US20100259002A1 - Animated character two-dimensional object distributor - Google Patents

Animated character two-dimensional object distributor Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100259002A1
US20100259002A1 US12/422,755 US42275509A US2010259002A1 US 20100259002 A1 US20100259002 A1 US 20100259002A1 US 42275509 A US42275509 A US 42275509A US 2010259002 A1 US2010259002 A1 US 2010259002A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
dimensional objects
appendage
base
animated character
device
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Abandoned
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US12/422,755
Inventor
Carolyn England
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Hasbro Inc
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Hasbro Inc
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Priority to US12/422,755 priority Critical patent/US20100259002A1/en
Assigned to HASBRO, INC. reassignment HASBRO, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ENGLAND, CAROLYN
Publication of US20100259002A1 publication Critical patent/US20100259002A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F1/00Card games
    • A63F1/06Card games appurtenances
    • A63F1/14Card dealers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F11/00Game accessories of general use, e.g. score counters, boxes
    • A63F11/0002Dispensing or collecting devices for tokens or chips
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/24Electric games; Games using electronic circuits not otherwise provided for
    • A63F2009/2448Output devices
    • A63F2009/2479Other kinds of output
    • A63F2009/2482Electromotor
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H13/00Toy figures with self-moving parts, with or without movement of the toy as a whole

Abstract

A device operable by a game player for distributing two-dimensional objects about a plurality of game players is defined. An animated character has an appendage that automatically distributes two-dimensional objects, such as card or tiles, from a bin next to the animated character. The animated character is supported by a base above a horizontal surface. The animated character and the bin rotates about the base as the two-dimensional objects are distributed about the horizontal surface. The device uses audio and visual indicators to communicate with game players.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to a game device, and more particularly to a table or floor game that uses an animated character with an appendage to distribute tiles about a horizontal surface for use during game play.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Board games or table games for children are well known and very popular. Often in the prior art, manufacturers of such games have used animals as part of the theme of the game to make the game more interesting and more exciting for children. For example, HUNGRY HIPPOS™, ANTS IN THE PANTS™, BARREL OF MONKEYS™, and CROCODILE DENTIST™, which are manufactured by Hasbro, and KING TOAD™ and DUCK, DUCK, BRUCE™, which are manufactured by Gamewright, all employ animals in the games' themes to make the game more attractive to children.
  • Many of these games, such as KING TOAD™ and DUCK, DUCK, BRUCE™ use playing cards as part of the game. The card games for children that use animated characters in the prior art, however, involve manually dealing or flipping the cards.
  • Also known in the prior art, are machines that automatically deal or distribute cards. For example, a 1911 patent, U.S. Pat. No. 999,670, issued to Murch, for “Machine for Dealing Playing Cards” discloses “a rotary card dealer-carrier, a card holder or box carried thereby, and devices acting in the rotation of the said dealer-carrier to deliver cards at predetermined points in the said rotation.” A patent issued in 1931, U.S. Pat. No. 1,824,542, to Hangerud, for an “Automatic Card Distributing Device” discloses a machine “for the distributing of a number of cards, one at a time, at a plurality of spaces disposed about a fixed point, the same being done automatically and continuously until the total number of cards to be distributed have been exhausted” and employs “a base and a housing disposed centrally of the base and superposed thereabove” with “[a]utomatic means . . . provided in the housing for the distributing of the cards one at a time”. A patent issued in 1992, U.S. Pat. No. 5,114,153, to Rosenwinkel et al., for “Mechanical Card Dispenser and Method of Playing a Card Game” discloses a machine that “is concerned with providing a game that mechanically dispenses additional cards to a player in a dramatic manner”, and “a chance element in operation of the device may still permit the player to escape receiving any additional cards” wherein “[d]epression of a button in accordance with card play, indexes a disc having variously spaced apart detents for actuating a battery motor driven eccentric wheel that expels the cards from a reservoir”.
  • A device combining an animated character that is used in a children's table game with an automatic card dealing machine is unknown in the prior art. Accordingly, it would be desirable to create this type of combination, which will increase children's interest and excitement during game play. The invention discussed in connection with the described embodiment addresses these and other deficiencies of the prior art.
  • The features and advantages of the present invention will be explained in or apparent from the following description of the preferred embodiment considered together with the accompanying drawings.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention addresses the deficiencies of the prior art of board games and table games for children that use animated characters and cards, tiles, or other two-dimensional objects as well as the deficiencies of the prior art of automatic card dealing machines by combining the two.
  • More particularly, a described embodiment of the invention provides a device operable by a game player for distributing two-dimensional objects, such as tiles or cards, about a plurality of game players. The device comprises an animated character with an appendage, such as a wing, an arm, or a leg, wherein the appendage is used to distribute the two-dimensional objects. The device also comprises a base for supporting the animated character above a horizontal surface with a panel for covering the base and providing one or more compartments associated with the base. In relation to the character and the base is a bin for holding a supply of the two-dimensional objects. An input mechanism, such as a beak or a nose to squeeze, is used for activating the appendage, which, in turn, flips the two-dimensional objects from the bin. A power source, such as a battery powered motor or a spring, is used in response to the input mechanism. In the present described embodiment, a rotating mechanism is operable with the power source for moving the character relative to the base for distributing the two-dimensional objects about the horizontal surface. Additionally, an indicator may be provided, such as a plurality of colored lights or an audio source, operable with the power source for communicating information to the game players. Finally, the two-dimensional objects may be cards or tiles containing graphics or text that are used as part of the game playing.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The invention will now be more particularly described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings. Novel features believed characteristic of the invention are set forth in the claims. The invention itself, as well as the preferred mode of use, further objectives, and advantages thereof, are best understood by reference to the following detailed description of the embodiment in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1A shows a perspective view of the front of the present described embodiment;
  • FIG. 1B shows a perspective view of the back thereof;
  • FIG. 1C shows a perspective view of the side thereof illustrated with the appendage as described;
  • FIG. 1D shows a perspective view of the side thereof opposite the side with the appendage;
  • FIG. 1E shows a perspective view of the top thereof;
  • FIG. 1F shows a perspective view of the bottom thereof;
  • FIG. 2 shows an exploded view of the complete assembly thereof;
  • FIG. 3 shows an exploded view of the front of the animated character of the described embodiments;
  • FIG. 4 shows an exploded view of the gear mechanism and lights of a present described embodiment;
  • FIG. 5 shows an exploded view of the back of the animated character thereof;
  • FIG. 6 shows an exploded view of the top of the base assembly thereof;
  • FIG. 7 shows an exploded view of the bottom of the base assembly thereof;
  • FIG. 8 shows a high-level schematic of the described embodiments;
  • FIG. 9 shows an example of a two-dimensional object containing graphics; and
  • FIG. 10 shows an example of a two-dimensional object containing text.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS
  • FIGS. 1A-1F show perspective views of the front, back, sides, top, and bottom, respectively, of a present described embodiment of the animated character two-dimensional object distributor device 10. The device 10 may be used by a game player for distributing two-dimensional objects 22 about a plurality of game players. The device 10 is operable by the game player for distributing two-dimensional objects about a plurality of game players is defined. The device 10 has an animated character with an appendage that automatically distributes the two-dimensional objects, such as cards or tiles, from a bin next to the animated character. The animated character is supported by a base above a horizontal surface. The animated character and the bin rotate about the base as the two-dimensional objects are distributed about the horizontal surface. The device uses audio and visual indicators to communicate with game players.
  • In the present described embodiment, the device 10 is shown as a penguin being the animated character 11 perched atop an iceberg. The animated character 11 has an appendage 12 for distributing, or flipping, two-dimensional objects 22, such as cards or tiles. In FIGS. 1A-1F, the appendage 12 is shown as the penguin's wing. In other described embodiments, a different animated character may be used with an appendage being an arm or a leg. The iceberg comprises a base 14 for supporting the animated character 11 above a horizontal surface, a rotating mechanism 15 for moving the character 11 relative to the base 14 for distributing two-dimensional objects 22 about the horizontal surface, and a bin 16 for holding a supply of the two-dimensional objects 22 in relation to the character 11 and the base 14. In other described embodiments, the animated character may rest upon a support other than an iceberg that relates to the animated character.
  • The device 10 has an input mechanism 18 for activating the appendage 12 for outwardly flipping the two-dimensional objects 22 from the bin 16. In the described embodiment, the input mechanism 18 is the penguin's beak, where one squeezes the beak to activate rotation of the penguin's wing. In other described embodiments, the input mechanism may be another body part, such as a nose, that when squeezed, or pulled or activated in some other way, will cause movement in a character's arm or leg.
  • The device 10 has a power source 20, shown in FIG. 1B as a battery compartment, for operating the appendage 12 in response to the input mechanism 18. The power source 20 may also be used to cause movement in the rotating mechanism 15. The power source 20 may be used to power a motor or spring or some other similar mechanism, which, in turn, causes the movement in the appendage 12 and the rotating mechanism 15.
  • The device 10 further has one or more indicators operable with the power source 20 for communicating information to game players using the device 10. FIG. 1E shows a light indicator 24 that may use a plurality of different colored lights to signal game players of certain events or situations. Although the described embodiment uses different colored lights, other means of using lights, such as flashing at different rates may be used. FIG. 1A shows an audio source 26 for communicating audio information to game players via a speaker or other means.
  • Lastly in referring to the perspective diagrams, FIG. 1F shows a panel 28 for covering the base 14 and providing one or more compartments associated with the base 14.
  • FIG. 2 shows an exploded view of the whole assembly of the device 10. FIGS. 3-7 show exploded views of various sections of the whole assembly shown in FIG. 2, and the whole assembly shown in FIG. 2 will be described with reference to FIGS. 3-7.
  • FIG. 3 shows an exploded view of the front of the animated character 11 in the present described embodiment. In FIG. 3, a front outer housing 30 or shell, which makes up the front outer portion of the penguin or other animated character, supports the input mechanism 18, the audio source 26, a drive assembly housing front 48, an appendage leaf switch 48, and the penguin's stationary wing 50.
  • The input mechanism 18 comprises a beak 32 or mouth portion, a lever 34, a lever support 36, and an input leaf switch 38. The beak 32 is composed of rubber, although other squeezable materials may be used, and fits through an opening on the front outer housing 30. The lever 34 fits into the beak 32 on one end and through an opening in the lever support 36 such that the end of the lever 34 through the lever support 36 rests below the contact of an input leaf switch 38. The input mechanism 18 is engaged by a game player squeezing the beak 32 and causing the end of the lever 34 through the lever support 36 to rise and press the contact on the input leaf switch 38, thus activating the electronic circuitry of the device 10. Although a leaf switch is shown, other microswitches may be used. Furthermore, although a squeezable beak is shown, other common input mechanisms may be used, such as buttons or switches.
  • The audio source 26 comprises a speaker 40, a speaker grill 42, and a speaker mounting support 44. The speaker 40 is mounted on the speaker mounting support 44 and pressed into the speaker grill 42 so that the audio sound will emanate from the front of the animated character 11. Once the electronic circuitry of the device 10 is activated, the power source 20 provides power to the audio source 26. Although audio communication is shown using a speaker in the described embodiment, other methods of communicating auditory information may be used, such as bells or whistles.
  • FIG. 3 also shows a stationary wing 50, which fits into a crevice on the outer side of the speaker grill 42 and is purely decorative.
  • FIG. 3 further shows a drive assembly housing front 46 and an appendage leaf switch 48, which are mounted inside the front outer housing 30. The use and operation of the drive assembly housing front 46 and the appendage leaf switch 48 will be described with reference to FIG. 4. Although a leaf switch is shown, other microswitches may be used.
  • FIG. 4 shows an exploded view of a gear mechanism and lights of the described embodiment. As described earlier, once the input mechanism 18 is engaged, the electronic circuitry of the device 10 is activated. When the electronic circuitry is activated, the power source 20 provides power to a motor 52 and to the light indicator 24. FIG. 4 shows the effect of providing power to these components.
  • Once power is provided to the motor 52, the motor 52 causes a gear assembly 54 to turn. As shown in FIG. 4, the gear assembly 54 is created to withstand manual manipulation so that the device 10 will be well suited for children to use and be difficult to break by using a clutching mechanism or other similar means. Once the gear assembly 54 begins to turn, it causes an axle 56 or shaft to turn. The axle 56 is supported on one end by an axle mount 58, and, on the other end, the axle 56 fits into a cam shaft 60. The cam shaft 60 further fits into the appendage 12. As the motor 52 causes the gear assembly 54 to turn, it causes the axle 56 to turn the cam shaft 60 and the appendage 12. Thus, as will be shown below, the appendage 12 may then be used to make contact with two-dimensional objects 22 and distribute or flip those objects about a horizontal surface. Also, as the cam shaft 60 turns, a cam makes contact with the appendage leaf switch 48 once per rotation. For each contact made, the appendage leaf switch 48 sends signals to the integrated circuitry on the printed circuit board 68, which contains the microprocessor or other similar integrated circuit that controls the logical operation of the device 10. Although a leaf switch is shown, other microswitches may be used. Counters and timers in the integrated circuitry on the printed circuit board may then be used to control the light indicator 24, the audio source 26, and the number of rotations of the appendage 12.
  • The gear assembly 54 is also used to turn a standard pinion gear 62, which, as will be shown in FIG. 6 and FIG. 7 rotates the animated character 11, the bin 16, and the rotating mechanism 15 about the base 14.
  • The components of the light indicator 24 are also shown in FIG. 4 and consist of a light assembly 64 and a light housing 66, the light assembly being mounted on the printed circuit board 68. In the described embodiment, colored lights are used to provide visual communications to game players, however, other means of using the lights, such as different rates of flashing, may be used.
  • FIG. 5 shows an exploded view of the back of the animated character 11 in the described embodiment. A drive assembly housing back 70 couples with the drive assembly housing front 46 to fully enclose the motor 52 and the gear assembly 54 and leave the axle 56 and the axle mount 58 protruding from the coupled drive assembly housing. FIG. 5 also shows a rear outer housing 72 of the animated character 11, which couples with the front outer housing 30. FIG. 5 further shows the various support components of the power source 20, which include an on/off/mode switch 74, and on/off/mode switch window 76, a battery compartment 78, and a battery compartment cover 80. Although the present described is shown as battery powered, an embodiment thereof may use mechanical power, such as springs, or other means of electrical power, such as powering with a plug into a wall outlet.
  • FIG. 6 shows an exploded view of the top of the base assembly of the described embodiment. The penguin's right foot 82 and left foot 82 are each supported on an animated character mounting platform 92 by a foot mounting boss 84. The animated character 11 fits behind the feet into a circular depression in the mounting platform 92 and is supported by an animated character mounting boss 86. When the animated character 11 is mounted on the mounting platform 92, the standard pinion gear 62 is positioned through the standard pinion gear aperture 88. The effect of this positioning will be apparent with reference to FIG. 7.
  • FIG. 6 also shows a biased tile platform 90, which fits into the bin 16 and is used to support the two-dimensional objects 22.
  • FIG. 7 shows an exploded view of the bottom of the base assembly of the described embodiment, which rests directly below what is shown in FIG. 6. A turntable 96 has the same shape as the combined animated character mounting platform 92 and the bin 16 and is attached directly below it. A wheel assembly 94 is mounted onto a wheel assembly mounting boss 98 such that the wheel protrudes through the turntable 96 and rests on the base 14, thus providing easy rotation of the turntable 96 about the base 14. The standard pinion gear 62 that is positioned through the standard pinion gear aperture 88, as described with reference to FIG. 6, fits into the aperture for a turntable gear 100 and provides the means for rotation of the turntable 96 about the base 14 once the turntable 96 is positioned atop a turntable mounting boss 106.
  • Also shown in FIG. 7 is a spring 102 positioned in a spring mount 104. The biased tile platform 90 is placed into the bin 16 such that it rests atop the spring 102. Thus, the spring 102 provides an upward tension into the biased tile platform 90, which, when the two-dimensional objects 22 are placed into the bin 16, provides tension between the two-dimensional objects 22 and the appendage 12 to allow proper flipping and distribution.
  • Further shown in FIG. 7 is the panel 28 for covering the base 14. The one or more compartments 108 are shown and may be used to store the two-dimensional objects 22 and other parts of the game such as instructions.
  • FIG. 8 shows a high-level schematic of the described embodiment. As shown in FIG. 8, the coordination of input signals from the input mechanism 18 and output signals to a motor driver circuitry 112, the rotating mechanism 15, a flipping mechanism 118, a sound effects circuitry 114, the audio source 26, an indicator lights circuitry 116, and the light assembly 64 is controlled by a microprocessor 110, which may be provided as a conventional microprocessor or microcontroller as electronic control circuitry that controls the described movement and sensory input and output of the device 10.
  • In the present described embodiment, the microprocessor 110 is operable with the power source 20 and receives input signals from the input mechanism 18 by a game player squeezing the beak 32 of the animated character 11. This squeezing motion causes the interaction between the lever 34 and the input leaf switch 38 as previously described, which sends an electronic signal to the microprocessor 110 indicating that the beak 32 has been squeezed. Upon receiving this input, the microprocessor 110 sends output signals to the motor driver circuitry 112 operable with the power source 20, which simultaneously causes the flipping mechanism 118 to move the appendage 12 and causes the rotating mechanism 15, which is also operable with the power source, to rotate the upper portion of the device 10 about the base 14. The microprocessor 110 or the motor driver circuitry 112 uses counters to control the number of flips and the number of rotations. Also upon receiving an input signal, the microprocessor 110 sends output signals to the sound effects circuitry 114, which controls the audio source 26 and is operable with the power source 20, and to the indicator lights circuitry, which controls the light assembly and is also operable with the power source. The microprocessor 110 uses timers to control both the audio and light indicators.
  • The remainder of this section describes the use of the device 10 in terms of using it during game play and provides an example of the operation of the device 10.
  • The contents of the game include the device 10, sixty-four double-sided picture tiles, such as are shown in FIG. 9, and sixteen double-sided tiles with text, known as “mission tiles”, as shown in FIG. 10. Each mission tile has two missions on it, one green and one red. The game is designed for two or more players age six or older.
  • To prepare for the game, a player must load the bin 16 with forty-eight picture tiles, shuffle the mission tiles, and place the mission tiles next to the device 10.
  • To begin the game, a player must squeeze the penguin's beak 32. The penguin will say “uh-oh” and begin flipping the picture tiles about the horizontal surface as all portions above the base 14 rotate. The penguin will flip up to twelve picture tiles about the horizontal surface. When the penguin stops flipping and spinning, a player must flip over the top mission tile. The players must then look at the color of the light indicator 24 to see if the light is green or red. If the light is red, the players must look at the red mission on the mission tile. If the light is green, the players must look at the green mission on the mission tile. To complete a mission, a player must find a picture on one of the picture tiles that matches the text on the mission tile. During play, the penguin may say “wat wat”, in which case the light indicator 24 will change colors and the mission changes to match the color of the light. If a player spots a picture that matches the mission, that player must shout “Pictureka!”, point at the picture and say what that player saw. If the other players disagree, the current mission continues. If nobody disagrees, the player removes the picture tile from the game and keeps it. Play then continues with the mission matching the color of the light on the light indicator 24. Once players have performed both missions on one side of a mission tile, one player must turn the mission tile over and perform the missions on the other side. Eventually, the penguin will begin flipping tiles again and everyone should take a break until the penguin finishes. Then, a new mission tile is used. If all players get cannot complete a mission, they may discard the current mission tile and use a new one. Play continues until the penguin makes a noise that sounds like someone “blowing a raspberry” on a baby's stomach. The player with the most picture tiles wins the game.
  • It should be noted that the game just described may be played with or without using the device 10, and, it should also be noted that other games may be played using the above-described tiles both with or without the device 10.
  • While the present invention has been illustrated by a description of various embodiments and while these embodiments have been set forth in considerable detail, it is intended that the scope of the invention be defined by the appended claims. It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that modifications to the foregoing preferred embodiments may be made in various aspects. It is deemed that the spirit and scope of the invention encompass such variations to be preferred embodiments as would be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art and familiar with the teachings of the present application.

Claims (20)

1. A device operable by a game player for distributing two-dimensional objects about a plurality of game players, the device comprising:
an animated character;
an appendage on the animated character for distributing the two-dimensional objects;
a base for supporting the animated character above a horizontal surface;
an input mechanism for activating the appendage for outwardly flipping the two-dimensional objects;
a power source for operating the appendage in response to the input mechanism; and
a rotating mechanism operable with the power source for moving the character relative to the base for distributing the two-dimensional objects about the horizontal surface.
2. The device recited in claim 1 further comprising an indicator operable with the power source for communicating information to the game players.
3. The device recited in claim 2 wherein said indicator comprises a light source.
4. The device recited in claim 3 wherein said light source provides a plurality of different colored lights.
5. The device recited in claim 2 wherein said indicator comprises an audio source.
6. The device recited in claim 1 further comprising a bin for holding a supply of the two-dimensional objects in relation to character and the base, wherein said input mechanism activates the appendage for outwardly flipping the two-dimensional objects from the bin.
7. The device recited in claim 6 further comprising an indicator operable with the power source for communicating information to the game players.
8. The device recited in claim 1 further comprising a panel for covering the base and providing one or more compartments associated with the base.
9. The device recited in claim 1 wherein said power source comprises a motor.
10. The device recited in claim 1 wherein said power source comprises a spring.
11. The device recited in claim 1 wherein said appendage comprises one of an arm, a leg, and a wing of said animated character.
12. The device recited in claim 1 wherein said input mechanism comprises one of a nose and a beak of said animated character.
13. The device recited in claim 1 further comprising a set of two-dimensional objects including text or graphics.
14. A method for distributing two-dimensional objects about a plurality of game players comprising:
providing an animated character;
providing an appendage on the animated character for distributing the two-dimensional objects;
supporting the animated character above a horizontal surface with a base;
activating the appendage with an input mechanism, operating the appendage in response to the input mechanism using a power source, and outwardly flipping the two-dimensional objects; and
moving the character relative to the base with a rotating mechanism operable with the power source and distributing the two-dimensional objects about the horizontal surface.
15. The method recited in claim 14 further comprising the steps of holding a supply of the two-dimensional objects in relation to the character and the base with a bin, and activating the appendage and outwardly flipping the two-dimensional objects from the bin with an input mechanism.
16. The method recited in claim 14 further comprising the steps of providing an indicator on the animated character and communicating information to the game players using the indicator operable with the power source.
17. The method recited in claim 14 further comprising the steps of covering the base with a panel and providing one or more compartments associated with the base.
18. A method for playing a game using a device operable by a game player for distributing two-dimensional objects about a plurality of game players, the device having an animated character, an appendage on the animated character for distributing the two-dimensional objects, a base for supporting the animated character above a horizontal surface, a bin for holding a supply of the two-dimensional objects in relation to character and the base, an input mechanism for activating the appendage for outwardly flipping the two-dimensional objects from the bin, a power source for operating the appendage in response to the input mechanism, a rotating mechanism operable with the power source for moving the character relative to the base for distributing the two-dimensional objects about the horizontal surface, a first set of two-dimensional objects containing graphics, and a second set of two-dimensional objects containing text, the method comprising:
placing the first set of two-dimensional objects in the bin;
engaging the input mechanism on the animated character;
allowing the device to automatically distribute the first set of two-dimensional objects about the horizontal surface;
placing the second set of two-dimensional objects near the device;
reading text from the second set of two-dimensional objects; and
matching graphics from the first set of two-dimensional objects to the text from the second set of two-dimensional objects.
19. The method recited in claim 18 further comprising the steps of activating the appendage with the input mechanism, and outwardly flipping the two-dimensional objects from the bin with the appendage to automatically distribute the first set of two-dimensional objects about the horizontal surface.
20. The method recited in claim 18 further comprising the steps of providing an indicator on the animated character operable with the power source, and communicating information to the game players using the indicator.
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN103170131A (en) * 2013-04-11 2013-06-26 浙江宣和电器有限公司 Lifting device and playing card lifting mechanism
CN106039695A (en) * 2016-07-01 2016-10-26 深圳市尚米乐科技有限公司 Door opening mechanism of poker machine

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CN106039695A (en) * 2016-07-01 2016-10-26 深圳市尚米乐科技有限公司 Door opening mechanism of poker machine

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