US20100283265A1 - Method for powering a device with an impact - Google Patents

Method for powering a device with an impact Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100283265A1
US20100283265A1 US12/839,316 US83931610A US2010283265A1 US 20100283265 A1 US20100283265 A1 US 20100283265A1 US 83931610 A US83931610 A US 83931610A US 2010283265 A1 US2010283265 A1 US 2010283265A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
impact
mass
electrical energy
energy
flashlight
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/839,316
Inventor
Jahangir S. Rastegar
Thomas Spinelli
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Omnitek Partners LLC
Original Assignee
Omnitek Partners LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US11/447,788 priority Critical patent/US7777396B2/en
Application filed by Omnitek Partners LLC filed Critical Omnitek Partners LLC
Priority to US12/839,316 priority patent/US20100283265A1/en
Publication of US20100283265A1 publication Critical patent/US20100283265A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02KDYNAMO-ELECTRIC MACHINES
    • H02K7/00Arrangements for handling mechanical energy structurally associated with dynamo-electric machines, e.g. structural association with mechanical driving motors or auxiliary dynamo-electric machines
    • H02K7/18Structural association of electric generators with mechanical driving motors, e.g. turbine
    • H02K7/1869Linear generators; sectional generators
    • H02K7/1876Linear generators; sectional generators with reciprocating, linearly oscillating or vibrating parts
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21LLIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF, BEING PORTABLE OR SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR TRANSPORTATION
    • F21L13/00Electric lighting devices with built-in electric generators
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02KDYNAMO-ELECTRIC MACHINES
    • H02K35/00Generators with reciprocating, oscillating or vibrating coil system, magnet, armature or other part of the magnetic circuit
    • H02K35/02Generators with reciprocating, oscillating or vibrating coil system, magnet, armature or other part of the magnetic circuit with moving magnets and stationary coil systems
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02NELECTRIC MACHINES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H02N2/00Electric machines in general using piezo-electric effect, electrostriction or magnetostriction
    • H02N2/18Electric machines in general using piezo-electric effect, electrostriction or magnetostriction producing electrical output from mechanical input, e.g. generators
    • H02N2/183Electric machines in general using piezo-electric effect, electrostriction or magnetostriction producing electrical output from mechanical input, e.g. generators using impacting bodies
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21YINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO THE FORM OR THE KIND OF THE LIGHT SOURCES OR OF THE COLOUR OF THE LIGHT EMITTED
    • F21Y2115/00Light-generating elements of semiconductor light sources
    • F21Y2115/10Light-emitting diodes [LED]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L41/00Piezo-electric devices in general; Electrostrictive devices in general; Magnetostrictive devices in general; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L41/08Piezo-electric or electrostrictive devices
    • H01L41/113Piezo-electric or electrostrictive devices with mechanical input and electrical output, e.g. generators, sensors
    • H01L41/1134Beam type
    • H01L41/1136Cantilevers

Abstract

A method for powering a device. The method including: impacting a portion of the device against a surface; converting the impacting to electrical energy; and providing at least a portion of the electrical energy to at least one powered element associated with the device.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application is a Divisional Application of U.S. application Ser. No. 11/447,788 filed on Jun. 6, 2006, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,xxx,xxx, the entire contents of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates generally to devices powered by energy generated by impacts and, more particularly, to consumer devices, such as a flashlight powered by an impact.
  • 2. Prior Art
  • In general, all chemical batteries contain hazardous and/or corrosive chemicals, have a relatively short shelf life, are relatively expensive and introduce waste disposal problems, with the latter being particularly the case for lithium based batteries and most rechargeable batteries. To satisfy the need for alternative power source solutions for various devices in general and for flashlights in particular, products have been developed that utilize coil and magnets to generate electrical energy. Bicycle dynamo and cranking type of dynamos have long been used to generate electrical energy. Similar coil and magnet generators have also been used in flashlights in the form of rotary crank type and sliding shaking type generators. The crank type generators are relatively heavy and bulky and when designed to be small as is needed for flashlights, they are cumbersome and tiring to crank. The shake type linear motion generators generate very small amounts of electrical energy during each shaking cycle, and are also relatively heavy. Each of such cranking and shaking devices are limited by the physical ability of the person providing the energy to crank or shake the device. In addition, the availability of low cost LED (Light Emitting Diode) lights that consume significantly less electrical energy than conventional light bulbs have made flashlights that harvest energy from the environment, including the user induced actions, much more practical. This is particularly the case for flashlights that are to be used in emergency situations and/or for use in locations where electricity is not available such as in the beach, during hiking, and the like, where flashlights with rechargeable batteries are not practical.
  • The only source of energy that is available to humans that could be harvested is mechanical energy. The energy to be harvested by any energy harvesting power source is mechanical in nature. The difference between any such energy harvesting power sources is: 1) in the method of transferring mechanical energy to the energy harvesting device; and 2) in the method of transforming mechanical energy to electrical energy.
  • A superior method of transferring mechanical energy to the energy harvesting device is ergonomic and does not put undue stress on the user limbs and joints. The method must also be efficient in making available the work done by the human subject to mechanical energy that can be harvested. In addition, the transferred mechanical energy is preferably stored in an intermediate medium to lengthen the period of time available for its conversion to electrical energy since it is generally easier and more efficient to convert mechanical energy to electrical energy and store it in electrical storage devices such as capacitors and rechargeable batteries. The means of transforming mechanical energy to electrical energy is also desired to produce high enough voltage to make the process of charging rechargeable batteries and/or capacitors more efficient.
  • A need therefore exists for methods and related devices for efficient transfer of the work done by human muscles to mechanical energy that can be harvested efficiently and transformed into electrical energy.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Accordingly, a method for powering a device is provided. The method comprising: impacting a portion of the device against a surface; converting the impacting to electrical energy; and providing at least a portion of the electrical energy to at least one powered element associated with the device.
  • The method can further comprise storing at least a portion of the electrical energy prior to the providing.
  • The providing can comprise directly providing the electrical energy to the at least powered element.
  • Also provided is a method for powering a device. The method comprising: providing an impulsive motion to a housing of the device; storing potential energy from the impulsive motion; and converting the stored potential energy to electrical energy.
  • The impulsive motion can be a shaking of the housing.
  • The impulsive motion can be an impact of the housing against a surface.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • These and other features, aspects, and advantages of the apparatus of the present invention will become better understood with regard to the following description, appended claims, and accompanying drawings where:
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a cross sectional schematic view of a first embodiment of an impact powered flashlight.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a variation of the mass-spring unit of the embodiment of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a cross sectional schematic view of a second embodiment of an impact powered flashlight.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a cross sectional schematic view of a third embodiment of an impact powered flashlight.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a cross sectional schematic view of a fourth embodiment of an impact powered flashlight.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • Although the present invention is applicable to numerous types of devices, it is particularly useful in the environment of a flashlight. Therefore, without limiting the applicability of the present invention to a flashlight, it will be described in such environment. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the methods of the present invention can be utilized for other devices, such as cell phones, PDA's, cameras, laptop computers and the like. Where the device includes interior electronics, such as circuit substrates, which may be prone to breakage, the device can also be designed such that the interior electronics are less prone to breakage from impacts. Designing electronic devices to be impact resistant, such as from dropping, are well known in the art.
  • The primary method of mechanical energy transfer to the generator mechanism described herein is an impulsive motion, such as an impact force. The user is intended to provide the impact (impulsive) force to the device by hitting it on some relatively hard object, hitting it on some relatively hard surface, dropping it repeatedly onto some relatively hard surface, or through other impact inducing actions. The user action results in the storage of certain amount of mechanical energy in the device in the form of potential energy, or kinetic energy, or their combination. The stored potential energy is then transformed into electrical energy through the vibration of the system, which generates varying force on at least one piezoelectric element or the like, which in turn generates varying charges (an AC voltage), which is then harvested by the system electronics using well known techniques, and used to charge a capacitor and/or rechargeable battery and/or directly to provide power, such as to provide light, preferably through an LED or other low power light source. The induced vibration may be axial, in bending, in torsion, or their combination.
  • Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown a first embodiment of a device using such an impact (or other impulsive motion) to provide power for at least one powered element associated with the device, in the form of a flashlight shown schematically in FIG. 1. The flashlight 10 has a powered element in the form of a light source 11, which can be one or a plurality of LEDs or other low power light source (collectively referred to as the light source 11). The light source 11 can be mounted in a housing 12 that contains the energy harvesting electronics and the electrical energy storage device(s), collectively indicated as element 25. Such energy storage devices are well known in the art, such as low leakage capacitors and/or rechargeable batteries and a detailed description thereof will be omitted for the sake of brevity. The impact force or vibration motion to mechanical energy storage mechanism is preferably positioned in a handle 13, away from the more sensitive electronics 25 and light source 11. The impact force or vibration motion to mechanical energy storage mechanism can comprise an impact power producing element, such as at least one mass-spring unit 20, with at least one relatively rigid mass 14 and at least one transition elements, such as one or more spring elements 15. As discussed below, the impact power producing element also functions with the application of other impulsive motions, such as shaking, either directly or incidental. The housing 21 of the handle and preferably the light source housing 12 are constructed strong enough to resist moderate impact and drops, such as with plastic. A bottom surface 22 of the flashlight can be constructed of a durable material that can withstand repeated impacts, such as one or more high-strength plastics. When the user hits the bottom surface 22 of the handle housing on a relatively rigid surface, the mass 14 is accelerated downwards in the direction of arrow 23 during the duration of the impact. Simply, this occurs since once the handle housing is stopped suddenly during a small period of time Δt (usually a few milliseconds depending on the physical characteristics of the impacting surfaces and on how rigid the impacted structure behaves), then the mass 14, which is free to accelerate, begins to accelerate and continues to accelerate during nearly the same period of time Δt. At the completion of this acceleration period, the mass 14 has reached a certain velocity VO and has traveled a certain distance DO. If the effective mass 14 of the mass-spring unit 20 is m and the effective spring rate of the mass-spring unit 20 is K, then the total mechanical energy Em stored in the mass-spring unit 20 as a result of the aforementioned impact (impulse) force is:

  • E m=0.5 m V O 2+0.5 k D O 2  (1)
  • Following the impact, the mass-spring unit 20 will begin to vibrate. The spring element(s) 15 will then exert a varying force on the piezoelectric elements 24 positioned on at least one end of the spring elements 15, which in turn generate a varying charge with a certain voltage that is harvested by the harvesting and storage electronics 25 and made available to power the light source 11 or other powered element associated with the device. As is known in the art, the piezoelectric elements can be made in stacked form, which are widely available commercially, for low voltage applications. As shown in FIG. 1, the mass 14 can be positioned in between two spring elements 15, each of which can exert a varying force on a corresponding piezoelectric element 24 positioned at two ends of the handle 13. The piezoelectric elements 24 can be electrically connected to the storage electronics 25 or directly to the light source 11 through appropriate wiring in the housing 12.
  • The mass 14 can be an integral part of the spring element(s) 15 as shown in FIG. 2. In this configuration, the entire mass-spring unit 20 can be constructed with a single spring wire helically wound with at least one compressed coil section 26, which acts as the relatively rigid mass 14 of the mass-spring unit 20.
  • It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that coil and magnet type of mechanical to electrical energy generators may also be used instead of the aforementioned piezoelectric elements with the above method of storing mechanical energy due to impact (impulsive) forces for relatively slow transformation into electrical energy. The schematics of one such embodiment is shown in FIG. 3. All elements of this embodiment may be identical to that of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1 with the difference that the piezoelectric elements 24 are replaced with the coil 27 and magnet 28 elements. The magnet 28 can be the mass 14 of the mass-spring unit 20 (and not the coil 27), to eliminate the need to attach wires to the vibrating mass 14. Following the impact or other impulsive motion, the magnet 28 vibrates inside the coil, therefore causing it to generate an AC current, which is then harvested by the harvesting and storage electronics 25.
  • It is appreciated by those familiar with the art that one or more mass-spring elements can also be mounted perpendicular to the long axis of the flashlight handle to be responsive mostly to an impact or other impulsive motion to the side of the flashlight. The schematic of such an embodiment is shown in FIG. 4. The at least one mass-spring unit 40 (in the schematic of FIG. 4, two of the mass-spring units shown in FIG. 1 or 2 are used) is similarly attached to piezoelectric elements 41 to harvest the stored mechanical energy during vibration of the mass-spring unit 40 as previously described by the harvesting and storage electronics 25. The lateral impact can be to the more rigid end 22 of the handle 13 in the direction of arrow 43. However, any lateral and/or axial impact or their combination will accelerate the mass 26 of the mass-spring unit 40. It is appreciated by those skilled in the art that the mass-spring unit 40 would similarly respond to an axial impact in the direction of the arrow 42 by vibrating in the axial direction, and the lateral component of the spring force on the piezoelectric element would similarly produce charges that can be harvested by the harvesting and storage electronics 25.
  • As was previously described, the impact or other impulsive motion induced vibration may be axial (i.e., in the direction of the length of the flashlight), in bending, in torsion, or their combination. When the impact is essentially in the axial direction 35 and generated by hitting the bottom surface of the flashlight on a relatively hard surface, bending deflection can be readily induced as shown schematically in FIG. 5 by at least one cantilever beam generator assembly 30, consisting of a beam 34 that is attached to the housing 21 of the handle 13 of the flashlight, preferably aided by at least one tip mounted mass 31 (the mass can be an integral part of the beam). At least one piezoelectric element 33 is attached to the surface of the beam 34, preferably close to its base (the end attached to the flashlight) so that it is subjected to high tensile strain on one side of the beam 34 and compressive strain on the other side of the beam 34. The varying charge generated due to the applied compressive and tensile strains on the piezoelectric elements is then supplied to and harvested by the harvesting and storage electronics 25. It is appreciated by those familiar with the art that the piezoelectric elements 33 can be pre-stressed in compression so that during the aforementioned vibration they are not subjected to tensile stress since piezoelectric elements can be very brittle and can withstand only small tensile strains.
  • It is noted that since the disclosed methods and embodiments rely on vibration of mass-spring units, mechanical energy is transferred to the mass-spring units during other flashlight acceleration and deceleration cycles other than those due to impact (impulsive) forces imparted somewhere on the flashlight body. For example, if the flashlight is placed inside a car, the vibration of the car will induce vibration of the flashlight mass-spring unit and thereby generate electrical energy that is stored, preferably in rechargeable batteries, for later use. The same process occurs if a person carries the flashlight in his/her pocket or purse or briefcase, etc., while walking or otherwise moving and would have a charged flashlight for use when needed.
  • Although the embodiments disclosed herein are discussed as providing electrical energy upon an impact of the device against a surface, then can also provide electrical power upon the application of any other impulsive motion, such as by shaking, which can be directly applied (such as by a person shaking the device with his or her hand) or incidentally applied (such as due to movement while being stored in a car, pocketbook etc.). However, unlike the shaking apparatus of the prior art, transition elements, such as the spring elements are provided for storing potential energy, which is in turn converted to electrical power, such as by the piezoelectric elements or magnet/coil arrangements. A shaking impulsive motion working solely on a movable mass, has limitations as to the frequency by which the mass can vibrate (less than 10 Hz), while the addition of the transition elements, such as the spring elements, can produce much higher frequencies, such as between 10-300 Hz and possibly higher, with the impact impulsive motion generally providing the higher frequencies in the range.
  • While there has been shown and described what is considered to be preferred embodiments of the invention, it will, of course, be understood that various modifications and changes in form or detail could readily be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is therefore intended that the invention be not limited to the exact forms described and illustrated, but should be constructed to cover all modifications that may fall within the scope of the appended claims.

Claims (6)

1. A method for powering a device, the method comprising:
impacting a portion of the device against a surface;
converting the impacting to electrical energy; and
providing at least a portion of the electrical energy to at least one powered element associated with the device.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising storing at least a portion of the electrical energy prior to the providing.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein the providing comprises directly providing the electrical energy to the at least powered element.
4. A method for powering a device, the method comprising:
providing an impulsive motion to a housing of the device;
storing potential energy from the impulsive motion; and
converting the stored potential energy to electrical energy.
5. The method of claim 4, wherein the impulsive motion is a shaking of the housing.
6. The method of claim 4, wherein the impulsive motion is an impact of the housing against a surface.
US12/839,316 2006-06-06 2010-07-19 Method for powering a device with an impact Abandoned US20100283265A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/447,788 US7777396B2 (en) 2006-06-06 2006-06-06 Impact powered devices
US12/839,316 US20100283265A1 (en) 2006-06-06 2010-07-19 Method for powering a device with an impact

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/839,316 US20100283265A1 (en) 2006-06-06 2010-07-19 Method for powering a device with an impact

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/447,788 Division US7777396B2 (en) 2006-06-06 2006-06-06 Impact powered devices

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100283265A1 true US20100283265A1 (en) 2010-11-11

Family

ID=38789281

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/447,788 Expired - Fee Related US7777396B2 (en) 2006-06-06 2006-06-06 Impact powered devices
US12/839,305 Abandoned US20100283264A1 (en) 2006-06-06 2010-07-19 Impact Powered Devices
US12/839,316 Abandoned US20100283265A1 (en) 2006-06-06 2010-07-19 Method for powering a device with an impact

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/447,788 Expired - Fee Related US7777396B2 (en) 2006-06-06 2006-06-06 Impact powered devices
US12/839,305 Abandoned US20100283264A1 (en) 2006-06-06 2010-07-19 Impact Powered Devices

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US7777396B2 (en)

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100045119A1 (en) * 2008-08-22 2010-02-25 Ronald Scott Jackson System for generating electrical energy from ambient energy
US8872640B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2014-10-28 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring health and ergonomic status of drivers of vehicles
US20150214823A1 (en) * 2014-01-28 2015-07-30 Stryde Technologies Inc. d/b/a AMPY Kinetic energy harvesting methods and apparatus
US9256711B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2016-02-09 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for providing health information to employees via augmented reality display
US20160059875A1 (en) * 2014-08-31 2016-03-03 Yosef Segman System of self-mobile carts with their own navigation system
CN105915114A (en) * 2016-05-31 2016-08-31 成都九十度工业产品设计有限公司 Energy collection device based on piezoelectric power generation and control system and control method thereof
US9462977B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2016-10-11 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9492120B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2016-11-15 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Workstation for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
CN106533259A (en) * 2016-11-29 2017-03-22 上海斐讯数据通信技术有限公司 Watch self-power-generation circuit and method based on piezoelectric ceramic piece
US9615746B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-04-11 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Floor mat system and associated, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9693734B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-07-04 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems for monitoring and improving biometric health of employees
US9710788B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-07-18 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Computer mouse system and associated, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9722472B2 (en) 2013-12-11 2017-08-01 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for harvesting human energy in the workplace
US9780633B2 (en) 2014-01-28 2017-10-03 Stryde Technologies Inc. Kinetic energy harvesting methods and apparatus
US9889311B2 (en) 2015-12-04 2018-02-13 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, protective casings for smartphones, and associated methods to enhance use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) device
US9949640B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2018-04-24 Saudi Arabian Oil Company System for monitoring employee health
US10108783B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2018-10-23 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring health of employees using mobile devices
US10307104B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2019-06-04 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Chair pad system and associated, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US10475351B2 (en) 2015-12-04 2019-11-12 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and methods for management training systems
US10628770B2 (en) 2015-12-14 2020-04-21 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems and methods for acquiring and employing resiliency data for leadership development
US10642955B2 (en) 2015-12-04 2020-05-05 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Devices, methods, and computer medium to provide real time 3D visualization bio-feedback

Families Citing this family (57)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2412501B (en) * 2004-03-26 2007-10-31 Univ Southampton An electromagnetic device for converting mechanical vibrational energy into electrical energy
US8447234B2 (en) * 2006-01-18 2013-05-21 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and system for powering an electronic device via a wireless link
US9130602B2 (en) 2006-01-18 2015-09-08 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and apparatus for delivering energy to an electrical or electronic device via a wireless link
US9774086B2 (en) 2007-03-02 2017-09-26 Qualcomm Incorporated Wireless power apparatus and methods
US9124120B2 (en) 2007-06-11 2015-09-01 Qualcomm Incorporated Wireless power system and proximity effects
KR20100057632A (en) 2007-08-09 2010-05-31 퀄컴 인코포레이티드 Increasing the q factor of a resonator
DE102007041918A1 (en) * 2007-09-04 2009-03-05 Siemens Ag Piezoelectric energy converter with double diaphragm
KR20100063756A (en) 2007-09-13 2010-06-11 퀄컴 인코포레이티드 Maximizing power yield from wireless power magnetic resonators
WO2009039113A1 (en) 2007-09-17 2009-03-26 Nigel Power, Llc Transmitters and receivers for wireless energy transfer
KR101414404B1 (en) * 2007-10-11 2014-07-01 퀄컴 인코포레이티드 Wireless power transfer using magneto mechanical systems
US8629576B2 (en) 2008-03-28 2014-01-14 Qualcomm Incorporated Tuning and gain control in electro-magnetic power systems
US10188902B2 (en) * 2008-10-09 2019-01-29 Roger Davenport Signal analysis and recharging system
US8160774B2 (en) * 2008-10-15 2012-04-17 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Vehicular actuator system
US8174377B2 (en) * 2008-11-14 2012-05-08 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Suspension height sensor
US8175770B2 (en) * 2008-11-17 2012-05-08 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Height sensing system for a vehicular suspension assembly
WO2010096917A1 (en) * 2009-02-26 2010-09-02 The University Of British Columbia Systems and methods for dipole enhanced inductive power transfer
US7936113B2 (en) * 2009-02-27 2011-05-03 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Harvesting energy from vehicular vibrations using piezoelectric devices
US8063498B2 (en) * 2009-02-27 2011-11-22 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Harvesting energy from vehicular vibrations
US8253281B2 (en) * 2009-02-27 2012-08-28 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Energy harvesting apparatus incorporated into shock absorber
US8143766B2 (en) * 2009-02-27 2012-03-27 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Harvesting energy from vehicular vibrations using piezoelectric devices
US7956797B2 (en) * 2009-03-09 2011-06-07 GM Global Technology Operations LLC System and method for measuring a relative distance between vehicle components using ultra-wideband techniques
US8476778B2 (en) * 2009-03-09 2013-07-02 Miw Associates, Llc Energy generator
US8350394B2 (en) * 2009-09-30 2013-01-08 Alcatel Lucent Energy harvester apparatus having improved efficiency
US8614518B2 (en) * 2009-10-14 2013-12-24 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Self-powered vehicle sensor systems
US20110156406A1 (en) * 2009-12-31 2011-06-30 Qing Ma Platform energy harvesting
US20110169271A1 (en) * 2010-01-11 2011-07-14 Chia-Li Chen Micro power generating device
US8525392B2 (en) * 2010-02-13 2013-09-03 Omnitek Partners Llc Generators for very-high-G energy harvesting
TWM398898U (en) * 2010-03-09 2011-03-01 Mesure Technology Co Ltd Thermometer without power switch
TWM398899U (en) * 2010-03-09 2011-03-01 Mesure Technology Co Ltd Motion powered thermometer
KR101220247B1 (en) * 2010-12-23 2013-01-09 전자부품연구원 Piezo power generator for emergency power feeding
US8912710B2 (en) * 2011-02-20 2014-12-16 Omnitek Partners Llc Energy harvesting from input impulse with motion doubling mechanism for generating power from mortar tube firing impulses and other inputs
TWI436243B (en) * 2011-02-25 2014-05-01 E Ink Holdings Inc Active digital pen
US20120223621A1 (en) * 2011-03-02 2012-09-06 Ki Il Kim Multipurpose portable power generating system
US8736148B2 (en) * 2011-05-04 2014-05-27 James Douglass Penn Multiple degree of freedom actuator and method
US8723348B2 (en) * 2011-06-16 2014-05-13 Ideation Designs Llc Battery assembly with kinetic energy-based recharging
NL2007609C2 (en) * 2011-10-18 2013-04-22 Univ Delft Tech Energy harvester.
TWI450135B (en) * 2011-12-06 2014-08-21 Wistron Corp Electromagnetic stylus and computer apparatus thereof
US20130154573A1 (en) * 2011-12-20 2013-06-20 The Chamberlain Group, Inc. Method and Apparatus Pertaining to Powering a Movable Barrier Operator Remote Controller
KR101216494B1 (en) * 2011-12-27 2012-12-31 (주)지원에프알에스 Device for generating micro electrical current
US9383180B2 (en) * 2012-03-12 2016-07-05 Omnitek Partners Llc Gravity dropped small weapon electronic safe arm fuze and energy harvesting device for power generation onboard gravity dropped weapons
US9063165B2 (en) 2012-06-01 2015-06-23 Landauer, Inc. System for motion and activity correlation with dose for occupational and environmental dosimetry
WO2014191960A1 (en) 2013-05-31 2014-12-04 Landauer, Inc. System for wireless, motion and position-sensing, integrating radiation sensor and energy harvester for occupational and environmental dosimetry
US8822924B2 (en) 2012-06-01 2014-09-02 Landauer, Inc. Wireless, motion and position-sensing, integrating radiation occupational and environmental dosimetry
US9417331B2 (en) 2012-06-01 2016-08-16 Landauer, Inc. System for wireless, motion and position-sensing, integrating radiation sensor and energy harvester for occupational and environmental dosimetry
US20130335011A1 (en) * 2012-06-06 2013-12-19 Ruamoko MEMS, Inc. Microelectronic devices for harvesting kinetic energy and/or detecting motion, and associated systems and methods
KR101320185B1 (en) * 2012-09-19 2013-10-23 삼성전기주식회사 Vibrating actuator
WO2014105703A2 (en) * 2012-12-26 2014-07-03 Nulman Yanir Method and apparatus for recovery of parasitic energy losses
US9837933B2 (en) * 2013-06-28 2017-12-05 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Energy harvester using mass and mobile device including the energy harvester
US9601267B2 (en) 2013-07-03 2017-03-21 Qualcomm Incorporated Wireless power transmitter with a plurality of magnetic oscillators
US20150042470A1 (en) * 2013-08-07 2015-02-12 Zf Friedrichshafen Ag Non-battery operated personal emergency response system
CN104110584B (en) * 2014-06-17 2017-08-04 江门市江海区琪泰机械五金有限公司 A kind of flashlight with electric generation by itself
KR101709536B1 (en) * 2014-09-04 2017-02-23 주식회사 엘지화학 Auxiliary Generator for Vehicle of Generating Electrical Power through Inertial Force
US9143061B1 (en) * 2014-12-29 2015-09-22 Wen-Sung Lee Bicycle power generation device
EP3245156A1 (en) * 2015-01-16 2017-11-22 Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Region Paris Ile de France Miniature kinetic energy harvester for generating electrical energy from mechanical vibrations
US10505471B2 (en) * 2015-06-26 2019-12-10 Roozbeh Khodambashi Emami Piezoelectric generator, method of its operation and its application in production, storage and transmission of electric energy
KR20170017575A (en) * 2015-08-07 2017-02-15 삼성전자주식회사 A battery pack
US9960715B1 (en) 2016-03-22 2018-05-01 The United States Of America, As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Light activated piezoelectric converter

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6411016B1 (en) * 1999-11-12 2002-06-25 Usc Co., Limited Piezoelectric generating apparatus
US20060021261A1 (en) * 2004-07-19 2006-02-02 Face Bradbury R Footwear incorporating piezoelectric energy harvesting system
US20060175937A1 (en) * 2003-07-30 2006-08-10 Clingman Dan J Strain energy shuttle apparatus and method for vibration energy harvesting
US20070145861A1 (en) * 2005-11-18 2007-06-28 Par Technologies, Llc Human powered piezoelectric power generating device
US20080074083A1 (en) * 2006-06-26 2008-03-27 Yarger Eric J System and method for storing energy
US20080136292A1 (en) * 2004-10-21 2008-06-12 Jack Thiesen Miniaturized Piezoelectric Based Vibrational Energy Harvester

Family Cites Families (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7231874B2 (en) * 2001-09-05 2007-06-19 Omnitek Partners Llc Power supplies for projectiles and other devices
WO2004023572A1 (en) * 2002-08-30 2004-03-18 Usc Corporation Piezoelectric generator
US20050168307A1 (en) * 2004-02-04 2005-08-04 Reynolds Michael G. High output magnetic inertial force generator
US7148583B1 (en) * 2005-09-05 2006-12-12 Jeng-Jye Shau Electrical power generators
US7388483B2 (en) * 2005-12-23 2008-06-17 General Electric Company Monitoring status of railyard equipment using wireless sensing devices

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6411016B1 (en) * 1999-11-12 2002-06-25 Usc Co., Limited Piezoelectric generating apparatus
US20060175937A1 (en) * 2003-07-30 2006-08-10 Clingman Dan J Strain energy shuttle apparatus and method for vibration energy harvesting
US20060021261A1 (en) * 2004-07-19 2006-02-02 Face Bradbury R Footwear incorporating piezoelectric energy harvesting system
US20080136292A1 (en) * 2004-10-21 2008-06-12 Jack Thiesen Miniaturized Piezoelectric Based Vibrational Energy Harvester
US20070145861A1 (en) * 2005-11-18 2007-06-28 Par Technologies, Llc Human powered piezoelectric power generating device
US20080074083A1 (en) * 2006-06-26 2008-03-27 Yarger Eric J System and method for storing energy

Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100045119A1 (en) * 2008-08-22 2010-02-25 Ronald Scott Jackson System for generating electrical energy from ambient energy
US8030786B2 (en) * 2008-08-22 2011-10-04 Willowview Systems, Inc. System for generating electrical energy from ambient energy
US9844344B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-12-19 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems and method to monitor health of employee when positioned in association with a workstation
US10307104B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2019-06-04 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Chair pad system and associated, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9256711B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2016-02-09 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for providing health information to employees via augmented reality display
US10206625B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2019-02-19 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Chair pad system and associated, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US10108783B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2018-10-23 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring health of employees using mobile devices
US10058285B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2018-08-28 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Chair pad system and associated, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9462977B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2016-10-11 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9492120B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2016-11-15 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Workstation for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9526455B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2016-12-27 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US10052023B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2018-08-21 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Floor mat system and associated, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9615746B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-04-11 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Floor mat system and associated, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9693734B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-07-04 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems for monitoring and improving biometric health of employees
US9710788B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-07-18 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Computer mouse system and associated, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9962083B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2018-05-08 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving biomechanical health of employees
US9949640B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2018-04-24 Saudi Arabian Oil Company System for monitoring employee health
US8872640B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2014-10-28 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring health and ergonomic status of drivers of vehicles
US9808156B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-11-07 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for monitoring and improving biomechanical health of employees
US9830576B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-11-28 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Computer mouse for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9830577B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-11-28 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Computer mouse system and associated computer medium for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees
US9833142B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-12-05 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for coaching employees based upon monitored health conditions using an avatar
US9805339B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2017-10-31 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Method for monitoring and improving health and productivity of employees using a computer mouse system
US9722472B2 (en) 2013-12-11 2017-08-01 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and computer-implemented methods for harvesting human energy in the workplace
US10153683B2 (en) 2014-01-28 2018-12-11 Stryde Technologies Inc. Kinetic energy harvesting methods and apparatus
US9780633B2 (en) 2014-01-28 2017-10-03 Stryde Technologies Inc. Kinetic energy harvesting methods and apparatus
US9331559B2 (en) * 2014-01-28 2016-05-03 Stryde Technologies Inc. Kinetic energy harvesting methods and apparatus
US20150214823A1 (en) * 2014-01-28 2015-07-30 Stryde Technologies Inc. d/b/a AMPY Kinetic energy harvesting methods and apparatus
US20160059875A1 (en) * 2014-08-31 2016-03-03 Yosef Segman System of self-mobile carts with their own navigation system
US10475351B2 (en) 2015-12-04 2019-11-12 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, computer medium and methods for management training systems
US9889311B2 (en) 2015-12-04 2018-02-13 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems, protective casings for smartphones, and associated methods to enhance use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) device
US10642955B2 (en) 2015-12-04 2020-05-05 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Devices, methods, and computer medium to provide real time 3D visualization bio-feedback
US10628770B2 (en) 2015-12-14 2020-04-21 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Systems and methods for acquiring and employing resiliency data for leadership development
CN105915114A (en) * 2016-05-31 2016-08-31 成都九十度工业产品设计有限公司 Energy collection device based on piezoelectric power generation and control system and control method thereof
CN106533259A (en) * 2016-11-29 2017-03-22 上海斐讯数据通信技术有限公司 Watch self-power-generation circuit and method based on piezoelectric ceramic piece

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20100283264A1 (en) 2010-11-11
US7777396B2 (en) 2010-08-17
US20070278902A1 (en) 2007-12-06

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Xie et al. Energy harvesting from transverse ocean waves by a piezoelectric plate
Guan et al. Design and analysis of a piezoelectric energy harvester for rotational motion system
Li et al. Energy harvesting from low frequency applications using piezoelectric materials
Kim et al. A review of piezoelectric energy harvesting based on vibration
Harb Energy harvesting: State-of-the-art
Wu et al. Tunable resonant frequency power harvesting devices
Khaligh et al. Kinetic energy harvesting using piezoelectric and electromagnetic technologies—state of the art
Fan et al. Scavenging energy from human walking through a shoe-mounted piezoelectric harvester
Tang et al. Bi-stable frequency up-conversion piezoelectric energy harvester driven by non-contact magnetic repulsion
McKay et al. An integrated, self-priming dielectric elastomer generator
Halim et al. An electromagnetic rotational energy harvester using sprung eccentric rotor, driven by pseudo-walking motion
Pozzi et al. Plucked piezoelectric bimorphs for knee-joint energy harvesting: modelling and experimental validation
Wei et al. Modeling and experimental investigation of an impact-driven piezoelectric energy harvester from human motion
Bhatnagar et al. Energy harvesting for assistive and mobile applications
Cepnik et al. Review on electrodynamic energy harvesters—a classification approach
Mateu et al. Review of energy harvesting techniques and applications for microelectronics
Sodano et al. Use of piezoelectric energy harvesting devices for charging batteries
Yang et al. Vibration energy harvesting using macro-fiber composites
Williams et al. Analysis of a micro-electric generator for microsystems
Kong et al. Resistive impedance matching circuit for piezoelectric energy harvesting
Lefeuvre et al. Piezoelectric energy harvesting device optimization by synchronous electric charge extraction
Niu et al. Evaluation of motions and actuation methods for biomechanical energy harvesting
EP1610646B1 (en) A backpack for harvesting electrical energy during walking and for minimizing shoulder strain
Lefeuvre et al. A comparison between several approaches of piezoelectric energy harvesting
US8410667B2 (en) Electrical generators for low-frequency and time-varying rocking and rotary motions

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION