between an n-type region and a p-type region;
a contact disposed on the p-type region, the contact comprising:
a transparent conductive material in direct contact with the p-type region;
a reflective metal layer;
an transparent insulating material disposed between the transparent conductive layer and the reflective metal layer; and
a plurality of openings in the transparent insulating material, wherein the transparent conductive material is in direct contact with the reflective metal layer in the plurality of openings.
2. The device of claim 1 wherein the transparent conductive material is one of silver and aluminum.
3. The device of claim 2 wherein the transparent conductive material comprises a plurality of discrete regions that occupy less than 10% of an area of a surface of the p-type region on which the contact is disposed.
4. The device of claim 1 wherein the transparent conductive material has a thickness between 0.5 and 10 nanometers.
5. The device of claim 1 wherein the transparent conductive material is an oxide and has a thickness between 30 and 1000 nanometers.
6. The device of claim 1 wherein the transparent conductive material is one of indium tin oxide, nickel oxide, and ZnO.
7. The device of claim 1 wherein the transparent insulating material is one of SiOx, SiNx, MgF2, and Al2O3.
8. The device of claim 1 wherein the transparent insulating material has a thickness between 200 and 500 nm.
9. The device of claim 1 wherein the openings have a width between two and fifteen microns.
10. The device of claim 1 wherein the openings are spaced between 20 and 200 microns apart.
11. The device of claim 1 wherein the transparent insulating material comprises a multi-layer stack.
12. The device of claim 11 wherein:
a first layer in the multi-layer stack is in direct contact with the transparent conductive material;
a second layer in the multi-layer stack is in direct contact with the reflective metal layer; and
a third layer disposed between the first and second layers has a lower index of refraction than the first and second layers.
13. The device of claim 1 wherein the reflective metal layer comprises silver.
14. The device of claim 1 wherein a surface of the p-type region in direct contact with the transparent conductive material is rough.
15. The device of claim 1 wherein the openings extend into the transparent conductive material.
16. The device of claim 1 wherein the openings have a sidewall angle between 5 and 50 degrees with respect to a normal to a top surface of the reflective metal layer.
17. The device of claim 1 wherein at least one of the transparent insulating material and the transparent conductive material is porous.
US12/491,976 2009-06-25 2009-06-25 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device Abandoned US20100327300A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/491,976 US20100327300A1 (en) 2009-06-25 2009-06-25 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device

Applications Claiming Priority (10)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/491,976 US20100327300A1 (en) 2009-06-25 2009-06-25 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device
TW099116193A TWI575773B (en) 2009-06-25 2010-05-20 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device
CN201080028617.4A CN102804417B (en) 2009-06-25 2010-05-21 For contacting the semiconductor light emitting device
PCT/IB2010/052277 WO2010150114A2 (en) 2009-06-25 2010-05-21 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device
CN201610406316.XA CN106057987A (en) 2009-06-25 2010-05-21 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device
KR1020127001895A KR20120101324A (en) 2009-06-25 2010-05-21 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device
EP10726287.5A EP2446486B1 (en) 2009-06-25 2010-05-21 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device
JP2012516887A JP2012531733A (en) 2009-06-25 2010-05-21 Contacts for semiconductor light emitting devices
US13/448,700 US20120199863A1 (en) 2009-06-25 2012-04-17 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device
JP2015187919A JP6155310B2 (en) 2009-06-25 2015-09-25 Contacts for semiconductor light emitting devices

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/448,700 Division US20120199863A1 (en) 2009-06-25 2012-04-17 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100327300A1 true US20100327300A1 (en) 2010-12-30

Family

ID=43379711

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/491,976 Abandoned US20100327300A1 (en) 2009-06-25 2009-06-25 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device
US13/448,700 Pending US20120199863A1 (en) 2009-06-25 2012-04-17 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/448,700 Pending US20120199863A1 (en) 2009-06-25 2012-04-17 Contact for a semiconductor light emitting device

Country Status (7)

Country Link
US (2) US20100327300A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2446486B1 (en)
JP (2) JP2012531733A (en)
KR (1) KR20120101324A (en)
CN (2) CN106057987A (en)
TW (1) TWI575773B (en)
WO (1) WO2010150114A2 (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110121332A1 (en) * 2009-11-23 2011-05-26 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Iii-v light emitting device with thin n-type region
US20120049154A1 (en) * 2010-08-31 2012-03-01 Micron Technology, Inc. Solid state lighting devices with point contacts and associated methods of manufacturing
US20130256702A1 (en) * 2012-03-30 2013-10-03 Chih-Jung Liu Light emitting diode with high light extraction efficiency and method for manufacturing the same
US20150093500A1 (en) * 2013-09-30 2015-04-02 Intermolecular, Inc. Corrosion-Resistant Silver Coatings with Improved Adhesion to III-V Materials
US9287449B2 (en) 2013-01-09 2016-03-15 Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc. Ultraviolet reflective rough adhesive contact
US9653570B2 (en) * 2015-02-12 2017-05-16 International Business Machines Corporation Junction interlayer dielectric for reducing leakage current in semiconductor devices
US9768357B2 (en) 2013-01-09 2017-09-19 Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc. Ultraviolet reflective rough adhesive contact
US10276749B2 (en) 2013-01-09 2019-04-30 Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc. Ultraviolet reflective rough adhesive contact

Families Citing this family (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE102010049186A1 (en) * 2010-10-21 2012-04-26 Osram Opto Semiconductors Gmbh Optoelectronic component and method for its production
KR102000271B1 (en) * 2017-04-19 2019-10-01 전북대학교산학협력단 PREPARING METHOD OF GaN TYPE LIGHT EMITTING DIODE AND GaN TYPE LIGHT EMITTING DIODE PREPARED THEREFROM
CN107845711A (en) * 2017-11-03 2018-03-27 江苏新广联半导体有限公司 LED flip chip of motor current extension uniformity and preparation method thereof

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5917202A (en) * 1995-12-21 1999-06-29 Hewlett-Packard Company Highly reflective contacts for light emitting semiconductor devices
US6194743B1 (en) * 1997-12-15 2001-02-27 Agilent Technologies, Inc. Nitride semiconductor light emitting device having a silver p-contact
US6514782B1 (en) * 1999-12-22 2003-02-04 Lumileds Lighting, U.S., Llc Method of making a III-nitride light-emitting device with increased light generating capability
US6794690B2 (en) * 2001-09-18 2004-09-21 Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd. Group III nitride compound semiconductor light-emitting element
US7326967B2 (en) * 2004-07-12 2008-02-05 Epistar Corporation Light emitting diode having an omnidirectional reflector including a transparent conductive layer
US7982236B2 (en) * 2007-02-01 2011-07-19 Nichia Corporation Semiconductor light emitting element

Family Cites Families (78)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5045408A (en) * 1986-09-19 1991-09-03 University Of California Thermodynamically stabilized conductor/compound semiconductor interfaces
JP3620926B2 (en) * 1995-06-16 2005-02-16 株式会社豊田中央研究所 p conductivity type group III nitride semiconductor electrode and the electrode forming method and device
JP3384700B2 (en) * 1996-10-22 2003-03-10 株式会社豊田中央研究所 Gallium nitride-based compound semiconductor light emitting device and manufacturing method thereof
US6291840B1 (en) * 1996-11-29 2001-09-18 Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd. GaN related compound semiconductor light-emitting device
JP4118371B2 (en) * 1997-12-15 2008-07-16 フィリップス ルミレッズ ライティング カンパニー リミテッド ライアビリティ カンパニー Nitride semiconductor light emitting device having silver as electrode, method for manufacturing the same, and semiconductor optoelectronic device
US6291839B1 (en) * 1998-09-11 2001-09-18 Lulileds Lighting, U.S. Llc Light emitting device having a finely-patterned reflective contact
JP3525061B2 (en) * 1998-09-25 2004-05-10 株式会社東芝 The method of manufacturing a semiconductor light emitting element
JP3685306B2 (en) * 1999-03-03 2005-08-17 パイオニア株式会社 Two-wavelength semiconductor laser device and a manufacturing method thereof
US6693352B1 (en) * 2000-06-05 2004-02-17 Emitronix Inc. Contact structure for group III-V semiconductor devices and method of producing the same
TW472400B (en) * 2000-06-23 2002-01-11 United Epitaxy Co Ltd Method for roughing semiconductor device surface to increase the external quantum efficiency
JP4024994B2 (en) * 2000-06-30 2007-12-19 株式会社東芝 Semiconductor light emitting device
US6946685B1 (en) * 2000-08-31 2005-09-20 Lumileds Lighting U.S., Llc Light emitting semiconductor method and device
TW579608B (en) * 2000-11-24 2004-03-11 High Link Technology Corp Method and structure of forming electrode for light emitting device
JP2002335048A (en) * 2001-03-06 2002-11-22 Sony Corp Nitride semiconductor laser element and its manufacturing method
US6547249B2 (en) * 2001-03-29 2003-04-15 Lumileds Lighting U.S., Llc Monolithic series/parallel led arrays formed on highly resistive substrates
CN1217425C (en) * 2001-07-12 2005-08-31 日亚化学工业株式会社 Semiconductor device
AU2003207287B2 (en) * 2002-01-28 2007-12-13 Nichia Corporation Nitride semiconductor device having support substrate and its manufacturing method
TW513821B (en) * 2002-02-01 2002-12-11 Hsiu-Hen Chang Electrode structure of LED and manufacturing the same
EP2234183A3 (en) * 2002-11-16 2011-08-17 LG Innotek Co., Ltd. Light emitting device and fabrication method thereof
TWI303909B (en) * 2002-11-25 2008-12-01 Nichia Corp Ridge waveguide semiconductor laser diode
TW591811B (en) * 2003-01-02 2004-06-11 Epitech Technology Corp Ltd Color mixing light emitting diode
EP1450414A3 (en) * 2003-02-19 2008-12-24 Nichia Corporation Nitride semiconductor device
US6990132B2 (en) * 2003-03-20 2006-01-24 Xerox Corporation Laser diode with metal-oxide upper cladding layer
JP4130163B2 (en) * 2003-09-29 2008-08-06 三洋電機株式会社 Semiconductor light emitting device
US20050072968A1 (en) * 2003-10-06 2005-04-07 Tzong-Liang Tsai Light-emitting device
US20050156183A1 (en) * 2003-10-06 2005-07-21 Tzong-Liang Tsai Light-emitting device having reflecting layer formed under electrode
EP1700344B1 (en) * 2003-12-24 2016-03-02 Panasonic Intellectual Property Management Co., Ltd. Semiconductor light emitting device and lighting module
JP4604488B2 (en) * 2003-12-26 2011-01-05 日亜化学工業株式会社 Nitride semiconductor light emitting device and manufacturing method thereof
KR100586943B1 (en) * 2003-12-26 2006-06-07 삼성전기주식회사 Method of Producing GaN Based Semiconductor Light Emitting Diode
US7173311B2 (en) * 2004-02-02 2007-02-06 Sanken Electric Co., Ltd. Light-emitting semiconductor device with a built-in overvoltage protector
KR100634503B1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2006-10-16 광주과학기술원 Light emitting device and method of manufacturing thereof
KR100631840B1 (en) * 2004-06-03 2006-10-09 삼성전기주식회사 Flip-chip nitride semiconductor light-emitting device
US7279751B2 (en) * 2004-06-21 2007-10-09 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Semiconductor laser device and manufacturing method thereof
WO2006006555A1 (en) * 2004-07-12 2006-01-19 Rohm Co., Ltd. Semiconductor light-emitting device
US7872271B2 (en) * 2004-07-12 2011-01-18 Samsung Led Co., Ltd. Flip-chip light emitting diodes and method of manufacturing thereof
US7557380B2 (en) * 2004-07-27 2009-07-07 Cree, Inc. Light emitting devices having a reflective bond pad and methods of fabricating light emitting devices having reflective bond pads
KR100896564B1 (en) * 2004-08-31 2009-05-07 광주과학기술원 Reflective electrode and compound semiconductor light emitting device including the same
US7512167B2 (en) * 2004-09-24 2009-03-31 Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd. Integrated semiconductor laser device and method of fabricating the same
DE102005045589A1 (en) * 2004-09-24 2006-04-06 Epistar Corp. liquid crystal display
US7291865B2 (en) * 2004-09-29 2007-11-06 Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd. Light-emitting semiconductor device
US7679097B2 (en) * 2004-10-21 2010-03-16 Nichia Corporation Semiconductor light emitting device and method for manufacturing the same
KR100631969B1 (en) * 2005-02-28 2006-10-11 삼성전기주식회사 The nitride semiconductor light emitting device
KR101100425B1 (en) * 2005-05-07 2011-12-30 삼성전자주식회사 Semiconductor laser diode and method for manufacturing the same
JP4670489B2 (en) * 2005-06-06 2011-04-13 日立電線株式会社 Light emitting diode and manufacturing method thereof
JP5030398B2 (en) * 2005-07-04 2012-09-19 昭和電工株式会社 Gallium nitride compound semiconductor light emitting device
JP4483728B2 (en) * 2005-07-19 2010-06-16 住友電気工業株式会社 Manufacturing method of semiconductor optical device
CN100449888C (en) * 2005-07-29 2009-01-07 日亚化学工业株式会社 Semiconductor laser element
KR100725610B1 (en) * 2006-04-18 2007-05-30 서울옵토디바이스주식회사 Method for forming ohmic electrode and semiconductor light emitting element
JP5044986B2 (en) * 2006-05-17 2012-10-10 サンケン電気株式会社 Semiconductor light emitting device
US7573074B2 (en) * 2006-05-19 2009-08-11 Bridgelux, Inc. LED electrode
JP4946195B2 (en) * 2006-06-19 2012-06-06 サンケン電気株式会社 Semiconductor light emitting device and manufacturing method thereof
JP4789713B2 (en) * 2006-06-29 2011-10-12 トヨタ自動車株式会社 Wet etching method, damaged layer removal method, semiconductor device manufacturing method, and semiconductor substrate manufacturing method
JP4929924B2 (en) * 2006-08-25 2012-05-09 サンケン電気株式会社 Semiconductor light emitting device, manufacturing method thereof, and composite semiconductor device
JP4142084B2 (en) * 2006-10-16 2008-08-27 三菱電機株式会社 Semiconductor optical device manufacturing method
US7646798B2 (en) * 2006-12-28 2010-01-12 Nichia Corporation Nitride semiconductor laser element
JP2008192782A (en) * 2007-02-05 2008-08-21 Toyoda Gosei Co Ltd Electrode and iii nitride compound semiconductor light-emitting element using the electrode
TWI331816B (en) * 2007-04-03 2010-10-11 Advanced Optoelectronic Tech Semiconductor light-emitting device
DE102007029370A1 (en) * 2007-05-04 2008-11-06 Osram Opto Semiconductors Gmbh Semiconductor chip and method for producing a semiconductor chip
US7714339B2 (en) * 2007-05-29 2010-05-11 Neoton Optoelectronics Corp. Light emitting diode
TWI344709B (en) * 2007-06-14 2011-07-01 Epistar Corp Light emitting device
US8212273B2 (en) * 2007-07-19 2012-07-03 Photonstar Led Limited Vertical LED with conductive vias
CN101355119B (en) * 2007-07-25 2010-08-18 Inst Of Semi Conductor Chinese Academy Of Sciences Method for preparing vertical structure LED using whole optical film system
JP2009049267A (en) * 2007-08-22 2009-03-05 Toshiba Corp Semiconductor light-emitting device and method of manufacturing the same
JP5251038B2 (en) * 2007-08-23 2013-07-31 豊田合成株式会社 Light emitting device
US7847312B2 (en) * 2007-09-14 2010-12-07 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Nitride semiconductor light-emitting device
JP5634003B2 (en) * 2007-09-29 2014-12-03 日亜化学工業株式会社 Light emitting device
US7569432B1 (en) * 2008-01-14 2009-08-04 Chang Gung University Method of manufacturing an LED
US8115222B2 (en) * 2008-01-16 2012-02-14 Rohm Co., Ltd. Semiconductor light emitting device and fabrication method for the semiconductor light emitting device
JP5651288B2 (en) * 2008-03-25 2015-01-07 株式会社東芝 Semiconductor light emitting device and manufacturing method thereof
JP2009260316A (en) * 2008-03-26 2009-11-05 Panasonic Electric Works Co Ltd Semiconductor light-emitting element and illuminating apparatus using the same
US7791101B2 (en) * 2008-03-28 2010-09-07 Cree, Inc. Indium gallium nitride-based ohmic contact layers for gallium nitride-based devices
KR20090106299A (en) * 2008-04-05 2009-10-08 송준오 group 3 nitride-based semiconductor light emitting diodes with ohmic contact light extraction structured layers and methods to fabricate them
DE102008035900A1 (en) * 2008-04-30 2009-11-05 Osram Opto Semiconductors Gmbh LED chip
JP5197186B2 (en) * 2008-06-30 2013-05-15 株式会社東芝 Semiconductor light emitting device
JP5305790B2 (en) * 2008-08-28 2013-10-02 株式会社東芝 Semiconductor light emitting device
JP5325506B2 (en) * 2008-09-03 2013-10-23 株式会社東芝 Semiconductor light emitting device and manufacturing method thereof
US7915629B2 (en) * 2008-12-08 2011-03-29 Cree, Inc. Composite high reflectivity layer
US7952106B2 (en) * 2009-04-10 2011-05-31 Everlight Electronics Co., Ltd. Light emitting diode device having uniform current distribution and method for forming the same

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5917202A (en) * 1995-12-21 1999-06-29 Hewlett-Packard Company Highly reflective contacts for light emitting semiconductor devices
US6194743B1 (en) * 1997-12-15 2001-02-27 Agilent Technologies, Inc. Nitride semiconductor light emitting device having a silver p-contact
US6514782B1 (en) * 1999-12-22 2003-02-04 Lumileds Lighting, U.S., Llc Method of making a III-nitride light-emitting device with increased light generating capability
US6794690B2 (en) * 2001-09-18 2004-09-21 Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd. Group III nitride compound semiconductor light-emitting element
US7326967B2 (en) * 2004-07-12 2008-02-05 Epistar Corporation Light emitting diode having an omnidirectional reflector including a transparent conductive layer
US7982236B2 (en) * 2007-02-01 2011-07-19 Nichia Corporation Semiconductor light emitting element

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110121332A1 (en) * 2009-11-23 2011-05-26 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Iii-v light emitting device with thin n-type region
US8581229B2 (en) * 2009-11-23 2013-11-12 Koninklijke Philips N.V. III-V light emitting device with thin n-type region
US8878160B2 (en) 2009-11-23 2014-11-04 Koninklijke Philips N.V. III-V light emitting device with thin n-type region
US20120049154A1 (en) * 2010-08-31 2012-03-01 Micron Technology, Inc. Solid state lighting devices with point contacts and associated methods of manufacturing
US8410515B2 (en) * 2010-08-31 2013-04-02 Micron Technology, Inc. Solid state lighting devices with point contacts and associated methods of manufacturing
US20130256702A1 (en) * 2012-03-30 2013-10-03 Chih-Jung Liu Light emitting diode with high light extraction efficiency and method for manufacturing the same
TWI563681B (en) * 2012-03-30 2016-12-21 Advanced Optoelectronic Tech Led die and method for manufacturing the same
US9054288B2 (en) * 2012-03-30 2015-06-09 Advanced Optoelectronic Technology, Inc. Light emitting diode with high light extraction efficiency and method for manufacturing the same
US10276749B2 (en) 2013-01-09 2019-04-30 Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc. Ultraviolet reflective rough adhesive contact
US9287449B2 (en) 2013-01-09 2016-03-15 Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc. Ultraviolet reflective rough adhesive contact
US9768357B2 (en) 2013-01-09 2017-09-19 Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc. Ultraviolet reflective rough adhesive contact
US20150093500A1 (en) * 2013-09-30 2015-04-02 Intermolecular, Inc. Corrosion-Resistant Silver Coatings with Improved Adhesion to III-V Materials
US9653570B2 (en) * 2015-02-12 2017-05-16 International Business Machines Corporation Junction interlayer dielectric for reducing leakage current in semiconductor devices

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
CN102804417A (en) 2012-11-28
JP2016015517A (en) 2016-01-28
WO2010150114A2 (en) 2010-12-29
WO2010150114A3 (en) 2011-02-17
CN102804417B (en) 2016-08-03
TWI575773B (en) 2017-03-21
US20120199863A1 (en) 2012-08-09
JP6155310B2 (en) 2017-06-28
JP2012531733A (en) 2012-12-10
TW201108465A (en) 2011-03-01
KR20120101324A (en) 2012-09-13
EP2446486A2 (en) 2012-05-02
CN106057987A (en) 2016-10-26
EP2446486B1 (en) 2016-09-28

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
CN100411205C (en) Light-emitting-diode chip comprising sequence of gan-based epitaxial layers which emit radiation, and method for producing same
JP3511970B2 (en) The nitride semiconductor light emitting device
JP4739294B2 (en) Vertical light emitting diode element and method for manufacturing the same
CN100565942C (en) Semiconductor chip for optoelectronics and method for production thereof
TWI479674B (en) Method for handling a semiconductor wafer assembly
CN101515614B (en) Semiconductor light-emitting device
CA2470095C (en) Light-emitting diode with planar omni-directional reflector
US9559252B2 (en) Substrate removal process for high light extraction LEDs
EP1603171B1 (en) Resonant cavity III-nitride light emitting devices fabricated by growth substrate removal
US7915629B2 (en) Composite high reflectivity layer
US8860065B2 (en) Optoelectronic semiconductor device
US7432119B2 (en) Light emitting diode with conducting metal substrate
CN102057505B (en) Optoelectronic component and method for the production thereof
US8653540B2 (en) Optoelectronic semiconductor body and method for producing the same
TWI493757B (en) High efficiency light emitting diode
US20040113156A1 (en) Semiconductor light emitting device and method for fabricating the same
KR101627010B1 (en) Semiconductor light emitting device including metal reflecting layer
CN101606246B (en) Light emitting device using gan led chip
CN101911317B (en) Semiconductor light emitting element and method for manufacturing the same
US8004006B2 (en) Nitride semiconductor light emitting element
US8395167B2 (en) External light efficiency of light emitting diodes
CN1917245B (en) Nitride-based light emitting device and manufacturing method thereof
CN102148301B (en) Optoelectronic element and manufacturing method thereof
US7872276B2 (en) Vertical gallium nitride-based light emitting diode and method of manufacturing the same
CN102742038B (en) With a dielectric mirror structure having a lateral light emitting diode

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: PHILIPS LUMILEDS LIGHTING COMPANY, LLC, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:EPLER, JOHN E.;DAVID, AURELIEN J.F.;REEL/FRAME:022877/0461

Effective date: 20090619

Owner name: KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS ELECTRONICS N V, NETHERLANDS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:EPLER, JOHN E.;DAVID, AURELIEN J.F.;REEL/FRAME:022877/0461

Effective date: 20090619

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION

AS Assignment

Owner name: LUMILEDS LLC, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:PHILIPS LUMILEDS LIGHTING COMPANY LLC;REEL/FRAME:036243/0630

Effective date: 20150326

Owner name: KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS N.V., NETHERLANDS

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS ELECTRONICS N.V.;REEL/FRAME:036243/0624

Effective date: 20130515

AS Assignment

Owner name: LUMILEDS LLC, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:KONINKLIJKE PHILIPS N.V.;REEL/FRAME:044792/0018

Effective date: 20170630