US20100295350A1 - Ergonomic musician's stool - Google Patents

Ergonomic musician's stool Download PDF

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US20100295350A1
US20100295350A1 US12653866 US65386609A US2010295350A1 US 20100295350 A1 US20100295350 A1 US 20100295350A1 US 12653866 US12653866 US 12653866 US 65386609 A US65386609 A US 65386609A US 2010295350 A1 US2010295350 A1 US 2010295350A1
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stool
legs
portion
ability
musician
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Abandoned
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US12653866
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Daniel Seth Barman
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Daniel Seth Barman
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C3/00Chairs characterised by structural features; Chairs or stools with rotatable or vertically-adjustable seats
    • A47C3/20Chairs or stools with vertically-adjustable seats
    • A47C3/36Chairs or stools with vertically-adjustable seats with means, or adapted, for inclining the legs of the chair or stool for varying height of seat
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C9/00Stools for specified purposes
    • A47C9/08Music stools

Abstract

An ergonomic musician's stool or chair, comprising of a sitting surface at the top, which is supported by a support frame or structure with a number of legs attached. One or more of said legs having the ability to telescope to be able to be of a different length than at least one, and possibly more, of the other said legs. The ability to adjust the length of one or more of said legs gives a user the ability to affect the pitch, or lack thereof, of said sitting surface. This allows the user to affect the position and tilt of their pelvic region, the outcome being an overall benefit to the user's posture.
An ergonomic attachment for a musician's stool or seat comprising a receiving piece capable of securely connecting to the stool or seat's supporting frame or leg, a telescoping foot or leg piece, a locking mechanism allowing said telescoping foot or leg piece to be locked or held into a desired position or length, and a self-leveling foot-base. The object of said attachment is to be incorporated to give the user the ability to have an affect on the sitting surface of the musician's stool or seat's degree of pitch or lack thereof. By doing so, the user will be able to affect the position and tilt of their pelvic region, the outcome being an overall benefit to the user's posture.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to the field of ergonomic chairs and stools. More specifically in this example, the present invention relates to musician's stools, which are commonly referred to as “thrones”.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • In the field of music study and performance, musician's stools, which are sometimes referred to as “thrones”, are common place. Although these stools come in various sizes with a variety of features available, most of them are generally quite similar to each other and are consisting of, 1) A sitting surface usually made of padding enclosed by woven fabric, rubber, or leather. 2) A supporting frame which may be height adjustable in some form or another. 3) A system of legs, most commonly 3 or 4 in number, which are connected to or extend from the supporting frame in some way, and may be able to collapse inward toward the frame for ease of storage and transportation.
  • Playing a musical instrument can be a very physical activity involving precise and repetitive body movements. Musicians who are in the habit of practicing and performing on a semi-regular to very regular basis often spend extended periods of time doing this physical activity in a seated position. It is for these reasons that several of the currently available, professional-level musician's stools have attempted to incorporate so-called “ergonomic” as well as high-comfort features and materials, and companies who manufacture and sell these devices have marketed them as such.
  • However, the fact remains that there is currently not a functional and portable musician's stool being offered that adequately addresses the topic of ergonomics as it relates to hip positioning and its affect on proper posture, support, and body movement of the individual user. The comfortable and so-called “ergonomic” features of current models fails to provide an answer for a musician's question of hip placement, ergonomics and proper body posture, and thus the problematic issues of chronic back, body, and joint pain still persist in the community.
  • It is therefore necessary to provide a design concept for an ergonomic musician's stool that will have a positive affect on the positioning of the user's hips, thus improving posture and helping to give proper support to the body so that one can do this work in a more comfortable, efficient, and overall healthy way, helping to prevent chronic body pain and fatigue.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The object of the present invention seeks to solve the above stated problems by offering a new, functional design for a musician's stool that allows the user to control the affect a stool has on their hip positioning, thus helping to provide for the individual user's proper body posture while performing their work.
  • The object of the present invention is provided for by an adjustable, tilting sitting surface which is affected by one or more telescoping legs, said leg/s being connected to the support structure of the stool's sitting surface.
  • The object of said telescoping leg/s is to have an effect on the pitch, or lack thereof, of the stool's sitting surface. The preferred method being to place the telescoping leg/s in back of the user's sitting position, and using said telescoping leg/s to tilt the sitting surface down and forward to a user's desired degree.
  • By allowing the user to be able to control the amount of pitch, or lack thereof, of the stool's sitting surface, the user will be able to affect the position of their hips while seated.
  • When the stool's sitting surface is tilted in the preferred method as described above, the user's hips will have cause to tilt upward and toward the back (away from the user's belly). Once a user has tilted the stool's sitting surface to a degree of their satisfaction, the user's preferred lumbar curve will be maintained, allowing opposing muscle groups in the back to be well-balanced, which in turn allows the back to rest in a straight and upright position.
  • Research suggests that sitting in the above mentioned positioning will increase a user's ease and range of mobility, allowing them to do their work in a more efficient manner as it relates to body mechanics. Further more, medical data and research suggest that when a user sits in the above mentioned positioning, the health benefits of said positioning may additionally include the alleviation of pressure on the lungs and stomach, resulting in easier breathing and improved circulation.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows an example of the present invention of an ergonomic musician's stool with a telescoping leg as it looks when it is set up and ready for use.
  • FIG. 2 shows the same example of the present invention as in FIG. 1, but also includes a drawing marked FIG. 2B, which is an up-close and separated view of the pieces that make up the telescoping portion of the telescoping leg.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • With reference to FIG. 1 and FIG. 2, an example of the present invention in the preferred embodiment a full musician's stool which includes a telescoping leg 5, is here shown, where the musician's stool includes a padded sitting surface 1 which is attached to a supporting frame or body 2 which is comprised of a threaded steel post, and thus has the ability to raise and lower the sitting surface 1. When lowered, the threaded steel post section of the supporting frame or body 2 can be housed in the lower portion 27 of the supporting frame or body 2, the lower portion 27 being internally threaded in a manner proper to receive and house the threaded steel post of the supporting frame or body 2.
  • The telescoping leg 5 is shown in both FIG. 1 and FIG. 2, and is comprised of a preferred embodiment of a threaded receiving section 8 which can be made from aluminum or steel, and is shown as being placed at the bottom end of the telescoping leg 5. The threaded receiving section 8 is internally threaded in a manner proper to receive and house a threaded steel post 6, as illustrated in FIG. 2.
  • The threaded steel post 6, when inserted into the threaded receiving section 8 as further illustrated in FIG. 2, is able to be adjusted to affect the overall length of the telescoping leg 5. By extending the threaded steel post 6 down through the bottom of the threaded receiving section 8, the telescoping leg 5 becomes longer, thus raising the padded sitting surface 1 upwards on the side of the stool containing the telescoping leg 5, and lowering it on the opposite side. It is in this manner that the telescoping leg 5, is able to affect the pitch or lack thereof of the padded sitting surface 1.
  • Although the threaded receiving section 8 is able to receive and house the threaded steel post 6, a locking nut 7 is incorporated to further secure and hold into place the threaded steel post 6 once it has been extended or retracted to the user's preferred length or position.
  • A self-leveling foot 9 is incorporated at the bottom end of the threaded steel post 6, in order to maintain stable contact on the floor or ground surface whilst the threaded steel post 6 is adjusted to it's various positions. Although, as illustrated in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2, a self-leveling foot 9 is not incorporated onto either of the standard, non-telescoping musician's stool legs 3, a manufacturer or user may choose to substitute a self-leveling foot 9 in place of a standard rubber capping foot 4 on one or several of the standard, non-telescoping musician's stool legs 3.
  • Furthermore, both FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 illustrate the preferred embodiment of an ergonomic musician's stool with three legs, two being standard, non-telescoping legs 3, and one comprising the ability to telescope 5. Although this is the case, it would be acceptable to offer an ergonomic musician's stool with three or more total legs, one or more of which may comprise the ability to telescope.
  • In summary, it is shown that the present invention as implemented using the preferred embodiment described herein, can be used as a design for an ergonomic musician's stool, in which the user is able to control the amount of pitch or lack thereof of the stool's sitting surface by way of an adjustable telescoping leg or legs. When a user is able to control the amount of pitch or lack thereof of a stool's sitting surface, they will in turn be able to control the positioning and angle of their pelvic region, which will have an affect on their overall posture.
  • Let it be stated that the preferred embodiment of the present invention described herein has been created to be simple and affordable to manufacture, and easy for a user to operate. Let it also be stated that the information and illustrations included here are not meant to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. All variations and modifications made in accordance with the patent application and the specification of the present invention are within the scope of the present invention.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to the field of ergonomic attachments and accessories for stools and chairs. More specifically in this example, the present invention relates to the field of ergonomic attachments and accessories for musician's stools, which are commonly referred to as “thrones”.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • In the field of music study and performance, musician's stools, which are sometimes referred to as “thrones”, are common place. Although these stools come in various sizes with a variety of features available, most of them are generally quite similar to each other and are consisting of, 1) A sitting surface usually made of padding enclosed by woven fabric, rubber, or leather. 2) A supporting frame which may be height adjustable in some form or another. 3) A system of legs, most commonly 3 or 4 in number, which are connected to or extend from the supporting frame in some way, and may be able to collapse inward toward the frame for ease of storage and transportation.
  • Playing a musical instrument can be a very physical activity involving precise and repetitive body movements. Musicians who are in the habit of practicing and performing on a semi-regular to very regular basis often spend extended periods of time doing this physical activity in a seated position. It is for these reasons that several different brands and models of stools or “thrones” have been specifically designed to be marketed to musicians such as drummers, guitar players, pianists, and the like.
  • This being the case, it stands to reason that there are many such items that have been sold in recent years, and are currently owned and in regular use by musicians
  • However, the fact remains that in recent years a functional and portable musician's stool has not been offered that adequately addresses the topic of ergonomics as it relates to hip positioning and its affect on proper posture, support, and body movement of the individual user. The comfortable and so-called “ergonomic” features of some recent models fails to provide an answer for a musician's question of hip placement, ergonomics and proper body posture, and thus the problematic issues of chronic back, body, and joint pain as well as inefficient body mechanics still persist in the use of these stools.
  • It is therefore necessary to provide a design concept for an ergonomic attachment for musicians' stools that, when attached and put to use, will have a positive affect on the positioning of the user's hips, thus improving posture and helping to give proper support to the body so that one can do their work in a more comfortable, efficient, and overall healthy way, helping to prevent chronic body pain and fatigue as well as improving overall body mechanics.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The object of the present invention seeks to solve the above stated problems by offering a new, functional design for an ergonomic attachment piece to be used with musicians' stools, that when attached will allow the user to control the affect that the stool has on their hip positioning, thus helping to provide for the individual user's proper body posture while performing their work.
  • The object of the present invention is provided for by giving the user the ability to tilt the sitting surface of their musician's stool by incorporating the use of a telescoping leg or foot piece, which is a part of said attachment piece.
  • By incorporating the use of one or more of said attachment pieces with a musician's stool, the user will gain the ability to raise or lower a particular side or area of the stool's sitting surface, thus allowing the user to have an effect on the pitch, or lack thereof, of said sitting surface. The preferred method of use being to place and use the attachment piece/s in such a way that the telescoping leg piece/s would be used to tilt the stool's sitting surface down and forward to a user's desired degree.
  • By allowing the user to be able to control the amount of pitch, or lack thereof, of the stool's sitting surface, the user will be able to affect the position of their hips while seated.
  • When the stool's sitting surface is tilted in the preferred method as described above, the user's hips will have cause to tilt upward and toward the back (away from the user's belly). Once a user has tilted the stool's sitting surface to a degree of their satisfaction, the user's preferred lumbar curve will be maintained, allowing opposing muscle groups in the back to be well-balanced, which in turn allows the back to rest in a straight and upright position.
  • Research suggests that sitting in the above mentioned positioning will not only benefit the user from a perspective of posture and body support, but will also increase a user's ease and range of mobility, allowing them to do their work in a more efficient manner as it relates to body mechanics. Further more, medical data and research suggest that when a user sits in the above mentioned positioning, the health benefits of said positioning may additionally include the alleviation of pressure on the lungs and stomach, resulting in easier breathing and improved circulation.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 3 illustrates the present invention in it's preferred embodiment as an attachment piece built to attach to a separate musician's stool or chair. The three illustrations in FIG. 3 are of the same piece from different perspectives, the top illustration being a side view with the telescoping section (threaded steel post) in it's fully non-extended position, the middle illustration being a side view with the telescoping section partially extended, and the bottom illustration being a rotated view showing the attachment piece from both the side as well as partially from the front.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates the present invention in it's preferred embodiment as an attachment piece, with the preferred embodiment in a disassembled manner to show both the internal and external parts of the invention and how they fit together.
  • FIG. 5 shows top views of the molded rubber insert portion of the preferred embodiment of the present invention, and a separate top view of the aluminum casing in which the molded rubber insert is placed, which is marked as FIG. 5A. To illustrate the possibility of creating different molded inserts that are pre-sized to be compatible with different sized musician's stool legs, a top view of three different molded rubber inserts is shown, and are marked as FIG. 5B, FIG. 5C, and FIG. 5D, each having a different sized receiving section, making each capable of receiving a different sized musician's stool leg. Also shown in FIG. 5 is an inside view of the preferred embodiment from a side perspective, marked as FIG. 5E, and includes a magnified illustration showing the inner-workings of the threaded steel post with the locking mechanism comprised of a threaded clamp collar, marked as FIG. 5F.
  • FIG. 6 shows an inside view of the preferred embodiment of the present invention from a side perspective, with the telescoping section (threaded steel post) in four examples of its many different possible positions, and includes degree markings to illustrate the workings of the self-leveling foot portion when the telescoping portion is in different positions. These for cross-section views are marked as FIG. 6A, FIG. 6B, FIG. 6C, and FIG. 6D.
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective sketch illustrating a human figure using an example of a musician's stool without the inclusion or use of the present invention. A rendering of the human figure's spinal column and pelvic area are included along with a contoured line drawing to illustrate an example of the negative posture that may occur when using a musician's stool without the present invention, which is the issue that the present invention seeks to address. The human figure's pelvic area is tucked down and forward towards the human's front, and the spinal column at both top and bottom ends is curved forward towards the humans front, causing the torso to bend forward in a partially collapsed fashion.
  • FIG. 8 is a sketch illustrating a human figure using an example of a musician's stool that includes the use of the preferred embodiment of the present invention, and is meant to be viewed in opposition of FIG. 7. A rendering of the human figure's spinal column and hip area are included along with a contoured line drawing to illustrate an example of the positive and beneficial affects that the present invention seeks to create in regards to hip positioning and proper posture. In comparison to FIG. 7, the human figure's hip joint is rotated up and toward the human's back (away from the belly), and the spinal column is resting in a more vertical and upright manner, giving the human a more proper posture while seated. Although the present invention is shown as being incorporated on only one of the musician's stool legs, multiple units of the preferred embodiment of the present invention may be used, placing one on each of any number of legs.
  • FIG. 9 is an example of a musician's stool that is supported by a structure with four legs, and has incorporated the use of two units of the preferred embodiment of the present invention in order to affect the pitch of the stool's sitting surface or lack thereof
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • With reference to FIG. 8 and FIG. 9, a preferred embodiment of the invention as an ergonomic attachment for a musician's stool 26 is shown, where the attachment 26 is incorporated with a musician's stool comprising of three legs in FIG. 8, and comprising of four legs in FIG. 9. The musician's stool in both FIG. 8 and FIG. 9 is comprised of a padded sitting surface 1, which is attached to a supporting frame or body 2 and includes a number of standard, non-telescoping stool legs 3, FIG. 8 showing a musician's stool with three such legs and FIG. 9 showing a musician's stool with four such legs.
  • Although in FIG. 8 the attachment 26 is shown as being incorporated on one of the standard legs 3, and in FIG. 9 as being incorporated on two of the standard legs 3, it is acceptable that a user may choose to incorporate the attachment 26, on any number of standard musician's stool legs 3.
  • In both FIG. 8 and FIG. 9, arrows are drawn underneath the padded sitting surface 1, showing the affect that the use of the attachment 26 has on the pitch or lack thereof of the padded sitting surface 1. The previously mentioned illustrated affect being to raise the side of the sitting surface that is matched with the side of the placement of the attachment or attachments, and to lower the side that is opposite the attachment or attachments.
  • Referring now to FIG. 3, FIG. 4, and FIG. 6, detailed illustrations of the preferred embodiment of the ergonomic attachment piece 26 are shown from various perspective angles and at different stages of assembly, where a rubber mold 10 is inserted into an aluminum casing 11. Included in said rubber mold 10 is a section 19 which is molded to receive and house a standard musician's stool leg 20. FIG. 5 includes three illustrations of a top view of the rubber mold 10 showing different sized housing sections 19, made to house different standard sized musician's stool legs 20
  • To aid in the insertion of the rubber mold 10 into the aluminum casing 11, FIG. 4 illustrates a molded ribbing 21, which is molded to fit around a corresponding ribbed section 22 found on the inside of the aluminum casing 11. In addition to aiding in the insertion of the rubber molding 10, the ribbed aluminum section 22 also works to strengthen the integrity of the structure of the aluminum casing 11.
  • As shown in FIG. 3 and FIG. 4, a protruding area 12 of the rubber mold 10 is designed to protrude outside of the aluminum casing 11, the purpose being for flexibility of the housing section 19 as well as for providing a visible location to be able to mold the product's logo.
  • Concerning the telescoping ability of the ergonomic attachment 26, FIG. 3, FIG. 4, FIG. 5, and FIG. 6 illustrate a square tipped, threaded steel post 13 equipped on the bottom with a self-leveling foot 17 which includes a rubber-tipped bottom 18. The threaded steel post 13 is equipped with a square tip so as to be compatible with a standard sized drum key 27. The self-leveling foot 17 is included so that the ergonomic attachment 26 can maintain stable contact with a ground or floor surface whilst the threaded steel post 13 is placed in it's various possible positions.
  • The threaded steel post 13 is designed to be inserted and housed in an internal, threaded housing area 14 which is a part of the aluminum casing 11, as illustrated in FIG. 4 and FIG. 5. Although the threaded housing area 14 is able to properly house the threaded steel post 13, a threaded clamp collar 15 is secured inside the aluminum housing 11 and placed around the threaded steel post 13 for added stability in locking and securing the threaded steel post 13. A magnified view of this relationship between the threaded clamp collar 15 and the threaded steel post 13 is shown in FIG. 5. The threaded clamp collar 15 is tightened and secured around the threaded steel post 13 by use of a square headed screw 16, which is designed to fit a standard sized drum key 27.
  • Looking at FIG. 7, which is an illustration of a perspective sketch of a human figure using a version of a standard musician's stool without the incorporation of the present invention 26, one can see the negative affects the use of such stools can have on a user, where the pelvic area 25 is rotated down and forward toward the user's front or belly, causing the top and bottom of the user's spinal column 24 to curve forward, thus causing the user's torso 23 to lean forward and collapse toward the front.
  • Comparing FIG. 7 to FIG. 8, in which FIG. 8 illustrates a sketch of a human figure using an example of a musician's stool that includes the use of the preferred embodiment of the present invention 26, one can see that the user's pelvic area 25 is rotated up and back to a preferred position, allowing the spinal column 24 to rest in a more vertical and upright position, which in turn allows the torso area 23 to become upright, giving the user a more proper overall posture and offering them the advantages that go along with such.
  • In summary, it is shown that the present invention as implemented using the preferred embodiment described herein, can be used to effectively turn a standard musician's stool into one that has ergonomic benefits for the user. This is achieved by incorporating the use of the present invention with a standard musician's stool to be able to affect the pitch or lack thereof of a stool's sitting surface. When a user is able to control the amount of pitch or lack thereof of a stool's sitting surface, they will in turn be able to control the positioning and angle of their pelvic region, which will have an affect on their overall posture.
  • Let it be stated that the preferred embodiment of the present invention described herein has been created to be simple and affordable to manufacture, and easy for a user to operate. Let it also be stated that the information and illustrations included here are not meant to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. All variations and modifications made in accordance with the patent application and the specification of the present invention are within the scope of the present invention.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. An ergonomic stool comprising a sitting surface which is attached to a supporting frame or body comprising legs, one or more of said legs comprising the ability to telescope to be of a different length than one or more of the other legs attached to said supporting frame or body or said sitting surface, thus acting upon said sitting surface to affect it's degree of pitch or lack thereof.
  2. 2. Legs as claimed in claim 1, comprising the ability to connect to the frame or body as claimed in claim 1, and comprising of a lower portion that sits on the ground.
  3. 3. A leg or legs comprising a telescoping ability as claimed in claim 1, which is comprised of the ability to increase and/or decrease the distance between a ground surface and a side or portion of the sitting surface claimed in claim 1, thus affecting said sitting surface's degree of pitch or lack thereof.
  4. 4. One or more legs comprising the ability to telescope as claimed in claim 1, comprising a telescoping, threaded steel post.
  5. 5. One or more legs comprising the ability to telescope as claimed in claim 1, comprising a threaded receiving piece able to receive said threaded steel post as claimed in claim 4.
  6. 6. A foot piece attached to said threaded steel post as claimed in claim 4, comprising the ability to maintain stable contact with a ground surface whilst said telescoping leg is placed into its numerous possible telescoping positions.
  7. 7. A telescoping leg or legs as claimed in claim 1, comprising a locking mechanism such as a locking nut allowing said telescoping leg or legs to be locked or held into a desired position or length.
  8. 8. An attachment piece made to fit onto a musician's chair or stool, giving the user the ability to affect and/or adjust the pitch, or lack thereof, of the sitting surface of said musician's chair or stool.
  9. 9. An attachment piece as claimed in claim 8, being comprised of a fitted attaching portion, an adjustable telescoping portion, a locking mechanism comprising the ability to lock the previously mentioned adjustable telescoping portion into a fixed position or length, and a foot portion which rests on the ground surface and may be attached to, affixed to, or a part of the adjustable telescoping portion.
  10. 10. A fitted attaching portion as claimed in claim 9, comprising of a portion which is molded or otherwise pre-sized to fit and attach to standard musician's stool or chair legs or frame pieces.
  11. 11. A fitted attaching portion as claimed in claim 9, comprising of a portion which is molded or otherwise pre-sized as claimed in claim 10, which is made of rubber, and is injected or otherwise fitted into an outer casing comprising of cast aluminum.
  12. 12. An attaching portion that is injected or otherwise fitted into an outer casing comprising of cast aluminum as claimed in claim 11, comprising a section that is not contained by the outer casing claimed in claim 11, for purposes of flexibility to account for the variation of size in musician's stool or chair legs or frame pieces.
  13. 13. An adjustable telescoping portion as claimed in claim 9, comprising the ability to increase and decrease the distance between a ground surface and a portion or side of the musician's chair or stool's sitting surface, thus affecting said sitting surface's pitch or lack thereof.
  14. 14. An adjustable telescoping portion as claimed in claim 9, comprising a threaded steel post.
  15. 15. An adjustable telescoping portion as claimed in claim 9, comprising a square-headed top piece, allowing said adjustable telescoping portion to be adjusted with the use of a standard sized drum key.
  16. 16. An attachment piece as claimed in claim 8, comprising a threaded receiving piece sized to be able to receive a threaded steel post as claimed in claim 14.
  17. 17. A foot portion as claimed in claim 9, comprising the ability to maintain stable contact with a ground or floor surface as the moveable telescoping portion claimed in claim 9 is moved in and out of it's various adjustable positions, an example of this being a self-leveling foot.
  18. 18. A foot portion as claimed in claim 9, comprising of a bottom-most section made of rubber, which can be attached or removed from the movable telescoping portion claimed in claim 9, allowing different sized foot portions to be interchanged with the attachment piece as claimed in clam 8.
  19. 19. A locking mechanism as claimed in claim 9, comprising of a threaded clamp collar.
  20. 20. A locking mechanism as claimed in claim 9, comprising of a square headed screw, allowing said locking mechanism to be activated by use of a standard sized drum key.
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