US20100313326A1 - Outer garment - Google Patents

Outer garment Download PDF

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US20100313326A1
US20100313326A1 US12813357 US81335710A US2010313326A1 US 20100313326 A1 US20100313326 A1 US 20100313326A1 US 12813357 US12813357 US 12813357 US 81335710 A US81335710 A US 81335710A US 2010313326 A1 US2010313326 A1 US 2010313326A1
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Prior art keywords
portion
torso
wearer
groin
panel
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Abandoned
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US12813357
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Craig Turner
Dan Allen
Sherry Ogrin
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Ethos Surgical LLC
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BRIDGE CITY SURGICAL Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D13/00Professional, industrial, or sporting protective garments, e.g. garments affording protection against blows or punches, surgeon's gowns
    • A41D13/12Surgeons' or patients' gowns or dresses
    • A41D13/1209Surgeons' gowns or dresses

Abstract

Surgical garments and methods are disclosed for maintaining a sterile field between a garment wearer seated on a surgical chair and a patient positioned between the wearer's legs.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority to and the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Nos. 61/186,333, filed Jun. 11, 2009, and 61/321,444, filed Apr. 6, 2010, both of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • FIELD
  • This disclosure concerns outer garments, and more particularly but not exclusively garments for use in clean environments, with a surgical garment for use in a sterile operating environment being one example.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Various classes of workers position themselves in a conventional posture whereby the worker stands adjacent a work area and uses outstretched arms to reach an object of the worker's labor. Some classes of these workers, such as, for example, artists, surgeons, assembly line workers, bakers, cleanroom workers and blacksmiths, work in an environment where, for convenience and/or safety reasons, the workers wear an external garment.
  • For example, a surgeon ordinarily wears an external surgical gown, many of which are disposable, to maintain a sterile field adjacent a surgical work area. However, conventional surgical gowns are only designed to maintain a sterile filed when the surgeon is in a standing position adjacent an operating table. If the surgeon assumes a different posture, such as a seated position, conventional surgical gowns may not maintain the sterile filed between the surgeon and the patient.
  • By way of further example, bakers and blacksmiths have traditionally worn an apron to avoid soiling street clothes, and, in the case of the blacksmith, to reduce the likelihood of being burned by things such as embers or slag. Other workers, such as assembly line workers, wear gowns, smocks and/or aprons to maintain a field of cleanliness (e.g., electronics assemblers, chicken processors) in a work space, as well as, in at least some instances, to avoid soiling street clothes. Such gowns, smocks and aprons traditionally cover part, or all, of the wearer's torso, and/or part or all of the worker's arms and leave the wearer's legs partially or entirely exposed. Cleanroom workers have traditionally worn external garments, such as “bunny suits,” over street clothes. These external garments are notoriously difficult and time-consuming to don, and can be uncomfortable to wear.
  • Accordingly, there exists a need for new and improved garments for use in such applications.
  • SUMMARY
  • Several embodiments of surgical garments are disclosed that allow a wearer, such as a surgeon, to assume different postures, such as seated in a chair straddling a patient, while still maintaining a sterile field between the patient and the wearer's torso, arms, and legs. The disclosed surgical garments can be donned from the front of the wearer and can wrap around the wearer's torso and lower body. Some embodiments include individual leg panels that wrap around each leg and a groin-covering panel that wraps through the wearer's groin region and is secured at the back of the wearer. Other embodiments include a flared, gown-like lower body portion that wraps around the entire lower body of the wearer.
  • According to one embodiment described herein, a surgical garment for covering a wearer's torso, arms and legs to maintain a sterile field between the wearer and a patient includes a torso portion, leg panels and a groin-covering panel. The torso portion comprises left and right side portions and a lower end portion. The torso portion is configured for wrapping around the torso of the wearer and the left and right side portions are securable to one another at the back of the wearer's torso. A left leg panel and a right leg panel extend downwardly from the lower end of the torso portion and extend horizontally between respective inner and outer side portions. Each leg panel is configured for wrapping around a respective leg of the wearer from a groin region of the wearer to an ankle region of the wearer and the inner and outer side portions of each leg panel are securable to one another at the back of the respective leg. A groin-covering panel comprises opposing side edges extending from an upper front edge portion to an upper rear edge portion of the groin-covering panel. At least the side edges and the upper rear edge portion are separate from the torso portion and the leg panels. The upper rear edge is securable to the torso portion at the back of the wearer.
  • An exemplary method is further disclosed for maintaining a sterile field between one's body and a patient in an operating environment while in a seated position above and straddling the patient. The method includes: positioning a surgical chair adjacent the patient, the surgical chair having a seat positioned above the patient and a front torso support extending upwardly from the seat; donning a sterile surgical garment, like the garment described in the previous paragraph, from the front of one's body; and sitting on the surgical chair such that the surgical garment forms a sterile field between the patient and one's body.
  • According to another embodiment disclosed herein, a surgical garment includes a torso portion, sleeves, and a flared lower body portion. The torso portion extends laterally between opposing side edges and extends vertically between an upper edge and a lower edge. The lower body portion extends laterally between opposing side edges and extends vertically between a bottom edge and an top edge, the top edge of the lower body portion is joined to the lower edge of the torso portion, and the bottom edge has a greater length than the top edge such that the garment flares in a direction extending from the top edge to the bottom edge. The lower body portion includes a plurality of first panels and a plurality of triangular second panels interposed between the first panels. The first and second panels are oriented with their heights extending from the bottom edge toward the top edge of the lower body portion and each triangular panel has a base that forms part of the bottom edge of the lower body portion. The surgical garment is donned from the front of a wearer and the torso portion is adapted to wrap completely around the torso of the wearer and the lower body portion is adapted to wrap completely around the lower body of the wearer from the torso to about the ankles of the wearer.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows a side-elevation view of a surgeon seating on a surgical chair, wearing one embodiment of a surgical gown as disclosed herein and straddling a patient lying on an operating table.
  • FIG. 2 shows a perspective view from above and to the right of the surgeon shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 shows a rear-elevation view of the surgical gown worn by the surgeon in FIGS. 1 and 2. FIG. 3A shows a front-elevation view of the surgical gown shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The surgical gown in FIGS. 3 and 3A is shown in an open, or non-working, position.
  • FIG. 4 shows a front-elevation view of the surgeon shown in FIG. 1 with the patient, operating table and surgeon-supporting structure removed to more clearly show the fit of the surgical gown to the surgeon when the gown is positioned in a closed, or working, position.
  • FIG. 5 shows a rear-elevation view of the surgeon shown in FIG. 4. Seams formed by edges of the surgical gown when the gown is positioned in a closed, or working, position are visible.
  • FIG. 6A shows another exemplary garment.
  • FIG. 6B shows a third exemplary garment.
  • FIG. 7 shows a groin-covering member for use with garments of the type disclosed herein.
  • FIG. 8 shows a surgeon wearing the groin-covering member shown in FIG. 7 with a surgical gown of the type disclosed herein.
  • FIG. 9 shows a surgeon wearing a gown of the type disclosed herein formed with a separate groin-covering member adjoining the torso-covering portion.
  • FIG. 10 is a rear elevation view of a surgical gown according to another embodiment.
  • FIG. 11 is a top view of the surgical gown of FIG. 10 shown with the lower portion of the gown spread apart and laid flat.
  • FIG. 12 is a front view of a surgeon wearing the gown of FIG. 10.
  • FIG. 13 is a rear view of a surgeon wearing the gown of FIG. 10.
  • FIG. 14 is front view of a surgeon wearing the gown of FIG. 10 and assuming a seated position.
  • FIG. 15 is a perspective view of a surgeon wearing the gown of FIG. 10 and seated in the surgical chair shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Although various classes of workers have traditionally stood adjacent a work area and used outstretched arms to reach the object of their labor, ergonomic considerations have lead some to reconsider this conventional working posture. For example, an improved surgical chair is disclosed in U.S. Publication No. 2009/0050162-A1, which is incorporated by reference herein. The disclosed surgical chair allows a surgeon to maintain a more comfortable posture during surgery.
  • With reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, an exemplary surgical chair 8 is shown, as disclosed in the prior-filed applications mentioned above. A surgeon seated in the chair 8 assumes a surgical posture 10. The posture 10 positions the surgeon in a forward-leaning, seated position above and straddling a patient 15, and surgical supports 12, 13, 14 of the chair support the surgeon's torso, arms (covered by garment arms 105) and feet 25, respectively, when the surgeon is so positioned. A surgical area 30 (or more generally, a working region) within reach of the surgeon (or more generally, a seated worker) in the exemplary posture 10 extends between the surgeon's knees 22. The surgeon's knees 22 and legs are shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 being covered by portions 120, 120′ of an external garment 100, described more fully below.
  • In FIGS. 1 and 2, the patient 15 is shown lying on an operating table 16 in a supine position with his feet elevated above his head relative to the ground 17. To reduce the likelihood of contamination of the surgical work area 30, patient infection, etc., a sterile field can be maintained in a region adjacent the surgical area extending below the top surface 18 of the table 16 and adjacent the table.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates an exemplary garment 100 for covering a surgeon's torso, arms and legs and for maintaining a sterile field in a region adjacent the surgical area 30 extending upwardly from the lower edges 121, 121′ of the garment legs, or panels, 120, 120′. As noted above, the garment 100 is laid open in a non-working (non-worn) position 101 in FIG. 3. By way of contrast, the same garment 100 is shown being worn by a surgeon in a closed, or working, position 102 in FIGS. 1, 2, 4 and 5. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the garment 100 extends upwardly from below the top surface 18 of the table 16, and maintains a sterile field of substantially the same extent.
  • With further reference to FIGS. 3 and 3A, the garment 100 comprises a panel, or sheet, having an upper, torso-covering portion 150 extending generally vertically between a top-edge 90 forming a neckline (see FIG. 4) and a lower end portion 92 adjacent to three lower panels 120, 120′, 130, and generally laterally between opposing longitudinal side edges 104 and 104′. The torso-covering portion 150 defines apertures 95 opening to sleeves 105. The three lower panels 120, 120′, 130 can adjoin the torso-covering portion 150 (e.g., one or more of the panels 120, 120′, 130 can be of a unitary construction with the torso-covering portion 150, or can be affixed to the torso-covering portion 150 by stitching, gluing, zippering or other known panel-joining technique suitable for use with surgical garments, as shown by the seam 502 in FIG. 9) and can extend generally downwardly from the torso-covering portion 150. The outer lower panels 120, 120′ define leg-covering members, and the central lower panel 130 defines a groin-covering member. Each of these features is described more fully below.
  • Each sleeve 105 of the illustrated garment 100 is attached, as by stitching, gluing or other known joining technique, to the torso-covering portion. In some embodiments, the sleeves 105 extend contiguously, without a discernible seam or joint, from the torso-covering portion 150.
  • In donning the garment shown in FIGS. 3 and 3A, a surgeon can approach the garment from the rear of the garment (e.g., by approaching the garment with outstretched arms when the garment 100 is positioned in the non-working position, as shown in FIG. 3A). The surgeon can extend his arms and hands 20 through the apertures 95, into the sleeves 105 and through the corresponding cuffs 106. An assistant can close the torso-covering portion 150 around the surgeon's torso and the leg-covering panels 120, 120′ around the surgeon's left leg and right leg, respectively, placing the garment in the working position 102 shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. The center panel 130 can be wrapped through the surgeon's groin region, being positioned to cover the surgeon's groin region, and, as more fully described below, fastened into place. As used herein, a “working position” means the position of a fully-donned garment.
  • FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate other exemplary garment embodiments, which are described more fully below. FIG. 7 shows a separate, hour-glass shaped groin-covering member, or panel, 400. As described more fully below and shown in FIG. 8, the groin-covering member 400 can be positioned to cover the wearer's groin region in combination with any of the described garments 100, 200 and 300.
  • The torso-covering portion 150 can be retained about a wearer's torso in a working position so as to cover all, or at least a significant portion, of the wearer's torso, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, by bringing an upper portion of each opposing longitudinal side edge 104, 104′ adjacent to one another in opposing and/or overlapping alignment (as seen most clearly in FIG. 5). Fasteners, such as a pair 151 of tied ties 103, 103′, can retain the opposing longitudinal side edges 104, 104′ in an opposing alignment. Alternatively, or in combination with the ties, other known fasteners, such as buttons and button holes, snaps, hook-and-loop fasteners (e.g., Velcro®), zippers, and the like, can be used to retain the panels 120, 120′ in the working position 102. Additional pairs 152 of ties 103, 103′ can be provided adjacent the torso-covering portion 150 (e.g., at locations along the longitudinal side edges 104, 104′ positioned between the slit apexes 139, 139′ and the upper edge 90) to maintain an opposing alignment between the edges 104, 104′ when in a working position.
  • In other embodiments, the torso-covering portion 150 can comprise left and right side portions that are configured for wrapping around the torso of the wearer such that the left and right side portions are securable in an overlapping position at the back or sides of the wearer.
  • Shown in FIG. 3 extending from the torso-covering portion 150 are two ties 134, 136 (each forming one-half of pairs 153, 154 of ties shown in FIG. 5) for securing a groin-covering member, such as the center panel 130, in a working position 160. Each tie 134, 136 can be of a unitary construction with the torso-covering portion 150, or can be fixedly attached to the torso-covering portion, as by stitching, gluing or other known joining technique.
  • In other embodiments, at least some of the ties 103, 103′ and/or additional ties (not shown) can be position at other portions on the garment, such as between the side edges 104, 104′ of the torso-covering portion 150, to facilitate securing the side portions of the torso-covering portion in an overlapping position at the back or sides of the wearer.
  • With reference to the garment 100 shown in FIG. 3, each of the lower panels 120, 120′, 130 in the illustrated embodiment is of a unitary construction with the torso-covering portion 150 and can be formed by slitting (or otherwise separating) portions of a single panel, or sheet, thereby forming the respective lower panel edges 122, 132 and 122′ and 132. The panels can 120, 120′ form leg coverings when positioned in a working position, and, as more fully described below, the panel 130 can form a groin-covering member when positioned in a working position.
  • As shown, each pair of adjacent panel edges 122, 132 and 122′, 132 can terminate at a respective apex 139, 139′. The apexes 139, 139′ provide convenient reference points for distinguishing between an “upper” or “torso-covering” portion extending above the apexes and “lower” or “leg-covering” panels extending below the apexes, but these reference points do not necessarily correspond to a wearer's anatomy. For example, a garment worn by a first individual can position the apexes (and therefore at least a portion of one or both “leg-covering” panels) adjacent the first individual's torso, and, if worn by a second individual, the garment can position the apexes (and therefore at least a portion of the “torso-covering” portion) adjacent the second individual's legs.
  • As noted above, the outer panels 120, 120′ can be used to cover a wearer's legs. As shown in FIG. 2, each of the left leg panel 120 and right leg panel 120′ can have sufficient length such that the lower ends 121, 121′ extend to adjacent the wearer's feet 25 or ankles while the wearer is in a squatting or seated position. In the operating position shown in FIG. 2, the lower ends 121, 121′ can extend below the level of the operating table 16 to maintain a sterile field between the wearer's lower body and the operating area.
  • As shown in FIG. 3, each of the leg panels 120, 120′ comprises an inner longitudinal edge 122, 122′, respectively, and an outer longitudinal edge 104, 104′, respectively. In some embodiments, the leg panels 120, 120′ can be configured to be wrapped around one of the wearer's legs such that the inner longitudinal edges 122, 122′ are in opposing alignment with the outer longitudinal edges 104, 104′, respectively, as shown in FIG. 5. In some embodiments, inner and outer side portions of each leg panel 120, 120′ can be configured for wrapping around a respective leg and being secured to one another in an overlapping position.
  • The leg panels 120, 120′ can be retained in the working position 102 by fasteners, as by, for example, a pair 155 of tied ties 124, 123. (Alternatively or in combination, other known fasteners, such as buttons and button holes, snaps, hook-and-loop fasteners, zippers, and the like, can be used to retain the panels 120, 120′ in a working position.)
  • As shown in FIG. 3, exemplary ties 123, 125, 127 extend from the outer edge 104 at locations positioned between the apex 139 and the lower edge 121, and corresponding ties 124, 126, 128 extend from the inner edge 122 to form respective pairs of ties 155, 156, 157 (see FIG. 5) that can be joined to cover a surgeon's legs. Each of the respective pairs of ties 155, 156, 157 can be joined, as by knotting, or tying in various known fashions, to retain the panel 120 in a pseudo-cylindrical configuration and around a wearer's left leg.
  • Similarly, ties 123′, 125′, 127′ can extend from the outer longitudinal edge 104′ at locations positioned between the apex 139′ and the lower edge 120′, and corresponding ties 124′, 126′, 128′ extend from the inner longitudinal edge 122′ to form respective pairs of ties 155′, 156′, 157′. Each of the respective pairs of ties 155′, 156′, 157′ can be formed to retain the panel 120′ in a pseudo-cylindrical configuration and around a wearer's right leg.
  • In other embodiments, at least some of the ties shown in FIG. 3 and/or additional ties (not shown) can be positioned at other portions on the leg panels 120, 120′, such as between the outer and inner edges of the leg panels, to facilitate securing the leg panels around a wearer's legs in an overlapping position.
  • Groin-covering members can be affixed to, or of unitary construction with, garments as disclosed herein. For example, as shown in FIG. 3, a panel 130 can serve as a groin-covering member extending below the apexes 139, 139′ and between the leg panels 120, 120′. Alternatively, and as noted above, the panel 130 can be replaced or supplemented with a separate groin-covering member 400 (see FIG. 7, for example) that compliments the torso-covering portion 150 and the leg panels 120, 120′. In some embodiments, the groin-covering member can be secured around the waist of the wearer, as shown in FIG. 8 and/or can be securable to another portion of the garment, such as the lower end portion 92 of the torso-covering portion 150.
  • Unlike the panels 120, 120′, which can be wrapped into pseudo-cylindrical structures for covering the wearer's legs, as shown in FIG. 4, the panel 130 can be used to cover the wearer's groin. The panel 130 can comprise opposing side edges 132 extending from an upper front edge portion 134 between the apexes 139, 139′ to a lower edge 131.
  • The upper front edge portion 134 of the panel 130 can be of unitary construction with the lower end portion 92 of the torso-covering portion 150 or can be securable thereto. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3-5, the panel 130 forms a seamless extension of the torso-covering portion 150. In other embodiments, the upper front edge portion 134 of panel 130 can be sewn or otherwise permanently attached to the torso-covering portion 150.
  • In the working position, as shown in FIG. 5, the groin-covering panel 130 can be wrapped through the wearer's groin region such that the lower edge 131 forms an upper rear edge positioned adjacent the wearer's buttocks or lower- or mid-back. An upper rear edge portion can be at least partially in an overlapping position with portions of the torso-covering portion and/or the leg panels 120, 120′. The upper rear edge portion of the panel 130 can be retained in the working position by securing ties 133, 135 to ties 134, 136, respectively, or by securing the upper rear edge portion to the back of the torso-covering portion 150 with hook-and-loop fasteners or equivalent mechanisms. The panel 130 can cover at least a significant portion of the wearer's lower abdomen, upper legs, and/or groin region.
  • Ties 133, 135 can extend from opposing side edges 132, lower edge 131, or the corners therebetween defined by the panel 130, as shown in FIG. 3. The ties 133, 135 can be joined to the ties 134, 136 extending from the torso-covering portion to form pairs of ties 152, 153, as shown in FIG. 5, and to retain the panel 130 in a groin-covering position 160. In some embodiments, some posterior areas 170 of a wearer can be left exposed, as shown by way of example in FIG. 5. These exposed posterior areas can be reduced in size or eliminated by positioning the pairs of ties 154, 154′ higher (e.g., closer to, or above, the apexes 139, 139′). Alternatively, additional pairs of ties (not shown) can be provided to supplement the array of ties illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 5. Alternatively, the exposed areas 170 can be covered with a separate groin covering member, such as of the type shown in FIGS. 7 and 8.
  • Referring to FIG. 7, a separate groin-covering member 400 is shown. As shown in FIG. 8, the groin-covering member 400 can be worn over and/or under garments of the type described herein. FIGS. 8-9 show the groin-covering member 400 being used with garment 100. However, it should be noted that the groin-covering member 400 can be used with garment 200 (FIG. 6A), garment 300 (FIG. 6B), or other garments described herein. The groin-covering member 400 in the illustrated embodiment comprises an hourglass-shaped panel 402, or sheet, formed of material similar to the disclosed garments. The panel 402 extends between a broad upper front edge portion 404 and a broad upper rear edge portion 406, and has opposing side edges 405 tapering toward each other extending from the front and rear edge portions to a narrow central region 408 that extends underneath the groin in an as-worn position. At or near each corner formed by the intersection of the edges 404, 405, 406, respective ties 411, 412, 413, 414 can extend from the panel. As with other ties described herein, each tie 411, 412, 413, 414 can be integrally formed with the panel 402 or fixedly attached to the panel (as by stitching, gluing or other known technique).
  • The panel 402 can also comprise a front hook-and-loop fastener strip 472 positioned adjacent the upper front edge portion 404 and a rear hook-and-loop fastener strip 474 positioned adjacent the upper rear edge portion 406. When the groin-covering member 400 is worn with garment 200 or 300, for example, the front hook-and-loop fastener strip 472 can be releasably secured to the hook-and-loop fastener strip 270 or 370, respectively, to secure the upper front edge portion 404 in an overlapping position with the front of the torso-covering portion 250 or 350, respectively. Similarly, the rear hook-and-loop fastener strip 474 can be releasably secured to a complimentary hook-and-loop fastener strip (not shown) positioned at the rear of the garment.
  • In lieu of or in addition to the hook and loop fasteners, the groin-covering member 400 can be retained in place covering the wearer's groin by joining ties 411, 412 and 413, 414 in respective pairs 420, 421 adjacent the hips of the wearer, as shown in FIG. 8. The tapered edges 405 can be shaped so as to be, when in a working position, compatibly contoured to substantially match a wearer's thigh curvature. As noted above, separate groin-covering member 400 can reduce the size of, or eliminate altogether, exposed regions 170 (FIG. 5).
  • In an alternative embodiment, as shown in FIG. 9, the upper front edge portion 404 of the groin-covering member 400 can be stitched to or otherwise permanently attached to a garment adjacent the abdomen of the wearer, such as indicated by stitch line 502.
  • The upper rear edge portion of 406 of the groin-covering member 400 can be similarly permanently or releasably secured to the garment at the rear of the wearer. In some embodiments, the upper rear edge portion 406 can hang free from the garment when it is not in the working, as-worn position. To place the groin-covering member 400 in the working, as-worn position (FIG. 9), the upper rear edge 406 can be tucked through the groin region of the wearer and secured in place to the rear of the garment, such as by using pairs of ties 152, 153 as illustrated in FIG. 5, hook-and-loop fasteners, or other suitable attachment mechanisms.
  • With respect to FIGS. 6A and 6B, some garments, such as the alternative garments 200, 300, lack a central lower panel. The garment 200 (FIG. 6A) retains the other features described above with regard to the garment 100. Each of the features of the garment 200 is identified by the reference numeral used in FIG. 3, incremented by 100.
  • As shown in FIG. 6A, two lower panels 220, 220′ adjoin and extend below the torso-covering portion 250. Whether in a working or non-working position, inner edges 222, 222′ of the panels 220, 220′, respectively, remain spaced apart from each other. A hook-and-loop fastener strip 270 can be secured to the torso-covering portion 250 to releasably receive a complimentary hook-and-loop fastener strip 472 secured to the upper front edge portion 404 of a groin covering member, such as member 400, as shown in FIG. 7.
  • FIG. 6B illustrates yet another garment embodiment 300. Features in FIG. 6B share common reference numerals with like features in FIG. 6A, with the numerals in FIG. 6B being incremented by 100 Like the garment 200, the garment 300 lacks a center panel 130 or any other groin covering member permanently adjoining a torso-covering portion. And like the garment 200 shown in FIG. 6A, the garment 300 defines two lower panels 320, 320′ adjoining and extending below the torso-covering portion 350. The torso-covering portion 350 can also include a hook-and-loop fastener strip 370.
  • Unlike the lower panels 220, 220′, however, the lower panels 320, 320′ comprise inner flaps 360, 360′ that are shaped to better conform to the wear's legs and groin area. The flaps 360, 360′ define respective vertical edges 322, 322′ and respective upper horizontal edges 362, 362′ that can be formed by cutting lower panels 320, 320′. Leg-covering portions of the type shown in FIG. 6B can reduce the amount of garment gathering when positioned in a working position as compared to the garments 100 and 200.
  • FIGS. 10-11 show an embodiment of another surgical garment in the form of a gown 600. The gown 600 includes an upper, torso portion 602, a lower body portion 604, and left and right sleeve portions 606. The construction of the torso portion 602 can be the same as the upper portion of a conventional surgical gown. The lower body portion 604 is constructed to wrap around the both of the wearer's legs to maintain a sterile field around a wearer's lower body, such as while a surgeon is sitting or in a seated position straddling a patient during surgery as shown in FIG. 15.
  • The lower body portion 604 can extend laterally between opposing side edges 616 and can extend vertically between a bottom edge 612 and a seam 614 separating the torso portion 602 and the lower body portion 604. The bottom edge 612 can have a greater length (measured from one side 616 to the other side 616) than the seam 614 such that the garment flares in a direction extending from the seam to the bottom edge.
  • The lower body portion 604 can comprise a plurality of generally rectangular shaped panels 608 (eight in the illustrated embodiment) and a plurality of generally triangular shaped panels 610 (seven in the illustrated embodiment) interposed between, or alternating with, the rectangular panels. Each of the panels 608 and 610 can be oriented with their respective longer dimensions, or heights, extending from the bottom edge 612 toward the seam 614. The alternating rectangular and triangular panels 608, 610 can form a row of panels that extends from one side edge 616 to the other side edge 616. Each triangular panel can comprise a base, or lower edge, 630 that forms part of the lower edge 612 of the gown and side edges 638 that taper toward a triangle apex 632 closer to the seam 614.
  • Each rectangular panel 608 can comprise a lower edge 634 that forms part of the lower edge 612 of the gown, an upper edge 636 that forms part of the seam 614, and side edges 640 extending therebetween. In some embodiments, the panels 608 are not true rectangles. As shown in FIG. 10, for example, the panels 608 can taper slightly in width from the triangle apexes 632 to the upper edges 636. The side edges 638 of the triangular panels 610 can be secured to the side edges 640 of the rectangular panels 608. The tapered upper portions of the side edges 640 of the rectangular panels 608 (the portions above apexes 632) can also be secured directly to each other. The upper edges 636 of the rectangular panels 608 are furthermore secured to the torso portion 602. Suitable securement means include stitching and gluing.
  • Due to the presence of the triangular portions, the lower body portion 604 has a much greater circumference at the lower edge 612 than at the seam 614. The lower body portion 604 would take on a generally frustoconical shape if the side edges 616 are placed in contact with each other and the lower body portion is filled out (all panels are spread out in a radial outward direction). The lower body portion 604 of the gown also is desirably sized such that the lower edge 612 extends to a position adjacent the ankles of the wearer, as shown in FIGS. 12 and 13. Due to the size and shape of the lower body portion 604, a surgeon (or other wearer) can comfortably wear the gown 600 while in a seated position straddling a patient during surgery and the gown can maintain a sterile field around the lower body of the surgeon, as further described below.
  • In some gown embodiments, some portions of the lower body portion 604, such as the triangular panels 610, can comprise pleats, as shown in FIG. 10, and/or can comprise elastomeric material (e.g. stretchable fabric), to allow the bottom of the gown to expand and contract.
  • The gown 600 can include straps, such as straps 618, 620, 622, 624, 626, and 628 shown in FIGS. 10 and 11, that allow the gown to be secured on a surgeon in an as-worn position, as depicted in FIGS. 12 and 13 (typically with the help of another person), while maintaining the sterility of the outside of the gown. The dashed lines in FIGS. 10-11 show how the exemplary straps are tied to each other to place the gown in the as-worn position. The gown 600 can comprise first and second side portions adjacent the side edges 616 that extend from the upper edge of the torso portion 602 to the bottom edge 612 of the lower body portion 604 and are securable to one another, such as with straps or hook-and-loop fasteners, in an overlapping position. For example, the first side portion can overlap the second side portion behind the wearer. Strips of hook-and-loop fasteners 603 can be attached to the torso portion 602 at the rear of the neckline to help keep the gown adequately secured around the neck of the wearer in the as-worn position (as shown in FIG. 13).
  • The gown 600 is different than conventional surgical gowns in that when the wearer assumes a seated position with legs spread apart, as depicted in FIG. 14, the lower portion 604 of the gown is able to expand or spread open to maintain coverage over substantially the entire extent of the lower legs. FIG. 15 illustrates a surgeon wearing the gown 600 and sitting in the surgical chair 8 straddling the patient and one end of the operating table. In this position, the lower portion 604 of the gown is able to expand sufficiently and maintain coverage over the surgeon's legs to a location below the operating table. In this manner, a sterile field is maintained from the surgical work area 30 above the operating table to locations below each side of the operating table. In contrast, a conventional surgical gown would ride up the surgeon's legs and expose the surgeon's legs above the operating table, thereby breaking the sterile field.
  • Although surgical gowns being compatible with improved surgical postures have been described, similar external garments can be made for various classes of workers (e.g., artists, surgeons, assembly line workers, bakers, cleanroom workers and blacksmiths) positioned in a seated, or partially seated, working posture. For example, assembly line workers that have traditionally stood adjacent the objects of their labor can sit adjacent to and/or straddle the objects of their labor. An external garment incorporating one or more of the disclosed features of the surgical gowns shown in the accompanying drawings can be worn by the seated or straddling assembly-line worker to maintain a field of cleanliness that heretofore has only been possible with a conventional gown, smock or apron when the worker is positioned in a standing position.
  • Cleanroom workers can wear an external garment incorporating one or more of the disclosed features in addition to, or instead of, a conventional cleanroom suit (e.g., a “bunny suit”). External garments as disclosed herein are easier and less time-consuming to don than conventional cleanroom garb, and can be more comfortable to wear.
  • Garments as described above can be constructed of any material suitable for the uses and characteristics described. For example, paper, laminates of paper and plastic, thin-plastic and/or rubberized films suitable for surgical applications can form one or more portions of the disclosed garments, e.g., the torso portion, lower body portion, sleeve, etc. A polyurethane (or other elastomer) film and/or treated fabric can also be used. Other materials, such as silicone rubber, urethane, etc, are possible as well.
  • Directions and references (e.g., up, down, top, bottom, left, right, rearward, forward, etc.) have been used in the detailed description above to facilitate discussion of the drawings, but are not intended to be limiting. For example, certain terms may have been used such as “up,” “down,”, “upper,” “lower,” “horizontal,” “vertical,” “left,” “right,” and the like. Such terms are used, where applicable, to provide some clarity of description when dealing with relative relationships, particularly with respect to the illustrated embodiments. Such terms are not, however, intended to imply absolute relationships, positions, and/or orientations. For example, with respect to an object, an “upper” surface can become a “lower” surface simply by turning the object over. Nevertheless, it is still the same surface and the object remains the same. As used herein, “and/or” means “and”, “or” and both “and” and “or.”
  • In view of the many possible embodiments to which the principles disclosed herein may be applied, it should be recognized that the illustrated embodiments are only preferred examples and should not be taken as limiting the scope of the disclosure. Rather, the scope is defined by the following claims. We therefore claim all that comes within the scope and spirit of these claims.

Claims (18)

  1. 1. A surgical garment for covering a wearer's torso, arms and legs to maintain a sterile field between the wearer and a patient, the surgical garment comprising:
    a torso portion comprising left and right side portions and a lower end portion, the torso portion being configured for wrapping around the torso of the wearer and the left and right side portions being securable to one another at the back of the wearer's torso;
    a left leg panel and a right leg panel, each extending downwardly from the lower end portion of the torso portion and extending horizontally between respective inner and outer side portions, each leg panel being configured for wrapping around a respective leg of the wearer from a groin region of the wearer to an ankle region of the wearer and the inner and outer side portions of each leg panel being securable to one another at the back of the respective leg; and
    a groin-covering panel configured to cover a groin region of the wearer, the groin-covering panel comprising opposing side edges extending from an upper front edge portion to an upper rear edge portion of the groin-covering panel, at least the side edges and the upper rear edge portion being separate from the torso portion and the leg panels, the upper rear edge being securable to the torso portion at the back of the wearer.
  2. 2. The surgical garment of claim 1, wherein the leg panels are sized to wrap around the legs of the wearer such that the inner and outer side portions overlap one another.
  3. 3. The surgical garment of claim 1, wherein the upper front edge portion of the groin-covering panel is also separate from the torso portion and the leg panels, the upper front edge portion being securable to the torso portion at the front of the wearer.
  4. 4. The surgical garment of claim 1, wherein the upper front edge portion of the groin-covering panel is secured to and extends downwardly from the lower end portion of the torso portion.
  5. 5. The surgical garment of claim 1, wherein the groin-covering panel is configured to overlap portions of the torso portion and portions of the leg panels.
  6. 6. A method of maintaining a sterile field between one's body and a patient in an operating environment while in a seated position above and straddling the patient, the method comprising:
    positioning a surgical chair adjacent the patient, the surgical chair comprising a seat positioned above the patient and a front torso support extending upwardly from the seat;
    placing a sterile surgical garment on one's body from the front of one's body, the surgical garment comprising:
    a torso portion comprising left and right side portions and a lower end portion, the torso portion being wrapped around one's torso and the left and right side portions being secured to one another;
    a left leg panel and a right leg panel, each extending downwardly from the lower end portion of the torso portion and extending horizontally between respective inner and outer side portions, each leg panel being wrapped around a respective leg from one's groin region to one's ankle region and the inner and outer side portions of each leg panel being secured to one another along the respective leg; and
    a groin-covering panel covering one's groin region, the groin-covering panel comprising opposing side edges extending from an upper front edge portion to an upper rear edge portion of the groin-covering panel, at least the side edges and the upper rear edge portion being separate from the torso portion and the leg panels, the upper rear edge being secured to the torso portion; and
    sitting on the surgical chair such that the surgical garment forms a sterile field between the patient and one's body.
  7. 7. The method of claim 6, wherein the leg panels are sized to wrap around one's legs such that the inner and outer side portions overlap one another.
  8. 8. The method of claim 6, wherein the upper front edge portion of the groin-covering panel is also separate from the torso portion and the leg panels, and the upper front edge portion is secured to the torso portion.
  9. 9. The method of claim 6, wherein the upper front edge portion of the groin-covering panel is secured to and extends downwardly from the lower end portion of the torso portion.
  10. 10. The method of claim 6, wherein the groin-covering panel overlaps portions of the torso portion and portions of the leg panels.
  11. 11. The method of claim 6, wherein the sterile field extends from one ankle, across the groin region, and to the other ankle.
  12. 12. The method of claim 6, wherein the sterile field extends below the patient to locations adjacent one's ankles.
  13. 13. A surgical garment for use in maintaining a sterile field between a wearer of the garment and a patient, comprising:
    a torso portion extending laterally between opposing side edges and extending vertically between an upper edge and a lower edge;
    sleeves joined to the torso portion; and
    a lower body portion extending laterally between opposing side edges and extending vertically between a bottom edge and an top edge, the top edge of the lower body portion being joined to the lower edge of the torso portion, the bottom edge having a greater length than the top edge such that the lower body portion flares in a direction extending from the top edge to the bottom edge, the lower body portion comprising a plurality of first panels and a plurality of triangular second panels interposed between the first panels, the first and second panels being oriented with their heights extending from the bottom edge toward the top edge of the lower body portion, and each triangular panel having a base that forms part of the bottom edge of the lower body portion;
    wherein the surgical garment is donned from the front of a wearer and the torso portion is adapted to wrap completely around the torso of the wearer and the lower body portion is adapted to wrap completely around the lower body of the wearer from the torso to about the ankles of the wearer.
  14. 14. The surgical garment of claim 13, wherein each triangular second panel comprises two opposing side edges, each of which is sewn to a side edge of an adjacent first panel.
  15. 15. The surgical garment of claim 13, wherein the plurality of triangular second panels comprises a plurality of pleats adjacent the bottom edge.
  16. 16. The surgical garment of claim 13, wherein the first and second panels form a row of alternating first and second panels, the row extending from one side of the lower body portion to the other side of the lower body portion.
  17. 17. The surgical garment of claim 13, further comprising first and second opposing side portions that extend from the upper edge of the torso portion to the bottom edge of the lower body portion, the side portions being securable to one another with the first side portion overlapping the second side portion.
  18. 18. The surgical garment of claim 17, further comprising a plurality of straps extending from the torso portion and the lower body portion for securing the opposing side portions together.
US12813357 2009-06-11 2010-06-10 Outer garment Abandoned US20100313326A1 (en)

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CN106409105A (en) * 2016-11-17 2017-02-15 包磊 Surgical clothes used for teaching
KR101902817B1 (en) 2017-08-16 2018-10-01 라영태 Apron

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CN106360848A (en) * 2016-11-17 2017-02-01 包磊 Surgical gown
CN106343635B (en) * 2016-11-17 2018-10-23 包磊 Anti-infected surgical gowns
CN106388087A (en) * 2016-11-17 2017-02-15 深圳市善行医疗科技有限公司 Operating coat capable of being repeatedly used
CN106388088B (en) * 2016-11-17 2018-01-12 包磊 A surgical gown

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN106409105A (en) * 2016-11-17 2017-02-15 包磊 Surgical clothes used for teaching
KR101902817B1 (en) 2017-08-16 2018-10-01 라영태 Apron

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