US20100252706A1 - Wind turbine mounting assembly - Google Patents

Wind turbine mounting assembly Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100252706A1
US20100252706A1 US12/751,585 US75158510A US2010252706A1 US 20100252706 A1 US20100252706 A1 US 20100252706A1 US 75158510 A US75158510 A US 75158510A US 2010252706 A1 US2010252706 A1 US 2010252706A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
elevator
leg
ridge
dextral
sinistral
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/751,585
Inventor
Samuel Pierce Hargis
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
WINDENERGY7 LLC
Original Assignee
WINDENERGY7 LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US16558309P priority Critical
Application filed by WINDENERGY7 LLC filed Critical WINDENERGY7 LLC
Priority to US12/751,585 priority patent/US20100252706A1/en
Assigned to WINDENERGY7 LLC reassignment WINDENERGY7 LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: HARGIS, SAMUEL PIERCE
Publication of US20100252706A1 publication Critical patent/US20100252706A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING, OR WEIGHT MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D13/00Assembly, mounting or commissioning of wind motors; Arrangements specially adapted for transporting wind motor components
    • F03D13/20Arrangements for mounting or supporting wind motors; Masts or towers for wind motors
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F03MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS; WIND, SPRING, OR WEIGHT MOTORS; PRODUCING MECHANICAL POWER OR A REACTIVE PROPULSIVE THRUST, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F03DWIND MOTORS
    • F03D9/00Adaptations of wind motors for special use; Combinations of wind motors with apparatus driven thereby; Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations
    • F03D9/30Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations
    • F03D9/34Wind motors specially adapted for installation in particular locations on stationary objects or on stationary man-made structures
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24SSOLAR HEAT COLLECTORS; SOLAR HEAT SYSTEMS
    • F24S25/00Arrangement of stationary mountings or supports for solar heat collector modules
    • F24S25/10Arrangement of stationary mountings or supports for solar heat collector modules extending in directions away from a supporting surface
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24SSOLAR HEAT COLLECTORS; SOLAR HEAT SYSTEMS
    • F24S25/00Arrangement of stationary mountings or supports for solar heat collector modules
    • F24S25/60Fixation means, e.g. fasteners, specially adapted for supporting solar heat collector modules
    • F24S25/61Fixation means, e.g. fasteners, specially adapted for supporting solar heat collector modules for fixing to the ground or to building structures
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F05INDEXING SCHEMES RELATING TO ENGINES OR PUMPS IN VARIOUS SUBCLASSES OF CLASSES F01-F04
    • F05BINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO WIND, SPRING, WEIGHT, INERTIA OR LIKE MOTORS, TO MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS COVERED BY SUBCLASSES F03B, F03D AND F03G
    • F05B2240/00Components
    • F05B2240/90Mounting on supporting structures or systems
    • F05B2240/91Mounting on supporting structures or systems on a stationary structure
    • F05B2240/911Mounting on supporting structures or systems on a stationary structure already existing for a prior purpose
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F05INDEXING SCHEMES RELATING TO ENGINES OR PUMPS IN VARIOUS SUBCLASSES OF CLASSES F01-F04
    • F05BINDEXING SCHEME RELATING TO WIND, SPRING, WEIGHT, INERTIA OR LIKE MOTORS, TO MACHINES OR ENGINES FOR LIQUIDS COVERED BY SUBCLASSES F03B, F03D AND F03G
    • F05B2240/00Components
    • F05B2240/90Mounting on supporting structures or systems
    • F05B2240/91Mounting on supporting structures or systems on a stationary structure
    • F05B2240/913Mounting on supporting structures or systems on a stationary structure on a mast
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B10/00Integration of renewable energy sources in buildings
    • Y02B10/20Solar thermal
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B10/00Integration of renewable energy sources in buildings
    • Y02B10/30Wind power
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/40Solar thermal energy, e.g. solar towers
    • Y02E10/47Mountings or tracking
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/70Wind energy
    • Y02E10/72Wind turbines with rotation axis in wind direction
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/70Wind energy
    • Y02E10/728Onshore wind turbines

Abstract

A wind turbine mounting assembly for mounting a wind turbine on a roof of a structure is provided. The wind turbine mounting assembly generally includes a ridge member, a mast, a first roof mounting assembly, and a second roof mounting assembly. The ridge member may be configured to extend along a ridge of a roof. The mast has a mast proximal end joined to the ridge member and a distal end for mounting a wind turbine. The first and second roof mounting assemblies may be joined at opposing ends of the ridge member and are configured to secure the mounting assembly to the roof. The first and second roof mounting assemblies may include a first and second ridge member elevator, respectively, to elevate the ridge member above the roof ridge. The assembly may include a third roof mounting assembly joined to the ridge member near a ridge member midpoint.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 61/165,583, filed on Apr. 1, 2009, all of which is incorporated by reference as if completely written herein.
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • This invention was not made as part of a federally sponsored research or development project.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present disclosure relates to mounting assemblies, and more particularly, to a wind turbine mounting assembly for mounting a wind turbine on a roof of a structure.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • With the threat of global warming becoming more of a reality, people and governments around the world have begun to utilize and encourage the use of renewable and sustainable sources of energy. One of the more popular renewable energy sources is wind power.
  • In wind power, the wind's kinetic energy is transformed into a useful form of energy. For example, a wind turbine may be used to convert the kinetic energy of the wind into usable electrical energy. Homeowners and businesses alike have become increasingly interested in utilizing small-scale wind turbines to generate “green” energy for their own consumption or to reduce utility bills by putting electrical energy back on “the grid.”
  • Such small-scale wind turbines are generally installed on the roof of a building. Current methods and apparatus used to install wind turbines on roofs tend to result in exceptionally loud noises and vibrations inside of the building. Moreover, such methods and apparatus tend to interfere with roof vents that typically run along the ridge of a roof. Still further, such methods and apparatus do not provide the ability for installation on roofs of various pitch angles.
  • What is needed in the art is an apparatus for mounting a wind turbine on a roof that does not transfer noises or vibrations to the interior of the building, that does not interfere with roof vents, and that may be easily adjusted for installation at various roof pitch angles.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In its most general configuration, the wind turbine mounting assembly advances the state of the art with a variety of new capabilities and overcomes many of the shortcomings of prior devices in new and novel ways. The wind turbine mounting assembly overcomes the shortcomings and limitations of the prior art in any of a number of generally effective configurations. The wind turbine mounting assembly demonstrates such capabilities and overcomes many of the shortcomings of prior devices and methods in new and novel ways.
  • The present disclosure relates to a wind turbine mounting assembly for mounting a wind turbine on a roof of a structure. The wind turbine mounting assembly generally includes a ridge member, a mast, a first roof mounting assembly, and a second roof mounting assembly.
  • The ridge member has a ridge member proximal end and a ridge member distal end separated by a ridge member length, including a ridge member midpoint. The mast includes a mast proximal end and a mast distal end separated by a mast length. A wind turbine may be mounted at the mast distal end, while the mast is joined to the ridge member at the mast proximal end.
  • The first roof mounting assembly includes a first sinistral leg and a first dextral leg. The first roof mounting assembly is joined to the ridge member near the ridge member proximal end such that the first sinistral leg and the first dextral leg extend in opposite directions from the ridge member to secure the assembly to the roof. Similarly, the second roof mounting assembly includes a second sinistral leg and a second dextral leg. The second roof mounting assembly is joined to the ridge member near the ridge member distal end such that the second sinistral leg and the second dextral leg extend in opposite directions from the ridge member to secure the assembly to the roof.
  • In one embodiment, the wind turbine mounting assembly may include a third roof mounting assembly that is similar to the first and second roof mounting assemblies. The third roof mounting assembly includes a third sinistal leg and a third dextral leg. The third roof mounting assembly may be joined to the ridge member near the ridge member midpoint such that the third sinistral and dextral legs extend in opposite directions from the ridge member to further secure the assembly to the roof.
  • In another embodiment, the first roof mounting assembly may include a first ridge member elevator. The first ridge member elevator is configured to elevate a portion of the ridge member so that the wind turbine mounting assembly may be installed over the ridge of a roof without damaging or interfering with the operation of a roof ridge vent. Furthermore, the first ridge member elevator is rotably connected to the first sinistral and dextral legs to provide the wind turbine mounting assembly with the ability to be adjusted for use with a wide range of roof pitch angles.
  • In yet another embodiment, the second roof mounting assembly may include a second ridge member elevator. The second ridge member elevator is configured to elevate a portion of the ridge member so that the wind turbine mounting assembly may be installed over the ridge of a roof without damaging or interfering with the operation of a roof ridge vent. Furthermore, the second ridge member elevator is rotably connected to the second sinistral and dextral legs to provide the wind turbine mounting assembly with the ability to be adjusted for use with a wide range of roof pitch angles.
  • In still another embodiment, the third roof mounting assembly may include a third ridge member primary elevator. The third ridge member primary elevator is configured to elevate a portion of the ridge member so that the wind turbine mounting assembly may be installed over the ridge of a roof without damaging or interfering with the operation of a roof ridge vent. Furthermore, the third ridge member primary elevator is rotably connected to the third sinistral and dextral legs to provide the wind turbine mounting assembly with the ability to be adjusted for use with a wide range of roof pitch angles.
  • In a further embodiment, the third roof mounting assembly may include a third ridge member secondary elevator, similar to the third ridge member primary elevator, which is also rotably connected to the third sinistral and dextral legs. In yet another embodiment, the rotable connections between the third ridge member primary and secondary elevators and the third sinistral and dextral legs may include a third roof mounting assembly vibration damper.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Without limiting the scope of the wind turbine mounting assembly as claimed below and referring now to the drawings and figures:
  • FIG. 1 is an isometric view of an embodiment of a wind turbine mounting assembly, not to scale;
  • FIG. 2 is an isometric view of an embodiment of a wind turbine mounting assembly, not to scale;
  • FIG. 3 is an isometric view of an embodiment of a wind turbine mounting assembly, not to scale;
  • FIG. 4 is an isometric view of an embodiment of a wind turbine mounting assembly, not to scale;
  • FIG. 5 is an elevation view of an embodiment of a first ridge member elevator, not to scale;
  • FIG. 6 is an elevation view of an embodiment of a second ridge member elevator, not to scale;
  • FIG. 7 is an elevation view of an embodiment of a third ridge member primary elevator, not to scale;
  • FIG. 8 is an elevation view of an embodiment of a third ridge member secondary elevator, not to scale;
  • FIG. 9 is a front elevation view of an embodiment of a wind turbine mounting assembly installed on a ridge of a roof, not to scale;
  • FIG. 10 is a side elevation view of an embodiment of a wind turbine mounting assembly installed on a ridge of a roof, not to scale; and
  • FIG. 11 is an isometric view of an embodiment of a wind turbine mounting assembly, not to scale.
  • These drawings are provided to assist in the understanding of the exemplary embodiments of a wind turbine mounting assembly as described in more detail below and should not be construed as unduly limiting the wind turbine mounting assembly. In particular, the relative spacing, positioning, sizing and dimensions of the various elements illustrated in the drawings are not drawn to scale and may have been exaggerated, reduced or otherwise modified for the purpose of improved clarity. Those of ordinary skill in the art will also appreciate that a range of alternative configurations have been omitted simply to improve the clarity and reduce the number of drawings.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The presently disclosed wind turbine mounting assembly (50) enables a significant advance in the state of the art. The preferred embodiments of the wind turbine mounting assembly (50) accomplish this by new and novel arrangements of elements and methods that are configured in unique and novel ways and which demonstrate previously unavailable but preferred and desirable capabilities. The description set forth below in connection with the drawings is intended merely as a description of the embodiments of the claimed wind turbine mounting assembly (50), and is not intended to represent the only form in which the wind turbine mounting assembly (50) may be constructed or utilized. The description sets forth the designs, functions, means, and methods of implementing the wind turbine mounting assembly (50) in connection with the illustrated embodiments. It is to be understood, however, that the same or equivalent functions and features may be accomplished by different embodiments that are also intended to be encompassed within the spirit and scope of the claimed wind turbine mounting assembly (50).
  • Referring generally to FIGS. 1-10, a wind turbine mounting assembly (50) for mounting a wind turbine on a roof of a structure is shown. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) generally includes a ridge member (100), a mast (200), a first roof mounting assembly (300), and a second roof mounting assembly (400), as seen in FIG. 1.
  • Still referring to FIG. 1, the ridge member (100) is configured to extend along a ridge of a roof. The ridge member (100) includes a ridge member proximal end (110) and a ridge member distal end (120) separated by a ridge member length (130). The ridge member length (130) includes a ridge member midpoint (132). The ridge member (100) may be constructed as a tube of various geometries, including but not limited to, square, triangular, rectangular, and round, just to name a few. However, those with skill in the art will appreciate that the ridge member (100) may, in the alternative, be constructed with a solid cross-section, or having a cross-sectional shape of common structural members including structural angles and beams.
  • With continued reference to FIG. 1, the mast (200) has a mast proximal end (210) and a mast distal end (220) separated by a mast length (230), and a mast diameter (240). The mast (200) is joined to the ridge member (100) at the mast proximal end (210), while the mast distal end (220) is configured for mounting a wind turbine. As with the ridge member (100), the mast (200) may be formed as a tube of various geometries, including but not limited to, square, triangular, and round, just to name a few. While the mast (200) is generally hollow to serve as a conduit for power transmission conductors, the mast (200) may, in the alternative, be formed with a solid cross-section, or have a cross-sectional shape of common structural members including structural angles and beams.
  • In one embodiment, the ridge member length (130) is configured such that it is greater than or equal to the mast length (230). Such an embodiment helps distribute the weight of the mounted wind turbine and the mounting assembly (50) over a larger surface area of the roof structure, which reduces the chance of damaging the structural integrity of the roof structure and reduces the likelihood of undesirable vibrations within the assembly (50) or the transmission of vibrations to the structure.
  • In the particular embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the mast (200) is fixedly joined to the ridge member (100) by welding the mast proximal end (210) to the ridge member (100). However, other joining techniques are contemplated, and will be discussed in more detail below.
  • The first roof mounting assembly (300) includes a first sinistral leg (310) and a first dextral leg (320), as seen in FIG. 1. The first roof mounting assembly (300) is joined to the ridge member (100) near the ridge member proximal end (110), and the first sinistral leg (310) and the first dextral leg (320) extend in opposite directions from the ridge member (100) to secure the mounting assembly (50) to the roof. The first sinistral leg (310) and the first dextral leg (320) may be secured to the rafters, joists, or support beams of a roof structure utilizing conventional fasteners, such as lag bolts, as seen in FIG. 9.
  • Similarly, the second roof mounting assembly (400) has a second sinistral leg (410) and a second dextral leg (420), also seen well in FIG. 1. The second roof mounting assembly (400) is joined to the ridge member (100) near the ridge member distal end (120), and the second sinistral leg (410) and the second dextral leg (420) extend in opposite directions from the ridge member (100) to secure the mounting assembly (50) to the roof. The second sinistral leg (410) and the second dextral leg (420) may be secured to the rafters, joists, or support beams of a roof structure utilizing conventional fasteners, such as lag bolts.
  • In the particular embodiment shown in FIG. 1, the first and second roof mounting assemblies (300, 400) are fixedly joined to the ridge member (100) by a welding process. However, other joining techniques are contemplated, and will be discussed in more detail below. The first sinistral and dextral legs (310, 320) may be joined to the ridge member (100) such that they are separated by a first pitch angle (325), as seen in FIG. 1. Similarly, the second sinistral and dextral legs (410, 420) may be joined to the ridge member (100) such that they are separated by a second pitch angle (425). The first and second pitch angles (325, 425) may be any angle desired, or required, such that the mounting assembly (50) may be custom built for installation on any roof structure. For example, the first and second pitch angles (325, 425) may be about 23 degrees (which would correspond to a common 5/12 roof pitch) or even 180 degrees for a flat roof.
  • It is contemplated that the wind turbine mounting assembly (50) may include multiple mounting assemblies in addition to the first and second roof mounting assemblies (300, 400). For example, in one embodiment, the wind turbine mounting assembly (50) may further include a third roof mounting assembly (500). The third roof mounting assembly (500) has a third sinistral leg (510) and a third dextral leg (520), as seen in FIG. 3. The third roof mounting assembly (500) is joined to the ridge member (100) near the ridge member midpoint (132), and the third sinistral leg (510) and the third dextral leg (520) extend in opposite directions from the ridge member (100) to further secure the mounting assembly (50) to the roof. The third sinistral leg (510) and the third dextral leg (520) may be secured to the rafters, joists, or support beams of a roof structure utilizing conventional fasteners, such as lag bolts. Moreover, the third sinistral and dextral legs (510, 520) may be joined to the ridge member (100) such that they are separated by a third pitch angle (525). The third pitch angle (525) may be any angle that is desired, or required, such that the mounting assembly (50) may be custom built for installation on any roof structure. Furthermore, the third roof mounting assembly (500), or additional roof mounting assemblies, help distribute the weight of the wind turbine and mounting assembly (50) over a larger surface area of the roof structure, which lessens the chance of damaging the structural integrity of the roof structure and reduces the likelihood of undesirable vibrations within the assembly (50) or the transmission of vibrations to the structure.
  • With reference now to FIGS. 2 and 5, an additional embodiment of the wind turbine mounting assembly (50) is shown. In this particular embodiment, the first roof mounting assembly (300) further includes a first ridge member elevator (350). The first ridge member elevator (350) includes a first elevator sinistral leg (360) having a first elevator sinistral leg proximal end (362) and a first elevator sinistral leg distal end (364), as seen in FIG. 5. As seen in FIG. 2, the first elevator sinistral leg proximal end (362) is rotably connected to the first sinistral leg (310). Similarly, the first ridge member elevator (350) includes a first elevator dextral leg (370) having a first elevator dextral leg proximal end (372) and a first elevator dextral leg distal end (374), shown well in FIG. 5. The first elevator dextral leg proximal end (372) is rotably connected to the first dextral leg (320), as seen in FIG. 2. The rotable connections allow the first sinistral and dextral legs (310, 320) to be adjustable such that the mounting assembly (50) may be easily utilized with a wide range of roof pitch angles, including flat roofs. Moreover, the rotable connections allow the installed mounting assembly (50) to flex, which helps reduce unwanted noise and vibrations. The rotable connections between the first ridge member elevator (350) and the first sinistral and dextral legs (310, 320) may be accomplished utilizing a bolt and nut. Elastomeric washers may be disposed on the bolt between the first ridge member elevator (350) and the first sinistral and dextral legs (310, 320) to help attenuate any noise or vibrations generated by the mounted wind turbine.
  • As seen in FIG. 9, the first sinistral leg (310) may include a first sinistral overhang distance (311), and the first dextral leg (320) may include a first dextral overhang distance (321). The first sinistral overhang distance (311) may be defined as the distance between the point where the first sinistral leg (310) is rotably connected to the first ridge member elevator (350) and the closest point from the rotable connection where the first sinistral leg (310) is secured to the roof. Similarly, the first dextral overhang distance (321) may be defined as the distance between the point where the first dextral leg (320) is rotably connected to the first ridge member elevator (350) and the closest point from the rotable connection where the first dextral leg (310) is secured to the roof. As seen in the embodiment of FIG. 9, the first sinistral and dextral legs (310, 320) are secured to the roof structure utilizing an appropriate fastener, such as a lag bolt. Elastomeric washers may be disposed between the top of the roof structure and the bottom surfaces of the first sinistral and dextral legs (310, 320) to help attenuate any noise or vibrations generated by the mounted wind turbine. Moreover, the first sinistral and dextral overhang distances (311, 321) further reduce noise and vibrations. This further reduction of noise and vibration is attributed to the fact that the first sinistral and dextral legs (310, 320) behave as leaf springs that dampen noise and vibration throughout the first sinistral and dextral overhang distances (311, 321). In one particular embodiment, the first sinistral and dextral overhang distances (311, 321) are each equal to at least one times the mast diameter (240).
  • As seen in FIG. 5, the first elevator sinistral leg (360) and the first elevator dextral leg (370) may be separated by a first elevator pitch angle (375). The first elevator pitch angle (375) may be any angle desired, or required, such that the mounting assembly (50) may be custom built for installation on any roof structure.
  • With continued reference to FIGS. 2 and 5, the first ridge member elevator (350) is configured to elevate the ridge member (100) above a roof ridge. The first ridge member elevator (350) elevates the ridge member (100) above the roof ridge by at least a first elevator ridge member offset (352). As seen in FIG. 5, the first elevator ridge member offset (352) may be defined as the vertical distance from the lowest point of the ridge member (100) to the furthest vertical projection of the first elevator dextral leg proximal end (372). In one particular embodiment, the first elevator ridge member offset (352) is at least ten percent of the mast length (230). Such an elevation is advantageous as the mounting assembly (100) may be installed over a roof ridge that includes a roof vent without damaging or interfering with the operation of the roof vent, and reduces the effect that the mounting assembly (100) has on the normal airflow pattern over the roof ridge.
  • With continued reference to FIG. 5, the first ridge member elevator (350) also includes a first elevator spread (354). The first elevator spread (354) may be defined as the horizontal distance between the point at which the first elevator sinistral leg proximal end (362) is rotably connected to the first sinistral leg (310) and the point at which the first elevator dextral leg proximal end (372) is rotably connected to the first dextral leg (320). In one embodiment, the first elevator spread (354) is at least five times the mast diameter (240). Such a relationship ensures that the weight and stresses associated with the wind turbine and mounting assembly (50) are distributed more evenly on the roof structure. Moreover, this particular relationship provides a wider and more stable base for supporting the wind turbine on the roof structure, without imparting a large load directly at the ridge joint where there is often discontinuity in the structural members supporting the roof.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 6, the second roof mounting assembly (400) may further include a second ridge member elevator (450). The second ridge member elevator (450) includes a second elevator sinistral leg (460) having a second elevator sinistral leg proximal end (462) and a second elevator sinistral leg distal end (464), seen well in FIG. 6. As seen in FIG. 2, the second elevator sinistral leg proximal end (462) is rotably connected to the second sinistral leg (410). Similarly, the second ridge member elevator (450) includes a second elevator dextral leg (470) having a second elevator dextral leg proximal end (472) and a second elevator dextral leg distal end (474), shown well in FIG. 6. The second elevator dextral leg proximal end (472) is rotably connected to the second dextral leg (420), as seen in FIG. 2. The rotable connections allow the second sinistral and dextral legs (410, 420) to be adjustable such that the mounting assembly (50) may be easily utilized with a wide range of roof pitch angles. Moreover, the rotable connections allow the installed mounting assembly (50) to flex, which helps reduce unwanted noise and vibrations. As previously explained, the rotable connections between the second ridge member elevator (450) and the second sinistral and dextral legs (410, 420) may be accomplished utilizing a bolt and nut. Elastomeric washers may be disposed on the bolt between the second ridge member elevator (450) and the second sinistral and dextral legs (410, 420) to help attenuate any noise or vibrations generated by the mounted wind turbine. As explained above with respect to the first sinistral and dextral legs (310, 320), the second sinistral leg (410) may include a second sinistral overhang distance (not shown), and the second dextral leg (420) may include a second dextral overhang distance (not shown). The second sinistral and dextral overhang distances would provide the same benefits as previously discussed with respect to the first sinistral and dextral overhang distances (311, 321).
  • As seen in FIG. 6, the second elevator sinistral leg (460) and the second elevator dextral leg (470) may be separated by a second elevator pitch angle (475). The second elevator pitch angle (475) may be any angle desired, or required, such that the mounting assembly (50) may be custom built for installation on any roof structure. One particularly effective embodiment incorporates a first elevator pitch angle (375) and a second elevator pitch angle (475) that are both between 70 degrees and 140 degrees, which appears to be effective in achieving the desired spread while not contributing to harmonic vibration. Similarly, yet another particularly effective embodiment incorporates a first pitch angle (325) and a second pitch angle (425) that are both between 70 degrees and 140 degrees, which appears to be effective in achieving the desired spread while not contributing to harmonic vibration.
  • As with the first ridge member elevator (350), the second ridge member elevator (450) is configured to elevate the ridge member (100) above a roof ridge. The second ridge member elevator (450) elevates the ridge member (100) above the roof ridge by at least a second elevator ridge member offset (452). As seen in FIG. 6, the second elevator ridge member offset (452) may be defined as the vertical distance from the lowest point of the ridge member (100) to the furthest vertical projection of the second elevator dextral leg proximal end (472). In one particular embodiment, the second elevator ridge member offset (452) is at least ten percent of the mast length (230). Such an elevation is advantageous as the mounting assembly (100) may be installed over a roof ridge that includes a roof vent without damaging or interfering with the operation of the roof vent, and reduces the effect that the mounting assembly (100) has on the normal airflow pattern over the roof ridge.
  • With continued reference to FIG. 6, the second ridge member elevator (450) also includes a second elevator spread (454). The second elevator spread (454) may be defined as the horizontal distance between the point at which the second elevator sinistral leg proximal end (462) is rotably connected to the second sinistral leg (410) and the point at which the second elevator dextral leg proximal end (472) is rotably connected to the second dextral leg (420). In one embodiment, the second elevator spread (454) is at least five times the mast diameter (240). Such a relationship ensures that the weight and stresses associated with the wind turbine and mounting assembly (50) are distributed more evenly on the roof structure. Moreover, this particular relationship provides a wider and more stable base for supporting the wind turbine on the roof structure without imparting a large load directly at the ridge joint where there is often discontinuity in the structural members supporting the roof.
  • In one embodiment, the first ridge member elevator (350) may further include a first elevator connection region (380), as seen in FIG. 5. The first elevator connection region (380) is joined to the first elevator sinistral leg (360), the first elevator dextral leg (370), and the ridge member (100). In a particular embodiment, the first elevator connection region (380) is joined to the first elevator sinistral leg (360), the first elevator dextral leg (370), and the ridge member (100) by welding. However, those with skill in the art will appreciate that the components may be joined with bolts and nuts, rivets, screws, or other types of conventional fasteners or conventional joining techniques. It should be noted that the first elevator connection region (380) may comprise at least two separate components.
  • In addition, the second ridge member elevator (450) may further include a second elevator connection region (480), as seen in FIG. 6. The second elevator connection region (480) is joined to the second elevator sinistral leg (460), the second elevator dextral leg (470), and the ridge member (100). In a particular embodiment, the second elevator connection region (480) is joined to the second elevator sinistral leg (460), the second elevator dextral leg (470), and the ridge member (100) by welding. However, those with skill in the art will appreciate that the components may be joined with bolts and nuts, rivets, screws, or other types of conventional fasteners or other conventional joining techniques. It should be noted that the second elevator connection region (480) may comprise at least two separate components.
  • In a further embodiment, the first elevator connection region (380) may be configured such that it totally encloses a portion of the ridge member (100) between the ridge member midpoint (132) and the ridge member proximal end (110), as seen in FIGS. 2 and 5. Similarly, the second elevator connection region (480) may be configured such that it totally encloses a portion of the ridge member (100) between the ridge member midpoint (132) and the ridge member distal end (120), as seen in FIGS. 2 and 6. Again, it should be noted that the first and second elevator connection regions (380, 480) may each comprise multiple components that are joined together when joined to the ridge member (100).
  • In yet another embodiment, the ridge member (100) has a ridge member profile (140) and the first elevator connection region (380) is configured to cooperate with the ridge member profile (140). For example, the first elevator connection region (380) may be formed with a first connection region opening (382) having a first connection region opening profile (384). The first connection region opening profile (384) may be configured to cooperate with the ridge member profile (140), as seen in FIG. 5. This allows the first elevator connection region (380) to be easily slid over a portion of the ridge member (100) such that the first elevator connection region (380) is joined to the ridge member (100). Moreover, the first connection region opening profile (384) and the ridge member profile (140) may be configured such that the first elevator connection region (380) prevents the ridge member (100) from rotating. Such cooperating profiles (140, 384) may be configured with various geometries, such as triangular, square, rectangular, and hexagonal, just to name a few.
  • Similarly, and as seen in FIG. 6, the second elevator connection region (480) may be configured to cooperate with the ridge member profile (140). For instance, the second elevator connection region (480) may be formed with a second connection region opening (482) having a second connection region opening profile (484). The second connection region opening profile (484) may be configured to cooperate with the ridge member profile (140), as seen in FIG. 6. This allows the second elevator connection region (480) to be easily slid over a portion of the ridge member (100) such that the second elevator connection region (480) is joined to the ridge member (100). Furthermore, the second connection region opening profile (484) and the ridge member profile (140) may be configured such that the second elevator connection region (480) prevents the ridge member (100) from rotating. Such cooperating profiles (140, 484) may be configured with various geometries, such as triangular, square, rectangular, and hexagonal, just to name a few.
  • In another embodiment, as seen in FIG. 5, the first elevator sinistral leg (360), the first elevator dextral leg (370), and the first elevator connection region (380) are integrally formed from a single piece of material. Similarly, and as seen in FIG. 6, the second elevator sinistral leg (460), the second elevator dextral leg (470), and the second elevator connection region (480) are integrally formed from a second single piece of material. Such an embodiment allows for reduced material costs and ease of manufacturing associated with producing the first and second ridge member elevators (350, 450), while reducing the number of joints that may reduce the assembly's ability to withstand concentrated stresses and fatigue. A further embodiment, also illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6, ensures that the distance from the connection region openings (382, 482) to a perimeter edge is at least 25% of the mast diameter (240), further reducing the likelihood of failure due to fatigue.
  • As previously explained, the wind turbine mounting assembly (50) may include a third roof mounting assembly (500), or even more roof mounting assemblies. In a particular embodiment of the mounting assembly (50) having a third roof mounting assembly (500), the third roof mounting assembly (500) may further include a third ridge member primary elevator (550), as seen in FIG. 3. The third ridge member primary elevator (550) includes a third primary elevator sinistral leg (560) having a third primary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (562) and a third primary elevator sinistral leg distal end (564), shown well in FIG. 7. As seen in FIG. 3, the third primary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (562) is rotably connected to the third sinistral leg (510). Similarly, the third ridge member primary elevator (550) includes a third primary elevator dextral leg (570) having a third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572) and a third primary elevator dextral leg distal end (574), as seen well in FIG. 7. The third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572) is rotably connected to the third dextral leg (520), as seen in FIG. 3. The rotable connections allow the third sinistral and dextral legs (510, 520) to be adjustable such that the mounting assembly (50) may be easily utilized with a wide range of roof pitch angles. Furthermore, the rotable connections allow the installed mounting assembly (50) to flex, which helps reduce unwanted noise and vibrations. As previously explained with respect to the first and second ridge member elevators (350, 450), the rotable connections between the third ridge member primary elevator (550) and the third sinistral and dextral legs (510, 520) may be accomplished utilizing a bolt and nut, or any other type of conventional rotable connection known to those skilled in the art. As explained above with respect to the first sinistral and dextral legs (310, 320), the third sinistral leg (510) may include a third sinistral overhang distance (not shown), and the third dextral leg (520) may include a third dextral overhang distance (not shown). The third sinistral and dextral overhang distances would provide the same benefits as previously discussed with respect to the first sinistral and dextral overhang distances (311, 321).
  • As seen in FIG. 7, the third primary elevator sinistral leg (560) and the third primary elevator dextral leg (570) may be separated by a third primary elevator pitch angle (575). The third primary elevator pitch angle (575) may be any angle desired, or required, such that the mounting assembly (50) may be custom built for installation on any roof structure.
  • Still referring to FIG. 7, the third ridge member primary elevator (550) also may include a third primary elevator connection region (580). The third primary elevator connection region (580) is joined to the third primary elevator sinistral leg (560), the third primary elevator dextral leg (570), and the ridge member (100). In a particular embodiment, the third primary elevator connection region (580) is joined to the third primary elevator sinistral leg (560), the third primary elevator dextral leg (570), and the ridge member (100) by welding. However, those with skill in the art will appreciate that the components may be joined with bolts and nuts, rivets, screws, or other types of conventional fasteners or other conventional joining techniques. It should be noted that the third primary elevator connection region (580) may comprise at least two separate components.
  • As with the first and second ridge member elevators (350, 450), the third ridge member primary elevator (550) is configured to elevate the ridge member (100) above a roof ridge. The third ridge member primary elevator (550) elevates the ridge member (100) above the roof ridge by at least a third primary elevator ridge member offset (552). As seen in FIG. 7, the third primary elevator ridge member offset (552) may be defined as the vertical distance from the lowest point of the ridge member (100) to the furthest vertical projection of the third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572). In one particular embodiment, the third primary elevator ridge member offset (552) is at least ten percent of the mast length (230). Such an elevation is advantageous as the mounting assembly (100) may be installed over a roof ridge that includes a roof vent without damaging or interfering with the operation of the roof vent and reduces the effect that the mounting assembly (100) has on the normal airflow pattern over the roof ridge.
  • Still referring to FIG. 7, the third ridge member primary elevator (550) also includes a third primary elevator spread (554). The third primary elevator spread (554) may be defined as the horizontal distance between the point at which the third primary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (562) is rotably connected to the third sinistral leg (510) and the point at which the third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572) is rotably connected to the third dextral leg (520). In one embodiment, the third primary elevator spread (554) is at least five times the mast diameter (240). Such a relationship ensures that the weight and stresses associated with the wind turbine and mounting assembly (50) are distributed more evenly on the roof structure. Moreover, this particular relationship provides a wider and more stable base for supporting the wind turbine on the roof structure without imparting a large load directly at the ridge joint where there is often discontinuity in the structural members supporting the roof.
  • In yet another embodiment of the mounting assembly (50) having a third roof mounting assembly (500), the third roof mounting assembly (500) may further include a third ridge member secondary elevator (650), as seen in FIGS. 4 and 8. The third ridge member secondary elevator (650) includes a third secondary elevator sinistral leg (660) having a third secondary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (662) and a third secondary elevator sinistral leg distal end (664). As seen in FIGS. 4 and 8, the third secondary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (662) is rotably connected to the third sinistral leg (510). Similarly, the third ridge member secondary elevator (650) includes a third secondary elevator dextral leg (670) having a third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672) and a third secondary elevator dextral leg distal end (674). The third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672) is rotably connected to the third dextral leg (520), as seen in FIGS. 4 and 8. As previously mentioned, the rotable connections allow the third sinistral and dextral legs (510, 520) to be adjustable such that the mounting assembly (50) may be easily utilized with a wide range of roof pitch angles. Furthermore, the rotable connections allow the installed mounting assembly (50) to flex, which helps reduce unwanted noise and vibrations. The rotable connections between the third ridge member secondary elevator (650) and the third sinistral and dextral legs (510, 520) may be accomplished utilizing a bolt and nut, or any other type of conventional rotable connection known to those skilled in the art.
  • As seen in FIG. 8, the third secondary elevator sinistral leg (660) and the third secondary elevator dextral leg (670) may be separated by a third secondary elevator pitch angle (675). The third secondary elevator pitch angle (675) may be any angle desired, or required, such that the mounting assembly (50) may be custom built for installation on any roof structure.
  • Still referring to FIG. 8, the third ridge member secondary elevator (650) may also include a third secondary elevator connection region (680). The third secondary elevator connection region (680) is joined to the third secondary elevator sinistral leg (660), the third secondary elevator dextral leg (670), and the ridge member (100). In a particular embodiment, the third secondary elevator connection region (680) is joined to the third secondary elevator sinistral leg (660), the third secondary elevator dextral leg (670), and the ridge member (100) by welding. However, those with skill in the art will appreciate that the components may be joined with bolts and nuts, rivets, screws, or other types of conventional fasteners or other conventional joining techniques. It should be noted that the third secondary elevator connection region (680) may comprise at least two separate components.
  • As with the third ridge member primary elevator (550), the third ridge member secondary elevator (650) is configured to elevate the ridge member (100) above a roof ridge. The third ridge member secondary elevator (650) elevates the ridge member (100) above the roof ridge by at least a third secondary elevator ridge member offset (652). As seen in FIG. 8, the third secondary elevator ridge member offset (652) may be defined as the vertical distance from the lowest point of the ridge member (100) to the furthest vertical projection of the third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672). In one particular embodiment, the third secondary elevator ridge member offset (652) is at least ten percent of the mast length (230). Such an elevation is advantageous as the mounting assembly (100) may be installed over a roof ridge that includes a roof vent without damaging or interfering with the operation of the roof vent and reduces the effect that the mounting assembly (100) has on the normal airflow pattern over the roof ridge.
  • With continued reference to FIG. 8, the third ridge member secondary elevator (650) also includes a third secondary elevator spread (654). The third secondary elevator spread (654) may be defined as the horizontal distance between the point at which the third secondary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (662) is rotably connected to the third sinistral leg (510) and the point at which the third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672) is rotably connected to the third dextral leg (520). In one embodiment, the third secondary elevator spread (654) is at least five times the mast diameter (240). Such a relationship ensures that the weight and stresses associated with the wind turbine and mounting assembly (50) are distributed more evenly on the roof structure. Moreover, this particular relationship provides a wider and more stable base for supporting the wind turbine on the roof structure without imparting a large load directly at the ridge joint where there is often discontinuity in the structural members supporting the roof.
  • In yet another embodiment, the third roof mounting assembly (500) may further include at least one third roof mounting assembly vibration damper (530). For example, as seen in FIG. 10, the rotable connection of the third dextral leg (520) to both the third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572) and the third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672) includes a third roof mounting assembly vibration damper (530). Still referring to FIG. 10, the third roof mounting assembly vibration damper (530) may include a primary damper (532) disposed between the third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572) and the third dextral leg (520), and a secondary damper (534) disposed between the third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672) and the third dextral leg (520). Incorporating two elevators in the immediate vicinity of the mast (200), combined with the connection of the two elevators to a single roof mounting assembly (500) via the primary damper (532) and the secondary damper (534) attenuates the assembly (50) at a key location and does so particularly well.
  • Similarly, the rotable connection of the third sinistral leg (510) to both the third primary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (562) and the third secondary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (662) may also include a third roof mounting assembly vibration damper (530), including a primary and secondary damper (532, 534) as described with respect to the third dextral leg (520) and the third primary and secondary elevator dextral leg proximal ends (572, 672). The primary and secondary damper (532, 534) may each comprise multiple, separate components, such as a series of elastomeric washers.
  • Preferably, the third roof mounting assembly vibration damper (530) comprises an elastomeric material, including but not limited to EPM rubber, EPDM rubber, silicone rubber, ethylene-vinyl acetate, thermoplastic elastomers, thermoplastic polyurethanes, polybutadiene, and nitrile rubbers, just to name a few. Constructing the vibration damper (530) with elastomeric materials allows the vibrations and noise generated by the mounted wind turbine to be efficiently absorbed so that any such noises or vibrations are not heard or felt in the interior of the building.
  • With reference now to FIGS. 4, 7 and 8, in one particular embodiment, the third ridge member primary elevator (550) further includes a third primary elevator mast connection region (590) having a third primary elevator mast connection region length (592). Similarly, in this embodiment, the third ridge member secondary elevator (650) further includes a third secondary elevator mast connection region (690) having a third secondary elevator mast connection region length (692). As seen in FIG. 4, the mast (200) is secured to the third primary elevator mast connection region (590) and the third secondary elevator mast connection region (690). Although FIG. 4 shows the mast (200) secured to the third primary elevator mast connection region (590) and the third secondary elevator mast connection region (690) with bolts and nuts, those with skill in the art will appreciate that the components may be just as easily be secured to one another with rivets, screws, or other types of conventional fasteners or other conventional joining techniques, such as welding.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 4, 7, 8 and 11, in one embodiment, the mast (200) may be secured to the third primary elevator mast connection region (590) and the third secondary elevator mast connection region (690) in such a way that the mast (200) is rotable with respect to the third ridge member primary and secondary elevators (550, 650), or even detachable. Preferably, such a rotable connection is accomplished utilizing nut and bolt type fasteners, wherein all but one set of nuts and bolts are removed to allow rotation of the mast (200), as seen in FIG. 11. For a mast (200) having a longer mast length (230), the third primary and secondary elevator mast connection region lengths (592, 692) may be increased to provide increased support and reduce mast (200) fatigue. For example, in one embodiment, the third primary and secondary elevator mast connection region lengths (592, 692) may be at least ten percent of the mast length (230). By providing the mounting assembly (50) with a rotable mast (200), users or maintenance workers will be able to lower the mast (200) to provide easier and safer access to the attached wind turbine.
  • In still another embodiment, the third primary elevator connection region (580) may be configured such that it totally encloses a portion of the ridge member (100) between the ridge member midpoint (132) and the ridge member proximal end (110), as seen in FIGS. 4 and 7. Similarly, the third secondary elevator connection region (680) may be configured such that it totally encloses a portion of the ridge member (100) between the ridge member midpoint (132) and the ridge member distal end (120), as seen in FIGS. 4 and 8. It should be noted that the third primary and secondary elevator connection regions (580, 680) may each comprise multiple components that are joined together when joined to the ridge member (100).
  • In a further embodiment, the ridge member (100) has a ridge member profile (140) and the third primary elevator connection region (580) is configured to cooperate with the ridge member profile (140). For example, the third primary elevator connection region (580) may be formed with a third primary connection region opening (582) having a third primary connection region opening profile (584). The third primary connection region opening profile (584) may be configured to cooperate with the ridge member profile (140), as seen in FIG. 7. This allows the third primary elevator connection region (580) to be easily slid over a portion of the ridge member (100) such that the third primary elevator connection region (580) is joined to the ridge member (100). Moreover, the third primary connection region opening profile (584) and the ridge member profile (140) may be configured such that the third primary elevator connection region (580) prevents the ridge member (100) from rotating. Such cooperating profiles (140, 584) may be configured with various geometries, such as triangular, square, rectangular, and hexagonal, just to name a few.
  • Similarly, and as seen in FIG. 8, the third secondary elevator connection region (680) may be configured to cooperate with the ridge member profile (140). For instance, the third secondary elevator connection region (680) may be formed with a third secondary connection region opening (682) having a third secondary connection region opening profile (684). The third secondary connection region opening profile (684) may be configured to cooperate with the ridge member profile (140), as seen in FIG. 8. This allows the third secondary elevator connection region (680) to be easily slid over a portion of the ridge member (100) such that the third secondary elevator connection region (680) is joined to the ridge member (100). Furthermore, the third secondary connection region opening profile (684) and the ridge member profile (140) may be configured such that the third secondary elevator connection region (680) prevents the ridge member (100) from rotating. Such cooperating profiles (140, 684) may be configured with various geometries, such as triangular, square, rectangular, and hexagonal, just to name a few.
  • In yet another embodiment, the third primary elevator sinistral leg (560), the third primary elevator dextral leg (570), the third primary elevator connection region (580), and the third primary elevator mast connection region (590) are integrally formed from a single piece of material, as seen in FIG. 7. Similarly, and as seen in FIG. 8, the third secondary elevator sinistral leg (660), the third secondary elevator dextral leg (670), the third secondary elevator connection region (680), and the third secondary elevator mast connection region (590) are integrally formed from a second single piece of material. Such embodiments allow for reduced material costs and ease of manufacturing associated with producing the third ridge member primary elevator (550) and the third ridge member secondary elevator (650).
  • The ridge member (100), the mast (200), and the roof mounting assemblies (300, 400, 500), including the elevators (350, 450, 550, 650), may be formed of virtually any material, such as metals, plastics, fiberglass, or any other material strong enough to support a wind turbine on a roof in heavy winds. Components formed of metal may be laser cut, heat formed, and bolted or welded together. Components formed of plastic may be injection molded. Moreover, the mounting assembly may be scaled up or down for use with various sizes of wind turbines. Still further, it should be noted that although the disclosure relates to a mounting assembly (50) for a wind turbine, the disclosed mounting assembly (50) may also be used for mounting solar panels or other objects on a roof.
  • Numerous alterations, modifications, and variations of the preferred embodiments disclosed herein will be apparent to those skilled in the art and they are all anticipated and contemplated to be within the spirit and scope of the wind turbine mounting assembly (50), as claimed below. For example, although specific embodiments have been described in detail, those with skill in the art will understand that the preceding embodiments and variations can be modified to incorporate various types of substitute and or additional or alternative manufacturing processes and materials, relative arrangement of elements, and dimensional configurations. Accordingly, even though only few variations of the wind turbine mounting assembly (50) are described herein, it is to be understood that the practice of such additional modifications and variations and the equivalents thereof, are within the spirit and scope of the wind turbine mounting assembly (50) as defined in the following claims. The corresponding structures, materials, acts, and equivalents of all means or step plus function elements in the claims below are intended to include any structure, material, or acts for performing the functions in combination with other claimed elements as specifically claimed.

Claims (20)

1. A wind turbine mounting assembly (50) for mounting a wind turbine on a roof of a structure, comprising:
a) a ridge member (100) having a ridge member proximal end (110) and a ridge member distal end (120) separated by a ridge member length (130), including a ridge member midpoint (132);
b) a mast (200) having a mast proximal end (210) and a mast distal end (220) separated by a mast length (230), and a mast diameter (240), wherein the wind turbine is mounted at the mast distal end (220) and the mast (200) is joined to the ridge member (100) at the mast proximal end (210);
c) a first roof mounting assembly (300) having a first sinistral leg (310) and a first dextral leg (320), wherein the first roof mounting assembly (300) is joined to the ridge member (100) near the ridge member proximal end (110), and the first sinistral leg (310) and the first dextral leg (320) extend in opposite directions from the ridge member (100) to secure the assembly (50) to the roof; and
d) a second roof mounting assembly (400) having a second sinistral leg (410) and a second dextral leg (420), wherein the second roof mounting assembly (400) is joined to the ridge member (100) near the ridge member distal end (120), and the second sinistral leg (410) and the second dextral leg (420) extend in opposite directions from the ridge member (100) to secure the assembly (50) to the roof.
2. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 1, wherein:
a) the first roof mounting assembly (300) further includes a first ridge member elevator (350) having:
i) a first elevator sinistral leg (360) with a first elevator sinistral leg proximal end (362) and a first elevator sinistral leg distal end (364), wherein the first elevator sinistral leg proximal end (362) is rotably connected to the first sinistral leg (310);
ii) a first elevator dextral leg (370) with a first elevator dextral leg proximal end (372) and a first elevator dextral leg distal end (374), wherein the first elevator dextral leg proximal end (372) is rotably connected to the first dextral leg (320);
iii) wherein the first ridge member elevator (350) elevates the ridge member (100) above a roof ridge so that a first elevator ridge member offset (352) is a vertical distance from the lowest point of the ridge member (100) to the furthest vertical projection of the first elevator dextral leg proximal end (372), and the first elevator ridge member offset (352) is at least ten percent of the mast length (230); and
iv) wherein the first ridge member elevator (350) has a first elevator spread (354) defined as the horizontal distance between the point at which the first elevator sinistral leg proximal end (362) is rotably connected to the first sinistral leg (310) and the point at which the first elevator dextral leg proximal end (372) is rotably connected to the first dextral leg (320), and the first elevator spread (354) is at least five times the mast diameter (240); and
b) the second roof mounting assembly (400) further includes a second ridge member elevator (450) having:
i) a second elevator sinistral leg (460) with a second elevator sinistral leg proximal end (462) and a second elevator sinistral leg distal end (464), wherein the second elevator sinistral leg proximal end (462) is rotably connected to the second sinistral leg (410);
ii) a second elevator dextral leg (470) with a second elevator dextral leg proximal end (472) and a second elevator dextral leg distal end (474), wherein the second elevator dextral leg proximal end (472) is rotably connected to the second dextral leg (420);
iii) wherein the second ridge member elevator (450) elevates the ridge member (100) above a roof ridge so that a second elevator ridge member offset (452) is a vertical distance from the lowest point of the ridge member (100) to the furthest vertical projection of the second elevator dextral leg proximal end (472), and the second elevator ridge member offset (452) is at least ten percent of the mast length (230); and
iv) wherein the second ridge member elevator (450) has a second elevator spread (454) defined as the horizontal distance between the point at which the second elevator sinistral leg proximal end (462) is rotably connected to the second sinistral leg (410) and the point at which the second elevator dextral leg proximal end (472) is rotably connected to the second dextral leg (420), and the second elevator spread (454) is at least five times the mast diameter (240).
3. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 2, further including:
a) a first elevator connection region (380) joined to the first elevator sinistral leg (360), the first elevator dextral leg (370), and the ridge member (100); and
b) a second elevator connection region (480) joined to the second elevator sinistral leg (460), the second elevator dextral leg (470), and the ridge member (100).
4. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 3, wherein:
a) the first elevator connection region (380) totally encloses a portion of the ridge member (100) between the ridge member midpoint (132) and the ridge member proximal end (110); and
b) the second elevator connection region (480) totally encloses a portion of the ridge member (100) between the ridge member midpoint (132) and the ridge member distal end (120).
5. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 4, wherein the ridge member (100) has a ridge member profile (140), and wherein:
a) the first elevator connection region (380) is formed with a first connection region opening (382) having a first connection region opening profile (384) that cooperates with the ridge member profile (140) such that the first elevator connection region (380) is slid over a portion of the ridge member (100) and prevents rotation of the ridge member (100); and
b) the second elevator connection region (480) is formed with a second connection region opening (482) having a second connection region opening profile (484) that cooperates with the ridge member profile (140) such that the second elevator connection region (480) is slid over a portion of the ridge member (100) and prevents rotation of the ridge member (100).
6. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 5, wherein the first elevator sinistral leg (360), the first elevator dextral leg (370), and the first elevator connection region (380) are integrally formed from a single piece of material, and the second elevator sinistral leg (460), the second elevator dextral leg (470), and the second elevator connection region (480) are integrally formed from a second single piece of material.
7. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 1, further including a third roof mounting assembly (500) having a third sinistral leg (510) and a third dextral leg (520), wherein the third roof mounting assembly (500) is joined to the ridge member (100) near the ridge member midpoint (132), and the third sinistral leg (510) and the third dextral leg (520) extend in opposite directions from the ridge member (100) to secure the assembly (50) to the roof.
8. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 2, further including a third roof mounting assembly (500) having a third sinistral leg (510) and a third dextral leg (520), wherein the third roof mounting assembly (500) is joined to the ridge member (100) near the ridge member midpoint (132), and the third sinistral leg (510) and the third dextral leg (520) extend in opposite directions from the ridge member (100) to secure the assembly (50) to the roof, wherein the third roof mounting assembly (500) further includes a third ridge member primary elevator (550) having:
a) a third primary elevator sinistral leg (560) with a third primary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (562) and a third primary elevator sinistral leg distal end (564), wherein the third primary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (562) is rotably connected to the third sinistral leg (510);
b) a third primary elevator dextral leg (570) with a third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572) and a third primary elevator dextral leg distal end (574), wherein the s third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572) is rotably connected to the third dextral leg (520);
c) a third primary elevator connection region (580) joined to the third primary elevator sinistral leg (560), the third primary elevator dextral leg (570), and the ridge member (100);
d) wherein the third ridge member primary elevator (550) elevates the ridge member (100) above a roof ridge so that a third primary elevator ridge member offset (552) is a vertical distance from the lowest point of the ridge member (100) to the furthest vertical projection of the third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572), and the third primary elevator ridge member offset (552) is at least ten percent of the mast length (230); and
e) wherein the third ridge member primary elevator (550) has a third primary elevator spread (554) defined as the horizontal distance between the point at which the third primary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (562) is rotably connected to the third sinistral leg (510) and the point at which the third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572) is rotably connected to the third dextral leg (520), and the third primary elevator spread (554) is at least five times the mast diameter (240).
9. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 8, further including a third ridge member secondary elevator (650) having:
a) a third secondary elevator sinistral leg (660) with a third secondary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (662) and a third secondary elevator sinistral leg distal end (664), wherein the third secondary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (662) is rotably connected to the third sinistral leg (510);
b) a third secondary elevator dextral leg (670) with a third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672) and a third secondary elevator dextral leg distal end (674), wherein the third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672) is rotably connected to the third dextral leg (520);
c) a third secondary elevator connection region (680) joined to the third secondary elevator sinistral leg (660), the third secondary elevator dextral leg (670), and the ridge member (100);
d) wherein the third ridge member secondary elevator (650) elevates the ridge member (100) above a roof ridge so that a third secondary elevator ridge member offset (652) is a vertical distance from the lowest point of the ridge member (100) to the furthest vertical projection of the third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672), and the third secondary elevator ridge member offset (652) is at least ten percent of the mast length (230); and
e) wherein the third ridge member secondary elevator (650) has a third secondary elevator spread (654) defined as the horizontal distance between the point at which the third secondary elevator sinistral leg proximal end (662) is rotably connected to the third sinistral leg (510) and the point at which the third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672) is rotably connected to the third dextral leg (520), and the third secondary elevator spread (654) is at least five times the mast diameter (240).
10. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 9, wherein the rotable connection of the third dextral leg (520) to both the third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572) and the third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672) includes a third roof mounting assembly vibration damper (530).
11. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 10, wherein the third roof mounting assembly vibration damper (530) includes a primary damper (532) between the third primary elevator dextral leg proximal end (572) and the third dextral leg (520), and a secondary damper (534) between the third secondary elevator dextral leg proximal end (672) and the third dextral leg (520).
12. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 9, wherein:
a) the third ridge member primary elevator (550) further includes a third primary elevator mast connection region (590);
b) the third ridge member secondary elevator (650) further includes a third secondary elevator mast connection region (690); and
c) the mast (200) is secured to the third primary elevator mast connection region (590) and the third secondary elevator mast connection region (690).
13. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 12, wherein:
a) the third primary elevator connection region (580) totally encloses a portion of the ridge member (100) between the ridge member midpoint (132) and the ridge member proximal end (110); and
b) the third secondary elevator connection region (680) totally encloses a portion of the ridge member (100) between the ridge member midpoint (132) and the ridge member distal end (120).
14. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 13, wherein the ridge member (100) has a ridge member profile (140), and wherein:
a) the third primary elevator connection region (580) is formed with a third primary connection region opening (582) having a third primary connection region opening profile (584) that cooperates with the ridge member profile (140) such that the third primary elevator connection region (580) is slid over a portion of the ridge member (100) and prevents rotation of the ridge member (100); and
b) the third secondary elevator connection region (680) is formed with a third secondary connection region opening (682) having a third secondary connection region opening profile (684) that cooperates with the ridge member profile (140) such that the third secondary elevator connection region (680) is slid over a portion of the ridge member (100) and prevents rotation of the ridge member (100).
15. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 14, wherein the third primary elevator sinistral leg (560), the third primary elevator dextral leg (570), the third primary elevator connection region (580), and the third primary elevator mast connection region (590) are integrally formed from a single piece of material, and the third secondary elevator sinistral leg (660), the third secondary elevator dextral leg (670), the third secondary elevator connection region (680), and the third secondary elevator mast connection region (690) are integrally formed from a second single piece of material.
16. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 1, wherein the ridge member length (130) is greater than or equal to the mast length (230).
17. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 1, wherein the first sinistral leg (310) and the first dextral leg (320) are separated by a first pitch angle (325), and the second sinistral leg (410) and the second dextral leg (420) by a second pitch angle (425).
18. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 17, wherein the first pitch angle (325) and the second pitch angle (425) are between 70 degrees and 140 degrees.
19. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 2, wherein:
a) the first elevator sinistral leg (360) and the first elevator dextral leg (370) are separated by a first elevator pitch angle (375); and
b) the second elevator sinistral leg (460) and the second elevator dextral leg (470) are separated by a second elevator pitch angle (475).
20. The wind turbine mounting assembly (50) of claim 19, wherein the first elevator pitch angle (375) and the second elevator pitch angle (475) are between 70 degrees and 140 degrees.
US12/751,585 2009-04-01 2010-03-31 Wind turbine mounting assembly Abandoned US20100252706A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US16558309P true 2009-04-01 2009-04-01
US12/751,585 US20100252706A1 (en) 2009-04-01 2010-03-31 Wind turbine mounting assembly

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/751,585 US20100252706A1 (en) 2009-04-01 2010-03-31 Wind turbine mounting assembly

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100252706A1 true US20100252706A1 (en) 2010-10-07

Family

ID=42825400

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/751,585 Abandoned US20100252706A1 (en) 2009-04-01 2010-03-31 Wind turbine mounting assembly

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20100252706A1 (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
ES2388388A1 (en) * 2012-05-21 2012-10-15 Centro De Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales Y Tecnológicas (C.I.E.M.A.T.) Mounting for instruments on buildings and method for installing same
US20130196165A1 (en) * 2012-01-27 2013-08-01 Amcol International Corporation Hydraulic Barrier Composition and Method of Making the Same
US20130219812A1 (en) * 2012-02-24 2013-08-29 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Solar panel roof-ridge mounting systems and methods
US20160065115A1 (en) * 2014-08-29 2016-03-03 Marcio Pugina Combined solar and wind power generation

Citations (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US249508A (en) * 1881-11-15 Trestle and scaffold
US403636A (en) * 1889-05-21 Scaffolding
US673065A (en) * 1900-11-06 1901-04-30 John A Scott Portable scaffolding.
US1148919A (en) * 1914-09-25 1915-08-03 Ole Nielsen Roof scaffolding-bracket.
US1501998A (en) * 1923-03-12 1924-07-22 Harry C Hanford Radio mast seat
US1770097A (en) * 1928-12-10 1930-07-08 Bede Richard Saxon Chimney-scaffold bracket
US2427679A (en) * 1946-01-05 1947-09-23 Charles O Larson Folding sawhorse
US2439063A (en) * 1945-04-21 1948-04-06 Shur Antenna Mount Inc Bracket for mounting antenna masts
US2439062A (en) * 1945-04-04 1948-04-06 Shur Antenna Mount Inc Antenna mounting bracket
US2439061A (en) * 1944-12-15 1948-04-06 Shur Antenna Mount Inc Antenna mounting
US2597733A (en) * 1951-03-07 1952-05-20 Foster C Jackson Antenna mount
US2733030A (en) * 1956-01-31 hawthorne
US2845243A (en) * 1955-02-11 1958-07-29 Lloyd W Mowers Antenna mount
US2923382A (en) * 1957-07-12 1960-02-02 Heldstab Willard Device for guying masts
US2933165A (en) * 1952-10-16 1960-04-19 Joseph K Rose Adjustable rigid support for masts and towers
US3041024A (en) * 1959-09-17 1962-06-26 Clear Beam Antenna Corp Antenna mount
US3162407A (en) * 1962-07-25 1964-12-22 French Radio Mfg Co Roof mount for tv antennas
US3318559A (en) * 1963-11-15 1967-05-09 Gordon T Mullen Antenna mounting base
US3409256A (en) * 1966-03-07 1968-11-05 Loren D. Burns Antenna roof mount support
US3469809A (en) * 1967-08-14 1969-09-30 David E Reznick Vibration-absorbing base
US3547227A (en) * 1969-08-25 1970-12-15 Herbert F Trevino Sawhorse trestle
US4238001A (en) * 1979-08-09 1980-12-09 Alexander Donald W Knockdown sawhorse bracket construction
US4723128A (en) * 1986-09-04 1988-02-02 Gasque Jr Samuel N Roof mount for dish antenna
US4730698A (en) * 1987-09-28 1988-03-15 Harris James E Foldable sawhorse
US4819006A (en) * 1986-05-08 1989-04-04 Aluminum Company Of America Mount for supporting a parabolic antenna
US4922264A (en) * 1989-04-24 1990-05-01 Fitzgerald Robert M Satellite antenna mounting apparatus with ballast means
US5142293A (en) * 1991-08-29 1992-08-25 Radiation Systems, Inc. Skylight roof mount for satellite antennas
US5143170A (en) * 1991-10-28 1992-09-01 Don Hunt Safety device for roof work
US5779003A (en) * 1997-01-14 1998-07-14 Carty; Walter F. Collapsible sawhorse
US5815996A (en) * 1997-01-31 1998-10-06 Granger; Timothy L. Interior-mounted cover for roof ventilator
US5933123A (en) * 1997-12-03 1999-08-03 Kaul-Tronics, Inc. Combined satellite and terrestrial antenna
US20030205652A1 (en) * 2002-05-06 2003-11-06 Mike Hagan Antenna mounting platform for mounting an antenna to a roof substrate
US6692230B2 (en) * 2001-06-14 2004-02-17 Douglas Spriggs Selsam Balanced, high output, rapid rotation wind turbine (Weathervane multi-rotor windmill)
US6734830B1 (en) * 2002-09-27 2004-05-11 Comazell Bickham Portable adjustable stand for satellite dish antennas
US6786020B2 (en) * 1998-09-03 2004-09-07 Arvo Poldmaa Anchor for safety rope
US6798387B2 (en) * 2001-10-19 2004-09-28 Steven Robert Cockell Secure non-penetrating flat roof mount for a satellite antenna and for use with a ballast
US6824073B1 (en) * 2003-08-20 2004-11-30 Ian Allen Haney Fire protection sprinkler
US6926241B2 (en) * 2001-01-22 2005-08-09 Roofmates, Inc. Roofmates™ roofing accessories
US6929450B2 (en) * 2001-03-20 2005-08-16 James D. Noble Turbine apparatus and method
US7021424B2 (en) * 2004-05-06 2006-04-04 Herman Frank W Support platform
US20080309033A1 (en) * 2007-06-18 2008-12-18 Twardzik Jeffery W Roofing cart
US20090060744A1 (en) * 2007-08-24 2009-03-05 Frenchy Krauss Vertical Axis Self-Breaking Wind Turbine
US7579701B1 (en) * 2008-08-13 2009-08-25 Ronald J White Insulation and power generation system for buildings
US20090237918A1 (en) * 2008-03-24 2009-09-24 Fu-Hung Yang Structure for road lamp with integration of wind power and solar power
US7595565B2 (en) * 2007-08-14 2009-09-29 Jetpro Technology Inc. Do-it-yourself wind power generation wall
US20090243302A1 (en) * 2008-03-05 2009-10-01 Gerd Eisenblaetter Gmbh Optimized rotor for a wind power plant and wind power plant for mounting on a building
US20090315332A1 (en) * 2008-06-19 2009-12-24 Sheikhrezai Reza J Wind energy system with wind speed accelerator and wind catcher

Patent Citations (48)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2733030A (en) * 1956-01-31 hawthorne
US403636A (en) * 1889-05-21 Scaffolding
US249508A (en) * 1881-11-15 Trestle and scaffold
US673065A (en) * 1900-11-06 1901-04-30 John A Scott Portable scaffolding.
US1148919A (en) * 1914-09-25 1915-08-03 Ole Nielsen Roof scaffolding-bracket.
US1501998A (en) * 1923-03-12 1924-07-22 Harry C Hanford Radio mast seat
US1770097A (en) * 1928-12-10 1930-07-08 Bede Richard Saxon Chimney-scaffold bracket
US2439061A (en) * 1944-12-15 1948-04-06 Shur Antenna Mount Inc Antenna mounting
US2439062A (en) * 1945-04-04 1948-04-06 Shur Antenna Mount Inc Antenna mounting bracket
US2439063A (en) * 1945-04-21 1948-04-06 Shur Antenna Mount Inc Bracket for mounting antenna masts
US2427679A (en) * 1946-01-05 1947-09-23 Charles O Larson Folding sawhorse
US2597733A (en) * 1951-03-07 1952-05-20 Foster C Jackson Antenna mount
US2933165A (en) * 1952-10-16 1960-04-19 Joseph K Rose Adjustable rigid support for masts and towers
US2845243A (en) * 1955-02-11 1958-07-29 Lloyd W Mowers Antenna mount
US2923382A (en) * 1957-07-12 1960-02-02 Heldstab Willard Device for guying masts
US3041024A (en) * 1959-09-17 1962-06-26 Clear Beam Antenna Corp Antenna mount
US3162407A (en) * 1962-07-25 1964-12-22 French Radio Mfg Co Roof mount for tv antennas
US3318559A (en) * 1963-11-15 1967-05-09 Gordon T Mullen Antenna mounting base
US3409256A (en) * 1966-03-07 1968-11-05 Loren D. Burns Antenna roof mount support
US3469809A (en) * 1967-08-14 1969-09-30 David E Reznick Vibration-absorbing base
US3547227A (en) * 1969-08-25 1970-12-15 Herbert F Trevino Sawhorse trestle
US4238001A (en) * 1979-08-09 1980-12-09 Alexander Donald W Knockdown sawhorse bracket construction
US4819006A (en) * 1986-05-08 1989-04-04 Aluminum Company Of America Mount for supporting a parabolic antenna
US4723128A (en) * 1986-09-04 1988-02-02 Gasque Jr Samuel N Roof mount for dish antenna
US4730698A (en) * 1987-09-28 1988-03-15 Harris James E Foldable sawhorse
US4922264A (en) * 1989-04-24 1990-05-01 Fitzgerald Robert M Satellite antenna mounting apparatus with ballast means
US4922264B1 (en) * 1989-04-24 1995-11-21 Robert M Fitzgerald Satellite antenna mounting apparatus with ballast means
US5142293A (en) * 1991-08-29 1992-08-25 Radiation Systems, Inc. Skylight roof mount for satellite antennas
US5143170A (en) * 1991-10-28 1992-09-01 Don Hunt Safety device for roof work
US5779003A (en) * 1997-01-14 1998-07-14 Carty; Walter F. Collapsible sawhorse
US5815996A (en) * 1997-01-31 1998-10-06 Granger; Timothy L. Interior-mounted cover for roof ventilator
US5933123A (en) * 1997-12-03 1999-08-03 Kaul-Tronics, Inc. Combined satellite and terrestrial antenna
US6786020B2 (en) * 1998-09-03 2004-09-07 Arvo Poldmaa Anchor for safety rope
US6926241B2 (en) * 2001-01-22 2005-08-09 Roofmates, Inc. Roofmates™ roofing accessories
US6929450B2 (en) * 2001-03-20 2005-08-16 James D. Noble Turbine apparatus and method
US6692230B2 (en) * 2001-06-14 2004-02-17 Douglas Spriggs Selsam Balanced, high output, rapid rotation wind turbine (Weathervane multi-rotor windmill)
US6798387B2 (en) * 2001-10-19 2004-09-28 Steven Robert Cockell Secure non-penetrating flat roof mount for a satellite antenna and for use with a ballast
US20030205652A1 (en) * 2002-05-06 2003-11-06 Mike Hagan Antenna mounting platform for mounting an antenna to a roof substrate
US6734830B1 (en) * 2002-09-27 2004-05-11 Comazell Bickham Portable adjustable stand for satellite dish antennas
US6824073B1 (en) * 2003-08-20 2004-11-30 Ian Allen Haney Fire protection sprinkler
US7021424B2 (en) * 2004-05-06 2006-04-04 Herman Frank W Support platform
US20080309033A1 (en) * 2007-06-18 2008-12-18 Twardzik Jeffery W Roofing cart
US7595565B2 (en) * 2007-08-14 2009-09-29 Jetpro Technology Inc. Do-it-yourself wind power generation wall
US20090060744A1 (en) * 2007-08-24 2009-03-05 Frenchy Krauss Vertical Axis Self-Breaking Wind Turbine
US20090243302A1 (en) * 2008-03-05 2009-10-01 Gerd Eisenblaetter Gmbh Optimized rotor for a wind power plant and wind power plant for mounting on a building
US20090237918A1 (en) * 2008-03-24 2009-09-24 Fu-Hung Yang Structure for road lamp with integration of wind power and solar power
US20090315332A1 (en) * 2008-06-19 2009-12-24 Sheikhrezai Reza J Wind energy system with wind speed accelerator and wind catcher
US7579701B1 (en) * 2008-08-13 2009-08-25 Ronald J White Insulation and power generation system for buildings

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20130196165A1 (en) * 2012-01-27 2013-08-01 Amcol International Corporation Hydraulic Barrier Composition and Method of Making the Same
US9550879B2 (en) * 2012-01-27 2017-01-24 Amcol International Corporation Hydraulic barrier composition and method of making the same
US20130219812A1 (en) * 2012-02-24 2013-08-29 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Solar panel roof-ridge mounting systems and methods
ES2388388A1 (en) * 2012-05-21 2012-10-15 Centro De Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales Y Tecnológicas (C.I.E.M.A.T.) Mounting for instruments on buildings and method for installing same
WO2013175035A1 (en) * 2012-05-21 2013-11-28 Centro De Investigaciones Energéticas,Mdioambientales Y Tecnológicas (C.I.E.M.A.T) Mounting for instruments on buildings and method for installing same
US20160065115A1 (en) * 2014-08-29 2016-03-03 Marcio Pugina Combined solar and wind power generation
US9859839B2 (en) * 2014-08-29 2018-01-02 Marcio Pugina Combined solar and wind power generation

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
JP5623458B2 (en) Photovoltaic (PV) module assembly with support
KR101242505B1 (en) Modular type wind power generation tower
US9394715B2 (en) Lattice tower covering for a wind turbine
JP2009121479A (en) Methods and systems for assembling tower
US20100252706A1 (en) Wind turbine mounting assembly
US20120187698A1 (en) Systems and methods to generate electricity using a flow of air
US8591186B2 (en) Nacelle for wind turbine
JP5856511B2 (en) Pile foundation structure
EP2527556A2 (en) Bolt Connection for a Wind Tower Lattice Structure
KR102142064B1 (en) Photovoltaic panel support structure
KR102010561B1 (en) Inclined Roof Fixed solar device
CA2960443A1 (en) Strut linkage for a steel construction, and steel construction having a strut linkage
JP2004063932A (en) Fixing apparatus and sunlight utilizing apparatus using it
KR101533773B1 (en) Beam-fixing structure for solar cell array of assemble roof
JP4589178B2 (en) Wind power generator and installation method thereof
KR200467819Y1 (en) Structure system for support of solar cell module
KR101730008B1 (en) A frame structure for mounting solar modules
US10480830B2 (en) Support for solar panels
US20090056792A1 (en) Interconnecting support panel providing substantially planar upper surface
JP5313408B1 (en) Solar cell module mounting device
JP4555251B2 (en) Mounting fixture on the roof
JP5067702B1 (en) Solar panel installation structure
CN210396959U (en) Assembled housing support of wind driven generator
WO2012151671A1 (en) Support arm assembly
JP2012043827A (en) Solar cell panel supporting structure

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: WINDENERGY7 LLC, OHIO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HARGIS, SAMUEL PIERCE;REEL/FRAME:024169/0166

Effective date: 20100331

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION