US20100242151A1 - Article Of Apparel With Variable Air Permeability - Google Patents

Article Of Apparel With Variable Air Permeability Download PDF

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US20100242151A1
US20100242151A1 US12/411,961 US41196109A US2010242151A1 US 20100242151 A1 US20100242151 A1 US 20100242151A1 US 41196109 A US41196109 A US 41196109A US 2010242151 A1 US2010242151 A1 US 2010242151A1
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Prior art keywords
textile
air permeability
article
apparel
cm
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Abandoned
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US12/411,961
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Sophie L. Mather
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Nike Inc
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Nike Inc
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Priority to US12/411,961 priority Critical patent/US20100242151A1/en
Assigned to NIKE, INC. reassignment NIKE, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: MATHER, SOPHIE L.
Publication of US20100242151A1 publication Critical patent/US20100242151A1/en
Priority claimed from US13/921,869 external-priority patent/US9700077B2/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D27/00Details of garments or of their making
    • A41D27/28Means for ventilation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D31/00Materials specially adapted for outerwear
    • A41D31/04Materials specially adapted for outerwear characterised by special function or use
    • A41D31/06Thermally protective, e.g. insulating
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D31/00Materials specially adapted for outerwear
    • A41D31/04Materials specially adapted for outerwear characterised by special function or use
    • A41D31/14Air permeable, i.e. capable of being penetrated by gases
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B21/00Warp knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B21/14Fabrics characterised by the incorporation by knitting, in one or more thread, fleece, or fabric layers, of reinforcing, binding, or decorative threads; Fabrics incorporating small auxiliary elements, e.g. for decorative purposes
    • D04B21/16Fabrics characterised by the incorporation by knitting, in one or more thread, fleece, or fabric layers, of reinforcing, binding, or decorative threads; Fabrics incorporating small auxiliary elements, e.g. for decorative purposes incorporating synthetic threads
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D13/00Professional, industrial or sporting protective garments, e.g. surgeons' gowns or garments protecting against blows or punches
    • A41D13/002Professional, industrial or sporting protective garments, e.g. surgeons' gowns or garments protecting against blows or punches with controlled internal environment
    • A41D13/005Professional, industrial or sporting protective garments, e.g. surgeons' gowns or garments protecting against blows or punches with controlled internal environment with controlled temperature
    • A41D13/0053Cooled garments
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L2201/00Properties
    • C08L2201/12Shape memory
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2401/00Physical properties
    • D10B2401/02Moisture-responsive characteristics

Abstract

An article of apparel may include a torso region with a front area, a back area, and a pair of side areas. At least a portion of each of the side areas are formed from a material with (a) a first air permeability when unexposed to water and (b) a second air permeability when exposed to water. The first air permeability may be less than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D 737, and the second air permeability may be greater than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D 737. In some configurations, at least a portion of the back area may be formed from the material. The article of apparel may be a shirt, and the article of apparel may include arm regions that extend outward from the torso region.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • As an individual engages in an athletic activity, including either practice sessions or competitions, the temperature of the individual may increase as time proceeds and the level of athletic activity increases. Many articles of apparel are designed to moderate or delay increases in the temperature of the individual. As an example, the apparel may incorporate materials that are specifically selected to promote cooling of the skin temperature of the individual. Commonly, such materials (e.g., a mesh textile) may exhibit a relatively high air permeability that permits air to enter the apparel through the material and circulate between the apparel and the individual, thereby convecting heat away from the individual.
  • SUMMARY
  • Various configurations of an article of apparel are disclosed below. In general, the article of apparel may include a torso region with a front area, a back area, and a pair of side areas. At least a portion of each of the side areas are formed from a material with (a) a first air permeability when unexposed to water and (b) a second air permeability when exposed to water. The first air permeability is less than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D737, and the second air permeability is greater than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D737. In some configurations, at least a portion of the back area is formed from the material. The article of apparel may be a shirt, and the article of apparel may include arm regions that extend outward from the torso region.
  • The advantages and features of novelty characterizing aspects of the invention are pointed out with particularity in the appended claims. To gain an improved understanding of the advantages and features of novelty, however, reference may be made to the following descriptive matter and accompanying figures that describe and illustrate various configurations and concepts related to the invention.
  • FIGURE DESCRIPTIONS
  • The foregoing Summary and the following Detailed Description will be better understood when read in conjunction with the accompanying figures.
  • FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of an article of apparel incorporating a textile with a variable air permeability.
  • FIG. 2 is a rear elevational view of the article of apparel.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B are schematic top plan views of a portion of the textile with a variable air permeability.
  • FIGS. 4A-4F are rear elevational views of further configurations of the article of apparel.
  • FIG. 5 is a front elevational view of another article of apparel incorporating the textile with a variable air permeability.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The following discussion and accompanying figures disclose various articles of apparel that incorporate a material (e.g., a textile) with a variable air permeability. When the material is dry or otherwise unexposed to water, the air permeability of the material is at a minimum. When the material is wet or otherwise exposed to water (e.g., due to perspiration from the wearer), however, the air permeability increases and allows a greater volume of air to flow through the apparel. The ability of air to flow through the material changes, therefore, depending upon whether the material is relatively dry or relatively wet. Moreover, the variable air permeability permits greater quantities of air to enter the apparel to remove water from perspiration when the perspiration is present, but restricts the quantity of air that enters the apparel when the perspiration is absent.
  • General Apparel Configuration
  • An article of apparel 100 is depicted in FIGS. 1 and 2 as including a torso region 110 and a pair of arm regions 120 that extend outward from torso region 110. Whereas torso region 110 corresponds with a torso of an individual wearing apparel 100 and covers at least a portion of the torso when worn, arm regions 120 respectively correspond with arms of the individual and cover at least a portion of the arms when apparel 100 is worn. Apparel 100 is depicted in FIGS. 1 and 2 as having the configuration of a shirt-type garment, particularly a short-sleeved shirt. In general, shirt-type garments cover a portion of a torso of the individual and may extend over arms of the individual. In further examples, apparel having the general structure of apparel 100 and incorporating concepts discussed below for apparel 100 may have the configuration of other shirt-type garments, including various long-sleeved shirts, tank tops, undershirts, jackets, or coats.
  • Torso region 110 may be divided into various areas for purposes of reference, including a front area 111, a back area 112, and a pair of side areas 113. Front area 111 generally corresponds with a chest and front abdomen of an individual wearing apparel 100. Back area 112 generally corresponds with a back of the individual. Similarly, side areas 113 generally correspond with sides of the individual. Whereas front area 111 is positioned opposite back area 112, side areas 113 extend between or separate portions of front area 111 and back area 112. Areas 111-113 are not intended to demarcate precise areas of apparel 100. Rather, areas 111-113 are intended to represent general areas of apparel 100 to aid in the following discussion.
  • An upper portion of torso region 110 defines a neck opening 114 through which the neck and head of the individual protrude when apparel 100 is worn. A lower area of torso region 110 defines a waist opening 115 through which the waist or pelvic area of the individual protrudes when apparel 100 is worn. In addition, torso region 110 defines a pair of arm openings 116 through which the arms of the individual protrude when apparel 100 is worn. Arm regions 120 extend outward from torso region 110 and, more particularly, extend outward from arm openings 116. Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the locations of arm openings 116 are depicted as corresponding with seams that join each of arm regions 120 to torso region 110. That is, arm openings 116 correspond with seams that join textile elements (or other material elements) from each of arm regions 120 to textile elements forming torso region 110. In some configurations of apparel 100, arm regions 120 may be joined to torso region 110 in a seamless manner. Each of arm regions 120 define an opening 121, located opposite arm openings 116, through which the hands, wrists, or arms of the wearer protrude when apparel 100 is worn.
  • Apparel 100 is formed from a plurality of textile or other material elements that are joined in a conventional manner (i.e., stitching, adhesive bonding, heat bonding) to form torso region 110 and arm regions 120. Referring to the configuration depicted in FIGS. 1 and 2, a majority of front area 111, back area 112, and arm regions 120 are formed from substantially conventional textile or other material elements. That is, front area 111, back area 112, and arm regions 120 may be formed from woven, knitted, or non-woven textiles formed from cotton, polyester, rayon, or a variety of other natural or synthetic materials that are conventionally utilized in articles of apparel. In some configurations, portions of torso region 110 and arm regions 120 may be formed from non-textiles (e.g., polymer sheets) or layered materials that include combinations of textile and/or other material layers. Additionally, zippers, buttons, or pockets may be incorporated into apparel 100.
  • Although conventional textiles or other conventional materials may be utilized in apparel 100, portions of back area 112 and side areas 113 are at least partially formed from various elements of a textile 130. For purposes of reference in FIGS. 1 and 2, as well as other figures, textile 130 is depicted as having a stippled or otherwise dotted appearance to distinguish textile 130 from other materials forming apparel 100. An advantage of textile 130 over various conventional textiles and other materials relates to air permeability. More particularly, the air permeability of textile 130 changes depending upon whether textile 130 is unexposed to water (i.e., relatively dry) or exposed to water (i.e., damp, wet, saturated). In general, the air permeability of textile 130 when unexposed to water is less the air permeability of textile 130 when exposed to water. Accordingly, (a) when textile 130 is dry, the air permeability of textile 130 is at a minimum and (b) when textile 130 is damp, wet, or saturated with water, the air permeability of textile 130 is at a maximum.
  • Variable Air Permeable Textile
  • As discussed in the Background section above, many articles of apparel incorporate materials that are specifically selected to promote cooling of the individual, and such materials may exhibit a relatively high air permeability that (a) convects heat away from the individual and (b) promotes evaporative cooling through the removal of perspiration. Mesh materials, which are commonly used to permit air to circulate between the apparel and the individual, exhibit a relatively constant air permeability. That is, mesh materials exhibit a relatively high air permeability as an individual is resting, warming-up, engaging in an athletic activity, and warming-down. Although mesh materials promote cooling when the individual is engaging in the athletic activity, mesh materials may also promote cooling during times when the individual may be concerned with conserving heat (e.g., during resting, warm-up, and warm-down periods). Accordingly, the relatively constant air permeability of mesh materials may promote cooling at times when a decrease in temperature is not beneficial or desired by the individual.
  • Whereas mesh materials exhibit a relatively constant air permeability, the air permeability of textile 130 increases when exposed to water, including perspiration. In general, the volume of perspiration increases as the temperature increases. Given that the perspiration will be absorbed or otherwise contact textile 130, the air permeability of textile 130 will effectively increase as the temperature increases. During times when the individual is not perspiring significantly (e.g., during resting, warm-up, and warm-down periods), the air permeability of textile 130 will be relatively low or at a minimum. When the individual is engaging in an athletic activity and perspiring, however, the air permeability of textile 130 will increase to allow air flow through apparel 100 that (a) convects heat away from the individual and (b) promotes evaporative cooling through the removal of perspiration.
  • Textile 130 is depicted in FIGS. 3A and 3B as having the configuration of a knitted fabric formed from one or more yarns 131. In general, knitting involves forming intermeshed loops from one of yarns 131 or multiple yarns 131. In production, knitting machines may be programmed to mechanically-manipulate yarns 131 into the configuration of textile 130. That is, textile 130 may be formed by mechanically-manipulating one or more yarns 131 to form a one-piece textile element. Two major categories of knitting techniques are weft-knitting and warp-knitting. Whereas a weft-knit fabric utilizes a single yarn within each course, a warp-knit fabric utilizes a different yarn for every stitch in a course. Although textile 131 may be formed through a variety of different knitting processes, advantages of warp knitting are a more secure structure, relatively easy methods to form apertures or other holes in the fabric, and relatively easy methods to form stretch fabrics that benefit athletic apparel. Examples of specific knitting processes that may be utilized for textile 130 include flat knitting, wide tube circular knitting, narrow tube circular knit jacquard, single knit circular knit jacquard, double knit circular knit jacquard, and warp knit jacquard. In some configurations, textile 130 may be formed from a non-woven material, a woven textile, or an intertwined and twisted textile.
  • Yarns 131 are formed from one or more filaments or fibers that experience a dimensional transformation when exposed to water. In other words, the dimensions (i.e., one or both of the length and thickness) of yarns 131 change when textile 130 is exposed to water. The dimensional transformation of yarns 131 has an effect upon the structure of textile 130. More particularly, the dimensional transformation of yarns 131 modifies the structure of textile 130 such that various apertures 132 between portions of yarns 131 increase in area. Referring to FIG. 3A, a portion of textile 130 is depicted as being unexposed to water, and the various apertures 132 are relatively small. Referring to FIG. 3B, the portion of textile 130 is depicted as being exposed to water. In this state, yarns 131 transform dimensionally (i.e., increased in length and thickness) such that apertures 132 are increased in area. Exposing textile 130 to water has, therefore, the effects of (a) changing the dimensions of yarns 131 and (b) increasing the area of various apertures 132 between portions of yarns 131. Moreover, increasing the area of apertures 132 has the effect of increasing the air permeability of textile 130.
  • A variety of materials that transform dimensionally in the presence of water may be utilized for yarns 131. For example, at least a portion of the filaments or fibers in yarns 131 may be formed of a moisture-absorptive polyester material, such as the various moisture-absorptive polyester materials manufactured by Tejin Fibers Limited of Japan. In some configurations, yarns 131 may be entirely formed from moisture-absorptive materials. In other configurations, yarns 131 may be formed from combinations of both moisture-absorptive materials and non-moisture-absorptive materials. For example, yarns 131 may be formed from 50 percent moisture-absorptive polyester materials and 50 percent non-moisture-absorptive polyester materials. As a more specific example, yarns 131 may be a semi-dull cationic polyester 50 percent and nylon 50 percent side-by-side conjugate yarn with a 75 denier, 24 filament structure. Other relatively non-moisture-absorptive polymer fibers or filaments may also be utilized, such as rayon, nylon, and polyacrylic. In addition, silk, cotton, or wool may be utilized in yarns 131. Accordingly, a wide range of materials are suitable for the various yarns 131, but at least a portion of the materials transform dimensionally in the presence of water.
  • Although textile 130 may incorporate yarns 131, which include a material that transforms dimensionally in the presence of water, yarns from textiles utilized in other portions of apparel 100 may be primarily formed from materials that do not significantly transform dimensionally in the presence of water. Apparel 100 may, therefore, incorporate textiles that react differently to water, and these textiles may be joined to each other (e.g., at seams) in each of back area 112 and side areas 113.
  • Physiological research indicates that air permeable materials located in side areas and along a back area of a shirt-type garment provide more effective ventilatory cooling for an individual than garments with air permeable materials in other locations. In addition to decreasing the temperature of the individual, the ventilatory cooling also moderates or delays increases in the temperature of the individual when engaging in athletic activities. During athletic activities, the individual may release a significant amount of excess heat in the center back area, and increased air flow in this region effectively (a) convects heat away from the individual and (b) promotes evaporative cooling through the removal of perspiration. Moreover, air permeable materials located in the side areas improves the intake and exhaust of air when the individual is moving in a forward or lateral direction. When air permeable materials are located in the side areas and along the back area of a shirt-type garment, air flows into the shirt-type garment at the side areas, flows around to the back area, and flows out of the shirt-type garment to decrease the temperature through both convection and evaporative cooling.
  • Physiological research also indicates that materials with an air permeability greater than 279 cm3/second per cm2 (i.e., approximately 550 ft3/minute per ft2) are effective at decreasing the skin temperature of the individual, which may promote overall cooling of the individual. Similarly, materials with an air permeability less than 279 cm3/second per cm2 are less effective at reducing the skin temperature of an individual. As discussed above, textile 130 has a variable air permeability depending upon whether textile 130 is exposed or unexposed to water. During times when the individual is not perspiring significantly, the air permeability of textile 130 will be less than 279 cm3/second per cm2 to retain heat. When the individual is engaging in an athletic activity and perspiring, however, the air permeability of textile 130 will increase to greater than 279 cm3/second per cm2 to allow air flow through apparel 100 that effectively decreases the skin temperature of the individual. Accordingly, textile 130 exhibits (a) a first air permeability when unexposed to water, the first air permeability being less than 279 cm3/second per cm2 and (b) a second air permeability when exposed to water, the second air permeability being greater than 279 cm3/second per cm2. ASTM International of Conshohocken, Pa. in the United States of America issued ASTM D 737, entitled Standard Test Method For Air Permeability Of Textile Fabrics, which provides a suitable test for determining the air permeability of a textile, although various other methods of measuring air permeability are known and may be utilized. In general, ASTM D 737 utilizes a pressure differential of 125 Pa (i.e., 0.0209 LB/FT2) when determining the air permeability.
  • Textile 130 has a variable air permeability depending upon whether textile 130 is exposed to water or unexposed to water. As discussed above, the air permeability is greater than 279 cm3/second per cm2 when exposed to water, and less than 279 cm3/second per cm2 when unexposed to water, as tested in accordance with ASTM D 737 or other test methods. The degree to which the air permeability of textile 130 changes may, however, vary significantly. In some configurations of textile 130, the air permeability may be 280 cm3/second per cm2 when exposed to water and 278 cm3/second per cm2 when unexposed to water, which is a differential of 2 cm3/second per cm2. In other configurations of textile 130, the differential may be at least 10 cm3/second per cm2, at least 50 cm3/second per cm2, or at least 100 cm3/second per cm2, for example. Given that the variable air permeability of textile 130 produces differences in the degree to which the skin temperature of the individual is cooled, differentials of at least 50 cm3/second per cm2 or at least 100 cm3/second per cm2 impart effective differences in air flow through back area 112 and side areas 113.
  • The volume of air flow through back area 112 and side areas 113 also depends upon the areas of textile 130 in each of back area 112 and side areas 113. In general, as the area of textile 130 increases, the volume of air flow through back area 112 and side areas 113 also increases. Accordingly, greater air flow is produced by incorporating larger elements of textile 130 into apparel 100. A suitable area of textile 130 in each of back area 112 and side areas 113 is at least 77 cm2 (i.e., approximately 12 in2), although the area of textile 130 in each of back area 112 and side areas 113 may also be at least 232 cm2 (i.e., approximately 36 in2).
  • In addition to overall area, the widths of the various elements of textile 130 may also have an effect upon the volume of air flow. For configurations of apparel 100 intended for either men or women, a suitable minimum width of textile 130 in back area 112 ranges from 10-15 centimeters (i.e., approximately 4-6 inches). For configurations of apparel 100 intended for men, a suitable minimum width of textile 130 in side areas 113 is 10 centimeters (i.e., approximately 4 inches). Additionally, for configurations of apparel 100 intended for women, a suitable minimum width of textile 130 in side areas 113 is 7.5 centimeters (i.e., approximately 3 inches).
  • Based upon the above discussion, apparel 100 incorporates a material with (a) a first air permeability when unexposed to water, the first air permeability being less than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D 737 and (b) a second air permeability when exposed to water, the second air permeability being greater than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D 737. The material may be located in any or all of back area 112 and side areas 113, and the material may be a textile that includes yarns that transform dimensionally in the presence of water. U.S. Patent Application Publication 2005/0204449 to Baron, et al., which is incorporated herein by reference, discloses additional information, features, or configurations that may be utilized for either of apparel 100 and textile 130.
  • Further Apparel Configurations
  • Apparel 100, as depicted in FIGS. 1 and 3, exhibits an example of a configuration for a shirt-type garment that incorporates textile 130. Apparel 100 or other articles of apparel incorporating textile 130 may, however, have a variety of other configurations. Referring to FIG. 4A, apparel 100 has a configuration wherein textile 130 is located in each of side areas 113, but is absent from back area 112. An opposite configuration is depicted in FIG. 4B, wherein textile 130 is located in back area 112, but is absent from each of side areas 113. The shapes of the elements of textile 130 may also vary significantly. Whereas the elements of textile 130 in FIGS. 1 and 2 have a generally elongate configuration with curved edges that extend in a vertical direction, FIG. 4C depicts a configuration wherein the elements of textile 130 have rectangular shapes with straight edges, but the elements of textile 130 may also be circular, elliptical, triangular, square, pentagonal, hexagonal, or a variety of other regular, non-regular or irregular shapes.
  • In FIGS. 1 and 2, the element of textile 130 in back area 112 extends from neck opening 114 to waist opening 115, and the elements of textile 130 in side areas 113 extend from each of arm openings 116 to waist opening 115. The configuration of apparel 100 depicted in FIG. 4C exhibits a configuration wherein the elements of textile 130 are spaced from neck opening 114, waist opening 115, and arm openings 116. Although the elements of textile 130 are spaced from openings 114, 115, and 116, the element of textile 130 in back area 112 is depicted as extending through approximately eighty-five percent of a distance between neck opening 114 and waist opening 115, and the elements of textile 130 in side areas 113 are depicted as extending through approximately eighty percent of a distance between arm openings 116 and waist opening 115. In other configurations, textile 130 may extend through at least twenty percent, at least fifty percent, or at least seventy percent of the distances between openings 114, 115, and 116. As discussed above, the volume of air flow through back area 112 and side areas 113 partially depends upon the areas of textile 130 in each of back area 112 and side areas 113. An advantage to configurations where the elements of textile 130 extend through at least fifty percent of the distances between openings 114, 115, and 116 is that apparel 100 generally has sufficient air flow to promote cooling of the skin temperature of the individual. FIG. 4D depicts another configuration of apparel 100, wherein multiple generally circular or elliptical elements of textile 130 are located in back area 112 and side areas 113. In this configuration, the multiple elements of textile 130 cooperatively extend through a majority of the distances between openings 114, 115, and 116.
  • Apparel 100 is depicted in FIGS. 1 and 2 as having the configuration of a shirt-type garment, particularly a short-sleeved shirt. Referring to FIG. 4E, apparel 100 has the configuration of a long-sleeved shirt. Although this configuration of apparel 100 includes textile 130 in back area 112 and each of side areas 113, additional elements of textile 130 are located in arm regions 120. Accordingly, textile 130 may be located in various areas of apparel 100, in addition to back area 112 and each of side areas 113. Referring to FIG. 4F, apparel 100 has the configuration of a tank top, in which arm regions 120 are absent. As with other configurations of apparel 100, however, this configuration includes textile 130 in back area 112 and each of side areas 113. In further configurations, apparel having the general structure of apparel 100 and incorporating concepts discussed above for apparel 100 may have the configuration of other shirt-type garments, including undershirts, jackets, or coats.
  • As another example of an apparel configuration, an article of apparel 200 having the configuration of a pants-type garment is depicted in FIG. 5. Apparel 200 includes a pelvic region 201 and a pair of leg regions 202 that extend downward from pelvic region 201. Pelvic region 201 corresponds with a pelvic area of a wearer and covers at least a portion of the pelvic area when worn. An upper area of pelvic region 201 defines a waist opening 203 that extends around the waist when apparel 200 is worn. Leg regions 202 correspond with a right leg and a left leg of the wearer and cover at least a portion of the legs. Each of leg regions 202 define an ankle opening 204 through which a foot and ankle of the wearer protrude when apparel 200 is worn. As with apparel 100, apparel 200 includes various elements of textile 130. More particularly, the elements of textile 130 are located in the sides of pelvic region 201, in the thigh-areas of leg regions 202, and on the sides of lower portions of leg regions 202, but may also be located in other areas. Accordingly, apparel incorporating textile 130 may also have the configurations of other types of apparel.
  • The above discussion of apparel 100 relates to the use of apparel 100 during various athletic activities, which includes both practice sessions and competitions. Although apparel 100 or other articles of apparel incorporating the concepts discussed above may be utilized for athletic activities, apparel 100 may also be utilized during various non-athletic activities to promote cooling of the temperature of an individual. During a variety of non-athletic activities (e.g., driving, shopping, gardening, reading, etc.), the skin temperature of the individual may rise as the exertion level or various environmental factors (e.g., temperature, humidity) increase, and apparel similar to apparel 100 may be worn to promote cooling. Accordingly, articles of apparel that incorporate textile 130 may be manufactured and utilized for a variety of activities, whether athletic or non-athletic.
  • The invention is disclosed above and in the accompanying figures with reference to a variety of configurations. The purpose served by the disclosure, however, is to provide an example of the various features and concepts related to the invention, not to limit the scope of the invention. One skilled in the relevant art will recognize that numerous variations and modifications may be made to the configurations described above without departing from the scope of the present invention, as defined by the appended claims.

Claims (25)

1. An article of apparel comprising a torso region with a front area, a back area, and a pair of side areas, at least a portion of each of the side areas being formed from a material with:
a first air permeability when unexposed to water, the first air permeability being less than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D 737; and
a second air permeability when exposed to water, the second air permeability being greater than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D 737.
2. The article of apparel recited in claim 1, wherein the apparel is a shirt and includes a pair of arm regions extending from the torso region.
3. The article of apparel recited in claim 1, wherein at least a portion of the back area is formed from the material.
4. The article of apparel recited in claim 3, wherein the material has an elongate configuration that extends in a vertical direction along the side areas and in the back area.
5. The article of apparel recited in claim 1, wherein the material is a warp knit textile.
6. The article of apparel recited in claim 1, wherein a difference between the first air permeability and the second air permeability is at least 50 cm3/second per cm2.
7. The article of apparel recited in claim 1, wherein a difference between the first air permeability and the second air permeability is at least 100 cm3/second per cm2.
8. The article of apparel recited in claim 1, wherein the material has an elongate configuration that extends in a vertical direction along the side areas.
9. The article of apparel recited in claim 1, wherein an area of the material in each of the side areas is at least 77 cm2.
10. The article of apparel recited in claim 1, wherein an area of the material in each of the side areas is at least 232 cm2.
11. An article of apparel comprising a torso region with a front area, a back area, and a pair of side areas, each of the side areas being formed from at least:
a first textile incorporating a yarn that exhibits a dimensional transformation upon exposure to water, the first textile having:
a first air permeability when unexposed to the water, the first air permeability being less than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D 737, and
a second air permeability when exposed to the water, the second air permeability being greater than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D 737; and
a second textile incorporating a yarn that is substantially dimensionally-stable upon exposure to water,
the first textile and the second textile being joined to each other in each of the side areas.
12. The article of apparel recited in claim 11, wherein the apparel is a shirt and includes a pair of arm regions extending from the torso region.
13. The article of apparel recited in claim 11, wherein at least a portion of the back area is formed from the first textile.
14. The article of apparel recited in claim 13, wherein elements of the first textile have elongate configurations that extend in a vertical direction along the side areas and in the back area.
15. The article of apparel recited in claim 11, wherein the first textile is a warp knit textile.
16. The article of apparel recited in claim 11, wherein a difference between the first air permeability and the second air permeability is at least 50 cm3/second per cm2.
17. The article of apparel recited in claim 11, wherein a difference between the first air permeability and the second air permeability is at least 100 cm3/second per cm2.
18. The article of apparel recited in claim 11, wherein elements of the first textile have elongate configurations that extend in a vertical direction along the side areas.
19. The article of apparel recited in claim 11, wherein an area of the first textile in each of the side areas is at least 77 cm2.
20. The article of apparel recited in claim 11, wherein an area of the first textile in each of the side areas is at least 232 cm2.
21. An article of apparel comprising a torso region having a front area, a back area located opposite the front area, and a pair of side areas that define arm openings, and the torso region having a neck opening and an opposite waist opening, the torso region being formed from at least a first textile and a second textile, the first textile forming:
a pair of side elements that are located in the side areas and extend through at least fifty percent of a distance between the arm openings and the waist opening; and
a back element that is centrally-located in the back area and extends through at least fifty percent of a distance between the neck opening and the waist opening,
the first textile incorporating a yarn that exhibits a dimensional transformation upon exposure to water, the first textile having:
a first air permeability when unexposed to the water, the first air permeability being less than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D 737; and
a second air permeability when exposed to the water, the second air permeability being greater than 279 cm3/second per cm2 measured in accordance with ASTM D 737.
22. The article of apparel recited in claim 21, wherein the apparel is a shirt and includes a pair of arm regions extending from the arm openings of the torso region.
23. The article of apparel recited in claim 21, wherein the first textile is a warp knit textile.
24. The article of apparel recited in claim 21, wherein a difference between the first air permeability and the second air permeability is at least 50 cm3/second per cm2.
25. The article of apparel recited in claim 21, wherein an area of the back element and each of the side elements is at least 77 cm2.
US12/411,961 2009-03-26 2009-03-26 Article Of Apparel With Variable Air Permeability Abandoned US20100242151A1 (en)

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PCT/US2010/024903 WO2010110979A1 (en) 2009-03-26 2010-02-22 Article of apparel with variable air permeability
EP10712596A EP2410883A1 (en) 2009-03-26 2010-02-22 Article of apparel with variable air permeability
CN201080012549.2A CN102355828B (en) 2009-03-26 2010-02-22 Article of apparel with variable air permeability
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