New! View global litigation for patent families

US20100298702A1 - Needle insertion systems and methods - Google Patents

Needle insertion systems and methods Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100298702A1
US20100298702A1 US12823005 US82300510A US2010298702A1 US 20100298702 A1 US20100298702 A1 US 20100298702A1 US 12823005 US12823005 US 12823005 US 82300510 A US82300510 A US 82300510A US 2010298702 A1 US2010298702 A1 US 2010298702A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
needle
sound
beam
axis
coupler
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12823005
Inventor
Peter H. Rogers
David H. Trivett
Francois Guillot
Michael Dean Gray
James W. Larsen
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Guillot Francois
Rogers Peter H
Larsen James W
Trivett David H
Gray Michael Dean
Original Assignee
Rogers Peter H
Trivett David H
Francois Guillot
Michael Dean Gray
Larsen James W
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B8/00Diagnosis using ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves
    • A61B8/06Measuring blood flow
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B8/00Diagnosis using ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves
    • A61B8/42Details of probe positioning or probe attachment to the patient
    • A61B8/4272Details of probe positioning or probe attachment to the patient involving the acoustic interface between the transducer and the tissue
    • A61B8/4281Details of probe positioning or probe attachment to the patient involving the acoustic interface between the transducer and the tissue characterised by sound-transmitting media or devices for coupling the transducer to the tissue
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/34Trocars; Puncturing needles
    • A61B17/3403Needle locating or guiding means
    • A61B2017/3413Needle locating or guiding means guided by ultrasound
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/48Other medical applications
    • A61B5/4887Locating particular structures in or on the body
    • A61B5/489Blood vessels
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B8/00Diagnosis using ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves
    • A61B8/08Detecting organic movements or changes, e.g. tumours, cysts, swellings
    • A61B8/0833Detecting organic movements or changes, e.g. tumours, cysts, swellings involving detecting or locating foreign bodies or organic structures
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B8/00Diagnosis using ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves
    • A61B8/08Detecting organic movements or changes, e.g. tumours, cysts, swellings
    • A61B8/0833Detecting organic movements or changes, e.g. tumours, cysts, swellings involving detecting or locating foreign bodies or organic structures
    • A61B8/085Detecting organic movements or changes, e.g. tumours, cysts, swellings involving detecting or locating foreign bodies or organic structures for locating body or organic structures, e.g. tumours, calculi, blood vessels, nodules

Abstract

Embodiments of a needle insertion system and method are disclosed. One method embodiment includes transmitting a sound beam along an axis to contact a blood vessel; receiving the reflected sound beam from the blood vessel; processing the reflected sound beam to detect the location of the blood vessel; and, responsive to the detection, receiving a needle in a guideway that is oriented parallel to the axis.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    This is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/897,663 filed Jul. 22, 2004 and entitled, “Needle Insertion Systems and Methods,” which claims the priority benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/489,125 entitled, “A Device For Locating Veins and Aligning and Inserting Intravenous Catheters and Blood Drawing Needles Therein,” filed Jul. 22, 2003, each of which is entirely incorporated herein by reference.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0002]
    The present disclosure is generally related to the medical field, and, more particularly, is related to systems and methods for locating veins and other blood vessels and inserting needles and catheters therein.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0003]
    In the medical field, a common procedure performed by emergency medical technicians, phlebotimists, nurses, doctors, and other medical field personnel is locating veins and inserting intravenous (IV) tubes (e.g., catheters) and blood drawing needles therein. One problem that is often encountered when administrating an IV or drawing blood is that it is often difficult for the medical person to locate a vein. This problem is particularly pronounced with obese or pediatric patients, or when conditions are less than favorable, for example on a battlefield or at an accident scene. Various methods and devices have been devised to help a user to locate a vein that would be otherwise difficult to locate.
  • [0004]
    One popular method for locating a vein is the Doppler sonar method. In this method, a transmitter (or transceiver) provides a high frequency sound signal that is transmitted through the surface of a patient's skin in an effort to locate a vein. Although sound will be scattered by all tissues, for the blood flowing through a vein, the signal will be Doppler shifted due to the motion of the blood. If the velocity of the blood is v, the received signal (received at the transducer of a transceiver or receiver) is shifted in frequency as provided in Equation 1 below:
  • [0000]
    Δ f = 2 f v c cos θ Eq . 1
  • [0000]
    where f is the transmitted frequency (e.g., 10 Mega-Hertz (MHz)), c is the speed of sound in the tissue (approximately 1500 meters per second (m/sec)) and θ is the angle between the flow velocity direction and the sound beam axis. For a typical vein, the flow velocity is of the order of 10 cm/sec. If θ is, for example, 30°, the frequency shift will be 667 Hz. Such shifts can be detected by “beating” the received signal against the transmitted signal. The presence of an audio frequency beat signal in the output (in this case at 667 Hz) indicates a Doppler shift, and hence that the beam is intersecting a blood vessel such as an artery or vein. Since arterial flow is away from the heart and venous flow is towards the heart, the distinction between arteries and veins is made by determining whether the Doppler shift is positive or negative. Both the size of the Doppler shift and the strength of the Doppler shifted signals are helpful in selecting the most suitable vein since a larger vein has higher flow velocities in addition to being a better scatterer.
  • [0005]
    Although the technology used to locate a vein has improved, the methods used to insert a needle quickly and accurately using a hand-held device and at a moderate cost could benefit from further development.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0006]
    Preferred embodiments of needle insertion systems and methods are disclosed. One method embodiment, among others, can be generally described by the following steps: transmitting a sound beam along an axis to contact a blood vessel; receiving the reflected sound beam from the blood vessel; processing the reflected sound beam to detect the location of the blood vessel; and, responsive to the detection, receiving a needle in a guideway that is oriented parallel to the axis.
  • [0007]
    Another embodiment of a needle insertion method, among others, can generally be described by the following steps: transmitting a sound beam along a first axis to contact a blood vessel; receiving a reflected sound beam reflected from the blood vessel along the first axis; processing the reflected sound beam to detect the location of the blood vessel; and, responsive to the detection, receiving a needle in a guideway that is oriented along a second axis that enables the needle to intersect the first axis in proximity to the blood vessel.
  • [0008]
    A needle insertion system embodiment, among others, can include a transducer assembly configured to radiate a sound beam along a first axis and detect a blood vessel responsive to receiving a reflected sound beam; and a coupler that is configured to reflect the sound beam along a second axis to and from the blood vessel, the coupler configured with a guideway that is oriented parallel to the second axis.
  • [0009]
    Another needle insertion system, among others, can include a transducer assembly configured to radiate a sound beam along a first axis and detect a blood vessel responsive to receiving a reflected sound beam; and a coupler that is configured to reflect the sound beam along a second axis to and from the blood vessel, the coupler configured with a guideway that is oriented along a third axis that enables the needle to intersect the second axis in proximity to the blood vessel.
  • [0010]
    The preferred embodiments also include a coupler that acts as an interface between a needle and a skin surface through which the needle is to advance to contact a blood vessel. In one embodiment, among others, a coupler can include means for receiving a reflected sound beam along a first axis; and means for receiving a needle along an axis that is parallel to the first axis.
  • [0011]
    Another embodiment of a coupler, among others, can include means for reflecting a transmitted sound beam along a first axis and a reflected sound beam reflected from a blood vessel along the first axis; and means for receiving a needle along a second axis that is oriented to enable the needle to intersect the first axis in proximity to a blood vessel in which the needle is to be inserted.
  • [0012]
    Other systems, methods, features, and advantages of the disclosure will be or become apparent to one with skill in the art upon examination of the following drawings and detailed description. It is intended that all such additional systems, methods, features, and advantages be included within this description, and be within the scope of the disclosure.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0013]
    The components in the drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon clearly illustrating the principles of the disclosed systems and methods. Moreover, in the drawings, like reference numerals designate corresponding parts throughout the several views.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram that illustrates an embodiment of a needle insertion system.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 2 is a block diagram that illustrates an embodiment of a transducer assembly of the needle insertion system shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 3 is a side-view cut-away that illustrates an embodiment of a coupler of the needle insertion system shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of a coupler embodiment similar to that shown in FIG. 3 that illustrates application of a sound beam and receiving a needle along an axis that is parallel to and offset from a sound beam axis.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of another coupler embodiment similar to that shown in FIG. 3 that illustrates application of a sound beam and receiving a needle along an axis that has a depth dependent offset relative to a sound beam axis.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 6 is a front-view schematic diagram of the needle insertion system shown in FIG. 1 that illustrates traversing the skin surface to obtain a strong signal that indicates location of a suitable vein and insertion location along the vein.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 7A is a schematic diagram that illustrates an embodiment of a needle insertion system.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 7B is a side-view cut-away of an embodiment of a coupler of the needle insertion system shown in FIG. 7A.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 8 is a flow diagram that illustrates one needle insertion method embodiment corresponding to the embodiment shown in FIG. 4.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 9 is a flow diagram that illustrates one needle insertion method embodiment corresponding to the embodiment shown in FIG. 5.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0024]
    Disclosed herein are various embodiments of a needle insertion system and method. A needle insertion system assists a user (e.g., a skilled medical professional such as a nurse, or an unskilled person for do-it-yourself medical kits) in locating a vein, for example, or artery, and inserting an intravenous (IV) tube, catheter, and/or blood drawing needle therein. In one embodiment, a needle insertion system is disclosed as comprising a handheld device having a transducer assembly and a coupler. The transducer assembly includes a focused ultrasonic transducer that produces a narrow sound beam with a focal region (e.g., the focal region in one embodiment having a diameter of less than or equal to approximately 1 millimeter (mm), approximately 2.5 centimeters (cm) in length, and whose center is approximately located 5 cm from the transducer face). The sound beam is preferably generated as a pulsed beam having a frequency of approximately 10 Mega-Hertz (MHz). The transducer, operating in one embodiment in a transmit/receive mode, detects a vein by functioning as a pulsed Doppler blood flow detector.
  • [0025]
    The coupler is configured to guide or direct a needle into a vein quickly and easily, and, preferably, to detach from the needle quickly and easily. In principle, the coupler portion works by aligning the axis of a needle relative to the axis of the sound beam radiated from the transducer assembly. If the beam is known to intersect a vein (using Doppler sonar), then advancing the needle in a path provided integral to or adjacent to the coupler along the beam axis, parallel to the beam axis at a slight offset, or offset in a depth dependent manner to intersect the beam axis, results in the needle entering the vein.
  • [0026]
    Although described in the context of locating a vein and inserting a needle therein, it would be understood by those having ordinary skill in the art that the principles disclosed in this disclosure can also apply to the location of other blood-carrying vessels. Further, although described using a needle, similar principles apply to the insertion of other objects such as a catheter, tube, or shunt, and thus are considered to be within the scope of the preferred embodiments.
  • [0027]
    In the description that follows, a needle insertion system embodiment is described in FIG. 1, and the various components that comprise the same is described with respect to FIGS. 2-4. An additional embodiment of a coupler for the needle insertion system described in FIG. 1 is illustrated in FIG. 5. FIG. 6 illustrates a method to elicit an optimal feedback signal indicating whether or when the center of a vein has been located. FIGS. 7A and 7B illustrate another embodiment of a needle insertion system and its corresponding components. Finally, FIGS. 8 and 9 illustrates various needle insertion method embodiments.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram that illustrates an embodiment of a needle insertion system. The needle insertion system 100 includes a coupler 102 and a transducer assembly 104. The coupler 102 includes a guideway 108, in which a needle 110 can be inserted and advanced along the guideway 108 and through the skin surface 112 to puncture a vein 114 located in a body 106 (for blood drawing and catheter insertion, the body site of interest will often be an arm, but the needle insertion system can be used in other locations of the body). Although the guideway 108 can be configured as a channel that runs through the body of the coupler 102, preferably the guideway 108 is configured as a channel that runs along the bottom, preferably angled surface of the coupler 102. The transducer assembly 104 can be rotatably attached and detached from the coupler 102, and/or slidably detached and re-attached in other embodiments according to well-known attachment/detachment mechanisms. Still in other embodiments, the transducer assembly 104 and the coupler 102 can be fixably attached or the two components can be molded as a single component. The needle 110 can be packaged with the coupler 102, for example disposed in the guideway 108 as part of the entire coupler 102, or available separately from the coupler 102.
  • [0029]
    FIG. 2 is a block diagram that illustrates an embodiment of a transducer assembly 104 of the needle insertion system 100 shown in FIG. 1. The transducer assembly 104 includes a transducer module 202, a switch module 204, a transmitter module 206, a receiver module 208, an oscillator and processing module 210, and an output module 212. One or more of the modules can be configured in hardware, software, or a combination of hardware and software. The transducer assembly 104 can be battery powered (not shown) and/or powered externally through use of a cord or other mechanism for connecting to an external power source.
  • [0030]
    The transducer module 202 preferably radiates a pulsed Doppler sound field which, in one embodiment, focuses to a beam of approximately 1 mm in diameter over a length of approximately 2.5 cm, as generated from the transmit electronics described below. The 1 mm diameter sound beam is smaller or comparable in diameter to a vein from which it is suitable to draw blood. The transducer module 202 includes a transducer element (not shown) that can be configured to radiate beams of greater or smaller diameter depending on the application, by adjusting the frequency. The transducer module 202 is also configured to receive a reflected sound beam, which it converts to a signal(s) for processing by the receive electronics described below.
  • [0031]
    The oscillator and processing module 210, in cooperation with the transmitter module 206, generate the pulses at a frequency of approximately 10 MHz, although sound beams of other frequencies can be generated depending on the application. The pulsed mode is preferably implemented in both transmit and receive modes. The receiver module 208 includes receive and processing electronics to receive the reflected signal and determine the presence or absence of a Doppler shift. If a Doppler shift is detected, an audible sound, tactile sensation (e.g., vibration), and/or visual display is activated via the output module 212. For example, an audible sound may be activated and may be adjustable based on the surrounding environment (e.g., loud enough to hear over sirens, etc.). As another example, a graphics user interface may be presented on the package of the transducer assembly 104 and which may show an arrow(s) indicating the direction of movement a user needs to take along a person's body to locate a vein or to optimize the signal strength (and thus center the needle on the vein). The switch module 204 provides functionality for switching between receive and transmit functionality. Note that the use of pulsed Doppler may also enable estimation of the depth of the vein from the pulse transit time. Further, the electronics of the transducer assembly 104 are well known to those having ordinary skill in the art, and thus further explanation of each component will be omitted for brevity.
  • [0032]
    The transducer assembly 104, when detachable from the coupler 102, does not have to be sterilizable. As a corollary to the detachable/attachable feature, the transducer assembly 104 is reusable with a plurality of different couplers 102.
  • [0033]
    Note that in some embodiments, two transducers may be used (a transmit and receive transducer) and the switch omitted.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 3 is a side-view cut-away that illustrates an embodiment of a coupler of the needle insertion system 100 shown in FIG. 1. The coupler 102 comprises a coupling portion 302 and a reflective portion 304. In one embodiment, the coupler 102 may be disposable, and included with the needle 110 in a plastic package (not shown) designed to maintain the sterility of the coupler 102 and the needle 110. The coupling portion 302 is preferably made of a plastic material, although other materials may be used. The coupling portion 302 comprises a chamber 306 that is preferably cylindrical in configuration. The chamber 306 contains a coupling material (not shown). The coupling material may include water, ultrasonic gel, solid rubber couplant, among other coupling material suitable for propagating the sound beam. The coupling portion 302 also includes a window 308 which allows the transmitted sound beam to radiate into the body 106 (FIG. 1) and allows the reflected sound beam to radiate back into the coupling portion 302. The window 308 may be comprised of a thin (e.g., approximately 25 microns to 250 microns thick) plastic material. The coupling portion 302 further includes a housing portion 310, which receives a transducer element (not shown) of the transducer module 202 (FIG. 2) when the coupling portion 302 is attached to the transducer assembly 104. The coupling portion also include a tube 312. The tube 312 serves as a conduit to enable filling the coupler with a coupling material, such as water. In some implementations, an ultrasonic coupling gel (not shown) may be applied to the outside surface of the coupler 102 (i.e., the surface contacting the skin surface 112).
  • [0035]
    The reflective portion 304 is attached to the coupling portion 302, for example using an adhesive, through the use of screws, or other fastening mechanisms known to those having ordinary skill in the art. The reflective portion 304 preferably has a flat reflecting surface (reflecting the sound beam) and is preferably comprised of a metallic material, such as stainless steel, although other reflective material, or a combination of reflective and non-reflective material, may be used. The reflective portion 304 redirects the sound beam received from a transducer element, or the reflected sound beam received from the located vein, at a defined angle. The reflective portion includes a guideway 108 that has a defined angle with respect to the skin surface 112 (FIG. 1), and is used to guide a needle along a predetermined orientation. In one embodiment, the guideway 108 is configured to provide a predetermined offset between the sound beam and the needle. The offset can be made depth-dependent or depth-independent by modifying the attachment angle (i.e., the angle between the guideway 108 and the horizontal surface of the coupler 102, such as β in FIG. 4 described below) with respect to the skin surface 112.
  • [0036]
    In one embodiment, the guideway 108 is made of a short, flexible tube attached to (adjacent) the reflective portion 304 (e.g., running along the bottom, angled surface of the reflective portion 304). The guideway 108 is preferably made of a plastic material, and can be attached using an adhesive or other fastening mechanisms known to those having ordinary skill in the art. A slot (not shown) is provided at the bottom of the guideway 108 running along the length of the guideway to enable a user to disengage the coupler 102 from a needle once the vein is punctured. In some embodiments, the slot can be omitted and the coupler 102 can be disengaged from the needle by cutting the guideway 108. In some embodiments, the slot can be omitted based on applications where disengagement from the needle is not needed. The guideway 108 has a diameter that is large enough to allow the needle to be advanced through it, yet small enough to hold the needle firmly. In some embodiment, a guideway of similar features can be configured as a channel bored within the body of the reflective portion 304.
  • [0037]
    FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of a coupler embodiment, coupler 102 a, similar to that shown in FIG. 3, and that illustrates application of a sound beam and receiving a needle along an axis that is parallel to and offset from a sound beam axis. As shown, a transducer element 402 of the transducer assembly 104 (FIG. 1) is disposed conformably (although any well-known attachment/detachment mechanisms may be employed) in the housing portion 310 and secured enough to assure proper alignment between the transducer assembly 104 and the coupler 102 a. In one embodiment, the transducer element 402 has a concave surface 404 to provide a focused sound beam. The focused beam could also be achieved using an acoustic lens. The transducer element 402 is disposed at a distance (represented by the line labeled “A” in FIG. 4) of approximately 4 cm from the location 406 on the reflective surface on which a sound beam 408 (shown herein as the centerline of the beam, with the understanding that a larger sound profile is preferably radiated) impinges to the point on the convex surface 404 farthest from said location 406. This 4 cm distance enables a 1 mm diameter sound beam focal region to begin at the skin surface. Note that this dimension “A” may vary in some embodiments, depending on the characteristics of the sound beam from the focused transducer element 402. “A” can be determined mathematically according to known formulas, and/or determined (or verified) experimentally. Thus, the transducer element 402 is disposed in the housing portion 310 at a suitable distance to accommodate a focal length of approximately 5 cm, in such a way that the focal region begins at the surface of the skin 112, which enables detection of a vein along a longer range. For example, experimentation and mathematical analysis have indicated that the focal region for a sound field produced by a 1 centimeter (cm) diameter, 10 MHz transducer with a focal length of 5 cm is ellipsoidal, about 1 mm in diameter, and more than 2 cm long. In other words, there exists a “beam-like” quality of the sound field within ±1 cm of the focal point.
  • [0038]
    The sound beam 408 is radiated in the chamber 306 along an axis that is coincident with a first axis 410. The chamber 306 includes a coupling material (not shown) that provides an appropriate low loss impedance matched propagation medium for the sound beam 408 when entering the interior of the body 106 and returning from the interior of the body 106.
  • [0039]
    The sound beam 408 impinges on the reflective portion 304 a at location 406 and is reflected along an axis coincident with a second axis 412. In one embodiment, the angle α between the reflected sound beam along the second axis 412 and the skin surface 112 is approximately 30°, although other angles may be used. The reflected sound beam 408 is transmitted through the skin surface 112 and impinges on the vein 114, and then at least a portion of the beam is reflected back to the transducer element 402 along the second axis 412, and then the first axis 410 after reflection at 406 of the reflective portion 304 a. The transducer element 402 converts the received sound beam 408 to an electronic signal that is processed in the receive electronics (e.g., 208, 210 of FIG. 2) of the transducer assembly 104 to elicit a feedback response by the output module 212 (FIG. 2). A feedback response provides an indication that a vein has been located, and in some embodiments, an indication of the signal strength corresponding to whether the vein has been located at a position offset from the centerline of the vein (where blood flow may be slower) or at the centerline (where blood flow is greatest).
  • [0040]
    If the vein 114 is located and the signal strength indicates that the location corresponds to an optimal position for insertion of the needle 110, then the user can insert the needle 110 through the guideway 108. The guideway 108 is oriented parallel to the second axis 412, offset a fixed and constant distance (e.g., 0 to 5 mm) from the second axis 412. By remaining offset from the second axis 412, the inserted needle 110 interferes minimally with the sound field present beneath the skin surface 112, and enables the user to continually monitor the location of the vein 114 as the needle is advanced, up until the time corresponding to when the vein 114 is punctured. In one embodiment, the angle β which is the angle formed between the guideway 108 and the skin surface 112, is approximately 30°, although other angles may be used.
  • [0041]
    FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of another coupler embodiment, coupler 102 b, that illustrates application of the sound beam 408 and receiving the needle 110 along an axis 502 that has a depth dependent offset relative to a sound beam axis 412. As shown, the coupler 102 b has similar components to those found in couplers 102, 102 a of FIGS. 3 and 4, respectively, and thus discussion of the same will be omitted or abbreviated. The sound beam 408 is radiated from the transducer element 402 along the first axis 410, reflected off a reflective portion 304 b, and provided along the second axis 412 to impinge on the vein 114. The angle α is approximately 30°, although other angles may be used. The guideway 108 (and also the bottom surface of the reflective portion 304 b in one embodiment) form an angle β of approximately 23°, although other angles may be used. Thus, the needle 110 is advanced along the guideway 108 along a third axis 502, resulting in the needle 110 intersecting the sound beam 408 provided along the second axis 412 in a location proximally (i.e., the axis 502 intersecting axis 402 in a location approximately at the point where the focal region ends, such as where the beam width ceases to be 1 mm in diameter in embodiments described herein) to the vein 114. Note that the offset will vary based on the depth of the vein 114.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 6 is a front-view schematic diagram of the needle insertion system 100 shown in FIG. 1 that illustrates traversing the skin surface 112 to obtain a strong signal indicating location of the vein 114 and/or optimal locations along the vein 114. For example, the needle insertion system 100 is shown traversing across the skin surface, but it also is traversable in the direction running along the length of the body 106, as well as rotatably traversable. In one implementation, the needle insertion system 100 is moved (represented by the double-arrow head above the system 100) across the skin surface 112 until the vein 114 is detected. Vein detection (and/or location) may be indicated by a light, sound or other display or feedback, as described above. The sound beam reflection from the vein 114 enables the needle 110 (or an IV catheter, for example, in some implementations) to be aligned, but offset, with the sound beam 408. In other words, the sound beam 408 is known (using Doppler technology) to be passing through a suitable vein 114. The needle is advanced through the guideway 108 a (parallel to, but offset from the sound beam 408 in this implementation), passing through the skin surface 112 and advanced until it punctures the vein 114. The user continually receives feedback that he or she is advancing the needle 110 in the right direction until the vein 114 is punctured.
  • [0043]
    FIG. 7A is a schematic diagram that illustrates another embodiment of a needle insertion system 700. The needle insertion system 700 differs from the prior described embodiments in that a needle is advanced to a vein along an axis that is coincident with the sound beam. The needle insertion system 700 includes a transducer assembly 704 attached to the coupler 702. Preferably, the transducer 704 is attachable and detachable from the coupler 702 (e.g., shown here as rotatably attachable and detachable). The transducer assembly 704 includes the same or similar electronics to the transducer assembly 104 shown in FIG. 2, and thus illustration and discussion of the same is omitted.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 7B is a side-view cut-away of an embodiment of the coupler 702 of the needle insertion system 700 shown in FIG. 7A. With continued reference to FIG. 7A, the coupler 702 is preferably made of plastic, and comprises membranes 706 and 708 and a chamber 710 that includes an ultrasonic coupling material (not shown). Membranes 706 and 708 may be made of, for example, rubber. The coupling material can be, for example, a sterile, de-aerated saline. In one embodiment, the coupler 702 may be disposable, and included with the needle 110 in a plastic package (not shown) designed to maintain the sterility of the coupler 702 and the needle 110. For IV catherization implementations, the coupler 702 can be designed to split in half to allow removal of the coupler 702 after the vein 110 has been punctured, an unnecessary step for simply drawing blood. The membranes 706 and 708 are traversed by the needle 110 during the insertion, the needle 110 being advanced through the guideway 712. The membrane 706 is also an ultrasound reflector. In one embodiment, the membrane 706 is air-backed and preferably as smooth and flat as possible. The membrane 708 serves to couple the sound beam 408 into the tissue of the body 106. In some implementations, an ultrasonic coupling gel (not shown) may be applied to the outside surface of the membrane 708 (i.e., the surface contacting the skin surface 112).
  • [0045]
    Directing attention to FIG. 7A, the operation of the transducer system 700 will now be described. The transducer element 402 of the transducer assembly 704 radiates the sound beam 408 a distance (represented by the line labeled “B”) of approximately 4 cm to the membrane 706 in similar manner to that described in association with FIG. 4. The sound beam is radiated along a first axis 410. The sound beam 408 is reflected by the air-backed membrane 706 before entering the body 106 through the membrane 708. The reflected sound beam 408 travels along the second axis 412. The travel path and orientation of the reflected sound beam 408 enables the needle 110 (or an IV catheter) to be exactly aligned or substantially aligned with the reflected sound beam 408, which is known by Doppler to be passing through a suitable vein 114. Although the sound beam 408 is shown to make an angle α of 30° relative to the plane of the skin surface 112, it would be understood by one having ordinary skill in the art that some embodiments may utilize one of a variety of different angles (e.g., 45° or 20° depending on the application.
  • [0046]
    The needle 110 is advanced (not shown) through the guideway 712, which is coincident (or coaxial) with the sound beam 408. The needle 110 is advanced through the membrane 706, through the chamber 710 (and thus through a coupling material not shown, such as saline fluid), and then through the membrane 708, and continually (still along the second axis 412) advanced until the needle 110 punctures the vein 114. The coaxial alignment of the guideway 712 and sound beam assures (or assures with a high-probability of certainty) that the needle 110 will encounter the vein 114. The coupler 702, in one embodiment, can then be easily disassembled into two or more pieces and removed, and the IV cauterization or blood draw can be completed.
  • [0047]
    In some embodiments, the saline filled chamber 710 can be replaced with a solid insert (not shown), which can be removed after the vein 114 is detected to allow passage of the needle 110. In such embodiments, the membranes 706 and 708 may be omitted and the user can view the insertion point.
  • [0048]
    In view of the above description, it will be appreciated that one embodiment of a needle insertion method 800 may comprise, as illustrated in FIG. 8, transmitting a sound beam along an axis to contact a blood vessel (802); receiving the reflected sound beam from the blood vessel (804); processing the reflected sound beam to detect the location of the blood vessel (806); and, responsive to the detection, receiving a needle in a guideway that is oriented parallel to the axis (808).
  • [0049]
    Another embodiment of a needle insertion method 900 may comprise, as illustrated in FIG. 9, transmitting a sound beam along a first axis to contact a blood vessel (902); receiving a reflected sound beam reflected from the blood vessel along the first axis (904); processing the reflected sound beam to detect the location of the blood vessel (906); and, responsive to the detection, receiving a needle in a guideway that is oriented along a second axis that enables the needle to intersect the first axis in proximity to the blood vessel (908).
  • [0050]
    Any process descriptions or blocks in the flow diagrams of FIGS. 8 and 9 should be understood as representing steps in an embodiment of one method, and alternate implementations are included within the scope of the preferred embodiments, as would be understood by those reasonably skilled in the art.
  • [0051]
    It should be emphasized that the above-described embodiments, particularly, any “preferred” embodiments, are merely possible examples of implementations, and are merely set forth for a clear understanding of the principles of the disclosure. Many variations and modifications may be made to the above-described embodiment(s) without departing substantially from the spirit and principles of the disclosure. All such modifications and variations are intended to be included herein within the scope of this disclosure.

Claims (26)

  1. 1. A needle insertion method, comprising:
    transmitting a sound beam along an axis to contact a blood vessel;
    receiving the reflected sound beam from the blood vessel;
    processing the reflected sound beam to detect the location of the blood vessel; and
    responsive to the detection, receiving a needle in a guideway that is oriented parallel to the axis, wherein receiving a needle in a guideway that is oriented parallel to the axis includes receiving the needle in the guideway that is oriented coincident with the axis.
  2. 2. A needle insertion method, comprising:
    transmitting a sound beam along a first axis to contact a blood vessel;
    receiving a reflected sound beam reflected from the blood vessel along the first axis;
    processing the reflected sound beam to detect the location of the blood vessel; and
    responsive to the detection, receiving a needle in a guideway that is oriented along a second axis that enables the needle to intersect the first axis in proximity to the blood vessel.
  3. 3. The method of claim 2, wherein transmitting includes transmitting a pulsed ultrasonic beam focused within the body to a diameter of approximately 1 millimeter.
  4. 4. The method of claim 2, further including providing feedback to a user in response to the detection.
  5. 5. The method of claim 4, wherein providing feedback includes providing the feedback at least until the needle contacts the blood vessel.
  6. 6. The method of claim 2, further including providing at least one of an audible sound, a visual display signal, and a tactile signal to a user in response to the detection.
  7. 7. The method of claim 2, wherein receiving a needle in a guideway includes receiving the needle along the second axis that has a depth-dependent offset relative to the first axis.
  8. 8. The method of claim 2, wherein receiving a needle in a guideway further includes contacting the blood vessel with the needle proximally to where the sound beam was reflected from the blood vessel.
  9. 9. A needle insertion system, comprising:
    a transducer assembly configured to radiate a sound beam along a first axis and detect a blood vessel responsive to receiving a reflected sound beam; and
    a coupler that is configured to reflect the sound beam along a second axis to and from the blood vessel, the coupler configured with a guideway that is oriented parallel to the second axis, wherein the guideway is oriented coincidentally with the second axis.
  10. 10. A needle insertion system, comprising:
    a transducer assembly configured to radiate a sound beam along a first axis and detect a blood vessel responsive to receiving a reflected sound beam; and
    a coupler that is configured to reflect the sound beam along a second axis to and from the blood vessel, the coupler configured with a guideway that is oriented along a third axis that enables the needle to intersect the second axis in proximity to the blood vessel.
  11. 11. The system of claim 10, wherein the transducer assembly includes a transducer set back a defined distance from a skin surface on which the coupler rests, the transducer configured to radiate a pulsed ultrasonic beam focused within the body to approximately 1 mm in diameter.
  12. 12. The system of claim 10, wherein the transducer assembly includes an output module that is configured to provide at least one of an audible sound, a visual display signal, and a tactile signal to a user in response to the detection of the blood vessel.
  13. 13. The system of claim 10, wherein the guideway is configured to receive the needle along the third axis that has a depth dependent offset relative to the second axis.
  14. 14. The system of claim 10, wherein the guideway is receptive to a needle that can be advanced in a direction oriented along the third axis to contact the blood vessel in a location that is proximal to where the sound beam intersects the third axis.
  15. 15. The system of claim 10, wherein the transducer assembly includes at least one of a switch, transmitter electronics, receiver electronics, an oscillator, a power amplifier, a pulse generator, and a processor.
  16. 16. The system of claim 10, wherein the coupler includes a chamber that contains a coupling material.
  17. 17. The system of claim 10, wherein the coupler includes a reflective portion that reflects the sound beam from the transducer assembly through a window to the blood vessel, and from the blood vessel through the window to the transducer portion.
  18. 18. The system of claim 10, wherein the coupler is at least one of attachable and detachable from the transducer assembly.
  19. 19. The system of claim 10, wherein the coupler is capable of disassembly.
  20. 20. The system of claim 10, wherein the guideway is configured with a slot that enables separation of the coupler and the needle.
  21. 21. A coupler that acts as an interface between a needle and a skin surface through which the needle is to advance to contact a blood vessel, the coupler comprising:
    means for receiving a reflected sound beam along a first axis; and
    means for receiving a needle along an axis that is parallel to the first axis, wherein the means for receiving a needle is oriented coincidentally with the first axis.
  22. 22. A coupler that acts as an interface between a needle and a skin surface through which the needle is to advance to contact a blood vessel, the coupler comprising:
    means for reflecting a transmitted sound beam along a first axis and a reflected sound beam reflected from a blood vessel along the first axis; and
    means for receiving a needle along a second axis that is oriented to enable the needle to intersect the first axis in proximity to a blood vessel in which the needle is to be inserted.
  23. 23. The coupler of claim 22, wherein the means for receiving a needle is a guideway.
  24. 24. The coupler of claim 23, wherein the guideway is slotted.
  25. 25. The coupler of claim 22, wherein the means for receiving a reflected sound beam includes means for receiving a transmitted sound beam along a third axis.
  26. 26. The coupler of claim 25, wherein the means for receiving a reflected sound beam includes a chamber configured to contain a coupling material, a reflective portion, a window, and a transducer assembly attachment means.
US12823005 2003-07-22 2010-06-24 Needle insertion systems and methods Abandoned US20100298702A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US48912503 true 2003-07-22 2003-07-22
US10897663 US7766839B2 (en) 2003-07-22 2004-07-22 Needle insertion systems and methods
US12823005 US20100298702A1 (en) 2003-07-22 2010-06-24 Needle insertion systems and methods

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12823005 US20100298702A1 (en) 2003-07-22 2010-06-24 Needle insertion systems and methods

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10897663 Division US7766839B2 (en) 2003-07-22 2004-07-22 Needle insertion systems and methods

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100298702A1 true true US20100298702A1 (en) 2010-11-25

Family

ID=34102826

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10897663 Active 2027-02-04 US7766839B2 (en) 2003-07-22 2004-07-22 Needle insertion systems and methods
US12823005 Abandoned US20100298702A1 (en) 2003-07-22 2010-06-24 Needle insertion systems and methods

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10897663 Active 2027-02-04 US7766839B2 (en) 2003-07-22 2004-07-22 Needle insertion systems and methods

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (2) US7766839B2 (en)
WO (1) WO2005009509A3 (en)

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8388541B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2013-03-05 C. R. Bard, Inc. Integrated system for intravascular placement of a catheter
US8388546B2 (en) 2006-10-23 2013-03-05 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Method of locating the tip of a central venous catheter
US8437833B2 (en) 2008-10-07 2013-05-07 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Percutaneous magnetic gastrostomy
US8478382B2 (en) 2008-02-11 2013-07-02 C. R. Bard, Inc. Systems and methods for positioning a catheter
US8512256B2 (en) 2006-10-23 2013-08-20 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Method of locating the tip of a central venous catheter
USD699359S1 (en) 2011-08-09 2014-02-11 C. R. Bard, Inc. Ultrasound probe head
US8781555B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2014-07-15 C. R. Bard, Inc. System for placement of a catheter including a signal-generating stylet
US8784336B2 (en) 2005-08-24 2014-07-22 C. R. Bard, Inc. Stylet apparatuses and methods of manufacture
US8801693B2 (en) 2010-10-29 2014-08-12 C. R. Bard, Inc. Bioimpedance-assisted placement of a medical device
US8849382B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2014-09-30 C. R. Bard, Inc. Apparatus and display methods relating to intravascular placement of a catheter
USD724745S1 (en) 2011-08-09 2015-03-17 C. R. Bard, Inc. Cap for an ultrasound probe
US9125578B2 (en) 2009-06-12 2015-09-08 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for catheter navigation and tip location
US9211107B2 (en) 2011-11-07 2015-12-15 C. R. Bard, Inc. Ruggedized ultrasound hydrogel insert
US9339206B2 (en) 2009-06-12 2016-05-17 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Adaptor for endovascular electrocardiography
US9445734B2 (en) 2009-06-12 2016-09-20 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for endovascular electrography
US9456766B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2016-10-04 C. R. Bard, Inc. Apparatus for use with needle insertion guidance system
US9492097B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2016-11-15 C. R. Bard, Inc. Needle length determination and calibration for insertion guidance system
US9521961B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2016-12-20 C. R. Bard, Inc. Systems and methods for guiding a medical instrument
US9532724B2 (en) 2009-06-12 2017-01-03 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for catheter navigation using endovascular energy mapping
US9554716B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2017-01-31 C. R. Bard, Inc. Insertion guidance system for needles and medical components
US9636031B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2017-05-02 C.R. Bard, Inc. Stylets for use with apparatus for intravascular placement of a catheter
US9649048B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2017-05-16 C. R. Bard, Inc. Systems and methods for breaching a sterile field for intravascular placement of a catheter
US9839372B2 (en) 2014-02-06 2017-12-12 C. R. Bard, Inc. Systems and methods for guidance and placement of an intravascular device
US9901714B2 (en) 2008-08-22 2018-02-27 C. R. Bard, Inc. Catheter assembly including ECG sensor and magnetic assemblies

Families Citing this family (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8309428B2 (en) 2004-09-15 2012-11-13 Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer
US7888709B2 (en) 2004-09-15 2011-02-15 Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer and manufacturing method
US8658453B2 (en) * 2004-09-15 2014-02-25 Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer
EP1830708A2 (en) * 2004-12-13 2007-09-12 Philips Electronics N.V. Cannula inserting system
US20070038088A1 (en) * 2005-08-04 2007-02-15 Rich Collin A Medical imaging user interface and control scheme
US8939911B2 (en) * 2006-01-25 2015-01-27 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Ultrasonic probe and apparatus for obtaining ultrasonic image
US20080071149A1 (en) * 2006-09-20 2008-03-20 Collin Rich Method and system of representing a medical event
US20080071292A1 (en) * 2006-09-20 2008-03-20 Rich Collin A System and method for displaying the trajectory of an instrument and the position of a body within a volume
DE102007025132B4 (en) * 2007-05-30 2014-09-11 Rolf Elliger vein Finder
WO2010006335A1 (en) * 2008-07-11 2010-01-14 Houston Medical Robotics, Llc Methods and apparatus for introducing a medical device into the body of a patient
US8315125B2 (en) * 2009-03-18 2012-11-20 Sonetics Ultrasound, Inc. System and method for biasing CMUT elements
US8655143B2 (en) * 2009-04-01 2014-02-18 Cisco Technology, Inc. Supplementary buffer construction in real-time applications without increasing channel change delay
US8277417B2 (en) * 2009-09-23 2012-10-02 James J. Fedinec Central venous catheter kit with line gripping and needle localizing devices
US8731000B2 (en) * 2009-09-30 2014-05-20 Cisco Technology, Inc. Decoding earlier frames with DTS/PTS backward extrapolation
JP2013535301A (en) * 2010-08-09 2013-09-12 シー・アール・バード・インコーポレーテッドC R Bard Incorporated Support and cover structure for an ultrasound probe head
US8761862B2 (en) * 2009-10-09 2014-06-24 Stephen F. Ridley Ultrasound guided probe device and sterilizable shield for same
US20110106052A1 (en) 2009-10-30 2011-05-05 Huihua Kenny Chiang Ultrasonic positioning device for epidural space and method using the same
US8914244B2 (en) * 2010-08-04 2014-12-16 The Boeing Company Apparatus and method for inspecting laminated structure
US8951195B2 (en) * 2011-04-05 2015-02-10 Houston Medical Robotics, Inc. Motorized systems and methods for accessing the lumen of a vessel
US9033880B2 (en) 2011-04-05 2015-05-19 Houston Medical Robotics, Inc. Robotic insertion systems and methods
US9861739B2 (en) 2011-04-05 2018-01-09 Houston Medical Robotics, Inc. Systems and methods for accessing the lumen of a vessel
US20130041250A1 (en) * 2011-08-09 2013-02-14 Ultrasonix Medical Corporation Methods and apparatus for locating arteries and veins using ultrasound
US20140323857A1 (en) * 2011-12-08 2014-10-30 University Of Washington Through Its Center For Commercialization Ultrasound stylet
US20140330087A1 (en) * 2013-05-01 2014-11-06 Medsensation, Inc. Devices and methods for obtaining physiological data
KR20150005052A (en) * 2013-07-04 2015-01-14 삼성메디슨 주식회사 Ultrasound system and method for providing target object information
DE102013218001B4 (en) * 2013-09-09 2015-04-02 Continental Automotive Gmbh Ultrasonic sensor with deflecting

Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3556079A (en) * 1967-05-16 1971-01-19 Haruo Omizo Method of puncturing a medical instrument under guidance of ultrasound
US4325381A (en) * 1979-11-21 1982-04-20 New York Institute Of Technology Ultrasonic scanning head with reduced geometrical distortion
US4527569A (en) * 1982-11-26 1985-07-09 South African Inventions Develop. Corp. Device for guiding a surgical needle into a blood vessel
US4667679A (en) * 1982-08-12 1987-05-26 Harvinder Sahota Apparatus and method for positioning and puncturing an artery and a vein
US4742829A (en) * 1986-08-11 1988-05-10 General Electric Company Intracavitary ultrasound and biopsy probe for transvaginal imaging
US4887606A (en) * 1986-09-18 1989-12-19 Yock Paul G Apparatus for use in cannulation of blood vessels
US5080103A (en) * 1989-03-21 1992-01-14 Isotopen-Technik Dr. Sauerwein Gmbh Syringe for doppler sonographically aided penetration
US5103825A (en) * 1991-03-05 1992-04-14 D. E. Hokanson, Inc. Doppler transducer probe with direction indicator
US5131395A (en) * 1990-03-28 1992-07-21 Gehlbach Steve M Ultrasonic apparatus for guiding needles into surface vessels
US5167630A (en) * 1991-09-26 1992-12-01 Paul Kamaljit S Blood vessel cannulation device
US5261409A (en) * 1991-05-27 1993-11-16 Sulzer Brothers Limited Puncturing device for blood vessels
US5309915A (en) * 1993-06-07 1994-05-10 Mte, Inc. Apparatus for locating veins and arteries
US5427108A (en) * 1993-04-01 1995-06-27 Bollinger; Armin Ultrasonic Doppler probe with needle guide
US6056692A (en) * 1998-07-08 2000-05-02 Schwartz; John Q. Apparatus and method for locating and marking blood vessels
US6132379A (en) * 1998-11-04 2000-10-17 Patacsil; Estelito G. Method and apparatus for ultrasound guided intravenous cannulation
US6379307B1 (en) * 1998-09-16 2002-04-30 Roy Filly Adjustable needle guide apparatus and method

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPH06213660A (en) * 1993-01-19 1994-08-05 Aisin Seiki Co Ltd Detecting method for approximate straight line of image
US6417133B1 (en) * 1998-02-25 2002-07-09 Monsanto Technology Llc Deeply reduced oxidation catalyst and its use for catalyzing liquid phase oxidation reactions
WO2001007380A1 (en) * 1999-07-21 2001-02-01 Carlton And United Breweries Limited Malt extract or spent grain liquor based fertilizer

Patent Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3556079A (en) * 1967-05-16 1971-01-19 Haruo Omizo Method of puncturing a medical instrument under guidance of ultrasound
US4325381A (en) * 1979-11-21 1982-04-20 New York Institute Of Technology Ultrasonic scanning head with reduced geometrical distortion
US4667679A (en) * 1982-08-12 1987-05-26 Harvinder Sahota Apparatus and method for positioning and puncturing an artery and a vein
US4527569A (en) * 1982-11-26 1985-07-09 South African Inventions Develop. Corp. Device for guiding a surgical needle into a blood vessel
US4742829A (en) * 1986-08-11 1988-05-10 General Electric Company Intracavitary ultrasound and biopsy probe for transvaginal imaging
US4887606A (en) * 1986-09-18 1989-12-19 Yock Paul G Apparatus for use in cannulation of blood vessels
US5080103A (en) * 1989-03-21 1992-01-14 Isotopen-Technik Dr. Sauerwein Gmbh Syringe for doppler sonographically aided penetration
US5131395A (en) * 1990-03-28 1992-07-21 Gehlbach Steve M Ultrasonic apparatus for guiding needles into surface vessels
US5103825A (en) * 1991-03-05 1992-04-14 D. E. Hokanson, Inc. Doppler transducer probe with direction indicator
US5261409A (en) * 1991-05-27 1993-11-16 Sulzer Brothers Limited Puncturing device for blood vessels
US5167630A (en) * 1991-09-26 1992-12-01 Paul Kamaljit S Blood vessel cannulation device
US5427108A (en) * 1993-04-01 1995-06-27 Bollinger; Armin Ultrasonic Doppler probe with needle guide
US5309915A (en) * 1993-06-07 1994-05-10 Mte, Inc. Apparatus for locating veins and arteries
US6056692A (en) * 1998-07-08 2000-05-02 Schwartz; John Q. Apparatus and method for locating and marking blood vessels
US6379307B1 (en) * 1998-09-16 2002-04-30 Roy Filly Adjustable needle guide apparatus and method
US6132379A (en) * 1998-11-04 2000-10-17 Patacsil; Estelito G. Method and apparatus for ultrasound guided intravenous cannulation

Cited By (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8784336B2 (en) 2005-08-24 2014-07-22 C. R. Bard, Inc. Stylet apparatuses and methods of manufacture
US8388546B2 (en) 2006-10-23 2013-03-05 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Method of locating the tip of a central venous catheter
US9345422B2 (en) 2006-10-23 2016-05-24 Bard Acess Systems, Inc. Method of locating the tip of a central venous catheter
US9265443B2 (en) 2006-10-23 2016-02-23 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Method of locating the tip of a central venous catheter
US8512256B2 (en) 2006-10-23 2013-08-20 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Method of locating the tip of a central venous catheter
US8858455B2 (en) 2006-10-23 2014-10-14 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Method of locating the tip of a central venous catheter
US8774907B2 (en) 2006-10-23 2014-07-08 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Method of locating the tip of a central venous catheter
US9833169B2 (en) 2006-10-23 2017-12-05 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Method of locating the tip of a central venous catheter
US9492097B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2016-11-15 C. R. Bard, Inc. Needle length determination and calibration for insertion guidance system
US8781555B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2014-07-15 C. R. Bard, Inc. System for placement of a catheter including a signal-generating stylet
US8849382B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2014-09-30 C. R. Bard, Inc. Apparatus and display methods relating to intravascular placement of a catheter
US9549685B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2017-01-24 C. R. Bard, Inc. Apparatus and display methods relating to intravascular placement of a catheter
US9521961B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2016-12-20 C. R. Bard, Inc. Systems and methods for guiding a medical instrument
US9681823B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2017-06-20 C. R. Bard, Inc. Integrated system for intravascular placement of a catheter
US9649048B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2017-05-16 C. R. Bard, Inc. Systems and methods for breaching a sterile field for intravascular placement of a catheter
US9636031B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2017-05-02 C.R. Bard, Inc. Stylets for use with apparatus for intravascular placement of a catheter
US9526440B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2016-12-27 C.R. Bard, Inc. System for placement of a catheter including a signal-generating stylet
US9554716B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2017-01-31 C. R. Bard, Inc. Insertion guidance system for needles and medical components
US8388541B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2013-03-05 C. R. Bard, Inc. Integrated system for intravascular placement of a catheter
US9456766B2 (en) 2007-11-26 2016-10-04 C. R. Bard, Inc. Apparatus for use with needle insertion guidance system
US8478382B2 (en) 2008-02-11 2013-07-02 C. R. Bard, Inc. Systems and methods for positioning a catheter
US8971994B2 (en) 2008-02-11 2015-03-03 C. R. Bard, Inc. Systems and methods for positioning a catheter
US9901714B2 (en) 2008-08-22 2018-02-27 C. R. Bard, Inc. Catheter assembly including ECG sensor and magnetic assemblies
US8437833B2 (en) 2008-10-07 2013-05-07 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Percutaneous magnetic gastrostomy
US9907513B2 (en) 2008-10-07 2018-03-06 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Percutaneous magnetic gastrostomy
US9445734B2 (en) 2009-06-12 2016-09-20 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for endovascular electrography
US9532724B2 (en) 2009-06-12 2017-01-03 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for catheter navigation using endovascular energy mapping
US9339206B2 (en) 2009-06-12 2016-05-17 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Adaptor for endovascular electrocardiography
US9125578B2 (en) 2009-06-12 2015-09-08 Bard Access Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for catheter navigation and tip location
US9415188B2 (en) 2010-10-29 2016-08-16 C. R. Bard, Inc. Bioimpedance-assisted placement of a medical device
US8801693B2 (en) 2010-10-29 2014-08-12 C. R. Bard, Inc. Bioimpedance-assisted placement of a medical device
USD754357S1 (en) 2011-08-09 2016-04-19 C. R. Bard, Inc. Ultrasound probe head
USD724745S1 (en) 2011-08-09 2015-03-17 C. R. Bard, Inc. Cap for an ultrasound probe
USD699359S1 (en) 2011-08-09 2014-02-11 C. R. Bard, Inc. Ultrasound probe head
US9211107B2 (en) 2011-11-07 2015-12-15 C. R. Bard, Inc. Ruggedized ultrasound hydrogel insert
US9839372B2 (en) 2014-02-06 2017-12-12 C. R. Bard, Inc. Systems and methods for guidance and placement of an intravascular device

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20050033177A1 (en) 2005-02-10 application
WO2005009509A2 (en) 2005-02-03 application
WO2005009509A3 (en) 2005-07-21 application
US7766839B2 (en) 2010-08-03 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Barber et al. Ultrasonic duplex echo-Doppler scanner
Kremkau et al. Ultrasonic detection of cavitation at catheter tips
Chapman et al. Visualisation of needle position using ultrasonography
US5427108A (en) Ultrasonic Doppler probe with needle guide
US5570692A (en) Ultrasonic doppler blood flow detector for hemorrhoid artery ligation
US3556079A (en) Method of puncturing a medical instrument under guidance of ultrasound
US5868673A (en) System for carrying out surgery, biopsy and ablation of a tumor or other physical anomaly
US6217530B1 (en) Ultrasonic applicator for medical applications
US5471988A (en) Ultrasonic diagnosis and therapy system in which focusing point of therapeutic ultrasonic wave is locked at predetermined position within observation ultrasonic scanning range
US6306097B1 (en) Ultrasound imaging catheter guiding assembly with catheter working port
US4407294A (en) Ultrasound tissue probe localization system
US7068867B2 (en) Ultrasonic position indicator
US8409103B2 (en) Ultrasound methods of positioning guided vascular access devices in the venous system
US5865178A (en) Method and apparatus for intravascular ultrasonography
US7575550B1 (en) Position sensing based on ultrasound emission
Brands et al. A noninvasive method to estimate pulse wave velocity in arteries locally by means of ultrasound
US6248072B1 (en) Hand controlled scanning device
US7520856B2 (en) Image guided high intensity focused ultrasound device for therapy in obstetrics and gynecology
US5158088A (en) Ultrasonic diagnostic systems for imaging medical instruments within the body
US5242386A (en) Echographic suction cannula
US20050033276A1 (en) Blood vessel detection device
US6623430B1 (en) Method and apparatus for safety delivering medicants to a region of tissue using imaging, therapy and temperature monitoring ultrasonic system
US6083159A (en) Methods and devices for providing acoustic hemostasis
US7621873B2 (en) Method and system to synchronize acoustic therapy with ultrasound imaging
US5582178A (en) Method and apparatus for intravascular ultrasonography