US20100275341A1 - Knitted Glove Having A Single Layer With A Plurality Of Yarns - Google Patents

Knitted Glove Having A Single Layer With A Plurality Of Yarns Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100275341A1
US20100275341A1 US12/768,953 US76895310A US2010275341A1 US 20100275341 A1 US20100275341 A1 US 20100275341A1 US 76895310 A US76895310 A US 76895310A US 2010275341 A1 US2010275341 A1 US 2010275341A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
yarn
glove
section
yarns
palm
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Abandoned
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US12/768,953
Inventor
Sean Sweeney
Eric Thompson
James H. Moreland
Cherilyn N. Nelson
Steven M. York
Norberto Hector Perales Solis
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Ansell Ltd
Ansell Healthcare Products LLC
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Ansell Healthcare Products LLC
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Priority to US17381109P priority Critical
Priority to US22255209P priority
Priority to US24248709P priority
Priority to US24293609P priority
Priority to US24292909P priority
Priority to US24337209P priority
Priority to US24337609P priority
Priority to US29492310P priority
Application filed by Ansell Healthcare Products LLC filed Critical Ansell Healthcare Products LLC
Priority to US12/768,953 priority patent/US20100275341A1/en
Assigned to Ansell Limited reassignment Ansell Limited ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: YORK, STEVEN M., SWEENEY, SEAN, NELSON, CHERILYN N., MORELAND, JAMES H., PERALES SOLIS, NORBERTO H., THOMPSON, ERIC
Publication of US20100275341A1 publication Critical patent/US20100275341A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/22Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration
    • D04B1/24Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration wearing apparel
    • D04B1/28Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration wearing apparel gloves
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D19/00Gloves
    • A41D19/015Protective gloves
    • A41D19/01505Protective gloves resistant to mechanical aggressions, e.g. cutting. piercing
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/10Patterned fabrics or articles
    • D04B1/12Patterned fabrics or articles characterised by thread material
    • D04B1/126Patterned fabrics or articles characterised by thread material with colour pattern, e.g. intarsia fabrics
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D2500/00Materials for garments
    • A41D2500/10Knitted

Abstract

A seamless, single layer, multi-yarn glove or glove liner is disclosed. The glove or glove liner includes a first type of yarn and a second type of yarn that is different from the first type of yarn. The glove or glove liner has a single layer that includes the first type of yarn and the second type of yarn knitted together to form a hand-like structure that includes a thumb section, a plurality of finger sections and a palm section. The first type of yarn is different that the second type of yarn. For example, the first type of yarn may be a cut resistant yarn and the second type of yarn may be an inexpensive elastic yarn such as Spandex. An optional cuff is part of the single layer, the cuff optionally comprising a tab to aid in donning and doffing. The glove can further comprise a tab with indicia, where the indicia can be, for example, shape or color to convey information about the glove such as size or cut resistant properties. Padded protection on the knuckles can also be provided.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 61/173,811, filed Apr. 29, 2009, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 61/222,552, filed Jul. 2, 2009; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 61/242,487, filed Sep. 15, 2009; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 61/242,936, filed Sep. 16, 2009; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 61/242,929, filed Sep. 16, 2009; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 61/243,372, filed Sep. 17, 2009, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 61/243,376, filed Sep. 17, 2009; and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 61/294,923, filed Jan. 14, 2010, each which is hereby incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • FIELD
  • The present invention relates to knitted gloves and knitted glove liners having a single layer.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The importance of gloves in protecting the hands of today's work force is growing. For example, many gloves are now incorporating cut resistant high performance yarns to provide cut protection to persons wearing the glove. Known gloves, particularly those providing increased functionality typically have multiple plies or layers to incorporate the different types of yarns required. Alternatively, known gloves rely on reinforced areas to incorporate the different types of yarns required.
  • Existing gloves that incorporate multiple types of yarns are therefore expensive because of the extra plies and layers used in the manufacturing process. Further the extra plies and layers in the gloves frequently can have a cost in performance. For example, gloves having extra plies and layers often have decrease dexterity because of the thickness of the layers. The thickness in the layers can contribute to less than optimum breathing capability of a glove as well. Thus, there is a need for a new type of glove and a new type of glove liner.
  • SUMMARY
  • Provided are knitted gloves and liners having a single layer of at least two different yarns. In accordance with one aspect, a knitted glove that includes a first type of yarn and a second type of yarn is provided. This glove is continuously knit, which simplifies processing steps and any need for manual handling of the glove to incorporate a second type of yarn. The first type of yarn is different than the second type of yarn. The glove includes a single layer that includes the first type of yarn and the second type of yarn knitted together to form a hand-like structure. The hand-like structure typically includes a thumb section, a plurality of finger sections and a palm section. In one embodiment, the thumb section, the plurality of finger sections and the palm sections are seamless, including the interface between each of these sections. The difference between the first yarn and the second yarn can be the color of the yarns. Alternatively, entirely different types of yarns can be used in the single layer of the knitted glove. For example, the first yarn can be a cut resistant yarn and the second yarn can be a standard elastic yarn, such as spandex, which is not cut resistant. The cut resistant yarn can be, for example, Dyneema or Kevlar.
  • The glove may also optionally include a coating over at least a part of the single knitted ply. The coating can be from a natural rubber latex or synthetic rubber latex, or other elastomeric polymer coatings. The coating can be applied by dipping the knitted glove into the coating material or by spraying the coating onto the glove. Coating the knitted gloves of this invention can improve the grip of the glove in handling dry and oily items when the coating is on the outside of the glove. The coating can be, by way of example only, polyurethane, nitrile, carboxylated acrylonitrile butadiene; the coating can be unfoamed or foamed.
  • The glove may also optionally include a cuff section attached to the palm section. There can also be a slit in the cuff section and a strap can be provided on the cuff section. Velcro can be provided on the strap and on the cuff section to allow the strap to be secured.
  • The different yarns in the single knitted layer of the glove can be provided anywhere in the glove. For example, the first yarn and the second yarn can be in a single layer in the thumb section. Additionally, the first yarn and the second yarn can be in the single layer in one of the finger sections. Further, the first yarn can be in the single knitted layer in one of the finger sections and the second yarn can be in the same single knitted layer in another of the finger sections. Also, the first yarn and the second yarn can be in the single knitted layer in the palm section.
  • In accordance with other aspects, the first yarn can be provided in the single layer in the thumb section and the second yarn can be provided in the single knitted layer in either one of the plurality of finger sections or in the palm section. Also, the first yarn can be provided in the single knitted layer in the palm section and the second yarn can be provided in the single knitted layer in one of the plurality of finger sections.
  • The glove, in accordance with a further aspect, can also include only the knitted single layer without any reinforced areas.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The following description of the figures provide non-limiting embodiments that shall serve to illustrate various aspects of the present invention.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a glove having a knitted continuous single layer with two different yarns;
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a section of a glove showing integration of two different yarns into a single layer;
  • FIG. 3 illustrates further aspects of a glove;
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a glove having a strap around its cuff;
  • FIGS. 5A and 5B illustrate each side of a glove with multiple zones, each of which can be made with one or more different types of yarns;
  • FIG. 6 further illustrates the construction of an exemplary protective glove;
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a tab of a glove;
  • FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 9 further illustrate a tab of a glove; and
  • FIGS. 10 and 11 illustrate a glove with knuckle protection.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Gloves provided are suitable for comfortably working for long periods of time handling tools, fine instruments, wires, piping, small and large mechanical parts where dexterity and hand protection are needed. Such gloves provide multiple functionalities in a single ply of knit. The use of multiple colors, for example, can provide visual indicators for safety purposes. The use of cut resistant yarns in targeted areas, for another example, provide protection where needed while using lower cost and potentially more comfortable yarns in other areas.
  • Turning to the figures, FIG. 1 illustrates a glove 10 having a thumb section 12, a plurality of finger sections 14, 16, 18 and 20 and a palm section 22. The glove 10 can also be a glove liner. The glove 10 or glove liner includes only a single layer of at least two knitted yarns. Thus, in accordance with one aspect, there is no second layer of knitted yarns. Also, in accordance with another aspect, there are no reinforced patches attached to the single layer of knitted yarns that the glove 10 comprises. As desired, however, the glove 10 or glove liner can also be used as a single knitted layer in a multi-layer glove or with reinforced patches.
  • The glove 10, as illustrated in FIG. 1, includes two different types of yarns. The first yarn is shown in the figure by a first texture depicted in the thumb section 12, in the finger sections 14, 16, 18 and 20 and in the lower palm section 22. The second yarn is shown in the figure by a second texture depicted in the upper palm section 24.
  • The first yarn is different from the second yarn. The first and second yarns can differ in color. Thus, as depicted in FIG. 1, the yarn in the upper palm section 24 can be darker than the yarns used in the thumb section 12, in the finger sections 14, 16, 18 and 20 and in the lower palm section 22. Such a color difference can be implemented in unlimited variations among any area(s) of the glove 10. Further, more than two yarns having differing properties such as color can be used in any area of the glove 10.
  • The different colored yarns can be used in any desired combination in any part of the glove 10 to provide a unique look. Additionally, the different colored yarns can be used in any desired combination in any part of the glove 10 to provide additional functionality. Thus, for example, if it was desired to highlight the index finger 14 to assist a wearer of the glove 10 in some fashion, the index finger 14 can be made with a first yarn having a first color and the rest of the glove 10, including the thumb section 12, the finger sections 16, 18 and 20 and the upper and lower palm sections 22 and 24, could be made with a yarn having a second color. Other areas of the single layer glove 10 can be highlighted in a similar fashion by knitting two different yarns together into a single layer.
  • If different functionality is required in different parts of the glove, two different yarns having different functional properties can be incorporated into the single layer of the glove 10 in accordance with aspects. Thus, if it is important to provide cut resistance to the fingers only, including the thumb, then the thumb section 12 and the finger sections 14, 16, 18 and 20 can be a cut resistant yarn, such as an ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) (sold, for example, under the trade name Dyneema®) or a para-aramid (sold, for example, under the trade name Kevlar®) or any other cut resistance yarn. In conjunction with this, the upper and lower palm sections 22 and 24 could be a low cost elastic yarn. By way of example, the low cost elastic yarn can be spandex (sold under the trade name Lycra®).
  • In accordance with another aspect, a first yarn having a first characteristic such as cut resistance and a second yarn having a different characteristic, such as absorption, can be knitted together into a single layer, and can be used in any part of the glove 10. Thus, a unique combination of characteristics—cut resistance and moisture absorption—can be obtained.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a section of a glove where the integration of two different yarns into a layer of a glove is shown. Six rows of yarns are shown in FIG. 2, including rows 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, and 50, where the row follows the path of the yarn. Only the top of the yarn in row 40 is shown and only the bottom of the yarn in row 50 is shown. A first yarn is used in rows 40, 42 and 44, which are knitted together using standard knitting techniques, as shown in FIG. 2.
  • A second yarn different from the first yearn is used in rows 46, 48, and 50. This is indicated by the contrasting color of the rows 46, 48, and 50. This is accomplished by instructing a knitting machine to introduce the new yarn into the rows 46, 48, and 50, and by knitting the different yarns together in the glove 10 as illustrated. As previously described, the yarn in rows 40, 42 and 44 can differ in color from the yarn in rows 46, 48, and 50. Alternatively, the yarn in rows 40, 42 and 44 can be a low cost elastic yarn such as spandex while the yarn introduced in rows 46, 48, and 50 can be a higher performance yarn such as Kevlar or Dyneema.
  • Another combination can be the use of a yarn having a high absorption rate, such as wool, in rows 40, 42 and 44 and the use of a high performance, cut resistant yarn, such as Kevlar or Dyneema in rows 46, 48, and 50. Other combinations are possible.
  • For example, the first yarn used in rows 40, 42 and 44 could be a cut resistant yarn and the second yarn used in rows 46, 48, and 50 could be an abrasion resistant yarn. Thus, the cut resistant yarn could be Kevlar or Dyneema or wire-containing. The abrasion resistant yarns are made from a material able to withstand the effects of wear. In accordance with an aspect, abrasion resistant yarns include a high hardness material such as fiberglass or other materials having a Mohs hardness of 3 or greater. An examples of abrasion resistant yarns that can be used in rows 46 and 48 include 2/70/34 textured nylon 66 filament and 2/70/34 textured nylon 6.
  • Another combination of yarns that can be used in the glove 10 includes a first type of cut resistant yarn and a second type of cut resistant yarn. Thus, the first cut resistant yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the second cut resistant yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. The first cut resistant yarn can be Kevlar and the second cut resistant yarn can be Dyneema.
  • Another combination of yarns that can be used in the glove 10 is a cut resistant yarn and a comfort thermal regulating yarn. Thus, the cut resistant yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the comfort thermal regulating yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. The cut resistant yarn can be Kevlar or Dyneema. The comfort thermal regulating yarn includes a phase change material. Examples of the comfort thermal regulating yarn include the Outlast® Acrylic and the Outlast® Viscose yarns.
  • Another combination of yarns that can be used in the glove 10 is a cut resistant yarn and an antimicrobial yarn. Thus, the cut resistant yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the antimicrobial yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. The cut resistant yarn can be Kevlar or Dyneema. The antimicrobial yarn includes antimicrobial ingredients embedded in fibers. Examples of antimicrobial yarns include A.M.Y.® yarns from Unifi or yarns treated with AEGIS Microbe Shield® technology from AEGIS Environments.
  • Further combinations of yarns can be used in the glove 10. Thus, a plied yarn and a non-plied yarn can be used in the glove 10. The plied yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the non-plied yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. Examples of plied yarns include 16/2 Kevlar® or 10/3 cotton. Examples of non-plied yarns include 16/1 Kevlar® or 10/1 cotton.
  • Another combination of yarns that can be used in the glove 10 is a spun yarn and a filament yarn. The spun yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the filament yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. Examples of spun yarns include 16/1 Dyneema® —nylon blend or 14/1 cotton or 36/1 DRYENERGY™ polyester/cotton from Achieve o2. Examples of filament yarns include 2/70/34 air-jet textured nylon 66 or 2/70/68 Nilit® Aquarius textured nylon 66.
  • Another combination of yarns that can be used in the glove 10 is a composite (gimped) yarn and a noncomposite yarn. The composite (gimped) yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the noncomposite yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. Examples of composite (gimped) yarns include Powerguard® yarns containing Kevlar®, modacrylic, and glass from Culimeta-Saveguard. Examples of noncomposite yarns include 16/1 Kevlar® or 14/1 cotton.
  • Another combination of yarns that can be used in the glove 10 is a synthetic yarn and a natural yarn. The synthetic yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the natural yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. Examples of synthetic yarns include 12/2 polyester or 4/70/34 nylon 66 or 40 denier spandex. Examples of natural yarns include 14/1 alpaca or 8/1 bamboo or 20/2 cotton.
  • Another combination of yarns that can be used in the glove 10 is a first synthetic blended yarn and a second synthetic blended yarn. The first blended synthetic yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the second blended synthetic yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. Examples of blended synthetic yarns that can be used include 16/2 Kevlar®/nylon/Spandex blend or 14/1 Dyneema®/nylon blend.
  • Another combination of yarns that can be used in the glove 10 is a first composite yarn and a second composite yarn. The first composite yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the second composite yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. Examples of composite yarns that can be used include steel core wrapped by nylon 66 filament yarn or fiberglass core wrapped by spun polyester and steel.
  • Another combination of yarns that can be used in the glove 10 is a first synthetic yarn and a second synthetic yarn. The first synthetic yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the second synthetic yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. Examples of synthetic yarns that can be used include 10/2 nylon 66 or 2/70/68 nylon 6.
  • Another combination of yarns that can be used in the glove 10 is a first natural yarn and a second natural yarn. The first natural yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the second natural yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. Examples of natural yarns that can be used include 40/1 cotton or 10/2 wool or 20/2 cashmere.
  • Another combination of yarns that can be used in the glove 10 is a textured yarn and a non-textured yarn. The textured yarn can be used in rows 40, 42 and 44 while the non-textured yarn can be used in rows 46, 48, and 50. Examples of textured yarns that can be used include 2/70/34 air-jet textured nylon 66 or 2/100/92 false-twist textured nylon 66. Examples of non-textured yarns that can be used include 70/68 flat nylon 66 or 940 denier Innegra™ S polypropylene from Innegrity.
  • The knitting structure shown in FIG. 2 and the knitting of the second yarn to the first yarn in a single layer of a glove can be accomplished in a satisfactory manner using a SWG-type knitting machine. SWG-type knitting machines are available from Shima Sieki. It is believed that gloves in accordance with the various aspects can also be made in a satisfactory manner with other types of knitting machines.
  • The yarn type or a color change previously described can be accomplished by either knotting the two different yarns together, floating the unused yarn out of the way until the pattern calls for that color, or by leaving a tail (string) at the changeover. This may vary according to the yarn feeder used.
  • In some cases, such as making stripes of alternating colors, the yarn of one color can simply be pulled out of the way and floated down the glove while the other color stripe is knitted. When a new yarn starts, in some cases, there may be just a small tail of unknit yarn at the start or end of the knitting, which appears as a small string inside the glove.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, a cuff 26 can be provided on the glove 10. The cuff 26 can be formed as an integral part of the single layer of knitted yarns shown in FIG. 1. Alternatively, the cuff 26 can be attached to the palm section 22. For example, the cuff 26 can be sewn to the palm section 22. When the cuff section 26 is sewn to the palm section, the thumb section, the plurality of finger sections and the palm sections and the interface between each of these sections. When the cuff 26 section is formed as an integral part of the single layer of knitted yarns shown in FIG. 1, then the interface between the cuff section 26 and the palm section 22 is also seamless.
  • FIG. 3 also illustrates a glove 50 with a cuff 52. A slit 54 can be provided in the cuff. The slit allows the glove 50 to be easily put on a hand as well as permitting easy removal of the glove 50 from a hand. Referring to FIG. 4, a strap 60 can be provided around the cuff 52 to allow the glove 50 to be securely placed on a hand. The strap 60 can include a plate 62, shown in FIG. 5A, that allows the strap 60 to be secured once the glove is placed on a hand. The strap 60 can be sewn into the cuff 52. FIGS. 3 and 4 also illustrate the glove 50 having a coating 64. A single layer, multi-yarn glove liner, having the construction as described herein can be dipped in a coating material using conventional techniques. The coating can be from a natural rubber latex or a synthetic latex either of which is foamed or unfoamed. Nitrile, and more specifically, carboxylated acrylonitrile butadiene is desirable for its chemical resistance. Foamed nitrile further provides grip. A polyurethane coating provides breathability. The coating used can depend on the preferred characteristics of the glove. It may also depend on the type of yarns used. The coating can be selectively applied over any desired area of the glove.
  • FIG. 5A shows a front or palm side that contacts the palm and FIG. 5B shows a back or knuckles side that contacts the knuckles of a glove 70, both sides can be divided into multiple zones. In FIGS. 5A and 5B, nine zones, including finger components 1, 2, 3, 4, thumb component 6, palm components 5, 5., and 7, and wrist component 8 are shown. Any of the zones can be a different yarn to accomplish the desired function in the glove 70. Thus, any two zones shown in FIGS. 5A and 5B can be made with a different yarn in a single layer of multiple yarns to form the two zones. So zones 5 and 7 may be formed from a single layer of knitted yarns with zone 7 a thicker yarn to provide improved protection to the hand and zone 5 can be a thinner yarn to provide improved dexterity to a part of the hand that flexes more than other parts. Of course, each of the zones can also be manufactured from with a single layer using two or more different yarns.
  • The gloves described herein may also be a glove liner used to form the inner layer of a protective glove. Glove liners can range from very thick 7 gauge plaited liners to ultra-thin 18 gauge single layer liners (including 10 gauge, 13 gauge, 15 gauge). The present invention can be used on all size glove liners, but has particular application on glove liners including 13 gauge and smaller yarns arranged in a single layer. Thus, the present invention can also be used on glove liners having 15 gauge yarns or smaller yarns arranged in a single layer. It can also be used on glove liners having 18 gauge yarns or smaller yarns arranged in a single layer.
  • In accordance with one aspect, the articles shown in the drawings are used as glove liners that are coated with nitrile or polyurethane to provide the final glove product. In this case, in accordance with a further aspect, the glove liner is a single layer of knitted yarns that does not include a second layer of yarns or any further reinforced areas of yarns sewn or knitted into the glove liner, so that a truly single layer glove liner is provided.
  • In addition to the use of two different yarns to form a glove or glove liner having a single layer, the present invention contemplates the use of three different yarns to form a glove or a glove liner having a single layer or to form a portion of a glove or glove liner having a single layer. As before, these multi-yarn single layers of knitted yarns are preferably continuous. Thus, it is contemplated that any combination of three of the different yarns previously mentioned herein can be used to form a single layer glove or glove liner. By way of example only, two different cut resistant yarns can be knitted into a single layer with a moisture absorbent yarn.
  • Glove with Indicia
  • In accordance with a further aspect, FIG. 6 shows a tab 150 for donning and doffing the glove that is coded with indicia to provide information about properties of the glove. Reference to “indicia” means something that conveys unique information about the properties of the glove. Properties of the glove can include size, cut resistance, yarn content, latex content, and the like. The indicia may be, for example, a component having a particular shape such as circle, triangle, or square to denote size, such as large, medium, or small. The indicia may also be, as an example, a colored portion of the tab. Turning to FIG. 7, in a detailed embodiment, the indicia is a colored component 161 of the tab 150 in the form of a dot, circle, or other geometric shape. A different color represents a different property or characteristic of the glove. The indicia will preferably be different colors such as red, orange, yellow, blue, green, violet, black or white to denote different sizes such as 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12.
  • The tab with indicia 150 is shown in FIG. 5 to be fastened at or on the cuff 8. The tab with indicia 150 can be positioned as a single tab at or about at the center of outside of the cuff on the palm side of the cuff. The tab with indicia 150 may also be placed elsewhere on the outside of the cuff, for instance off-center closer to the thumb or anywhere else where a tab is helpful for donning or doffing the glove. In accordance with one aspect, the tab 150 has a portion extending over the edge of the cuff 8. The amount of the portion extending over the cuff 8 can be from a very short length to one inch. It may be desirable to configure the cuff with a triangular or other suitable shape to accommodate the extended portion of the tab.
  • As a further aspect, two tabs may be provided at the same position or close to the same position on a cuff at the inside and the outside of the cuff. This allows a person to have a better grip at the cuff for donning and doffing the glove.
  • The tab with indicia 150 can be provided with a component of a specific color to indicate a property or characteristic of the glove. The tab with indicia 150 is manufactured from a material that is preferably flexible and non-irritating to the skin. The tab with indicia 150 comprises at least one element that conveys information, such as a coded shape or color. Turning to FIG. 7, the tab with indicia 150 comprises a carrier 162, a thumb contour 165, and a color component 161, the tab with indicia 150 being attached to the cuff 8. In one embodiment, the carrier 162 may be sewn to the cuff 8, for instance, along a stitch-line 163. The carrier 162 may also be bonded or stapled to the cuff. In a further embodiment, the carrier 162 may be an integral part of the cuff, for instance, by knitting a desired configuration into the cuff at a desired location. Also, a pocket knitted into the cuff can be affixed with a tab with indicia. The elements of the tab with indicia 150 may be made of one or a combination of materials such as a natural or a synthetic rubber, a polymer, a woven or a knitted cloth, or of any flexible material that provides a grip to a user. The color component 161 may be provided in a color that indicates a glove property or a characteristic. For instance, the color component 161 may indicate a size of the glove. As an example, a color component 161 that is green may indicate a glove that is size 9. Other elements of the tab 150 may be made of the same color as the color component 161 for further visual reinforcement of the code. That is, the carrier 162 and/or the thumb contour 165 may be the same color as the color component 161. A color and/or shape may also indicate if a glove is a right hand glove or a left hand glove.
  • The color component 161 may be a piece of material, for instance in the shape of a circle, that has a specific color and that is part of the carrier 162 or has been fixed to the carrier 162. For instance, a hole, partial or complete, in the carrier in a shape such as a circle can receive a material of a specific color to form the color component 161. The tab 150 may be formed, for instance, in a molding process, from a first polymer of a first color to make the carrier 162 and with a second polymer of a second color as the color component 161 with a second color. It may be desirable to provide the color component 161 with a specific shape that indicates a property of the glove, for instance, shapes such as circle, square, and triangle to indicate for instance sizes small, medium and large may be used.
  • The color component 161 may be a piece of material separate from the carrier 162. It may be a polymer, a natural rubber, metal, yarn, wood or any other material that can be colored and affixed to the carrier 162. The color component 161 may also be part of the carrier 162 that is treated locally with a dye, a pigment or an ink or any other coloring that will create the color component 161 on the carrier 162.
  • As a further aspect, the color component 161 is positioned away from the edge of the cuff 8. Thus, a person grabbing the tab 150 with their fingers to don the glove on their hand will still be able to see the color component 161.
  • In accordance with yet a further aspect, a thumb contour 165 is located on or as part of the carrier 162. Should it be desired, the thumb contour 165 can be affixed directly to the cuff or be made integrally with the cuff. The color and/or shape of the thumb contour may indicate a property of the glove. The thumb contour 165 itself provides a grip for a user for donning or doffing the glove. In accordance with a further aspect, the thumb contour 165 is made of a material that provides a non-slippery grip of a glove user. Preferably the thumb contour material is resistant to oil and chemicals. Furthermore, the thumb contour preferably has a pleasant texture or feel for a user. In one embodiment, the thumb contour 165 is made of neoprene. In another embodiment, the thumb contour is 165 textured.
  • In a further embodiment, the thumb contour 165 has a slight dimple to receive the thumb or a finger of a user to provide a better grip. This is illustrated in FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 9. FIG. 8A shows the thumb contour 165 from a top view, having a width W and a length L. FIG. 8B shows the thumb contour in a cross-sectional view 166, where a dip or dimple in the thumb contour has a thickness T at its edge where it is substantially flush with the intermediate layer 164 and a maximum depth D relative to its edge. This provides excellent fit for a finger or a thumb for donning or doffing of the glove. In one embodiment, the thumb contour 165 has an oval shape with a length L in the range of 0.75 to 1.25 inches, preferably about 1 inch, and a width W in the range of 0.25 to 0.27 inches, preferably about one-half inch. The dimensions may be smaller or greater, depending on the size of the glove and/or the size of a thumb of a user. The shape of the thumb contour 165 may also be circular, rectangular, or polygonal. The thumb contour 165 is preferably flexible and compressible under compression by a thumb and a finger of a user. Alternatively, the thumb contour may also be made of substantially inflexible material. The depth D of the dip or dimple may vary. In a specific embodiment, D is in the range of 1/24 inch to 2/24 inch. The thumb contour 165 may also have no dip or dimple. The dip or dimple depth may also be greater than 2/24 inch.
  • The thumb contour 165 has a thickness T at its edges. In an embodiment, T is 2/24 inch and D is 1/24 inch. In another embodiment, T is 1/24 inch and D is negligible. T may also be greater for instance 5/24 inch or even greater.
  • FIG. 9 shows a color-coded tab 150 from a top view. The top view shows the carrier 162, the stitch-line 163, the color component 161, and the thumb contour 165. In one embodiment, the top of the thumb contour 166 aligns at its edges with the top of the carrier 162 to provide a flush alignment.
  • The carrier 162 may be less compressible than the thumb contour 165 to provide the user with a feel of a positive grip on the tab. Thus the carrier 162 can be made with a material that is harder than the thumb contour 165. By having the thumb contour 165 made from a material like neoprene, the tab with indicia 150 may provide a comfortable experience of gripping the tab, which can facilitate donning and doffing the glove. In a further embodiment, the thumb contour 165 is omitted and the carrier 162 provides a gripping location, which may have a measurable dip. The grip is then provided by the profile of the carrier 162 only.
  • In one embodiment, the carrier 162 can be omitted and only the thumb contour 165 is provided for donning and doffing the glove. In such a case, the thumb contour 165 is coded by color or shape or otherwise and/or provided with a coded component that signifies a property of the glove. The thumb contour 165 in such an embodiment may also have a dip or a dimple and may be compressible between two fingers or a thumb and a finger. In such an embodiment, the thumb contour 165 may be neoprene. The thumb contour may also be rigid. It may be stitched or bonded on the cuff. The cuff can have with a pocket for affixing the thumb contour.
  • In yet a further embodiment, as shown in FIG. 6, a glove is provided with a cushioned patch 151 on the knuckle side. The cushioned patch 151 can cover one or more of the following locations: the top of the hand, the knuckles of the fingers, the knuckle of the thumb, areas of the fingers. In one embodiment, the cushioned patch 151 only covers the knuckles of the fingers. The patch may be manufactured from a rubber, a polymer, a yarn, a metal or any other material that may protect the knuckles from an impact. The patch may be stitched or bonded to the glove. A pocket on the glove can be configured to receive and store the patch. A user may have to put his hand into fairly narrow spaces with unknown or unseen edges, angles or objects. During entering such spaces with a hand or manipulating an object in such a space one can easily hit and hurt the knuckles or other outside parts of the hand by direct impact with an object, as one is unable to see directly what is going on. A patch is helpful to dull or diminish the effect of an impact in those situations and helps to protect the user. The patch 151 can include a logo or other writings to indicate the source of the glove of other information about the glove.
  • In one embodiment, the cushioned patch 151 only covers the knuckles of the fingers that are most exposed to being hit: the index finger, the middle finger and the fourth finger or ring finger, but not the little finger or pinky and not the thumb. In a further embodiment, the cushioned patch may only cover the knuckles of two fingers or even one finger. In yet a further embodiment, the cushioned patch may cover the four fingers and not the thumb. In yet a further embodiment, the cushioned patch may cover the knuckles of all fingers and the thumb.
  • In one embodiment, a single cushioned patch covers only one knuckle. This is shown in FIG. 10 wherein the knuckle side of glove 1900 has an individual patch on each knuckle, for instance 1901 for the thumb knuckle, 1902 for the index finger knuckle, 1903 for the middle finger knuckle, 1904 for the fourth finger knuckle and 1905 for the little finger knuckle. The patches may be of any shape, including circle, oval, and rectangular.
  • In a further embodiment a cushioned patch may cover 2 knuckles. This is illustrated in FIG. 20 wherein the knuckle side of glove 2000 has patch 2001 that covers two knuckles (index and middle finger), patch 2002 also covers two knuckles (the fourth and the little finger), and patch 2004 covers the middle finger and the fourth finger.
  • Preferably, the cushioned patch 151 is not bulky, almost or substantially flush with the glove surface and substantially flexible so it does not limit the movement of the hand in the glove, nor does the patched glove diminish access to narrow spaces because of the added patch. In one embodiment, the patch is formed of a substantially rigid material with an optional a layer of padding under the rigid material to further dull the impact to the hand when hitting an object. The cushioned patch 151 in an embodiment is provided with a logo that identifies a company or an organization. The logo is preferable placed in such a manner that the user will see the logo as being upside-down, as shown in FIG. 6.
  • The invention has been described with specific reference to the embodiments and modifications thereto described above. It is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the details of construction or process steps set forth in the following description. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced in various ways. Further modifications and alterations may occur to others upon reading and understanding the specification. It is intended to include all such modifications and alterations insofar as they come within the scope of the invention.

Claims (20)

1. A knitted glove, comprising:
a first yarn;
a second yarn different from the first yarn;
a continuous single layer that includes the first yarn and the second yarn knitted together to form a hand-like structure that comprises a thumb section, a plurality of finger sections and at least one palm section.
2. The glove of claim 2 wherein the first type of yarn and the second type of yarn are knitted together using a single jersey stitch.
3. The glove of claim 1, wherein the hand-like structure comprises four finger sections, three palm sections, and a wrist section.
4. The glove of claim 1, wherein the first yarn is a first color and the second yarn is a second color.
5. The glove of claim 1, wherein the first yarn is a cut resistant yarn and the second yarn is a non-cut resistant yarn.
6. The glove of claim 5, wherein the cut resistant yarn comprises an ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), a para-aramid, or both.
7. The glove of claim 1, further comprising an elastomeric coating over at least a part of the single layer.
8. The glove of claim 1, further comprising a cuff section attached to the palm section.
9. The glove of claim 1, wherein the thumb section comprises the first yarn and either one of the plurality of finger sections or the at least one palm section comprises the second yarn.
10. The glove of claim 1, wherein the at least one palm component comprises the first yarn and one of the plurality of finger sections comprises the second yarn.
11. The glove of claim 1, wherein the glove includes only the single layer without any reinforced areas.
12. The glove of claim 1, wherein the first and second yarns are selected from the group consisting of: a cut resistant yarn and a highly absorbent yarn, a cut resistant yarn and an abrasion resistant yarn, a first cut resistant yarn and a second cut resistant yarn, a cut resistant yarn and a comfort thermal regulating yarn, a cut resistant yarn and an antimicrobial yarn, a plied yarn and a non-plied yarn, a spun yarn and a filament yarn, a composite (gimped) yarn and a noncomposite yarn, a synthetic yarn and a natural yarn, a first blended synthetic yarn and a second blended synthetic yarn, a first composite yarn and a second composite yarn, a first synthetic yarn and a second synthetic yarn, a first natural yarn and a second natural yarn, and a textured yarn and a non-textured yarn.
13. The glove of claim 1, wherein the continuous single third payer further comprises a third yarn different from the first yarn and the second yarn.
14. The glove of claim 1 comprising:
a continuous layer of at least two different yarns knitted together to form a thumb section, three palm sections, and four finger sections; wherein one of the two different yarns is located in two of the palm sections and any one of the four finger sections and the other of the two different yarns is located in the thumb section, the remaining palm section, and the remaining finger sections; and
a cuff section attached to the palm section.
15. The glove of claim 14, wherein the two different yarns comprise a first yarn having a first color and a second yarn having a second color.
16. The glove of claim 14, further comprising a tab with indicia for donning and doffing the glove.
17. The glove of claim 14, further comprising a patch on a knuckle side covering substantially at least one knuckle.
18. A method of protecting hands and handling tools and equipment comprising: wearing a knitted glove comprising:
a first yarn;
a second yarn different from the first yarn;
a continuous single layer that includes the first yarn and the second yarn knitted together to form a hand-like structure that comprises a thumb section, a plurality of finger sections and at least one palm section.
19. A method of wearing a glove having a desired property to a wearer, the method comprising:
locating a knitted glove liner having a continuous single layer with two different yarns, the single layer comprising four finger sections, a thumb section a palm section, and a cuff, each of these sections having a palm side and a knuckle side, wherein the cuff comprises a tab with indicia;
identifying that the indicia of the tab corresponds to the desired property; and
donning or doffing the glove by contacting the tab with the thumb of the wearer.
20. The method of claim 19, wherein the tab comprises a carrier, a color component, and a thumb contour, and the desired property is size.
US12/768,953 2009-04-29 2010-04-28 Knitted Glove Having A Single Layer With A Plurality Of Yarns Abandoned US20100275341A1 (en)

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US17381109P true 2009-04-29 2009-04-29
US22255209P true 2009-07-02 2009-07-02
US24248709P true 2009-09-15 2009-09-15
US24293609P true 2009-09-16 2009-09-16
US24292909P true 2009-09-16 2009-09-16
US24337209P true 2009-09-17 2009-09-17
US24337609P true 2009-09-17 2009-09-17
US29492310P true 2010-01-14 2010-01-14
US12/768,953 US20100275341A1 (en) 2009-04-29 2010-04-28 Knitted Glove Having A Single Layer With A Plurality Of Yarns

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US12/768,953 US20100275341A1 (en) 2009-04-29 2010-04-28 Knitted Glove Having A Single Layer With A Plurality Of Yarns
PCT/US2010/032977 WO2010127123A1 (en) 2009-04-29 2010-04-29 Knitted gloves having a single layer with a plurality of yarns
CN 201080028874 CN102458168A (en) 2009-04-29 2010-04-29 Knitted gloves having a single layer with a plurality of yarns
EP20100770335 EP2424395A1 (en) 2009-04-29 2010-04-29 Knitted gloves having a single layer with a plurality of yarns
AU2010242946A AU2010242946A1 (en) 2009-04-29 2010-04-29 Knitted gloves having a single layer with a plurality of yarns

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US20150000349A1 (en) * 2012-03-01 2015-01-01 Showa Glove Co. Method for manufacturing glove, method for manufacturing coated glove, glove, and coated glove
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WO2013156790A1 (en) 2012-04-19 2013-10-24 Midas Safety, Inc. Knitted glove
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US9877529B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-01-30 World Fibers, Inc. Protective glove with enhanced exterior sections
US10130128B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2018-11-20 World Fibers, Inc. Cut resistant gloves and methods of making same
US9655393B2 (en) 2013-11-05 2017-05-23 Ansell Limited Layered structural fire glove
US9587333B1 (en) * 2014-02-28 2017-03-07 Noble Rider, Llc Roper's glove
DE102014110791A1 (en) * 2014-07-11 2016-01-14 BLüCHER GMBH Protective clothing unit with preferably textile splinter protection equipment

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AU2010242946A1 (en) 2011-11-24
CN102458168A (en) 2012-05-16
WO2010127123A1 (en) 2010-11-04
EP2424395A1 (en) 2012-03-07
US20100275342A1 (en) 2010-11-04

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