US20100324940A1 - Methods, Systems, and Products for Processing Images - Google Patents

Methods, Systems, and Products for Processing Images Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100324940A1
US20100324940A1 US12870862 US87086210A US2010324940A1 US 20100324940 A1 US20100324940 A1 US 20100324940A1 US 12870862 US12870862 US 12870862 US 87086210 A US87086210 A US 87086210A US 2010324940 A1 US2010324940 A1 US 2010324940A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
image
processed
medical image
images
medical
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12870862
Inventor
Brett D. Johnson
Laurence Siegel
Marty Smith
Adrian Popescu
Charles Frederick Hart
Larry Kent, Jr.
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
AT&T Delaware Intellectual Property Inc
Original Assignee
AT&T Delaware Intellectual Property Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/06Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications adapted for file transfer, e.g. file transfer protocol [FTP]
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F19/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific applications
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F19/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific applications
    • G06F19/30Medical informatics, i.e. computer-based analysis or dissemination of patient or disease data
    • G06F19/32Medical data management, e.g. systems or protocols for archival or communication of medical images, computerised patient records or computerised general medical references
    • G06F19/321Management of medical image data, e.g. communication or archiving systems such as picture archiving and communication systems [PACS] or related medical protocols such as digital imaging and communications in medicine protocol [DICOM]; Editing of medical image data, e.g. adding diagnosis information
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q50/00Systems or methods specially adapted for specific business sectors, e.g. utilities or tourism
    • G06Q50/10Services
    • G06Q50/22Social work
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q50/00Systems or methods specially adapted for specific business sectors, e.g. utilities or tourism
    • G06Q50/10Services
    • G06Q50/22Social work
    • G06Q50/24Patient record management
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L51/00Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages
    • H04L51/24Arrangements for user-to-user messaging in packet-switching networks, e.g. e-mail or instant messages with notification on incoming messages
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/12Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications adapted for proprietary or special purpose networking environments, e.g. medical networks, sensor networks, networks in a car or remote metering networks
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/30Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications involving profiles
    • H04L67/303Terminal profiles
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/32Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications for scheduling or organising the servicing of application requests, e.g. requests for application data transmissions involving the analysis and optimisation of the required network resources
    • H04L67/322Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications for scheduling or organising the servicing of application requests, e.g. requests for application data transmissions involving the analysis and optimisation of the required network resources whereby quality of service [QoS] or priority requirements are taken into account
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/36Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications involving the display of network or application conditions affecting the network application to the application user
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H15/00ICT specially adapted for medical reports, e.g. generation or transmission thereof

Abstract

Methods, systems, and products process medical images. A notification is received that indicates a processed medical image is available and that indicates unprocessed medical images in a queue that have yet to be processed for display. The processed medical image is requested, received, and stored. The processed medical image and the notification are displayed. The processed medical image is visually distinguished in the notification from the unprocessed medical images in the queue that are yet to be processed.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 11/523,466, filed Dec. 9, 2008 (Attorney Docket 060039), and now issued as U.S. Patent X,XXX,XXX, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The ability to review data-intensive images is a useful tool, e.g., in the medical profession. Many of the issues involving patient health can only be seen or verified by some of the imaging techniques that exist today and cannot be reliably diagnosed by an external exam alone. For example, if a patient's symptoms led a physician to believe that the patient had a cracked rib an x-ray of the area could be used to verify the physician's belief. Often, for many types of medical images, a patient would go to a location remote from the physician's office and have an image taken.
  • As technology develops, improvements to communication systems and computers have created the ability to transfer large amounts of data relatively quickly over large distances. At the same time, the types of medical images and the amount of data these images contain has continued to grow. Some of the types of medical images currently used by physicians for patient diagnostics include: x-ray, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), electrocardiogram (ECG), ultrasonography, nuclear medicine and digitized radiography. A standard format for medical images is the Digital Imaging Communications in Medicine (DICOM) format. This format allows a common image format to be used among a multitude of different imaging equipment.
  • With the advances in medical science, more options for medical imagery now exist that a physician can use to assist in patient diagnostics. Sometimes people are sent to multiple locations in order to have different types of images taken. The image would be taken, processed at the location, and then a report would be generated. The report would get back to the physician days later through one or more of a number of different channels such as: the patient returning to the imaging location(s) to pick-up and deliver the image film(s) and report(s) to their physician or the imaging location specialist mailing the report and/or film(s) to the physician. These methods are slow and inefficient.
  • Teleradiology (which term refers generally to the transmission of digitized medical images) improved upon these purely manual delivery methods in part, by allowing many types of image taking devices to send their images to a central processing station. For example, as shown in FIG. 1, a patient is referred by a physician to imaging center 102. Depending upon the imaging requested, the patient could get an x-ray taken in x-ray imaging room 104, a magnetic resonance image (MRI) taken in MRI room 106 and an ultrasound in ultrasound room 108. These medical images are then forwarded electronically to the film processing lab 110 for processing. Upon completion of this process, the image films and any associated information either needs to be picked up and hand carried or mailed to a physician's office 112. Thus teleradiology techniques initially allowed a patient to get all of the imaging needed performed in one location, as well as getting the reports generated at one location, but did not improve the steps involved with image report delivery to the patient's physician.
  • A next logical step in the usage of medical images is to allow remote access to images and their associated reports for physicians and/or patients. Some of the advantages associated with such an improvement would be a faster turn around time on diagnosing patient problems and cost reductions. Some challenges associated with this step of allowing remote access are privacy/security concerns, format of the medical image, quality of the image, notification and ensuring that the remote station had the correct capabilities to view the image(s).
  • In conjunction with remote medical image viewing, notification to the physician and/or patient that report delivery occurred is also desirable. One method of notification has been described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 6,934,698 B2 filed on Dec. 20, 2000, entitled “Medical Image Management System” and which is hereafter referred to as the “698 application”. In the 698 application, upon completion of the computations related to the image, an email notification is sent to the person submitting the request or via a text message to a physician's pager. However, some limitations still exist when using the systems or methods described in this patent. For example, if the physician was not close to his computer he could not view the images immediately. Moreover, there is limited to no ability to interact with the sender of the notification to query the status of other requests. Additionally, the difficulties associated with remotely viewing medical images also arise in other fields, e.g., geology, astronomy, and aerial imaging in which data-intensive images are recorded and analyzed.
  • Accordingly, there is a need for more efficient systems and methods for both viewing data-intensive images at remote locations and supplying notification of the readiness of such images for viewing to the relevant individuals.
  • SUMMARY
  • Systems and methods according to exemplary embodiments address this need and others by providing techniques for processing medical images and their associated notifications.
  • According to one exemplary embodiment, a device for processing images comprising: a server for receiving a notification indicating that an image is available for transmission to the device from a remote location, transmitting a request for the image, and receiving the image; and a display for displaying the image and the notification.
  • According to another exemplary embodiment, a method for processing an image comprising the steps of: receiving a notification which indicates that an image is available for transmission from a remote location; transmitting a request for the image; and receiving the image for display.
  • According to another exemplary embodiment, a computer-readable medium containing instructions which, when executed on a computer, perform the steps of: receiving a notification which indicates that an image is available for transmission from a remote location; transmitting a request for the image; and receiving the image for display.
  • According to another exemplary embodiment, a system for processing medical images comprising: a first server in communication with a database, wherein the database contains medical images, a second server in communication with the first server, wherein the second server contains protocols for transmitting the medical images and the second server contains protocols for sending notifications, and an electronic device in communication with the second server, the electronic device comprising: a processor, wherein the processor receives and processes the images and the notifications, and a display for displaying the images and the notifications.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The accompanying drawings illustrate exemplary embodiments of the present invention, wherein:
  • FIG. 1 depicts the conventional method for processing medical images to be received by a physician;
  • FIG. 2 depicts a system for processing and transmitting images according to an exemplary embodiment;
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a method to distinguish between processed and unprocessed images according to an exemplary embodiment;
  • FIG. 4 shows a flowchart illustrating a method for transmitting images according to an exemplary embodiment.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The following detailed description refers to the accompanying drawings. The same reference numbers in different drawings identify the same or similar elements. Also, the following detailed description does not limit the invention. Instead, the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims.
  • In order to provide some context for this description, an exemplary environment in which exemplary embodiments can be employed will now be described with respect to FIG. 2. The description that follows focuses on medical images for ease of illustration. It should be appreciated, however, that the invention is also applicable to other types of data-intensive images, e.g., geological images, astronomical images, satellite images, etc. Using medical images as an example, in one embodiment a patient can have a variety of medical images taken in different locations or labs, referred to herein as “rooms”, such as, x-rays in x-ray room 202, MRIs in MRI room 204 and ultrasounds in ultrasound room 206. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the present invention is equally applicable to other types of medical images, e.g., computed tomography, electrocardiogram, nuclear medicine images, digitized radiography, etc., and that the examples depicted in FIG. 2 are shown for illustrative purposes. The images taken in these rooms may be transmitted to a central location such as, film processing lab 208, for processing. When the images are received in film processing lab 208, pertinent information such as patient name, physician name and/or type of image are entered into the system and transmitted to database 210. This allows the server 212 to create a list or database of images indexed based on patients and/or physician of images that are being processed. Alternatively, other identification methods could be used. The images can be processed into physical films for pickup or distribution, or processed into a transmittable and viewable electronic format, such as DICOM and/or joint photographics expert group (JPEG). Additionally, a local technician may write up a report with his or her evaluation of the images. Like the images themselves, these reports can also be rendered in electronic form for transmission and subsequent viewage by, e.g., a physician and/or patient, as described below.
  • As an alternative to the transmission of images to the film processing lab, images may be digitally recorded and processed in each of the rooms 202-206. In yet another embodiment, different kinds of images may be recorded and stored in one or more digital imaging/processing device(s) 207. In either scenario, the digitally recorded images may be processed and the report generated in the device 207 and delivered directly to the database 210.
  • Upon completion of the image processing and the report write up, the processed images and report are relocated to a database 210. According to an exemplary embodiment, the DICOM images are stored in a photosharing section of database 210, while the JPEG images are stored in a filesharing section of database. Upon sending the images from the film processing lab 208 to the database 210, a notification signal is sent to server 212 by database 210. The server 212 then processes the notification message, matches it to information stored in database 210 and retrieves contact information for the relevant physician(s) (and/or patient). Notification of a viewable image is then sent from server 212 through a network, such as the Internet 214, to another server 216 and a notification device 218 (multiple notification devices (not shown) could be used based on user preferences). While the Internet 214 is shown as an example of a network useful for notifications, it should be appreciated that any other suitable network may be used.
  • Upon receipt of the notification, the user has the ability to view the image on the notification device 218 or upon display 220. In some cases, notification device 218 might only be capable of viewing the image a particular format, such as the JPEG format, so the user has the option of using display 220 (e.g., part of a personal computer in the physician's office or hospital) which is in communication with server 216 to view the higher quality image (DICOM image in this example) if desired. Additionally, there may be two-way communications between server 212 and both notification device 218 and server 216, which allow the user to query server 212 to determine the status of images to be viewed as will be described in more detail below.
  • Notification devices according to exemplary embodiments can be any electronic device capable of both receiving notification messages from a server and then being able to also view the referenced image in at least one of the image formats in which the medical image is stored in database 210. For example a notification device could be a laptop computer, a desktop computer, a personal digital assistant (PDA), a cell phone capable of receiving and displaying digital images, such as JPEG images, or any other electronic device capable of receiving and displaying the desired images. According to one exemplary embodiment, the notification message allows the user to see which image is currently ready for viewing as well as other images in the queue. For example, if a physician had two patients that had undergone both x-rays and MRIs, the physician could use her or his notification device to determine the status of the images. Then, the images ready for viewing could be listed on a display of the notification device 218 in a manner which is visually distinguishable from those images that were still being processed as shown in FIG. 3. In FIG. 3, images ready for viewing are displayed in capital letters 302, and images still being processed are displayed in lower case letters 304.
  • Additional or alternative visual techniques could be used to differentiate viewable images from images that are still being processed, such as black lettering for viewable images and grayed out lettering for images that are still being processed. The manner in which the notification device 218 is updated can vary as well. For example, according to one exemplary embodiment, the server 212 can “push” status updates to the notification device 218 as new images become available for viewing. Alternatively, the notification device 218 can query the server 212 when the user actuates an update command. Similarly, instead of a three-step process, i.e., notification, request, image delivery, the notification message could contain the medical image and/or report itself so that the physician could immediately view the image without first requesting it from server 212.
  • According to another exemplary embodiment, a method for processing an image is illustrated in the flowchart of FIG. 4. Again, for illustrative purposes, the images described with reference to FIG. 4 are medical images. The first activity is storing a medical image in a database at step 402. The medical image can be one of image types listed above or any medical image that would benefit from these techniques. Next, a notification is sent to a user's device in step 404. This notification could be as described above or come in alternate forms, such as sound or voice. This is followed by transmitting a request from the user's device in step 406. This request may be, for example, a request for the processed image to be sent to the user's device. For those embodiments in which the image(s) are attached to the notification, the request could also be a status update on other images. Additionally, the user could direct the image to be sent to a different device than is currently being used. Next, the medical image is sent to the user's device in step 408. Lastly the medical image is output for display on the user's device in step 410.
  • According to one exemplary embodiment, notification messages are sent out through instant messaging. Referring back to FIG. 2, the notification messages may be sent from server 212. Server 212 may be a type of server that supports instant messaging to notification device 218 and/or server 216. For example, server 212 could be a Jabber server that uses a messaging and presence protocol, such as the Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP), which supports instant messaging. Additionally, a publish and subscribe (pub/sub) system that utilizes persistent or future searching could be combined with the instant messaging setup to send out notification messages when images are ready for transmittal to a user. Another issue of concern during the transmission of images is security. According to an exemplary embodiment, the images are kept in a secure database, accessed by only authorized personnel and transmitted in a secure fashion.
  • According to another exemplary embodiment, images can be displayed and manipulated on an electronic device that is also used as the notification device 218. For example, after a notification message has been received by a notification device 218 (in this example, a cell phone), the user sends back the request to server 212 to have the image sent to her or his cell phone. The cell phone receives the image and the user, e.g., the physician, decides to manipulate the image, e.g., to see features of the medical image which are significant to diagnose the patient. Exemplary image manipulation options may be to use various buttons to perform functions such as zooming, panning or rotating the image in order to better view the area of interest to assist in quick and timely patient diagnosis.
  • According to yet another exemplary embodiment, the server 212 knows the capabilities of the notification device 218, e.g., by retrieving pre-stored capabilities data from the database 210 indexed, e.g., by physician. Alternatively, for those embodiments where a request message is explicitly transmitted by the user of the notification device 218, the request message can include device capabilities information therein. In either event, the server 212 knows what format notification device 218 is capable of receiving images in, e.g., both DICOM and JPEG images or just JPEG images, and transmits the requested image(s) in those format(s) which the requesting device is capable of handling.
  • The above-described exemplary embodiments are intended to be illustrative in all respects, rather than restrictive, of the present invention. Thus the present invention is capable of many variations in detailed implementation that can be derived from the description contained herein by a person skilled in the art. All such variations and modifications are considered to be within the scope and spirit of the present invention as defined by the following claims. No element, act, or instruction used in the description of the present application should be construed as critical or essential to the invention unless explicitly described as such. Also, as used herein, the article “a” is intended to include one or more items.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A method for processing an image, comprising:
    receiving a notification indicating that a processed medical image is available and indicating unprocessed medical images in a queue that have yet to be processed for display;
    requesting the processed medical image;
    receiving the processed medical image;
    storing the processed medical image in memory;
    displaying the processed medical image and the notification; and
    visually distinguishing the processed medical image in the notification from the unprocessed medical images in the queue that are yet to be processed.
  2. 2. The method according to claim 1, further comprising creating a list of medical images stored in the memory.
  3. 3. The method according to claim 2, further comprising indexing the list of medical images based on a name of a patient.
  4. 4. The method according to claim 2, further comprising indexing the list of medical images based on a name of a physician.
  5. 5. The method according to claim 1, further comprising receiving an input to retrieve the processed medical image.
  6. 6. The method according to claim 1, further comprising sending a request for the processed medical image.
  7. 7. The method according to claim 1, wherein the processed medical image is at least one of an X-ray, a magnetic resonance image, a computed tomographic image, an electrocardiogram, an ultrasonography image, a nuclear image, and a radiographic image.
  8. 8. The method according to claim 1, wherein receiving the processed medical image comprises receiving a digital image.
  9. 9. The method according to claim 1, wherein receiving the processed medical image comprises receiving an analog image.
  10. 10. A system for processing medical images comprising:
    a processor executing code stored in memory that causes the processor to:
    receive a notification indicating that a processed medical image is available and indicating unprocessed medical images in a queue that have yet to be processed for display;
    request the processed medical image;
    receive the processed medical image;
    store the processed medical image in memory;
    display the processed medical image and the notification; and
    visually distinguish the processed medical image in the notification from the unprocessed medical images in the queue that are yet to be processed.
  11. 11. The system according to claim 10, further comprising code that causes the processor to create a list of medical images stored in the memory.
  12. 12. The system according to claim 11, further comprising code that causes the processor to index the list of medical images based on a name of a patient.
  13. 13. The system according to claim 11, further comprising code that causes the processor to index the list of medical images based on a name of a physician.
  14. 14. The system according to claim 10, further comprising code that causes the processor to receive an input to retrieve the processed medical image.
  15. 15. The system according to claim 10, further comprising code that causes the processor to send a request for the processed medical image.
  16. 16. The system according to claim 10, wherein the processed medical image is at least one of an X-ray, a magnetic resonance image, a computed tomographic image, an electrocardiogram, an ultrasonography image, a nuclear image, and a radiographic image.
  17. 17. The system according to claim 10, wherein receiving the processed medical image comprises at least one of receiving a digital image and receiving an analog image.
  18. 18. A computer readable medium storing processor executable instructions for performing a method, the method comprising:
    receiving a notification indicating that a processed medical image is available and indicating unprocessed medical images in a queue that have yet to be processed for display;
    requesting the processed medical image;
    receiving the processed medical image;
    storing the processed medical image in memory;
    displaying the processed medical image and the notification; and
    visually distinguishing the processed medical image in the notification from the unprocessed medical images in the queue that are yet to be processed.
  19. 19. The computer-readable medium according to claim 18, further comprising instructions for creating a list of medical images stored in the memory.
  20. 20. The computer-readable medium according to claim 19, further comprising instructions for indexing the list of medical images based on at least one of a name of a patient and a name of a physician.
US12870862 2006-09-19 2010-08-30 Methods, Systems, and Products for Processing Images Abandoned US20100324940A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11523466 US7809816B2 (en) 2006-09-19 2006-09-19 Imaging viewer systems and methods
US12870862 US20100324940A1 (en) 2006-09-19 2010-08-30 Methods, Systems, and Products for Processing Images

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12870862 US20100324940A1 (en) 2006-09-19 2010-08-30 Methods, Systems, and Products for Processing Images

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11523466 Continuation US7809816B2 (en) 2006-09-19 2006-09-19 Imaging viewer systems and methods

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100324940A1 true true US20100324940A1 (en) 2010-12-23

Family

ID=39189982

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11523466 Active 2027-10-10 US7809816B2 (en) 2006-09-19 2006-09-19 Imaging viewer systems and methods
US12870862 Abandoned US20100324940A1 (en) 2006-09-19 2010-08-30 Methods, Systems, and Products for Processing Images

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11523466 Active 2027-10-10 US7809816B2 (en) 2006-09-19 2006-09-19 Imaging viewer systems and methods

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US7809816B2 (en)

Families Citing this family (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE102006008508A1 (en) * 2006-02-23 2007-09-13 Siemens Ag Medical visualization method for e.g. cardiological diagnosis of heart, involves storing recorded organ layer pictures with information about series of organ layer pictures and time period of recording in image data memory
US8775501B2 (en) * 2006-08-17 2014-07-08 Coincident.Tv, Inc. Interactive television framework utilizing program-synchronous triggers and standard messaging and presence-detection protocols
US8806353B2 (en) * 2008-04-30 2014-08-12 Beyondvia Technologies Mobile electronic communications dialog using sequenced digital images
US8074176B2 (en) * 2008-04-30 2011-12-06 Beyondvia Technologies, Llc Electronic communications dialog using sequenced digital images stored in an image dictionary
US9310980B2 (en) 2012-08-21 2016-04-12 Beyondvia Technologies Systems and methods for performance comparisons utilizing an infinite cylinder user interface
US9305026B2 (en) 2008-04-30 2016-04-05 Beyondvia Technologies Systems and methods for digital images utilizing an infinite cylinder user interface
US8769423B2 (en) 2008-04-30 2014-07-01 Beyondvia Technologies Content distribution systems and methods using digital images
CA2718696C (en) 2010-06-08 2018-06-12 Merge Healthcare, Inc. Remote control of medical devices using instant messaging infrastructure
US8799358B2 (en) 2011-11-28 2014-08-05 Merge Healthcare Incorporated Remote cine viewing of medical images on a zero-client application
KR101559056B1 (en) * 2012-12-12 2015-10-12 주식회사 인피니트헬스케어 Collaborative treatment method by sharing medical image based on messenger and system thereof
US20140160150A1 (en) * 2012-12-12 2014-06-12 Infinitt Healthcare Co., Ltd. Remote collaborative diagnosis method and system using server-based medical image sharing scheme
US9582170B2 (en) * 2014-10-31 2017-02-28 Mckesson Financial Holdings Method and apparatus for managing a configurable display environment

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20020065854A1 (en) * 2000-11-29 2002-05-30 Jennings Pressly Automated medical diagnosis reporting system
US20050148849A1 (en) * 2003-10-29 2005-07-07 Heere Edward C. Image archiving and communications system

Family Cites Families (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE69632011D1 (en) * 1995-11-10 2004-05-06 Toshiba Kawasaki Kk File transfer methods, procedures for requesting user device files and files party device
US6381029B1 (en) * 1998-12-23 2002-04-30 Etrauma, Llc Systems and methods for remote viewing of patient images
US7028182B1 (en) 1999-02-19 2006-04-11 Nexsys Electronics, Inc. Secure network system and method for transfer of medical information
US6938211B1 (en) 1999-11-24 2005-08-30 University of Pittsburgh of the Common Wealth System of Higher Education Methods and apparatus for an image transfer object
US20010041991A1 (en) 2000-02-09 2001-11-15 Segal Elliot A. Method and system for managing patient medical records
US8166381B2 (en) 2000-12-20 2012-04-24 Heart Imaging Technologies, Llc Medical image management system
US6934698B2 (en) 2000-12-20 2005-08-23 Heart Imaging Technologies Llc Medical image management system
US20020103935A1 (en) * 2001-01-26 2002-08-01 Neil Fishman Pushing rich content information to mobile devices
US6876759B2 (en) 2001-02-01 2005-04-05 Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. Image transmitting system, image transmitting method and storage medium
EP1239397A3 (en) * 2001-03-08 2006-05-24 Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd. Method of and system for reading medical image
US20060218482A1 (en) * 2002-04-19 2006-09-28 Droplet Technology, Inc. Mobile imaging application, device architecture, service platform architecture and services
EP1404104B1 (en) * 2002-09-24 2013-01-02 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Method of and apparatus for processing image data, and computer product
US7310651B2 (en) * 2004-08-18 2007-12-18 Ashok Dave Medical media file management system and method
US8463709B2 (en) * 2006-04-11 2013-06-11 Dell Products L.P. Identifying and labeling licensed content in an embedded partition

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20020065854A1 (en) * 2000-11-29 2002-05-30 Jennings Pressly Automated medical diagnosis reporting system
US20050148849A1 (en) * 2003-10-29 2005-07-07 Heere Edward C. Image archiving and communications system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US7809816B2 (en) 2010-10-05 grant
US20080071895A1 (en) 2008-03-20 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6621918B1 (en) Teleradiology systems for rendering and visualizing remotely-located volume data sets
US7612679B1 (en) Computerized method and system for providing alerts from a multi-patient display
Bidgood Jr et al. Understanding and using DICOM, the data interchange standard for biomedical imaging
US6424996B1 (en) Medical network system and method for transfer of information
US20030130871A1 (en) Patient data mining for clinical trials
US20060058603A1 (en) Medical media file management system and method
US20030115084A1 (en) System and method for electronic medical record keeping
US7366992B2 (en) Method and system for displaying and/or manipulating medical image data
US6678703B2 (en) Medical image management system and method
US20020046346A1 (en) Electronic medical records system
US20050197860A1 (en) Data management system
US20100131591A1 (en) Method and system for providing remote access to a state of an application program
US20090182577A1 (en) Automated information management process
US7523505B2 (en) Methods and systems for managing distributed digital medical data
US20050261942A1 (en) Self-serve patient check-in and preventive services kiosk
US20080059245A1 (en) Medical image management method, medical image management apparatus, and medical network system
US6434569B1 (en) Integrated medical information system formed of text-based and image-based databases, and display thereof
US20030156745A1 (en) Image based medical report system on a network
US20040073453A1 (en) Method and system for dispensing communication devices to provide access to patient-related information
US20040071038A1 (en) System and method for storing and retrieving medical images and records
US20020138301A1 (en) Integration of a portal into an application service provider data archive and/or web based viewer
US20080021834A1 (en) Medical Data Encryption For Communication Over A Vulnerable System
Andrade et al. Wireless and PDA: a novel strategy to access DICOM-compliant medical data on mobile devices
Grigsby et al. Effects and effectiveness of telemedicine
US7953614B1 (en) Smart placement rules

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: BELLSOUTH INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY CORPORATION (NOW A

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:JOHNSON, BRETT D.;SIEGEL, LAURENCE;SMITH, MARTY;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20060915 TO 20060918;REEL/FRAME:024996/0621