US20100314268A1 - Universal shoe box - Google Patents

Universal shoe box Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100314268A1
US20100314268A1 US12485685 US48568509A US2010314268A1 US 20100314268 A1 US20100314268 A1 US 20100314268A1 US 12485685 US12485685 US 12485685 US 48568509 A US48568509 A US 48568509A US 2010314268 A1 US2010314268 A1 US 2010314268A1
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Prior art keywords
face
shoe box
shoe
front
edge
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Abandoned
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US12485685
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Wilbert Blair Goodman
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Wilbert Blair Goodman
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/001Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper stackable
    • B65D5/0015Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper stackable the container being formed by folding up portions connected to a central panel
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/20Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper by folding-up portions connected to a central panel from all sides to form a container body, e.g. of tray-like form
    • B65D5/22Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper by folding-up portions connected to a central panel from all sides to form a container body, e.g. of tray-like form held erect by extensions of one or more sides being doubled-over to enclose extensions of adjacent sides
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/42Details of containers or of foldable or erectable container blanks
    • B65D5/4212Information or decoration elements, e.g. content indicators, or for mailing
    • B65D5/4233Cards, coupons, labels or the like formed separately from the container or lid
    • B65D5/4237Cards, coupons, labels or the like formed separately from the container or lid located in a compartment formed by a container wall and additional panel or panels formed integrally with the container
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/42Details of containers or of foldable or erectable container blanks
    • B65D5/64Lids
    • B65D5/66Hinged lids
    • B65D5/6685Hinged lids formed by extensions hinged to the upper edge of a container body formed by erecting a blank to U-shape
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/42Details of containers or of foldable or erectable container blanks
    • B65D5/72Contents-dispensing means
    • B65D5/721Contents-dispensing means consisting of mobile elements forming part of the containers or attached to the containers

Abstract

A universal shoe box has plural faces formed of a common continuous material with each face having a preferential fold disposed between adjacent faces which enable the quick assembly and disassembly of the shoe box. The shoe box includes a display window to enable quick and efficient visual identification of the contents of the shoe box on an image/photograph depicted on a card which may be disposed within the window. Two embodiments of the shoe box are presented, one primarily suited for residential/after market usage and one primary suitable for retail storage usage.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • Not Applicable
  • STATEMENT RE: FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH/DEVELOPMENT
  • Not Applicable
  • BACKGROUND
  • The present invention relates generally to a universal shoe box.
  • When a customer in a shoe store requests a pair of shoes to try on, a sales person typically goes to a room filled with shoe inventory stored in boxes that may identify a particular shoe by style no., model no., size, color, and/or other information describing the contents of the box. Often, the numbers and/or letters printed on a box to describe its contents are small and difficult to read. As a result, the sales person looking for a pair of shoes requested by a customer may end up spending an inordinate amount of time looking for the specific box that contains the requested shoes. Needless to say, this reduces the amount of time the sales person may spend with the customer, thereby affecting the customer's perception of the quality of customer service, as well as potentially limiting the number of customers a sales person may be able to service at any given time. As a result, the time lost by a sales person looking for the correct shoe may affect the volume of shoes sold and corresponding profits generated by the shoe store.
  • Accordingly, there appears to be a need for a new shoe box that has a picture receiving means on the box that displays an image of its contents and provides ease of visual identification and accountability as to its contents for use in the retail shoe store setting. Such a box will reduce the time required by the sales person to locate and retrieve a requested shoe for a customer. In addition, because of the picture, the sales person may quickly locate another shoe that is the right color or style that the customer had overlooked or not been aware of; these too can be brought out by the sales person and suggested to the customer. This form of customer service increases the potential for sales and greater profits by the shoe store.
  • Similarly, once a customer has purchased a pair of shoes, and they choose to continue to use the same shoe box provided at the time of purchase, they will be able to view in advance and quickly identify and retrieve the desired shoes they wish to wear without looking through several boxes which involves the removal, reinsertion, and restacking of shoe boxes.
  • In the prior art, there is a shoe box that has a picture receiving means for placing a picture on the box that displays an image of a shoe. U.S. Patent Publication No. US2006/0054674 A1 is understood to disclose a clothing article organizer having a picture retaining apparatus mounted on its surface. The clothing article box has a removable lid. The clothing article box is also understood to have a stackable construction, allowing one box to be stored on top of another based on the height and width of the “family” of boxes. However, the stacking feature of the clothing article organizer does not appear to provide any further support beyond the height and width dimensions of the underlying boxes. Also, this clothing article organizer does not appear to be subject to quick disassembly into a configuration that takes up minimal space. Finally, this clothing article organizer does not appear to provide ready accessibility to its contents when multiple boxes are in a stacked configuration.
  • Accordingly, there further appears to be a need for a new shoe box in the aftermarket residential use setting that may be readily assembled into a stackable configuration with adequate support that also provides ease of visual identification and accessibility to its contents.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY
  • According to an aspect of the present invention, there is provided a universal shoe box. The universal shoe box has six faces formed of a common contiguous material. Each face is interconnected with at least one adjacent face, with at least one face being hingedly attached to the adjacent face. Each face further has a preferential fold disposed between the adjacent face. There is a front face defining generally a longitudinal front face axis and a lateral front face axis. The shoe box also has a rear face opposing the front face defining generally a longitudinal rear face axis and a lateral rear face axis. There is also a first face defining generally a longitudinal first face axis and a lateral first face axis disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face and the rear face. Also included is a non-removable top face defining generally a longitudinal top face axis and a lateral top face axis. The top face is disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face, the rear face, the first face, and the second face. The preferential fold between the first face and the top face is a first face edge extending from the front face to the rear face. The shoe box further includes a second face opposing the first face defining generally a longitudinal second face axis and a lateral second face axis. The second face is disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face and the rear face. The preferential fold between the second face and the top face is a second face edge extending from the front face to the rear face. The shoe box also has a non-removable bottom face opposing the top face defining generally a longitudinal bottom face axis and a lateral bottom face axis. The bottom face is disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face, the rear face, the first face, and the second face. The shoe box further has a first display window disposed on the front face proximate to the access aperture. The first display window may be operative to display a product card depicting an image of a shoe. The shoe box also has an access aperture disposed on the front face.
  • The shoe box is innovative in that the preferential folds enable the quick assembly and disassembly of the shoe box into a flat configuration that may be readily stored and may save space when the shoe box is not being used. The preferential folds may be configured to enable the shoe box to be universally adapted to shoes of different types and sizes. The shoe box may also be adapted for the storage of articles of clothing and other miscellaneous items The access aperture on the front face of the shoe box enables ready access to and/or retrieval of a single shoe box, either by hand or through the use of a tool. The first display window enables quick and efficient visual identification of the contents of the shoe box based on the image depicted on the product card. The non-removable top face and bottom face have no lid that may be dropped or dislodged, thereby improving the stackability and underlying support provided by the shoe box.
  • This embodiment of the shoe box may be most advantageously used in a retail shoe store or commercial setting, where the shoe inventory is stored in a room filled with shoe boxes stacked one on top of the other. The first display window on the universal shoe box may enable a sales person to readily locate, identify, and retrieve a shoe with the size, color, style, and/or brand requirements requested by a customer, or to readily find another shoe that may also satisfy the customer's tastes that had not been previously considered by the customer. As such, the sales person is able to devote less time looking for shoes in inventory and more time presenting shoes to the customer. The increased amount of time a shoe salesperson is able to spend with the customer and the more shoe selection alternatives the salesperson is able to present to the customer may improve the perceived quality of customer service and therefore increase the potential revenue and profits for the shoe store.
  • U.S. Patent Publication No. US2006/0054674 A1 as discussed above has a removable lid that may be dislodged, thereby impairing the stackability and support of shoe boxes placed thereon. Furthermore, for this reason, many prior art shoe boxes are distinguishable in their absence of having all faces made of a common contiguous separated by a preferential fold disposed between adjacent faces, with each face interconnected with at least one adjacent face.
  • In another embodiment of the present invention, the shoe box may have a front face that is pivotally extendable in an open position at a front face angle greater than orthogonal to the first face and the second face. The front face may have a first front face edge adjacent the first face and a second front face edge adjacent to the second face. The first front face edge may have a first face wall extending generally orthogonal to the first front face edge proximate the first face. The second front face edge may have a second face wall extending generally orthogonal to the second front face edge proximate the second face. The first face wall may have a first face wall hook and the second face wall may have a second face wall hook operative to attach to the first face and the second face respectively to stop the front face from being pivotally extended past the front face angle in an open position.
  • The shoe box is further innovative in that the pivoting mechanism of the front face enables the shoe box to be opened, even when there are other shoe boxes stacked on top of it. As a result, the contents of the shoe box may be readily accessed without having to remove, adjust, or otherwise affect the position of the other stacked shoe boxes. As such, once the contents of the shoe box has been visually identified by the product card on the first display window, the shoes contained therein may be readily removed while maintaining the stacked configuration of the shoe boxes.
  • These embodiments of the shoe box may be most advantageously used in an aftermarket residential setting by an individual desiring to save space by storing multiple shoe boxes in a stacked configuration while still being able to readily identify and access the contents therein. The individual may also choose to store articles of clothing or other miscellaneous items in the shoe box, in addition to or in lieu of shoes. As in the case of the embodiment of the shoe box used in the retail or commercial shoe store setting, the image of the shoe in the first display window in these embodiments of the shoe box may enable the individual to readily locate and identify a shoe having the desired size, color, style, and/or brand. In addition, the pivoting mechanism of the front face in this embodiment of the shoe box enables the individual to readily remove a desired shoe from a shoe box without disturbing the configuration of shoe boxes stacked on top of the shoe box. This in turn enables an individual to more efficiently determine what shoe they wish to wear with a particular outfit and then retrieve the desired shoe while at the same time maintaining an organized shoe storage system in their closet.
  • In another embodiment, the first face wall of the shoe box may have a first face wedge and the second face wall may have a second face wedge proximate to the front face. The first face wedge and the second face wedge may be operative to secure the front face orthogonal to the first face and the second face respectively in a closed position.
  • In this regard, the shoe box is further innovative in that the front face may be securely closed against the first face and the second face while maintaining the stacked configuration. As such, the shoe box will remain in the closed position.
  • According to another embodiment, the access aperture may be oval in shape. This configuration of the shoe box may be most useful in the aftermarket residential setting to an individual desiring to be able to pivotally open or close with their fingers the front face of the shoe box in the stacked configuration. In another embodiment, the access aperture may be circular. This configuration may be most useful in the retail or commercial shoe store setting to a salesperson desiring to be able to retrieve and remove a shoe box from inventory stored in a stacked configuration with other shoe boxes. It is also contemplated within the scope of the present invention that the various aspects of the shoe box may be employed with the access aperture being any other shape, including but not limited to square, polygonal, rectangular, etc.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention further includes a first face first tab proximate to the first face edge that may be disposable in a first face first recess proximate to the first face edge of a second shoe box placed on top of the shoe box. A second face first tab proximate to the second face edge may be disposable in a second face first recess proximate to the second face edge of a second shoe box, thereby enabling the second shoe box to be fixedly mounted on the shoe box. In another embodiment, the first face first tab may be on the first face edge proximate to the front face projecting above the top face. The second face first tab may be on the second face edge proximate to the front face projecting above the top face. The first face first tab may be disposable in the first face first recess on the first face edge of the second shoe box. The second face first tab may be disposable in the second face first recess on the second face edge of the second shoe box. In yet another embodiment, the shoe box may further include a first face second tab on the first face edge proximate to the rear face projecting above the top face. A second face second tab may be on the second face edge proximate to the rear face projecting above the top face. In this embodiment, the first face second tab may be disposable in a first face second recess on the first face edge of the second shoe box. The second face second tab may be disposable in a second recess on the second face edge of the second shoe box. In yet a further embodiment, a plurality of shoe boxes may be fixedly mounted on top of the shoe box, with each shoe box having a first face tab, a first face second tab, a second face first tab, a second face second tab, a first face first recess, a first face second recess, a second face first recess, and a second face second recess on the first face edge and the second face edge respectively.
  • These features of the shoe box uniquely enable the mounting of one shoe box on top of another in a stackable configuration. These features further allow one shoe box to be precisely positioned on top of another shoe box, with the insertion of the tabs on the lower shoe box into the recesses located on the upper shoe box such that the upper shoe box will not be dislodged or slip off the lower shoe box. In this embodiment, the shoe box is able to support the second shoe box above it, the second shoe box is able to support the third shoe box above it and so forth, without risk of slippage or dislodgment of one or more shoe boxes from the stacked configuration. As such, the space-saving features of this stackable configuration may be maintained. Furthermore, the absence of a removable lid avoids the dropping or misplacing of the top of the shoe box. This embodiment of the shoe box may be most advantageously used in the aftermarket residential setting by an individual desiring to store a pluarility of shoe boxes in a stackable configuration in their closet. In particular, the pivoting mechanism enables the front face to be extended in an open position, thereby enabling removal of a pair of shoes from an individual shoe box, while still maintaining the stackable configuration of all shoe boxes stored on top of the shoe box.
  • In a further embodiment of the present invention, the non-removable top face of the shoe box may be hingedly attached to the rear face of the shoe box. In another embodiment, the non-removable top face may be hingedly attached to the first face of the shoe box. In yet a further embodiment, the non-removable top face may be hingedly attached to the second face of the shoe box. As discussed above, these embodiments uniquely enable the shoe box to be maintained either individually or in a stackable configuration without risk of dislodgment of a lid that is commonly found in many prior art shoe boxes. Accordingly, the non-removable top face may provide more reliable support, especially in a stackable configuration.
  • In another embodiment, the shoe box may further include a shoe label on the front face identifying information about the shoe, such as the size, brand, and/or model information. In a further embodiment, the shoe label may be disposed in the first display window. In an alternative embodiment, the shoe label may disposed in a second display window. Accordingly, the contents of the shoe box may be further identifiable by the model no., style no., color, size, or other descriptive information about the shoe, in addition to the visual identification provided by the product card in the first display window. This feature may uniquely enable more convenient and efficient identification of the shoe contained in the shoe box.
  • In another embodiment, the shoe box may be made of cardboard or corrugated paper board. This material is light weight and therefore amenable to convenient transport and/or storage. Furthermore, this material is inexpensive, thereby reducing the costs of production and enabling competitive pricing of the shoe box.
  • In another embodiment, the product card may be mounted on a product card face behind the first display window, the product card face being slidably disposable between the front face and a first front face fold behind the front face. In a further embodiment, a product card retaining tab disposed on the product card face may be operative to hold the product card in position behind the first display window. These embodiments of the shoe box may be most advantageously used in a retail commercial shoe store setting, wherein the front face of the shoe box is not pivotally extendable. In this configuration, the product card may slide behind the front display window onto the product card face without having to disassemble or otherwise open the shoe box. In yet another embodiment, the product card may be disposed behind the first display window between the front face and a second front face fold. This embodiment of the shoe box may be most advantageously used in a residential aftermarket setting, wherein the front face of the shoe box may be pivotally opened, thereby allowing the individual to slide the product card behind the first display window between the front face and the second front face fold.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • These and other features and advantages of the various embodiments disclosed herein will be better understood with respect to the following description and drawings, in which like numbers refer to like parts throughout, and in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the front face of the shoe box depicting the first display window and access aperture.
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the shoe box utilized primarily in a retail or commercial shoe store setting depicting the hinged attachment between the first face and the non-removable top face of the shoe box.
  • FIG. 2A is a cross-sectional view of the shoe box shown in FIG. 2 depicting the product card on a product card face behind the first display window held in position by a product card retaining tab between the front face and the first front face fold.
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective of the preferential folds disposed between each of the six faces of the shoe box.
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the front face pivotally extended in an open position at a front face angle greater than orthogonal to the first face and the second face, with the first face first tab and the first face second tab disposed in the first face first recess and the first face second recess respectively of a second shoe box stacked on top of a shoe box, and the second face first tab and second face second tab disposed in the second face first recess and second face second recess of a second shoe box on top the first shoe box.
  • FIG. 4A is a cross-sectional view of the shoe box shown in FIG. 4 depicting the product card behind the first display window between the front face and the second front face fold.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the shoe box utilized primarily in a stackable configuration in an aftermarket residential setting depicting a front face having a first face first tab and a first face second tab on the first face edge, a second face first tab and a second face second tab on the second face edge, and an access aperture and first display window on the front face.
  • FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the preferential folds of the shoe box with the first front face edge having a first face wall with a first face wall hook and a first face wedge, and a second front face edge having a second face wall with a second face wall hook and a second face wedge operative to securely open and close the front face relative to the first face and the second face.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The drawings referred to herein are for the purposes of illustrating the preferred embodiments of the present invention and not for the purposes of limiting the same.
  • FIG. 1 is an embodiment of the universal shoe box 10. A non-removable top face 42 and a front face 14 are visible. The top face 42 is “non-removable” in that it is hingedly attached to at least one adjacent face. Although the top face 42 depicted in FIG. 1 is hingedly attached to the first face 26, it is also contemplated within the scope of the present invention that various embodiments of the shoe box 10 may have the top face 42 hingedly-attached to either the rear face 20, the front face 14, or the second face 34. The perspective shown in FIG. 2 visibly depicts the rear face 20 and the second face 34 of the shoe box 10.
  • Still referring to FIG. 1, the front face 14 is generally defined by a longitudinal front face axis 16 and a lateral front face axis 18. The first face 26 and the second face 34 are generally defined by a longitudinal first face axis 28, a lateral first face axis 30, a longitudinal second face axis 36, and a lateral second face axis 38, respectively. FIG. 2 depicts the rear face 20 generally defining a longitudinal rear face axis 22 and a lateral rear face axis 24. The non-removable top face 42 is generally defined by a longitudinal top face axis 44 and a lateral top face axis 46. More clearly depicted in FIG. 6, the shoe box 10 also has a non-removable bottom face 48 generally defining a longitudinal bottom face axis 50 and a lateral bottom face axis 52.
  • Referring now to FIG. 3, the universal shoe box 10 has six faces formed of a common contiguous material, with each face interconnected with at least one adjacent face. At least one face is hingedly attached to an adjacent face. Each face of the universal shoe box 10 has a preferential fold 12 disposed between the adjacent face. For example, FIG. 3 depicts preferential folds 12 between the front face 14 and the first face 26, the top face 42 and the first face edge 32, the rear face 20 and the first face 26, the bottom face 48 and the first face 26, the bottom face 48 and the second face 34, and the second face 34 and the second face edge 40.
  • As shown in FIGS. 1-3, the first face 26 is disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face 14 and the rear face 20. The top face 42 is disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face 14, the rear face 20, the first face 26, and the second face 34. The second face 34 is disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face 14 and the rear face 20. The preferential fold 12 between the first face 26 and the top face 42 is a first face edge 32 extending from the front face 14 to the rear face 20. The preferential fold 12 between the second face 34 and the top face 20 is a second face edge 40 extending from the front face 14 to the rear face 20. As shown is FIG. 3, the bottom face 48 is disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face 14, the rear face 20, the first face 26, and the second face 34.
  • Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the shoe box 10 is shown to have an access aperture 54 disposed on the front face 14. The access aperture 54 depicted in FIGS. 1 and 2 is circular. However, in another embodiment of the shoe box 10, the access aperture 54 may be oval in shape. This configuration of the shoe box 10 may be most useful in an aftermarket residential setting for an individual desiring to be able to pivotally open or close with their fingers the front face 14 of the shoe box 10 in the stacked configuration to insert or remove a pair of shoes. It is also contemplated within the scope of the present invention that the various aspects of the shoe box 10 may be employed with an access aperture 54 that may also have a polygonal, square, heart, or other configuration.
  • FIGS. 1, 2, 4 & 5 depict an embodiment of the shoe box 10 having a first display window 56 disposed on the front face 14 of the shoe box 10 proximate to the access aperture 54. The first display window 56 is operative to display a product card 58 behind the front face 14 depicting an image of a shoe 60. As shown in FIGS. 2, 2A, and 3, in one embodiment of the shoe box 10, the product card 58 may be mounted on a product card face 114 behind the first display window 56. The product card face 58 may be slidably disposable between the front face 14 and a first front face fold 114 behind the front face. In a further embodiment, a product card retaining tab 112 disposed on the product card face 114 may be operative to hold the product card 58 in position behind the first display window 56. These embodiments of the shoe box 10 may be most advantageously used in a retail commercial shoe store setting, wherein the front face 14 of the shoe box 10 is not pivotally extendable. In this configuration, the product card 58 may be slid behind the first display window 56 onto the product card face 114 without having to disassemble or otherwise open the shoe box 10. In yet another embodiment shown in FIGS. 4 and 4A, the product card 58 may be disposed behind the first display window 56 between the front face 14 and a second front face fold 110. This embodiment of the shoe box 10 may be most advantageously used in a residential aftermarket setting, wherein the front face 14 of the shoe box 10 may be pivotally opened, thereby allowing the individual to slide the product card 58 behind the first display window 56 between the front face 14 and the second front face fold 110.
  • The shoe box 10 is innovative in that the preferential folds 12 enable the quick assembly and disassembly of the shoe box 10 into an interconnected flat configuration that may be readily stored in a space-saving manner when the shoe box is not being used. The preferential folds 12 may be configured to enable the shoe box 10 to be universally adapted to store shoes of different types and sizes. The shoe box 10 may also be adapted for the storage of articles of clothing and other miscellaneous items. Furthermore, the access aperture 54 on the front face 14 of the shoe box 10 may enable ready accessibility to and/or retrieval of a single shoe box 10, either by hand or through the use of a retrieval tool. The first display window 56 enables quick and efficient visual identification of the contents of the shoe box 10 based on the image 60 depicted on the product card 58, before the shoe box 10 is opened. As is discussed in further detail below, the non-removable top face 20 and bottom face 48 are innovative in that there is no lid that may fall off or otherwise be dislodged from the shoe box 10. This feature may uniquely enable the shoe box 10 to be more readily positioned in a stackable configuration as well as providing underlying support to a plurality of shoe boxes 102 that may be stacked on top of the shoe box 10.
  • This embodiment of the shoe box 10 shown in FIGS. 1-3 may be most advantageously used in a retail shoe store or commercial setting, where the shoe inventory is stored in a room filled with shoe boxes 88, 102 stacked one on top of the other. The first display window 56 on the universal shoe box 10 may enable a sales person to readily locate, identify, and retrieve a shoe with the size, color, style, and/or brand requirements requested by a customer, or to readily find another shoe that may also satisfy the customer's tastes that had not been previously considered by the customer. As such, the sales person is able to devote less time looking for shoes in inventory and more time presenting shoes to the customer. The increased amount of time a shoe salesperson is able to spend with the customer and the more shoe selection alternatives the salesperson is able to present to the customer may improve the perceived quality of customer service and therefore increase the potential revenue and profits for the shoe store.
  • Referring now to FIG. 5, the embodiment of the shoe box 10 may further include a front face 14 that is pivotally extendable in an open position 62 at a front face angle 64 that is greater than orthogonal to the first face 26 and the second face 34. The front face 14 may have a first front face edge 66 proximate to the first face 26 and a second front face edge 68 proximate to the second face 34. The first front face edge 66 may have a first face wall 70 extending generally orthogonal to the first front face edge 66 toward the first face 26. The second front face edge 68 may have a second face wall 72 extending generally orthogonal to the second front face edge 68 toward the second face 34.
  • As shown in FIG. 6, the first face wall 70 may have a first face wall hook 77 operative to attach to the first face 26. Likewise the second face wall 72 may have a second face wall hook 76 operative to attach to the second face 34. The first face wall hook 77 and the second face wall hook 76 stop the front face 14 from being pivotally extended beyond the front face angle 64 in an open position 62.
  • This feature of the shoe box 10 is further innovative in that the pivoting mechanism of the front face 14 enables the shoe box to be in an opened position 62, even when there are a plurality of shoe boxes 102 stacked on top of the shoe box 10 as shown in FIG. 4. As a result, the contents of the shoe box 10 may be readily accessed without having to remove, adjust, or otherwise effect the position of the one or more shoe boxes 102 stacked on top of the shoe box 10. As such, once the contents of the shoe box 10 have been visually identified by the product card 58 on the first display window 56, the shoes contained therein may be readily removed while maintaining the stacked configuration of the plurality of shoe boxes 102.
  • The embodiments of the shoe box 10 shown in FIGS. 4-6 may be most advantageously used in an aftermarket residential setting by an individual desiring to save space by storing multiple shoe boxes 88, 102 in a stacked configuration while still being able to readily identify and access the contents therein. The individual may also choose to store articles of clothing or other miscellaneous items in the shoe box, in addition to or in lieu of shoes. As in the case of the embodiment of the shoe box used in the retail or commercial shore store setting, the image of the shoe in the first display window 56 in these embodiments of the shoe box 10 may enable the individual to readily locate and identify a shoe having the desired size, color, style, and/or brand. In addition, the pivoting mechanism of the front face 14 in this embodiment of the shoe box 10 enables the individual to readily remove a desired shoe from a shoe box 10 without disturbing the configuration of shoe boxes stacked on top of the shoe box 88, 102. This in turn enables an individual to more efficiently determine what shoe they wish to wear with a particular outfit and then retrieve the desired shoe while at the same time maintaining an organized shoe storage system in their closet.
  • Still referring to FIGS. 4-6, in another embodiment of the shoe box 10, the first face wall 70 may have a first face wedge 78 and the second face wall 72 may have a second face wedge 80 proximate to the front face 14. The first face wedge 78 and the second face wedge 80 may be operative to secure the front face 14 of the shoe box 10 orthogonal to the first face 26 and the second face 34 respectively in a closed position 82. This feature of the shoe box 10 uniquely enables the front face 14 to be securely closed against the first face 26 and the second face 34 while maintaining the stacked configuration. As such, the contents may be secured in the shoe box 10 in the closed position 82.
  • Still referring to FIGS. 4-6, another embodiment of the present invention may further include a first face first tab 84 proximate to the first face edge 32. The first face first tab 84 may be disposable in a first face first recess 86 proximate to the first face edge 32 of a second shoe box 88 on top of the shoe box 10. A second face first tab 90 proximate to the second face edge 40 may be disposable in a second face first recess 92 proximate to the second face edge 40 of the second shoe box 88. This feature enables the second shoe box 88 to be fixedly mounted in a stacked configuration on top of the shoe box 10. In another embodiment, the first face first tab 84 may be on the first face edge 32 proximate to the front face 14 projecting above the top face 42, as shown in FIG. 4. In this embodiment, the second face first tab 90 may likewise be on the second face edge 40 proximate to the front face 14 projecting above the top face 42. The first face first tab 84 may be disposable in the first face first recess 86 on the first face edge 32 of the second shoe box 88. The second face first tab 90 may be disposable in the second face first recess 92 on the second face edge 40 of the second shoe box 88. In yet a further embodiment, the shoe box 10 may further include a first face second tab 94 on the first face edge 32 proximate to the rear face 20 projecting above the top face 42. In this embodiment, the shoe box 10 may further include a second face second tab 96 on the second face edge 40 proximate to the rear face 20 projecting above the top face 42. The first face second tab 94 may be disposable in the first face second recess 98 on the first face edge 32 of the second shoe box 88. The second face second tab 96 may be disposable in the second face second recess 100 on the second face edge 40 on the second shoe box 88.
  • These features of the shoe box 10 uniquely enable the mounting of the second shoe box 88 or a plurality of shoe boxes 102, one on top of the other in a stackable configuration. In these embodiments, the second shoe box 88 or one of a plurality of shoe boxes 102 may be precisely positioned on top of the shoe box 10, with the insertion of the tabs 84, 90, 94, 96 on the lower shoe box 10 into the recesses 86, 92, 98, 100 located on the second shoe box 88 or one or more plurality of shoe boxes 102 on top of the shoe box 10. In this embodiment, the second shoe box 88 or one more plurality of shoe boxes 102 stacked on top of the shoe box 10 may be better supported and less likely to be dislodged or to otherwise fall off of the shoe box 10. Accordingly, the lower shoe box 10 may be better able to support the second shoe box 88 above it, and the second shoe box 88 may be better able to support the one or more of a plurality of shoe boxes 102 above it, and so forth, thereby reducing the risk of slippage of dislodgement of one or more shoe boxes placed in a stacked configuration. As such, the space-saving features of this stackable configuration may be maintained.
  • This embodiment of the shoe box 10 may be most advantageously used in the aftermarket residential setting by the individual consumer desiring to use the shoe box 10 for storage purposes in their closet at home. In particular, this configuration may be most effectively used in an embodiment of the shoe box 10 wherein the front face 14 may also be pivotally extended in an open position 62 as depicted in FIG. 5, thereby enabling removal of a pair of shoes or other item from an individual shoe box 10 while maintaining the stackable configuration of the second shoe box 88 or one or more plurality of additional shoe boxes 102 positioned on top of the shoe box 10 in their closet.
  • As shown in FIGS. 1A-1B, the shoe box 10 may further include a shoe label 104 on the front face 14. The shoe label 104 may include identifying information about the shoe, such as the size, color, and/or model information. In a further embodiment, the shoe label 104 may be disposed in the first display window 56. In yet a further embodiment, the shoe label 104 may be disposed in a second display window 106.
  • These features uniquely enable the shoe box 10 to identify its contents by descriptive information in addition to the visual identification provided by an image of the shoe 60 on the product card 58 in the first display window 56. As such, this feature may uniquely enable the more convenient and efficient identification of the shoe contained in the shoe box 10 without having to open the shoe box 10.
  • Although the shoe box 10 depicted in FIGS. 1-6 are made of cardboard or corrugated paper board material, it is also contemplated within the scope of the present invention that the various aspects of the shoe box 10 may be employed with any lightweight material. The lightweight nature of these materials are advantageous in allowing and enabling the shoe box 10 to be conveniently transported and/or placed in storage. Furthermore, these materials may be inexpensive and thereby reduce the cost of production of the shoe box and enable its competitive pricing.
  • The above description is given by way of example, and not limitation. Given the above disclosure, one skilled in the art could devise variations that are within the scope and spirit of the invention disclosed herein. Further, the various features of the embodiments disclosed herein can be used alone, or in varying combinations with each other and are not intended to be limited to the specific combination described herein. Thus, the scope of the claims is not to be limited by the illustrated embodiments.

Claims (19)

  1. 1. A universal shoe box comprising:
    six faces formed of a common contiguous material, each face interconnected with at least one adjacent face with at least one face being hingedly attached to the adjacent face, each face further having a preferential fold disposed between each adjacent face, the six faces including a front face defining generally a longitudinal front face axis and a lateral front face axis, a rear face opposing the front face, the rear face defining generally a longitudinal rear face axis and a lateral rear face axis, a first face defining generally a longitudinal first face axis and a lateral first face axis, the first face disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face and the rear face, a non-removable top face defining generally a longitudinal top face axis and a lateral top face axis, the top face disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face, the rear face, the first face, and the second face, the preferential fold between the first face and the top face being a first face edge extending from the front face to the rear face, a second face opposing the first face, the second face defining generally a longitudinal second face axis and a lateral second face axis, the second face further disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face and the rear face, the preferential fold between the second face and the top face being a second face edge extending from the front face to the rear face, and a non-removable bottom face opposing the top face, the bottom face defining generally a longitudinal bottom face axis and a lateral bottom face axis, the bottom face further disposed generally orthogonal to and between the front face, the rear face, the first face, and the second face;
    an access aperture disposed on the front face; and
    a first display window disposed on the front face proximate to the access aperture, the first display window operative to display a product card depicting an image of a shoe.
  2. 2. The shoe box as claimed in claim 1, wherein the front face is pivotally extendable in an open position at a front face angle greater than orthogonal to the first face and the second face, the front face having a first front face edge adjacent the first face and a second front face edge adjacent the second face, the first front face edge having a first face wall extending generally orthogonal to the first front face edge proximate to the first front face, the second front face edge having a second face wall extending generally orthogonal to the second front face edge proximate to the second face, the first face wall having a first face wall hook and the second face wall having a second face wall hook operative to attach to the first face and the second face respectively to stop the front face from being pivotally extended past the front face angle in an open position;
  3. 3. The shoe box as claimed in claim 2, wherein the first face wall has a first face wedge and the second face wall has a second face wedge proximate to the front face operative to secure the front face orthogonal to the first face and the second face respectively in a closed position.
  4. 4. The shoe box as claimed in claim 1, wherein the access aperture is oval in shape.
  5. 5. The shoe box as claimed in claim 1, wherein the access aperture is circular in shape.
  6. 6. The shoe box as claimed in claim 1 further includes a first face first tab proximate to the first face edge disposable in a first face first recess proximate to the first face edge of a second shoe box on top of the shoe box, and a second face first tab proximate to the second face edge disposable in a second face first recess proximate to the second face edge of the second shoe box, thereby enabling the second shoe box to be fixedly mounted on the shoe box.
  7. 7. The shoe box as claimed in claim 6, wherein the first face first tab is on the first face edge proximate to the front face projecting above the top face, and the second face first tab is on the second face edge proximate to the front face projecting above the top face, the first face first tab being disposable in the first face recess on the first face edge of the second shoe box, and the second face first tab being disposable in the second face first recess on the second face first recess on the second face edge of the second shoe box.
  8. 8. The shoe box as claimed in claim 7, further includes a first face second tab on the first face edge proximate to the rear face projecting above the top face, and a second face second tab is on the second face edge proximate to the rear face projecting above the top face, the first face second tab being disposable in a first face second recess on the first face edge of the second shoe box, the second face second tab being disposable in a second face second recess on the second face edge of the second shoe box.
  9. 9. The shoe box as claimed in claim 8 further includes a plurality of shoe boxes fixedly mounted on top of the shoe box, each shoe box having a first face first tab, a first face second tab, a second face first tab, a second face second tab, a first face first recess, a first face second recess, a second face first recess, and a second face second recess on the first face edge and the second face edge respectively.
  10. 10. The shoe box as claimed in claim 1, wherein the non-removable top face is hingedly attached to the rear face of the shoe box.
  11. 11. The shoe box as claimed in claim 1, wherein the non-removable top face is hingedly attached to the first face of the shoe box.
  12. 12. The shoe box as claimed in claim 1, wherein the non-removable top face is hingedly attached to the second face of the shoe box.
  13. 13. The shoe box as claimed in claim 1 further includes a shoe label on the front face identifying information about the shoe, such as the size, brand, and/or model information.
  14. 14. The shoe box as claimed in claim 13, wherein the shoe label is disposed in the first display window.
  15. 15. The shoe box as claimed in claim 13, wherein the shoe label is disposed in a second display window.
  16. 16. The shoe box as claimed in claim 1, wherein the six faces are made of cardboard or corrugated paper board.
  17. 17. The shoe box as claimed in claim 1, wherein the product card is mounted on a product card face behind the first display window, the product card face being slidably disposable between the front face and a first front face fold behind the front face.
  18. 18. The shoe box as claimed in claim 17 further includes a product card retaining tab disposed on the product card face operative to hold the product card in position behind the first display window.
  19. 19. The shoe box as claimed in claim 1, wherein the product card is disposed behind the first display window between the front face and a second front face fold.
US12485685 2009-06-16 2009-06-16 Universal shoe box Abandoned US20100314268A1 (en)

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US12485685 US20100314268A1 (en) 2009-06-16 2009-06-16 Universal shoe box

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US12485685 US20100314268A1 (en) 2009-06-16 2009-06-16 Universal shoe box
US12719656 US20100314435A1 (en) 2009-06-16 2010-03-08 Universal two-cell storage box

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US12719656 Continuation-In-Part US20100314435A1 (en) 2009-06-16 2010-03-08 Universal two-cell storage box

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US20120267385A1 (en) * 2011-04-25 2012-10-25 William Mitchell Scott Container with grips
USD673368S1 (en) 2012-04-06 2013-01-01 William Mitchell Scott Box
USD675443S1 (en) 2011-05-10 2013-02-05 William Scott Box
USD679094S1 (en) 2011-05-10 2013-04-02 William Scott Box
USD681331S1 (en) 2011-05-10 2013-05-07 William Scott Box with private label
USD681953S1 (en) 2011-05-09 2013-05-14 William Scott Box
USD685634S1 (en) 2012-04-27 2013-07-09 William Mitchell Scott Box
USD690105S1 (en) 2012-04-28 2013-09-24 William Mitchell Scott Carrying tote
USD690107S1 (en) 2012-04-28 2013-09-24 William Mitchell Scott Carrying tote
USD690106S1 (en) 2012-04-28 2013-09-24 William Mitchell Scott Carrying tote
US20140183071A1 (en) * 2012-12-28 2014-07-03 Roy Robert Smith, III Shake Me & Look Inside, Interactive Footwear Container
USD712476S1 (en) 2012-11-09 2014-09-02 William Mitchell Scott Document holder
USD712475S1 (en) 2012-11-09 2014-09-02 William Mitchell Scott Document holder
USD720539S1 (en) 2012-09-07 2015-01-06 William Mitchell Scott Box
USD721495S1 (en) 2012-09-07 2015-01-27 William Mitchell Scott Box
US9051075B2 (en) 2012-09-07 2015-06-09 William M. Scott Corrugated container box and blank
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US9162799B2 (en) 2013-08-30 2015-10-20 Heather M. Perry Storage container and identification system
US9352888B2 (en) 2012-09-07 2016-05-31 William Mitchell Scott Shipping container with grips and locking ports
US20170001751A1 (en) * 2015-07-01 2017-01-05 Generation Tux, Inc. Shoe packaging systems and methods
CN106494709A (en) * 2016-11-19 2017-03-15 无锡中环包装有限公司 Packaging box with multiple placing side surfaces
WO2017141059A1 (en) 2016-02-15 2017-08-24 Andreas Kioroglou Footwear packaging with opening wherein footwear can be seen and touched

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WO2012140554A1 (en) * 2011-04-13 2012-10-18 Evoluzione S.R.L. Container
US20120267385A1 (en) * 2011-04-25 2012-10-25 William Mitchell Scott Container with grips
US9242759B2 (en) * 2011-04-25 2016-01-26 William Mitchell Scott Container with grips
USD681953S1 (en) 2011-05-09 2013-05-14 William Scott Box
USD711108S1 (en) 2011-05-09 2014-08-19 William Mitchell Scott Box
USD681331S1 (en) 2011-05-10 2013-05-07 William Scott Box with private label
USD679094S1 (en) 2011-05-10 2013-04-02 William Scott Box
USD675443S1 (en) 2011-05-10 2013-02-05 William Scott Box
USD712251S1 (en) 2011-05-10 2014-09-02 William Mitchell Scott Box
USD698152S1 (en) 2011-05-10 2014-01-28 William Mitchell Scott Box
USD709704S1 (en) 2011-05-10 2014-07-29 William Mitchell Scott Box
USD673368S1 (en) 2012-04-06 2013-01-01 William Mitchell Scott Box
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US20140183071A1 (en) * 2012-12-28 2014-07-03 Roy Robert Smith, III Shake Me & Look Inside, Interactive Footwear Container
US9162799B2 (en) 2013-08-30 2015-10-20 Heather M. Perry Storage container and identification system
US20150208764A1 (en) * 2014-01-28 2015-07-30 Delservices Group, Inc. Fo-fa-tu
US10028546B2 (en) * 2014-01-28 2018-07-24 Delservices Group, Inc. Fo-Fa-Tu
US20170001751A1 (en) * 2015-07-01 2017-01-05 Generation Tux, Inc. Shoe packaging systems and methods
WO2017141059A1 (en) 2016-02-15 2017-08-24 Andreas Kioroglou Footwear packaging with opening wherein footwear can be seen and touched
CN106494709A (en) * 2016-11-19 2017-03-15 无锡中环包装有限公司 Packaging box with multiple placing side surfaces

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