US20100273614A1 - Method for Passive Abdominal Exercise Using Elastic Exercise Band - Google Patents

Method for Passive Abdominal Exercise Using Elastic Exercise Band Download PDF

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US20100273614A1
US20100273614A1 US12/765,845 US76584510A US2010273614A1 US 20100273614 A1 US20100273614 A1 US 20100273614A1 US 76584510 A US76584510 A US 76584510A US 2010273614 A1 US2010273614 A1 US 2010273614A1
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band
user
exercise
abdominal muscle
torso
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Abandoned
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US12/765,845
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Joseph Lastik
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Joseph Lastik
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B23/00Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body
    • A63B23/035Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously
    • A63B23/03575Apparatus used for exercising upper and lower limbs simultaneously

Abstract

A passive exercise device allows for a method of passive exercise such as while sleeping or normal daily activities, the method using an elastic band worn over clothing around the user's waist, and secured with non-slip material or pre-cut end sections inserted into overlapping band layers. The band may provide alternative utility to the user such as to provide back support while being worn, to minimize caloric intake while being worn, the band may be used to actively exercise abdominal or other muscle groups, used in combination with or to supplement other exercise equipment, wrapped around injured joints or muscles, and easily worn, stored and transported.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/171,623 entitled “Passive Elastic Exercise Band” filed Apr. 22, 2009.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates to a method for passive abdominal muscle exercise using a belt or band made of elastic or stretchable material primarily to be worn over clothing and used passively such as during sleep or normal daily activities to exercise, tone or condition abdominal or waist muscles.
  • 2. Background Information
  • The use of abdominal compression is widely known in a number of distinct applications, with quite a long history. Further, the broad concept of a belt or band is that it is worn around a user's waist as a piece of clothing or as an exercise accessory is very old and well known.
  • Regarding one widely known use for abdominal compression, the long and extensive history of corsets warrants a mention. The corset is an interesting garment, which to most people in our modern world seems a very strange piece of underwear. In the 1830's, the corset was thought of by some as a medical necessity for women. When talking corsetry, the most interesting period of fashion is the period from 1820 to about 1910. However the corset is much older than that. In Europe, it has been in general use as an undergarment since the middle ages, but it probably dates several thousands of years back. The corset has at all times been used for shaping the body, most often for compressing the waist, but sometimes for raising the bust. The most widespread use of corsets was in the 19th century. Although used for body shaping which included abdominal compression, corsets were not designed or implemented for toning the user's muscles.
  • A discussion of the fields of abdominal compression including corsets as noted above which will lead into a discussion of the related girdle. A girdle is generally an elastic garment which is designed to shape and smooth a woman's figure from the waist to the thighs. Many fashion historians agree that it was invented around 1910 by the French designer Paul Poiret, to be worn with the clothing he was designing. Compared to the fashions of the period 1830-1910, Poiret's revolutionary designs placed much less emphasis on the waist and fit much closer to a woman's body in the area of the hips and derriere. Poiret's revolution became permanent in the 20th century. His new understanding of the way in which women's bodies should interact with their clothing, and his invention of the girdle, was a major reason why the corset, which had determined the shape of women's clothing for most of at least the previous century, went out of fashion. Girdles, it has been asserted, were worn by most women throughout the period 1920-70. They were an important part of the fashion aesthetic of these decades. As the century progressed, shaping garments gradually came to depend less on lacing and rigid panels and more on rubberized stretch fabrics for more comfortable control, although the rubber rationing of World War II temporarily interrupted this trend. The “girdle” like the corset that it largely replaced, did supply abdominal compression as part of the overall goal of body shaping. Further, the girdle, unlike conventional corset, included some elastic nature to the garment. However the girdle is not intended as an exercise device and is well suited for isolating the abdominal muscles for this purpose.
  • The abdominal compression discussion of girdles must note for the sake of parity that these body shaping garments are not limited to women. Girdle type garments have been recently marketed to men with statements such as “It's for the man who has a little too much of everything—the man girdle, or “mirdle.”” In an attempt to define an odd niche to cash in on the lucrative men's underwear market a gut-cinching garment self entitled as a “mirdle” has been proposed that designers say “will help men make it through these belt-tightening times”. This stretchy contraption resemble normal sleeveless tank tops or long-sleeved T-shirts—only shrunk down two or three sizes in a special blend of Spandex, nylon and polyester. In actuality, men's control or body shaping wear has been around since at least Victorian times in Britain, including devotees such as Lord Byron and Oscar Wilde. Advertisements for male girdles became popular in the 1930s but many of the products struggled to look different than women's undergarments. Whether for men or women the girdle is primarily a body shaping garment that as a result does not isolate or work the abdominal muscles for exercise and toning.
  • The abdominal compression discussion is not limited to garments such as corsets or girdles. The medical field has long used abdominal compression for a variety of generally post operative care scenarios. There are a number of companies that provide abdominal compression devices generally in the form of sleeves to fit around the patient, generally for wound care. The majority of these sleeve type devices will also have some elasticity to the device to maintain constant pressure on the desired site throughout the patients breathing cycles. These medical compression devices tend to take the form of a girdle type configuration with appropriate wound care padding. These devices, like girdle designs, are not intended for exercise and thus to not properly isolate the patients abdominal muscles.
  • A medical use of abdominal compression much more closely related to the present application is the field of what has been called postpartum “belly binding”. It is likely that as long as procreation's been around, women everywhere have searched for easier methods to speed up the healing of their abdomens following pregnancy. In many cultures, belly binding after giving birth is a common practice. For centuries, Japanese mothers have used their “Sarashi” for belly binding purposes to speed up weight loss and toning of the abdominal muscles and skin after childbirth. Hispanic women have similarly utilized their “faja” as a belly binding tool to help bring all the muscles used in the birthing process back together again. In ancient Indian rituals, post partum belly binding is practiced to warm and close the open stomach and birth canal, and it is believed to speed up the ridding of waste blood. It is still common for modern Indian women to wear these belly binders to promote good posture during breastfeeding, persuade the stomach muscles back together, reposition the womb, and eliminate stretch marks. Women in Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore, Latin America, Mexico, Spain, and the Philippines have long benefited from using an abdominal compression wrap for “belly binding” purposes after childbirth. Postpartum belly binding aids has seen resurgence in western cultures in recent years and there a number of commercially available post partum belly binding devices. Although clearly designed as, in part, an exercise device, postpartum belly binding aids do not isolate the abdominal muscles for the purposes of toning and exercise in the most people. These devices are generally found to extend from above the lowest rib to below the pelvic bone of the user, which is desirable for postpartum applications, but less useful in other applications.
  • The patent literature notes a wide collection of “exercise belts” of differing types which deserve a cursory mention here. U.S. Pat. No. 6,645,128 discloses a belt with pads and panels to apply localized pressure to the abdomen of the user. U.S. Pat. No. 6,645,128 discloses an elastic band that is worn with the user's upper arms inserted through loops and stretched across the back of the user. U.S. Pat. No. 6,146,312 discloses a fabric belt with elastic material that includes sensors, motor and a battery that provides a vibration when proper posture is not maintained. U.S. Pat. No. 5,086,759 discloses a chiropractic belt having two sold segments connected by a central back elastic section. U.S. Pat. No. 4,832,033 discloses a system to stimulate muscles with electrical pulses supplied to electrodes applied to the skin over the targeted muscle. U.S. Pat. No. 4,524,774 discloses an apparatus for embedding electronic stimulators within the muscle. U.S. Pat. No. 7,264,600 discloses belt for weight reduction having a buckle that fits over the abdomen and stomach, the buckle having one or more air bladders with pressure sensors, an air pump, and a massager. The air bladders are maintained at a constant pressure as signals from the pressure sensors activate the air pump to fill or deflate the air bladder. The constant pressure applied chronically to the abdomen reduces hunger and food intake to produce weight loss. Activation of the massager helps to further control hunger between meals.
  • Although continuous abdominal compression has been used for centuries in different applications as noted above, there has been a more recent effort to review the actual physiologic effects of such compression. A study entitled “Effects of abdominal compression on respiratory parameters in normal volunteers” by V Wagana (of University of São Paulo, Brazil), S Ferreras (of University of Bandeirantes of São Paulo, Brazil) and C Barbas (of University of São Paulo, Brazil) that was presented in the 24th International
  • Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (Brussels, Belgium 30 Mar.-2 Apr. 2004, see Critical Care 2004, 8 (Suppl 1):P167doi:10.1186/cc2634 15 Mar. 2004) analyzed the effects of 10% and 15% of the baseline abdominal circumference compression with a band in the respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (TV), forced vital capacity (FVC) and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) in normal volunteers. The study found that the abdominal compression of −10% and −15% with an external band decreased TV, MIP and MEP (the last one only with −5% compression) and did not affect RR and FVC. The study verifies why abdominal compression can be utilized in subjects, and seems to confirm what is obvious from centuries of use.
  • There remains a need in the art for a simple apparatus for abdominal compression that efficiently isolates the abdominal muscles providing a method for passive abdominal exercise.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Some of the objects of the present invention are achieved with a method for passive abdominal muscle exercise comprising the steps of: wrapping an elastic exercise band around the torso of the user with the band positioned above the pelvic bone and below the lowermost ribs of the user, wherein the band as a width of less than five inches and has an elasticity of at least 25%, whereby the exercise band is configured to apply substantially constant pressure on the user's abdomen while on the user's torso; and wearing the band on the user's torso for an extended period of time, such as during sleeping or normal daily activity.
  • In one embodiment of the invention the band has width of about 3 inches, and the band has a relaxed length of about 5 to 6 feet. The fully extended position of the band may be at least ninety inches.
  • In one embodiment of the invention the band further includes a securing mechanism in the form of one of a non-slip pad or pre-cut flap. The securing mechanism may be inserted into overlapping layers of the band. The securing mechanism may be in the form a non-slip pad which is inserted into overlapping layers of the band. The non-slip pad may be a rectangular pad secured to a longitudinal edge of the band, such as a square pad of about 2 inches by 2 inches and spaced about 1 inch from an end of the band.
  • In one embodiment of the invention, the user will wear the band during sleeping. Further, the step of wrapping the band around the torso of the user includes forming at least two complete wraps around the torso with the band.
  • At least some of the above objectives are achieved by using a band of un-stretched elastic knit or woven material (“band”) measuring approximately 3 inches×5½ feet (in the relaxed condition) worn over clothing and around the user's waist primarily while sleeping. The band may be constructed of elastic or stretchable material that may be made of non-roll elastic fabric. The band may have an elasticity of 25%-50% or more, wherein elasticity is a measure of the fully extended or stretched length to the relaxed length. AN elasticity of 25% to 50% means that the fully extended position is 1.25 to 1.50 times the fully relaxed length of the band.
  • The band may be formed, for example of Style #747-3″ knitted elastic by R. I. Knitting, Inc., and may be secured (i) by about a 2½″×2½″ pad that can be formed of non-slip material (example: non-slip liner “Easy Liner” by Henkel Consumer Adhesive, Inc. or a piece of hook forming material of a hook and loop type fastener combination) sewn or otherwise attached to a longitudinal edge of the band near one or both ends of the band only at the top section of the pad with the bottom non-sewn section of the pad inserted between overlapping band layers, (ii) by a flap (“flap”) made by cutting a slot three (3) or so inches from one or both ends of the band stopping within ½ inch of the full width of the band and inserting the resulting ‘flap’ between overlapping layers of the band, (iii) or by knotting or overlapping the band ends, hook and loop type fasteners or other alterative securing mechanisms.
  • These and other advantages of the present invention will be clarified in the brief description of the preferred embodiment in connection with the attached drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an elastic band for passive adnominal exercise in accordance with one aspect of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view illustrating a securing mechanism for the band of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 3 a is plan elevation view of an elastic band for passive adnominal exercise in accordance with another aspect of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 b is plan elevation view of the elastic band of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an elastic band in accordance with FIG. 3 a or 3 b in rolled form;
  • FIG. 5 a-5 d illustrate four passive abdominal muscle exercising applications of the elastic band in accordance with the present invention.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The present invention provides a passive exercise device in the form of a band 12 of un-stretched elastic knit or woven material (“band”). The band 12 has a width of about 2″-5″ and more preferably measuring approximately 3″. The width is significant because if the band is too wide it will overlap the ribs and or the pelvic bone of the user and prevent the band 12 from providing sufficient resistance to the user for isolating and toning the abdominal muscles. Further if the elastic band is too narrow it does not provide a desired distribution of compressive force to the user.
  • The band 12 is utilized in a method for passive abdominal muscle exercise in accordance with the present invention which comprises the steps of: wrapping the elastic exercise band 12 around the torso of the user with the band positioned above the pelvic bone and below the lowermost ribs of the user. The band 12 has an elasticity of at least 25%, and generally between 25-50%. The elasticity is a measure of the percentage of elongation that the band can undergo from the relaxed state to a fully extended state. This minimal level of compliance is deemed important to provide for movement and working of the abdominal muscles, while too high of an elasticity prevents sufficient compressive force from being easily generated. The exercise band is configured to apply substantially constant pressure on the user's abdomen while on the user's torso. The method further includes the wearing of the band on the user's torso for an extended period of time, such as during sleeping or normal daily activity.
  • The preferred length of the band 12 is about 4 feet to about 6 feet, and more preferably about 5 to 5½ feet, and more preferably about 5½ feet. The band 12 is designed to be worn over clothing to prevent adverse reaction with the user's skin due to the relative motion thereby avoiding chafing or irritating the skin of the user. The band 12 is configured to be wrapped around the user's waist such as while sleeping as shown in FIG. 5A.
  • The band 12 may be formed, for example of Style #747-3″ knitted elastic by R. I. Knitting, Inc., and may be secured by a securing mechanism. One securing mechanism may be a 2-2½″×2-2½″ pad 16 of non-slip material as shown in FIG. 3A and FIGS. 5B and 5D. The pad 16 may be, for example, non-slip liner “Easy Liner” by Henkel Consumer Adhesive, Inc. One securing mechanism may be a 2-2½″×2-2½″ pad 16 of non-slip material, such as, for example, the hook forming material of hook and loop type fasteners as this material provides a non-slipping feature that locks the band in place. The pad 16 is sewn or otherwise attached near one end of the band 12 only at the top section of the pad 16 along a longitudinal edge of the band 16 with the bottom non-sewn section of the pad 16 free to be inserted between overlapping band layers to secure the band 12 to the user in an efficient, effective manner.
  • The band may include a securing mechanism formed by a flap 16 made by cutting a slot 18 three (3) or so inches from one, or even both, ends of the band 12 stopping within ½ inch or so of the total width of the band 12. This securing mechanism allows for inserting the resulting flap 16 between overlapping layers of the band 12 to secure the band 12 to the user in an efficient, effective manner.
  • Alternatively the band 12 may be secured by knotting or overlapping the band ends, and/or with hook and loop type fasteners or other alterative securing mechanisms.
  • A significant use of the band 12 is to be worn while sleeping as shown in FIG. 5A to passively exercise and tone the abdominal muscles, but can be worn actively during the day under normal activities and shown in FIGS. 5B-5D or as a resistance band to exercise tone and maintain certain muscle groups. The wearing of the band also provides support to the users back and can help minimize caloric intake as it promotes a more rapid feeling of fullness in the user as they will reach a point of satiety faster with the band in position.
  • One preferred method of the band 12 usage is to be worn by a user at night while sleeping or other passive activity whereby the elastic band is wrapped around the user's waist at least twice and overlapping the band layers and pulling the band 12 as tight as desired. The band 12 is secured by a non-slip “pad” 14 or pre-cut “flap” 16 inserted between layers, or similar mechanism as defined and mentioned in above. The band preferably wraps around the user at least twice to allow for the flap 16 to be secured between two other portions of the band as shown specifically in FIGS. 5B and 5D. Wrapping less than twice around the user is still possible but the securing mechanism may not be as effective.
  • Alternative uses of the band may supplement other exercise apparel or equipment, and may be used to actively exercise abdominal and other muscle groups similar to a restriction band without being actually worn. The band 12 is a multiple use passive and active exercise device that measures approximately 3 in.×5½ ft., easily transportable, and easy to use. The band can be used in combination with and may supplement other exercise equipment, or used separately to exercise abdominal and other muscle groups as a resistance band. An alternative use of the band is to wrap a sprained or injured joint or muscle to provide protection and stabilization, such as what is commonly called an ace bandage. The band may be considered in further support of or possibly in lieu of, a surgical stomach band, gastric bypass surgery, or stomach stapling as a means to lose weight.
  • It will be apparent that various modifications may be made to the present invention without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. The scope of the present invention is to be defined by the appended claims and equivalents thereto.

Claims (20)

1. A method for passive abdominal muscle exercise comprising the steps of:
wrapping an elastic exercise band around the torso of the user with the band positioned above the pelvic bone and below the lowermost ribs of the user, wherein the band as a width of less than five inches and has an elasticity of at least 25%, whereby the exercise band is configured to apply substantially constant pressure on the user's abdomen while on the user's torso; and
wearing the band on the user's torso for an extended period of time.
2. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 1, wherein the band has width of about 3 inches.
3. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 2, wherein the band has a relaxed length of about 5 to 6 feet.
4. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 3, wherein the step of wrapping the band around the torso of the user includes forming at least two complete wraps around the torso with the band.
5. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 4, wherein the band further includes a securing mechanism in the form of one of a non-slip pad or pre-cut flap.
6. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 5, wherein the securing mechanism is inserted into overlapping layers of the band.
7. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 6, wherein the user will wear the band during sleeping.
8. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 7, wherein a fully extended position of the band is at least ninety inches.
9. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 6, wherein the securing mechanism is in the form a non-slip pad which is inserted into overlapping layers of the band.
10. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 9, wherein the non-slip pad is a rectangular pad secured to a longitudinal edge of the band.
11. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 10, wherein the non-slip pad is a square pad of about 2-2½ inches by 2-2½ inches and spaced about 1 inch from an end of the band.
12. An elastic exercise band configured to be wrapped around the torso of the user with the band positioned above the pelvic bone and below the lowermost ribs of the user, wherein the band as a width of less than five inches and has an elasticity of at least 25%, whereby the exercise band is configured to apply substantially constant pressure on the user's abdomen while wrapped around the user's torso wherein the band further includes a securing mechanism in the form of one of a non-slip pad or pre-cut flap.
13. The elastic exercise band for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 12, wherein the securing mechanism is in the form a non-slip pad which is inserted into overlapping layers of the band.
14. The elastic exercise band for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 13, wherein the non-slip pad is a rectangular pad secured to a longitudinal edge of the band.
15. The elastic exercise band for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 14, wherein the non-slip pad is a square pad of about 2-2½ inches by 2-2½ inches and spaced about 1 inch from an end of the band.
16. A method for passive abdominal muscle exercise comprising the steps of:
providing an elastic exercise band configured to be wrapped around the torso of the user with the band positioned above the pelvic bone and below the lowermost ribs of the user, wherein the band as a width of less than five inches and has an elasticity of at least 25%, whereby the exercise band is configured to apply substantially constant pressure on the user's abdomen while wrapped around the user's torso wherein the band further includes a securing mechanism in the form of one of a non-slip pad or pre-cut flap; and
wrapping the elastic exercise band around the torso of the user with the band positioned above the pelvic bone and below the lowermost ribs of the user, whereby the exercise band applies substantially constant pressure on the user's abdomen while on the user's torso.
17. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 16, wherein the securing mechanism is in the form a non-slip pad which is inserted into overlapping layers of the band.
18. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 17, wherein the non-slip pad is a rectangular pad secured to a longitudinal edge of the band.
19. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 18, wherein the non-slip pad is a square pad of about 2-2½ inches by 2-2½ inches and spaced about 1 inch from an end of the band.
20. The method for passive abdominal muscle exercise according to claim 16, wherein the step of wrapping the band around the torso of the user includes forming at least two complete wraps around the torso with the band.
US12/765,845 2009-04-22 2010-04-22 Method for Passive Abdominal Exercise Using Elastic Exercise Band Abandoned US20100273614A1 (en)

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Cited By (4)

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US20140135187A1 (en) * 2012-11-15 2014-05-15 Dong-Her Wu Portable exercise device
WO2015075605A1 (en) 2013-11-19 2015-05-28 Magyar István Body shaping sports equipment
CN107694047A (en) * 2017-09-07 2018-02-16 华南理工大学 A kind of personalized basin bottom recovery training method
USD852908S1 (en) * 2019-02-18 2019-07-02 Delroy Dennisur Exercise resistance band with an instructional guide

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US20100234780A1 (en) * 2009-03-10 2010-09-16 Shrinkx, Inc. Adjustable pelvic compression belt and methods for reducing the width of, and/or realigning, a user's hips

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140135187A1 (en) * 2012-11-15 2014-05-15 Dong-Her Wu Portable exercise device
WO2015075605A1 (en) 2013-11-19 2015-05-28 Magyar István Body shaping sports equipment
CN107694047A (en) * 2017-09-07 2018-02-16 华南理工大学 A kind of personalized basin bottom recovery training method
USD852908S1 (en) * 2019-02-18 2019-07-02 Delroy Dennisur Exercise resistance band with an instructional guide

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