US20100237068A1 - Container With In-Molded Exposed Panel - Google Patents

Container With In-Molded Exposed Panel Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100237068A1
US20100237068A1 US12405887 US40588709A US2010237068A1 US 20100237068 A1 US20100237068 A1 US 20100237068A1 US 12405887 US12405887 US 12405887 US 40588709 A US40588709 A US 40588709A US 2010237068 A1 US2010237068 A1 US 2010237068A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
skeleton
base
bottom
panel structure
container
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12405887
Inventor
Kenneth W. Hull
Larry T. McKinney
Michael J. Orroth
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Rubbermaid Inc
Original Assignee
Rubbermaid Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D25/00Details of other kinds or types of rigid or semi-rigid containers

Abstract

A container has a base bottom and a base side wall extending up from and circumferentially around a perimeter of the base bottom. The base side wall terminates at an upper end with a top opening at the upper end into an interior of the container. The base side wall is formed in part by a molded plastic skeleton and in part by at least a wall section of a pre-formed panel structure in-molded with and carried by the skeleton. The wall section is joined to the skeleton along perimeter edges of the panel structure. Portions of both an inner surface and an outer surface of the wall section are exposed and not covered by the skeleton.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • 1. Field of the Disclosure
  • The present disclosure is generally directed to storage containers, and more particularly to a container with a structural skeleton and in-molded panels forming wall portions of the container.
  • 2. Description of Related Art
  • Plastic storage containers, such as food storage containers, are well known in the art and many of them are typically molded from plastic materials. One objective for competitors in this field has been to produce such containers in a more cost effective manner while still providing a suitably useful product. The typical storage container of this type is molded entirely of plastic. Raw plastic material or resin is relatively expensive, as most such materials are petroleum based. The price of the raw material or resin also has a tendency to fluctuate dramatically, which can make the product price and/or profit margin unpredictable.
  • Some manufactures have developed what are known as thin walled, semi disposable containers to try and reduce the amount of resin or raw material required to fabricate the containers. These types of products can typically be reused and washed a number of times, but breakdown after relatively few use cycles. The semi-disposable containers either crack or deteriorate to the point of being unsuitable as a storage container for food. Examples of such products are Rubbermaid's TakeAlong products, Clorox's Gladware products, and S. C Johnson's Ziplock Snap'n Seal products.
  • Manufacturers of these types of containers also offer other types of food storage products that are disposable, but that do not offer a stiff or rigid structurally fixed container shape. These types of products include freezer bags, sandwich bags, and rolls of food wrap products. These products do not offer physical protection for articles contained or stored therein. Also, such products are typically not suitable for holding liquids, although some lock-type bags are touted as being capable of storing liquids.
  • Similar problems are known in other non-food storage container fields. Many of these types of storage containers are larger and more substantial then a typical food storage container. Thus, these types of containers often require even more raw material or resin to fabricate the product. Examples of such containers are outdoor refuse containers, indoor waste containers, storage and organization totes, and the like.
  • In-mold labeling technology is also known in the art. In-molded labels are typically added to one or more walls of a container to add decoration, enhance aesthetics, provide manufacturer information, display marketing and trademark slogans, and the like. A typical product that employs an in-molded label uses a paper or paper laminate label that is placed into a mold prior to injecting or otherwise introducing the plastic resin or raw material into the mold. Thus, the label material is “in-molded” during the manufacturing process of the product. A known product with an in-molded label is essentially identical to a product without such a label, except that the in-molded label is adhered to and completely backed by a plastic layer of the product. In such known containers, the in-molded label is thus entirely backed on at least one side of the label by a plastic layer. Conventional in-mold labeling technology is used to eliminate having to later adhere or otherwise attach the label to the pre-molded product and to eliminate the need for the adhesive or other substrate or method required to adhere the label.
  • SUMMARY
  • A container is disclosed herein that, in one example, has a skeleton of a molded plastic and a pre-formed panel structure in-molded with and carried by the skeleton. The panel structure can have one or more inner surfaces, outer surfaces, and perimeter edges and can form, together with the skeleton, a container base. The base can include a base bottom, a base side wall that extends up from and circumferentially around a perimeter of the base bottom and that terminates at an upper end. The base can also have a top opening at the upper end into an interior of the container base. A portion of the base side wall is formed in part by the skeleton and in part by at least a wall section of the panel structure joined to the skeleton. Side wall portions of both the inner and outer surfaces of the panel structure are exposed and not covered by the skeleton.
  • In one example, the base bottom of the container can be formed in part by the skeleton and in part by at least a bottom section of the panel structure joined to the skeleton. Bottom wall portions of both the inner and outer surfaces of the bottom section can be exposed and not covered by the skeleton.
  • In one example, the wall section has a perimeter edge joined to the skeleton. In another example a bottom section of the panel structure has a perimeter edge joined to the skeleton.
  • In one example, the wall section and a bottom section of the panel structure are integrally coupled to one another along a joint. In one example, the panel structure is in part a paper product and the joint is a fold joint or a fold line.
  • In one example, the panel structure is a non-plastic material formed of paper, paperboard, laminate paper, or fabric and has a wall thickness less than a thickness of the skeleton to which it is joined. In another example, the panel structure is a thin film plastic or a thermoformed plastic material and has a wall thickness less than a thickness of the skeleton to which it is joined. In yet another example, the panel structure is a laminate or composite of two or such materials and/or material layers.
  • In one example, the side wall includes multiple discrete sides. In another example, the side wall has multiple segments and the skeleton has a plurality of upstanding posts that separate each of the multiple segments from one another.
  • In one example, the skeleton has a bottom rib interconnected with at least two of the plurality of upstanding posts and traversing the base bottom. In one example, the skeleton has a top ring joined to each of the plurality of upstanding posts and forming the top end of the side wall.
  • In one example, the side wall has four corners and four of the segments arranged at least in part in a generally rectangular configuration, one corner between each pair of the four segments, and wherein the skeleton has four of the plurality of upstanding posts, one positioned at each of the four corners.
  • In one example, the container has a selectively openable lid sized to fit on the upper end of the side wall and to close off the top opening. In another example, the lid has a plastic molded lid ring and has a preformed lid panel joined to the lid ring wherein portions of both an inner surface and an outer surface of the lid panel are exposed and not covered by plastic of the lid ring.
  • In one example, the skeleton includes a top ring extending around the upper end of the side wall. In another example, the skeleton includes a bottom rib traversing a portion of the base bottom. In yet another example, the skeleton includes a bottom ring along a lower end of the side wall and around the perimeter of the base bottom.
  • In one example, the skeleton can be molded from a thermoplastic elastomer, polypropylene, polyethylene material, or the like.
  • In one example, a container has a base bottom, a base side wall that extends up from and circumferentially around a perimeter of the base bottom and that terminates at an upper end, and a top opening at the upper end into an interior of the container. The base side wall is formed in part by a molded plastic skeleton and in part by at least a wall section of a pre-formed panel structure in-molded with and carried by the skeleton. The wall section is joined to the skeleton along perimeter edges of the panel structure. Portions of both an inner surface and an outer surface of the wall section are exposed and not covered by the skeleton.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon reading the following description in conjunction with the drawing figures, in which:
  • FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of one example of an assembled storage container constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 shows an exploded view of the storage container in FIG. 1 including a container base and a lid.
  • FIG. 3A shows a perspective view of a panel structure blank of the base in FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 3B shows the panel structure blank in FIG. 3A after being reconfigured to the shape of the container.
  • FIG. 4 shows a perspective view of a plastic skeleton of the base in FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 5 shows a cross-section view taken along line V-V of the base in FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 6 shows a cross-section view taken along line VI-VI of the base in FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 7 shows a cross-section view taken along line VII-VII of the base in FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 8 shows a cross-section view of part of a mold assembly configured to form the base in FIGS. 2 and 6-8.
  • FIG. 9 shows a perspective view of a panel structure blank of the lid in FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 10 shows a cross-section view taken along line X-X of the lid in FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 11 shows a cross-section view of part of a mold assembly configured to form the lid in FIGS. 2, 9, and 10.
  • FIG. 12A shows a cross-section view of another example of a container base constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention and taken corner-to-corner, similar to the cross-section in FIG. 5.
  • FIG. 12B shows a cross-section view of the container base in FIG. 12A and taken side-to-side, similar to the cross-section in FIG. 6.
  • FIG. 12C shows a cross-section of part of a mold assembly configured to form the container base depicted in FIGS. 12A and 12B.
  • FIG. 12D shows an enlarged view of a portion of the mold assembly in FIG. 12C.
  • FIG. 13A shows a cross-section view of part of another container base example constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.
  • FIG. 13B shows a cross-section view of part of a mold assembly configured to construct the container base depicted in FIG. 13A.
  • FIG. 14 shows a cross-section view of part of a mold assembly configured to construct another example of a storage container base in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.
  • FIG. 15 shows a cross-section view of part of a mold assembly configured to construct another example of a storage container base in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.
  • FIG. 16 shows a cross-section view of part of a mold assembly configured to construct another example of a storage container base in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.
  • FIG. 17A shows a cross-section view of part of a mold assembly configured to construct another example of a lid in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.
  • FIG. 17B shows a cross-section view of part of a mold assembly configured to construct another example of a lid in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.
  • FIG. 18 shows a cross-section view of another example of a storage container base constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • The present invention is directed to a storage container that solves or improves upon one or more of the above noted problems and/or disadvantages with prior art containers. In one example, the disclosed containers allow for a significant reduction in the amount of plastic resin or raw material to produce a container. This in turn results in a measurable cost reduction to produce the disclosed containers. In one example, a portion of the disclosed containers is injection molded or otherwise formed of a plastic material creating a skeleton structure. A portion of the disclosed containers is formed using in-mold labeling technology to create a structural wall portion of the containers. In one example, the disclosed containers include a container base with a plastic skeleton and an in-molded structural panel structure. In one example, the disclosed containers include a lid for the base that has a plastic skeletal ring and an in-molded panel structure forming the top panel of the lid. In one example, the disclosed containers utilize a thin walled material for the panel structure of the base and/or the lid relative to the surrounding skeletal plastic material. The storage containers disclosed and described herein can be configured in a variety of ways to provide a suitable container while utilizing significantly less resin or raw material for the structural components of the containers.
  • Turing now to the drawings, FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate one example of a storage container 20 constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. The container assembly 20 generally has a container base 22 and a lid 24 that can be removably connected to the base as in FIG. 1. In this example, the lid 24 is generally a circular lid, whereas the base 22 is a complex shaped structure with a generally circular top end 26 and a generally square bottom end 28. As will become evident to those having ordinary skill in the art upon reviewing this disclosure, both the lid 24 and base 22 of the container assembly 20 can vary in size, shape, configuration, and construction and yet fall within the spirit and scope of the present invention.
  • In general, the container base 22 has a closed bottom at the bottom end 28. A side wall 30 extends up from and circumferentially around a perimeter of the bottom. The side wall 30 terminates at and defines the top end 26 of the base 22. The top end 26 creates a top opening 32 into the base 22. An interior storage space 34 is formed within the side wall 30 and above the closed bottom of the base.
  • FIGS. 3A, 3B, and 4 illustrate the construction and components of the base 22 in the disclosed example. The container base 22 in this example is formed in part from a pre-formed panel structure 40 depicted in FIG. 3A. The panel structure 40 can be created as a flat blank having a central bottom section 42 of a generally rectangular or square configuration. A number of wall sections 44, also rectangular or square in this example, are integrally joined to the bottom section 42 in this example along fold lines 46. Since the bottom section 42 is square and, thus, has four perimeter edges, the panel structure 40 in this example has four of the wall sections 44; one joined to each of the perimeter edges of the bottom section. Thus, one of the perimeter edges (a bottom edge) of each of the wall sections 44 is integrally joined at a fold line 46 to the bottom section, while the other three perimeter edges, including opposed side edges 48 and a top edge 50, are free and exposed.
  • Also in this example, the width of each of the wall sections 44 is less than the width of the corresponding bottom section 42 along the joined edges. Thus, as can be seen in FIG. 3 B, four right angled corners 52 are exposed between each of the wall sections 44 at the bottom end 28. As represented in FIG. 3A, the panel structure blank can be formed from a flat substrate or sheet of material by cutting, punching or other suitable process to the desired size and shape for a particular application. As depicted in FIG. 3B, the panel structure can then be reconfigured for installation in a mold cavity, as is described in greater detail below. The panel structure 40 has an inside or top surface that will face the interior space 34 of the container 20 and has an opposite outside or bottom surface that will face the outside of the container 20. The inside surface includes an inside surface portion 54 a on the bottom section 42 and an inside surface portion 54 b on each of the wall sections 44. Likewise, the outside surface has an outside surface portion 56 a on the bottom section 42 and an outside surface portion 56 b on each of the wall sections.
  • In this example, the panel structure 40 is as a multi-section integral structure. However, the panel structure 40 can instead be formed to include two or more separate and discrete panel sections that are not connected to one another and that are instead placed into a mold cavity independent of one another. The disclosed one-piece or integral panel structure 40 allows for a single insertion operation where a container assembly 20 has more than one panel section.
  • The panel structure 40 can be formed from a wide variety of materials that can be selected as suitable for a particular application. However, the intent of the present invention is that by employing the panel structure material, the cost and amount of raw resin material can be reduced over what would otherwise be needed to form a contiguous molded plastic container base having a similar shape. In one example, the panel structure can be selected from a non-plastic material such as a paper product, a laminate product, a paperboard, a fabric material, and/or the like. The thickness of the blank substrate material for the panel structure 40 can be substantially less than the wall thickness of the adjacent, surrounding plastic skeleton of the base.
  • In addition, other materials are certainly within the spirit and scope of the present invention. For example, the panel structure 40 can be formed of a thin film plastic material or a thermoformed material fabricated from a polyolefin, polypropylene, polycarbonate, or other such thin film material. Thus, the panel structure 40 can be pre-formed as a plastic film material having a thin wall thickness for insertion into a mold cavity as is described below. In another example, the panel structure 40 can be a composite or a layered laminate having layers of different materials and yet still be a thin film layer with respect to the adjacent or surrounding plastic skeleton of the container base.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates the skeletal structure or skeleton 60 of the container base 22 for illustrative purposes only. It is to be understood that the skeleton 60 will not be provided in the state illustrated in FIG. 4. Instead, the skeleton 60 is molded to the preformed panel structure 40 during fabrication of the skeleton as is described in greater detail below. The skeleton 60 is illustrated in FIG. 4 simply to show and better describe the components and configuration of the structure in this example.
  • As shown in FIG. 4, the skeleton 60 of the container base 22 in this example has a top ring 62 that extends circumferentially around the top end 26 of the side wall 30 and defines the top opening 32. The base 22 in this example has four upstanding posts 64 or side wall support structures. Each of these posts 64 is integrally joined to and depends from the top ring 62 in this example. The posts 64 are spaced equidistant apart relative to one another around the circumference of the side wall 30 of the base 22. The skeleton 60 also includes a cross-member 65 on the bottom end 28 of the base. The cross-member 65 has a pair of bottom ribs 66 that traverse the bottom end of the base 22. The ribs 66 of the cross-member 65 are integrally connected to and extend between opposing pairs of the posts 64. The two bottom ribs 66 are configured to form an X-shaped cross-member 65 at the bottom end 28 of the base in this example.
  • However, the bottom end of the skeleton 60 can vary in configuration and construction. For example, the skeleton 60 can also include a circumferential bottom ring as well, if desired. Again, the configuration and construction of the skeleton structure 60 can vary within the scope of the present invention. The skeleton structure can vary in shape depending on the particular size, shape, configuration, and intended use or application for the container base 22. The orientation, width, depth, height, and number of the posts 64 or upstanding supports can vary as well. In fact, the posts 64 can be corner posts for a square or rectangular shaped base, or can simply be structural ribs, supports, or braces provided on the sides of the skeleton 60 in order to support and strengthen the side walls of the container base 22.
  • The configuration of the skeleton 60 in this example is such that it creates a round or circular top end 26 inclusive of the top ring 62 and yet creates a square bottom end 28 as can be seen with reference to FIGS. 1 and 2. Upon fabrication of the base 22, the exposed or protruding corners 52 of the bottom section 42 are juxtaposed with a corresponding one of the posts 64. As may become apparent to those reviewing this disclosure, the corners 52 can be joined to the interior surfaces of the posts 64, or to the top surfaces of the ribs 66, upon manufacture of the base 22. With reference to FIG. 5, a cross-section of the base 22 is illustrated and shows that the corners 52 of the bottom section 42 on the panel structure 40 can indeed be joined to the skeleton 60 upon molding of the skeleton. With reference to FIG. 6, the top edges 50 of the wall sections 44 on the panel structure 40 can also be joined to the top ring 62 of the skeleton 60 upon molding the skeleton. Likewise, with reference to FIG. 7, the exposed side edges 48 of the wall sections 44 can be joined to the side edges of the posts 64 upon molding of the skeleton.
  • As depicted in FIGS. 1, 2, and 5-7, after being molded, portions of each of the inside and outside surfaces 54 a, 54 b, 56 a, 56 b of the panel structure 40 on the side wall 30 and the bottom end 28 are exposed and not covered by the plastic material of the resin. In other words, these exposed portions of the panel structure surfaces 54 a, 54 b, 56 a, 56 b are not directly backed by or covered by any part of the skeletal resin material of the container, i.e., the skeleton 60 in this example. By forming a container assembly 20 in this manner, the amount of raw material or resin used to fabricate the container 20 can be substantially reduced in comparison to like, known, storage containers. These exposed inner and outer surfaces or side wall portions of the panel structure 40 create at least part of the container side wall and bottom wall structure itself.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a cross-section that is representative of part of a mold assembly 70 configured to form the container base 22 in this example. The mold assembly 70 generally has a pair of molds including an A mold 72 and a B mold 74 that together define one or more cavities therein when assembled. In the disclosed example, the A and B molds 72 and 74 together define at least one single interconnected cavity that forms the skeleton structure 60 of the base 20 shown in FIG. 4. As shown in FIG. 8, an upper portion 76 of the mold cavity defines the top ring 62 on the skeleton 60. A lower portion 78 of the mold cavity defines one of the bottom ribs 66. Other portions of the cavity (not shown) form or define the other parts of the ribs 66 and the posts 64 in this example.
  • As represented in FIG. 8, the pre-formed panel structure 40 can be reshaped from the flat blank in FIG. 3A to the reconfigured shape in FIG. 3B and then can be inserted into the A mold 72 prior to closing the mold assembly. As is known in the art, the panel structure 40 can be retained in place against a surface of the A mold 72 using a negative pressure or vacuum, static electricity, or the like. Once the pre-formed panel structure 40 is properly placed in the A mold, the A and B molds 72 and 74 can be repositioned to close the mold assembly 70. Using conventional sprues, runners, and/or gates, the base resin material can be injected or otherwise introduced into the mold cavity. A portion of the panel structure 40, such as one or more of its perimeter edges (top edges 50 of the wall sections 44 as shown in FIG. 8) can extend into a portion of the cavity. Adjacent these edges, the closed mold assembly can create a shut-off or pinch 80 along the surfaces of the panel structure. The shut-offs capture and hold the panel structure and prevent resin material from flowing over or onto unintended surfaces of the panel structure. In this manner, the panel structure 40 can be joined “in-mold” to the skeleton 60 of the base 22 without one side of the panels being completely covered or backed by resin material, as is known for conventional in-mold labeling processes.
  • Also as shown in FIG. 8, ribs, protrusions, mechanical threads, detents, and/or the like can be formed on the surfaces of the skeleton structure 60 using one or more slides 82 as is known in the art. In this example, an annular seal rib 84 is formed extending around an outer surface 86 of the top ring 62 on the skeleton. The slide 82 can be manipulated to form the seal rib 84 and then to permit release of the skeleton 60 from the mold assembly 70. In addition, for more complex structures, the mold assembly 70 can be built with cavities and cores that are divided into separate pieces, i.e., mold inserts and subassemblies, which also are known as mold blocks or chase blocks. The base 22 disclosed and described herein is a relatively simple structure, which requires a relatively simple mold assembly 70 to fabricate same. As will be evident to those having ordinary skill in the art, the mold assembly 70 and, thus, the configuration and structure of the base 22 can vary from the example disclosed and described herein.
  • With reference to FIGS. 2 and 9, the lid 24 of the container 20 in this example also has a panel structure or lid disc 90 and a lid skeleton or ring 92. In this example, the lid disc 90 is a simple flat disc having a circular shape and the lid skeleton 92 is a circular, annular ring shape. As with the earlier described panel structure 40, the lid disc 90 has an outer or top surface 94, an inner or bottom surface 96, and a perimeter edge 102. The lid ring 92 has a wall thickness, a height that is substantially greater than the wall thickness, an interior or inward facing surface 98, and an exterior or outward facing surface 100. FIG. 10 shows a cross-section of the lid 24 wherein the perimeter edge 102 of the disc 90 is joined to the interior surface 98 of the lid ring 92. As with the base skeleton 60, the lid skeleton or ring 92 can also include channel, a rim, and/or one or more ribs, protrusions, mechanical threads, detents, or other features. These structures or features can, for example, assist in securing or retaining the lid 24 on the base 22 when attached and/or assist in creating a lid seal. In this example, the lid ring 92 can include an annular rib 104 on the interior surface 98. The rib 104 on the lid can interferingly engage with the seal rib 84 on the base 22 when the lid is installed on the base.
  • FIG. 11 shows a cross section of one example of part of a mold assembly 110 that is configured to fabricate the disclosed lid 24. The mold assembly 10 in this example has an A mold 112 and a B mold 114 that, when closed, create a cavity 115 that forms the lid ring 92. The pre-formed panel structure or lid disc 90 can be inserted into the mold cavity 115 prior to the mold assembly being closed. Again, the lid disc 90 can be retained in place against a surface of the mold cavity 115 using a vacuum, a static charge, or the like. The mold assembly 110 can then be closed and the cavity 115 injected or otherwise filled with a suitable resin material as previously described. Again, a shut-off 116 can be positioned in the mold assembly 110 so as to hold the disc 90 in place and to prevent plastic or resin material from unintentionally exiting the cavity 115 and covering the top and bottom surfaces 94, 96 of the disc. Also, the perimeter edge 102 of the disc 90 is captured at the shut-off 116 with a portion of the edge extending into the cavity 115. This portion will be joined to the lid ring 92 “in-mold” during molding of the lid ring.
  • As will be evident to those having ordinary skill in the art, the configuration and construction of the lid mold assembly 110 and the lid 24 can vary from the example disclosed and described above. One or more reinforcing ribs can be provided extending across or traversing either the inner or outer surfaces 96, 94 of the panel structure. In addition, the configuration of the skeleton or ring 92 can be much more complex than the example shown. In this example, a slide 118 is depicted as being suitable for creating the rib 104 on the interior surface 98 of the ring 92 and then to permit release of the part from the mold cavity. More complex molds, inserts, and/or slides, can again be utilized to create an alternate and more complex lid structure.
  • FIGS. 12A-12D illustrate an alternate example of a container base 120 constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. The container base 120 in this example has a more complex rim configuration. Each of FIGS. 12A and 12B shows a cross-section of the base 120 taken at locations on the base 120 that correspond to FIGS. 5 and 6, respectively, of the previously described base 22. With reference to FIG. 12A, the base 120 again has a panel structure with a bottom section 122 and a plurality of wall sections 124. The wall sections 122 can again be integrally joined to the bottom section 122 at fold lines 125, similar to the previous example. The base 120 also has a skeleton 126 with bottom ribs 128, a plurality of upstanding posts 130, and a rim structure 132. The rim structure 132 replaces the top ring 62 of the skeleton 60 in the previous example.
  • In this example, the rim structure 132 has a generally horizontal shoulder 134 extending circumferentially around the base 120 and extending radially outward from a rim ring 136. A skirt wall 138 projects downward from an outer end of the shoulder 134 and an annular flange 140 extends radially outward from the bottom end of the skirt wall. As in the prior example, perimeter edges of the bottom section 122 on the panel can be joined to portions of the skeleton 126 upon molding the skeleton. Likewise, perimeter edges of the wall sections 124 can be joined to portions of the skeleton 126 upon molding the skeleton. As shown in FIG. 12B, the perimeter edges of the wall sections 124, for example, include a top edge 142 that is joined to the rim ring 126.
  • FIGS. 12B-12D illustrate that a plurality of perforations or holes 143can be formed in the appropriate locations or edges on the panel sections 122 and 124. These holes can be positioned to provide resin flow-through during molding of the skeleton 126. A mold assembly 144 again has an A mold 146 and a B mold 148 that, when closed, define a cavity 150 therebetween to form the skeleton 126, including the rim structure 132. As shown in FIGS. 12C and 12D, the top edge 142 of the wall sections 124, including the holes 143, are positioned in the cavity 150. When the resin material is introduced into the cavity, the material will flow through the holes 143. This can create a mechanical interlock between the skeleton structure 126 and the pre-formed panel structure of the base 120. Such holes 143 can be provided on other parts and at other locations on the perforate panel, such as along the side edges of the wall sections 124 or on edges of the bottom section 122, depending on the intended application.
  • FIGS. 13A and 13B illustrate another alternate example of a container base 160 constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. The container base 160 in this example has a rim structure 162 similar to that of the base 120. The base 160 also has a similar pre-formed panel structure including a bottom section 164 and wall sections 166. However, in this example, a top edge 168 of the wall sections 166 is different. Instead of having perforations or holes, the top edge is curved or bent. The top edge 168 is positioned in a mold cavity 170 of a mold assembly 172 as discussed previously. When resin is introduced into the cavity 170, the material will flow around the top edge 168. The curved or bent end can create an alternate form of a mechanical interlock between the panel structure and the rim structure 162 of the skeleton. This feature can be combined with the perforations or holes 143 to create an even stronger interlock between the two materials.
  • FIGS. 14 and 15 illustrate two alternate examples of mold assemblies 180 for forming alternate bases constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. In each example, the mold assembly is essentially the same and has an A mold 182 and a B mold 184 that define a cavity 186 therebetween. A pre-formed panel structure is shown within the mold assembly 180 in each example. Each panel structure has a bottom section 188 and wall sections 190. In FIG. 14, a top edge 192 of the wall sections 190 is non-perforated and is bent to a horizontal position. In FIG. 15, a top edge 194 of the wall sections 190 is perforated with holes 196, but is likewise bent to a horizontal position.
  • The cavity 186 in these examples is configured to form a rim structure similar to those described above with respect to FIGS. 12-13B. However, in this example, the rim rings would be replaced by a horizontal rim flange formed by a flange portion 200 of the cavities 186. The rim flange would extend around and radially inward from the rim structure. As shown in FIGS. 14 and 15, the bent parts of the respective top edges 192 and 194 are positioned in the flange portions 200 of the cavity. Each of the top edges would be joined to the rim flange portion of the rim structure. The holes 196 in the top edge 194 of FIG. 15 would create a mechanical interlock between the wall sections and the base skeleton. The top edge 192 in FIG. 14 would not do so.
  • FIG. 16 shows another example of a mold assembly 210 for creating a container base constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. In this example, a top ring would be formed on the base skeleton that would be similar to the top ring 62 on the base 22. The mold assembly 210 has an A mold 212 and a B mold 214 that, when closed, create a cavity 216 therebetween. The cavity 216 is configured to form a relatively simple top ring. However, in this example, a plurality of slides 218 can be carried in the B mold 214. Interior surfaces of the slides can be configured to create mechanical threads 220 during the molding process. In this example, the threads 220 would be formed on the exterior side of the rim ring. Such threads could also be formed on a corresponding interior side of a lid. The threads can also be reversed on the base and lid if desired.
  • FIGS. 17A and 17B illustrate two alternate examples of mold assemblies 230 for forming alternate lids constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. In each example, the mold assembly is essentially the same and has an A mold 232 and a B mold 234 that define a cavity 236 therebetween. A pre-formed lid panel structure or disc 238 is shown within the mold assembly 230 in each example. The cavity 236 in these examples forms a lid rim structure having a more complex shape, similar to the previously described base rim structures. An edge 240 of the panel or disc 238 positioned within the cavity 236 in FIG. 17A is not perforated and thus would not create a mechanical lock between the disc 238 and the lid rim, though joined thereto during molding of the lid skeleton. An edge 242 of the disc 238 positioned in the cavity 236 in FIG. 17B has holes 244. A mechanical interlock between the disc 238 and the lid rim would be created in this example.
  • FIG. 18 shows a cross-section through part of another alternate example of a base 250 constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. The container base 250 in this example has a skeleton with a rim structure 252 similar to that of earlier described bases. The base 250 in this example also has a similar pre-formed panel structure including a bottom section 254 and wall sections 256. Also, top edges 258 of the wall sections 256 have perforations 260, mechanically interlocking the panel structure to the skeleton of the base 250.
  • In this example, the panel structure is formed as a laminate having at least two layers of material. The laminate panel structure could include more than two layers, depending on the intended use or application for the base 250. In addition, the laminate layer materials can vary as well. In this example, an interior or upper layer 262 is a thin film plastic material bonded to an exterior or lower layer 264 of a fabric material. Either layer 262, 264 can be formed of other materials and /or additional layers can be added to the structure within the spirit and scope of the present invention. The fabric layer can be added to provide a desired texture, aesthetic appearance or the like, depending on the intended use of the base 250. The plastic film layer can be added to protect the fabric during use, to make the panel liquid impervious, and/or the like.
  • A number of storage container examples are disclosed and described herein. Disposable or semi-disposable food storage containers can be fabricated according to the teachings of the present invention. However, the disclosed invention can be applied to a vast array of storage and other containers. Examples can include shoe boxes, clothing storage containers, shopping bags, purses, holiday themed storage totes and bins, targeted advertising and marketing products, lunch boxes, waste baskets, gift boxes, baskets, sandwich containers, decorative storage bins, and the like. This list is intended to be informative, not exhaustive.
  • As noted above, the materials used to fabricate the skeletons and pre-formed panels can vary considerably. In one example, the panel structures can be formed of non-plastic materials such as paper, paperboard, laminate paper, fabric, of the like. In each case, the panel structures should have a wall thickness less than a thickness of the skeleton to which it is joined. In another example, the panel structure can be formed of a thin film plastic or a thermoformed plastic material and again should have a wall thickness less than a thickness of the skeleton to which it is joined. In yet another example, the panel structure can be formed as a laminate or composite of two or such materials and/or material layers.
  • In one example, the skeleton can be injection molded from a thermoplastic elastomer, polypropylene, polyethylene material, or the like. The manufacturing process and materials used to form the constituent parts of the bases and lids disclosed and described herein can vary according to the needs of a given application or intended use of the products.
  • Although certain container components and manufacturing methods and devices have been described herein in accordance with the teachings of the present disclosure, the scope of coverage of this patent is not limited thereto. On the contrary, this patent covers all embodiments of the teachings of the disclosure that fairly fall within the scope of permissible equivalents.

Claims (19)

  1. 1. A container comprising:
    a skeleton of a molded plastic; and
    a pre-formed panel structure in-molded with and carried by the skeleton, the panel structure having one or more inner surfaces, outer surfaces, and perimeter edges and forming, together with the skeleton, a container base having
    a base bottom,
    a base side wall extending up from and circumferentially around a perimeter of the base bottom and terminating at an upper end, and
    a top opening at the upper end into an interior of the container base,
    wherein a portion of the base side wall is formed in part by the skeleton and in part by at least a wall section of the panel structure joined to the skeleton, and wherein side wall portions of both the inner and outer surfaces of the panel structure are exposed and not covered by the skeleton.
  2. 2. A container according to claim 1, wherein the base bottom is formed in part by the skeleton and in part by at least a bottom section of the panel structure joined to the skeleton, and wherein bottom wall portions of both the inner and outer surfaces of the bottom section are exposed and not covered by the skeleton.
  3. 3. A container according to claim 2 wherein the wall section has a perimeter edge joined to the skeleton and the bottom section has a perimeter edge joined to the skeleton.
  4. 4. A container according to claim 2, wherein the wall section and the bottom section of the panel structure are integrally coupled to one another along a joint.
  5. 5. A container according to claim 4, wherein the panel structure is in part a paper product and the joint is a fold joint.
  6. 6. A container according to claim 1, wherein the panel structure is a non-plastic material formed of paper, paperboard, laminate paper, or fabric and has a wall thickness less than a thickness of the skeleton to which it is joined.
  7. 7. A container according to claim 1 wherein the panel structure is a thin film plastic or a thermoformed plastic material and has a wall thickness less than a thickness of the skeleton to which it is joined.
  8. 8. A container according to claim 1, wherein the side wall includes multiple discrete sides.
  9. 9. A container according to claim 1, wherein the side wall has multiple segments and the skeleton has a plurality of upstanding posts that separate each of the multiple segments from one another.
  10. 10. A container according to claim 9, wherein the skeleton has a bottom rib interconnected with at least two of the plurality of upstanding posts and traversing the base bottom.
  11. 11. A container according to claim 9, wherein the skeleton has a top ring joined to each of the plurality of upstanding posts and forming the top end of the side wall
  12. 12. A container according to claim 9, wherein the side wall has four corners and four of the segments arranged in a generally rectangular configuration, one corner between each pair of the four segments, and wherein the skeleton has four of the plurality of upstanding posts, one positioned at each of the four corners.
  13. 13. A container according to claim 1, wherein the container further comprises a selectively openable lid sized to fit on the upper end of the side wall to close off the top opening.
  14. 14. A container according to claim 13, wherein the lid has a plastic molded lid ring and has a preformed lid panel joined to the lid ring wherein portions of both an inner surface and an outer surface of the lid panel are exposed and not covered by plastic of the lid ring.
  15. 15. A container according to claim 1, wherein the skeleton includes a top ring extending around the upper end of the side wall.
  16. 16. A container according to claim 1, wherein the skeleton includes a bottom rib traversing a portion of the base bottom.
  17. 17. A container according to claim 1, wherein the skeleton includes a bottom ring along a lower end of the side wall and around the perimeter of the base bottom.
  18. 18. A container according to claim 1, wherein the skeleton is molded from a thermoplastic elastomer, polypropylene, or polyethylene material.
  19. 19. A container comprising:
    a base bottom;
    a base side wall extending up from and circumferentially around a perimeter of the base bottom, the base side wall terminating at an upper end; and
    a top opening at the upper end into an interior of the container,
    wherein the base side wall is formed in part by a molded plastic skeleton and in part by at least a wall section of a pre -formed panel structure in-molded with and carried by the skeleton, wherein the wall section is joined to the skeleton along perimeter edges of the panel structure and such that portions of both an inner surface and an outer surface of the wall section are exposed and not covered by the skeleton.
US12405887 2009-03-17 2009-03-17 Container With In-Molded Exposed Panel Abandoned US20100237068A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12405887 US20100237068A1 (en) 2009-03-17 2009-03-17 Container With In-Molded Exposed Panel

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12405887 US20100237068A1 (en) 2009-03-17 2009-03-17 Container With In-Molded Exposed Panel

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100237068A1 true true US20100237068A1 (en) 2010-09-23

Family

ID=42736614

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12405887 Abandoned US20100237068A1 (en) 2009-03-17 2009-03-17 Container With In-Molded Exposed Panel

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20100237068A1 (en)

Citations (95)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4802295A (en) * 1987-04-28 1989-02-07 Plastipak Packaging, Inc. Blow molded polyethylene terephthalate container having IML textured label wall and method for making same
US4940158A (en) * 1987-09-22 1990-07-10 American National Can Company Container and seam ring for container
US5037350A (en) * 1984-12-14 1991-08-06 Hardee's Food Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for forming meat patties having a closer-to-handformed appearance and texture
US5079057A (en) * 1986-12-29 1992-01-07 Owens-Illinois Plastic Products Inc. Plastic container with multilayer label applied by in-mold labeling
US5180064A (en) * 1990-09-24 1993-01-19 Elvin Jensen Flemming Container
US5238630A (en) * 1990-02-26 1993-08-24 The Dow Chemical Company In-mold labeling method
US5238720A (en) * 1991-05-03 1993-08-24 Menasha Corporation Molded-in label with removable portion
US5498307A (en) * 1994-08-30 1996-03-12 Stevenson; John D. In-mold labeling using an adhesive
US5647501A (en) * 1995-06-19 1997-07-15 Double "H" Plastics, Inc. Composite lid for container
US5911334A (en) * 1997-11-03 1999-06-15 Double "H" Plastics, Inc. Closable arrangement including resealable lid
US5916646A (en) * 1996-03-15 1999-06-29 L'oreal Container having a decorative label and a method for obtaining this container
US6053353A (en) * 1999-02-19 2000-04-25 Double "H" Plastics, Inc. Composite container closure
US6179142B1 (en) * 1998-04-13 2001-01-30 The Coca-Cola Company Wire-frame bottle and method of manufacturing same
US6194011B1 (en) * 1998-01-06 2001-02-27 Lawrence F. Glaser Closure for vacuum-sealed containers with resealable pressure release
US6196451B1 (en) * 1999-10-13 2001-03-06 Double “H” Plastics, Inc. Paper-sided composite lid
US6220507B1 (en) * 1997-01-14 2001-04-24 Groupe Guillin Packaging box for food products
US6223980B1 (en) * 1996-10-30 2001-05-01 Groupe Guillin Packaging box comprising a cardboard bottom and a transparent lid
US6255636B1 (en) * 1998-03-20 2001-07-03 Fort James Corporation Disposable, microwaveable containers having suitable food contact compatible olfactory properties and process for their manufacture
US6257403B1 (en) * 2000-02-08 2001-07-10 Kraft Foods, Inc. Packaging system for meal kit
US6365245B2 (en) * 1996-03-07 2002-04-02 Cryovac, Inc. Zeolite in packaging film
US6371643B2 (en) * 1999-06-02 2002-04-16 S. C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Multi-Layered freezer storage bag
US6371324B1 (en) * 1999-02-12 2002-04-16 General Mills, Inc. Portable food container cover with detachable utensil
US6422454B1 (en) * 2001-02-13 2002-07-23 Kraft Foods, Inc. Flip-top package for shipping and display of a multi-component meal kit
US6508096B1 (en) * 2000-07-14 2003-01-21 Versaform Corp. Process for drawing and stretching sheet metal
US6551685B1 (en) * 2000-05-19 2003-04-22 Multi-Color Corporation In-mold label
US6575299B1 (en) * 2000-09-06 2003-06-10 Kraft Foods Holdings, Inc. Meal kit packaging system
US6602590B2 (en) * 2001-05-08 2003-08-05 Honeywell International Inc. Lidding film for modified atmosphere packaging
US6676256B2 (en) * 2000-02-23 2004-01-13 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Printer for wrapping material
US6677048B2 (en) * 1998-07-20 2004-01-13 Upm-Kymmene Corporation Foodstuff package coverstructure
US6682808B2 (en) * 2001-04-20 2004-01-27 Asahi Kasei Kabushiki Kaisha Crosslinked laminated wrap film and dispenser box therefor
US6726969B1 (en) * 1997-01-28 2004-04-27 Avery Dennison Corporation In-mold labels and uses thereof
US6726968B2 (en) * 2002-02-22 2004-04-27 Honeywell International Inc. Antifog/barrier laminate for use in meat packaging
US6838186B2 (en) * 2002-04-22 2005-01-04 Polinas Plastic Of America, Inc. Multilayer oriented antimicrobial and antifogging films
US6846449B2 (en) * 2001-09-07 2005-01-25 S. C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Method of producing an electrically charged film
US6846530B2 (en) * 2002-03-05 2005-01-25 Honeywell International Inc. Lamination for specialty meat packaging
US20050037168A1 (en) * 1999-12-02 2005-02-17 Associated Packaging Enterprises, Inc. Thermoformed food trays having improved toughness
US6860952B2 (en) * 2000-08-15 2005-03-01 S. C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Method for laminating closure member to film web
US6863212B2 (en) * 2003-03-11 2005-03-08 Caraustar Custom Packaging Reclosable container
US6863912B2 (en) * 2001-01-02 2005-03-08 Duke Lin Shrimp and surimi tray
US6874938B2 (en) * 2002-04-22 2005-04-05 S.C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Jacketed reclosable container
US6887540B2 (en) * 2002-03-14 2005-05-03 Mitsui Chemicals, Inc. Sealant film, resin composition for sealant and uses of the film
US6889891B2 (en) * 2003-04-23 2005-05-10 John D. Correll Multi-featured box and blank
US20050100751A1 (en) * 2001-02-22 2005-05-12 Yupo Corporation Label for in-mold forming
US6892932B2 (en) * 2002-11-27 2005-05-17 John D. Correll Efficient food carton
US6893672B2 (en) * 2001-09-07 2005-05-17 Pechiney Emballage Flexible Europe Peelable film and packaging made therefrom
US6896140B1 (en) * 2003-05-12 2005-05-24 Ramsey Perry Crush proof cupcake holder
US6899460B2 (en) * 2001-10-23 2005-05-31 S.C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Storage bag with openly biased mouth
US6899931B2 (en) * 2001-09-07 2005-05-31 S. C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Film material
US6903320B2 (en) * 2002-12-10 2005-06-07 Mars, Incorporated Differential temperature microwavable container
US6910580B1 (en) * 2002-02-19 2005-06-28 Sally May Frankum Portable condiment caddy
US6910584B2 (en) * 2003-02-13 2005-06-28 Henderson Mcpherson Pty. Ltd. Display box having a hinge including a flexible and rigid portion
US6915948B2 (en) * 2003-04-29 2005-07-12 Nadim William George Collapsible/easily disposable food container
US6918532B2 (en) * 2003-04-16 2005-07-19 Kraft Foods Holdings, Inc. Resealable food container
US6981593B1 (en) * 2004-01-27 2006-01-03 Klodt Nancy L Apparatus and method for storing snack items and school supplies
US6983845B2 (en) * 2002-06-28 2006-01-10 S.C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Recloseable storage bag with user-deformable air vent
US20060014002A1 (en) * 2004-07-14 2006-01-19 Moulton Jeffrey D High barrier antifog laminate for case ready meat packaging
US6988653B2 (en) * 1998-08-04 2006-01-24 Matthew Colin Bell Foldable carton
US6988654B2 (en) * 2001-01-18 2006-01-24 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Container with improved stacking/denesting capability
US6988829B2 (en) * 2001-05-14 2006-01-24 Bms Papier Concept Gmbh Bag with a window for foodstuffs
US20060032858A1 (en) * 2004-08-13 2006-02-16 Lee Sang J Air-tight reclosable processed food container
US7000825B2 (en) * 2004-02-25 2006-02-21 Rogar Capital Corporation Food enclosing container with rebondable rim and liquid absorption and barrier layers
US7005094B2 (en) * 2002-11-04 2006-02-28 Jack Neil C Method and systems for in-mold labeling of irregularly shaped products
US7004314B2 (en) * 2003-05-09 2006-02-28 Weyerhaeuser Company Multi-product container
US7011615B2 (en) * 1998-01-09 2006-03-14 S.C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Method for making a multicompartment thermoplastic bag
US7017798B2 (en) * 2003-03-07 2006-03-28 Tin Inc. Food-transport tray
US7021525B2 (en) * 2003-09-05 2006-04-04 General Mills, Inc. Recloseable carton
US7036718B2 (en) * 2002-07-10 2006-05-02 International Paper Company Offset dove tail locks
US7041326B2 (en) * 2002-03-29 2006-05-09 Kraft Foods Holdings, Inc. Food package
US7048176B2 (en) * 2000-10-27 2006-05-23 Fort James Corporation Deep dish disposable container
US7051919B1 (en) * 2003-08-22 2006-05-30 Walsh William R Convertible pizza box
US20060113305A1 (en) * 2004-10-26 2006-06-01 Erica Ferrazzi Reclosable food package
US7063882B2 (en) * 2000-06-06 2006-06-20 Cryovac, Inc. Printed thermoplastic film with radiation-cured overprint varnish
US20070010621A1 (en) * 2003-07-07 2007-01-11 Total Petrochemicals Research Feluy Peelable polyethylene films
US7163123B2 (en) * 2001-10-29 2007-01-16 Frito-Lay North America, Inc. Implosion resistant container
US20070023435A1 (en) * 2003-04-16 2007-02-01 Sierra-Gomez Gladys O Resealable tray container
US7172814B2 (en) * 2003-06-03 2007-02-06 Bio-Tec Biologische Naturverpackungen Gmbh & Co Fibrous sheets coated or impregnated with biodegradable polymers or polymers blends
US7172110B2 (en) * 2001-07-10 2007-02-06 Packaging Corporation Of America Economical, stackable container for retail goods
US20070042147A1 (en) * 2005-08-16 2007-02-22 Altman Carl E Lid stock using oriented fluoropolymers
US7183518B2 (en) * 2004-09-24 2007-02-27 Michael Near System of food storage preparation and delivery in finished cooked state
US20070044917A1 (en) * 2005-08-25 2007-03-01 Yixin Jiang Plastic Container with In-Mold Label and Method for Manufacturing the Same
US7193632B2 (en) * 2003-11-06 2007-03-20 Behr Process Corporation Distributed color coordination system
US7204069B2 (en) * 2005-05-09 2007-04-17 Yu Chi Liao Container sealing device
US7207473B2 (en) * 2002-09-27 2007-04-24 International Paper Company Self-locking stackable tapered container with partial top stucture
US7210613B2 (en) * 2003-05-30 2007-05-01 Lehrer Richard M Quality maintaining pizza/food take-out box
US20070095828A1 (en) * 2005-10-28 2007-05-03 Edward Schapiro Snack food container
US20070107379A1 (en) * 2004-08-19 2007-05-17 Dewey Kevin J Food container sealing apparatus
US7219797B2 (en) * 2002-01-14 2007-05-22 Alliance Packaging Llc. Box with insert that extends from a side and that divides the box into compartments and methods for forming and using
US7222778B2 (en) * 2003-04-17 2007-05-29 Ronald Brian Smith Multifunctional device for supporting a container lid
US20070122599A1 (en) * 2005-11-02 2007-05-31 Rubbermaid Incorporated Food storage wrap
US7225930B2 (en) * 2003-11-05 2007-06-05 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Combination shipping carton and twin dispenser boxes
US7232055B1 (en) * 2003-12-30 2007-06-19 Edmond Heng Lim Folding serving tray
US20070145001A1 (en) * 2005-12-22 2007-06-28 Tilton Andrew T Removable and reclosable lid for jar for a food product
US7240797B1 (en) * 2003-01-27 2007-07-10 Grossman Victor A Packaging and dispensing system for sandwich food products
US20070163990A1 (en) * 2005-12-08 2007-07-19 Roberto Escobosa Container comprising an in-mold label positioned proximate to a surface topography
US7641835B2 (en) * 2005-08-11 2010-01-05 Edison Nation, Llc Trashcan having improved bag retention member

Patent Citations (99)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5037350A (en) * 1984-12-14 1991-08-06 Hardee's Food Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for forming meat patties having a closer-to-handformed appearance and texture
US5079057A (en) * 1986-12-29 1992-01-07 Owens-Illinois Plastic Products Inc. Plastic container with multilayer label applied by in-mold labeling
US4802295A (en) * 1987-04-28 1989-02-07 Plastipak Packaging, Inc. Blow molded polyethylene terephthalate container having IML textured label wall and method for making same
US4940158A (en) * 1987-09-22 1990-07-10 American National Can Company Container and seam ring for container
US5238630A (en) * 1990-02-26 1993-08-24 The Dow Chemical Company In-mold labeling method
US5180064A (en) * 1990-09-24 1993-01-19 Elvin Jensen Flemming Container
US5238720A (en) * 1991-05-03 1993-08-24 Menasha Corporation Molded-in label with removable portion
US5498307A (en) * 1994-08-30 1996-03-12 Stevenson; John D. In-mold labeling using an adhesive
US5647501A (en) * 1995-06-19 1997-07-15 Double "H" Plastics, Inc. Composite lid for container
US6365245B2 (en) * 1996-03-07 2002-04-02 Cryovac, Inc. Zeolite in packaging film
US5916646A (en) * 1996-03-15 1999-06-29 L'oreal Container having a decorative label and a method for obtaining this container
US6223980B1 (en) * 1996-10-30 2001-05-01 Groupe Guillin Packaging box comprising a cardboard bottom and a transparent lid
US6220507B1 (en) * 1997-01-14 2001-04-24 Groupe Guillin Packaging box for food products
US6726969B1 (en) * 1997-01-28 2004-04-27 Avery Dennison Corporation In-mold labels and uses thereof
US20040096612A1 (en) * 1997-01-28 2004-05-20 Ramabhadran Balaji In-mold labels and users thereof
US5911334A (en) * 1997-11-03 1999-06-15 Double "H" Plastics, Inc. Closable arrangement including resealable lid
US6194011B1 (en) * 1998-01-06 2001-02-27 Lawrence F. Glaser Closure for vacuum-sealed containers with resealable pressure release
US7011615B2 (en) * 1998-01-09 2006-03-14 S.C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Method for making a multicompartment thermoplastic bag
US6255636B1 (en) * 1998-03-20 2001-07-03 Fort James Corporation Disposable, microwaveable containers having suitable food contact compatible olfactory properties and process for their manufacture
US6700106B2 (en) * 1998-03-20 2004-03-02 Fort James Corporation Disposable, microwaveable containers having suitable food contact compatible olfactory properties and process for their manufacture
US6179142B1 (en) * 1998-04-13 2001-01-30 The Coca-Cola Company Wire-frame bottle and method of manufacturing same
US6677048B2 (en) * 1998-07-20 2004-01-13 Upm-Kymmene Corporation Foodstuff package coverstructure
US6988653B2 (en) * 1998-08-04 2006-01-24 Matthew Colin Bell Foldable carton
US6371324B1 (en) * 1999-02-12 2002-04-16 General Mills, Inc. Portable food container cover with detachable utensil
US6053353A (en) * 1999-02-19 2000-04-25 Double "H" Plastics, Inc. Composite container closure
US6371643B2 (en) * 1999-06-02 2002-04-16 S. C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Multi-Layered freezer storage bag
US6196451B1 (en) * 1999-10-13 2001-03-06 Double “H” Plastics, Inc. Paper-sided composite lid
US20050037168A1 (en) * 1999-12-02 2005-02-17 Associated Packaging Enterprises, Inc. Thermoformed food trays having improved toughness
US6257403B1 (en) * 2000-02-08 2001-07-10 Kraft Foods, Inc. Packaging system for meal kit
US6676256B2 (en) * 2000-02-23 2004-01-13 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Printer for wrapping material
US6551685B1 (en) * 2000-05-19 2003-04-22 Multi-Color Corporation In-mold label
US7063882B2 (en) * 2000-06-06 2006-06-20 Cryovac, Inc. Printed thermoplastic film with radiation-cured overprint varnish
US6508096B1 (en) * 2000-07-14 2003-01-21 Versaform Corp. Process for drawing and stretching sheet metal
US6860952B2 (en) * 2000-08-15 2005-03-01 S. C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Method for laminating closure member to film web
US6575299B1 (en) * 2000-09-06 2003-06-10 Kraft Foods Holdings, Inc. Meal kit packaging system
US7048176B2 (en) * 2000-10-27 2006-05-23 Fort James Corporation Deep dish disposable container
US6863912B2 (en) * 2001-01-02 2005-03-08 Duke Lin Shrimp and surimi tray
US6988654B2 (en) * 2001-01-18 2006-01-24 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Container with improved stacking/denesting capability
US6422454B1 (en) * 2001-02-13 2002-07-23 Kraft Foods, Inc. Flip-top package for shipping and display of a multi-component meal kit
US20050100751A1 (en) * 2001-02-22 2005-05-12 Yupo Corporation Label for in-mold forming
US6682808B2 (en) * 2001-04-20 2004-01-27 Asahi Kasei Kabushiki Kaisha Crosslinked laminated wrap film and dispenser box therefor
US6602590B2 (en) * 2001-05-08 2003-08-05 Honeywell International Inc. Lidding film for modified atmosphere packaging
US6988829B2 (en) * 2001-05-14 2006-01-24 Bms Papier Concept Gmbh Bag with a window for foodstuffs
US7172110B2 (en) * 2001-07-10 2007-02-06 Packaging Corporation Of America Economical, stackable container for retail goods
US6846449B2 (en) * 2001-09-07 2005-01-25 S. C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Method of producing an electrically charged film
US6899931B2 (en) * 2001-09-07 2005-05-31 S. C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Film material
US6893672B2 (en) * 2001-09-07 2005-05-17 Pechiney Emballage Flexible Europe Peelable film and packaging made therefrom
US6899460B2 (en) * 2001-10-23 2005-05-31 S.C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Storage bag with openly biased mouth
US7163123B2 (en) * 2001-10-29 2007-01-16 Frito-Lay North America, Inc. Implosion resistant container
US7219797B2 (en) * 2002-01-14 2007-05-22 Alliance Packaging Llc. Box with insert that extends from a side and that divides the box into compartments and methods for forming and using
US6910580B1 (en) * 2002-02-19 2005-06-28 Sally May Frankum Portable condiment caddy
US6726968B2 (en) * 2002-02-22 2004-04-27 Honeywell International Inc. Antifog/barrier laminate for use in meat packaging
US6846530B2 (en) * 2002-03-05 2005-01-25 Honeywell International Inc. Lamination for specialty meat packaging
US6887540B2 (en) * 2002-03-14 2005-05-03 Mitsui Chemicals, Inc. Sealant film, resin composition for sealant and uses of the film
US7041326B2 (en) * 2002-03-29 2006-05-09 Kraft Foods Holdings, Inc. Food package
US6838186B2 (en) * 2002-04-22 2005-01-04 Polinas Plastic Of America, Inc. Multilayer oriented antimicrobial and antifogging films
US20050158569A1 (en) * 2002-04-22 2005-07-21 Polinas Plastic Of America, Inc. Multilayer oriented antimicrobial and antifogging films
US20050158537A1 (en) * 2002-04-22 2005-07-21 Polinas Plastic Of America, Inc. Multilayer oriented antimicrobial and antifogging films
US6874938B2 (en) * 2002-04-22 2005-04-05 S.C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Jacketed reclosable container
US6983845B2 (en) * 2002-06-28 2006-01-10 S.C. Johnson Home Storage, Inc. Recloseable storage bag with user-deformable air vent
US7036718B2 (en) * 2002-07-10 2006-05-02 International Paper Company Offset dove tail locks
US7207473B2 (en) * 2002-09-27 2007-04-24 International Paper Company Self-locking stackable tapered container with partial top stucture
US7005094B2 (en) * 2002-11-04 2006-02-28 Jack Neil C Method and systems for in-mold labeling of irregularly shaped products
US6892932B2 (en) * 2002-11-27 2005-05-17 John D. Correll Efficient food carton
US6903320B2 (en) * 2002-12-10 2005-06-07 Mars, Incorporated Differential temperature microwavable container
US7240797B1 (en) * 2003-01-27 2007-07-10 Grossman Victor A Packaging and dispensing system for sandwich food products
US6910584B2 (en) * 2003-02-13 2005-06-28 Henderson Mcpherson Pty. Ltd. Display box having a hinge including a flexible and rigid portion
US7017798B2 (en) * 2003-03-07 2006-03-28 Tin Inc. Food-transport tray
US6863212B2 (en) * 2003-03-11 2005-03-08 Caraustar Custom Packaging Reclosable container
US6918532B2 (en) * 2003-04-16 2005-07-19 Kraft Foods Holdings, Inc. Resealable food container
US20070023435A1 (en) * 2003-04-16 2007-02-01 Sierra-Gomez Gladys O Resealable tray container
US7222778B2 (en) * 2003-04-17 2007-05-29 Ronald Brian Smith Multifunctional device for supporting a container lid
US6889891B2 (en) * 2003-04-23 2005-05-10 John D. Correll Multi-featured box and blank
US6915948B2 (en) * 2003-04-29 2005-07-12 Nadim William George Collapsible/easily disposable food container
US7004314B2 (en) * 2003-05-09 2006-02-28 Weyerhaeuser Company Multi-product container
US6896140B1 (en) * 2003-05-12 2005-05-24 Ramsey Perry Crush proof cupcake holder
US7210613B2 (en) * 2003-05-30 2007-05-01 Lehrer Richard M Quality maintaining pizza/food take-out box
US7172814B2 (en) * 2003-06-03 2007-02-06 Bio-Tec Biologische Naturverpackungen Gmbh & Co Fibrous sheets coated or impregnated with biodegradable polymers or polymers blends
US20070010621A1 (en) * 2003-07-07 2007-01-11 Total Petrochemicals Research Feluy Peelable polyethylene films
US7051919B1 (en) * 2003-08-22 2006-05-30 Walsh William R Convertible pizza box
US7021525B2 (en) * 2003-09-05 2006-04-04 General Mills, Inc. Recloseable carton
US7225930B2 (en) * 2003-11-05 2007-06-05 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Combination shipping carton and twin dispenser boxes
US7193632B2 (en) * 2003-11-06 2007-03-20 Behr Process Corporation Distributed color coordination system
US7232055B1 (en) * 2003-12-30 2007-06-19 Edmond Heng Lim Folding serving tray
US6981593B1 (en) * 2004-01-27 2006-01-03 Klodt Nancy L Apparatus and method for storing snack items and school supplies
US7000825B2 (en) * 2004-02-25 2006-02-21 Rogar Capital Corporation Food enclosing container with rebondable rim and liquid absorption and barrier layers
US20060014002A1 (en) * 2004-07-14 2006-01-19 Moulton Jeffrey D High barrier antifog laminate for case ready meat packaging
US20060032858A1 (en) * 2004-08-13 2006-02-16 Lee Sang J Air-tight reclosable processed food container
US20070107379A1 (en) * 2004-08-19 2007-05-17 Dewey Kevin J Food container sealing apparatus
US7183518B2 (en) * 2004-09-24 2007-02-27 Michael Near System of food storage preparation and delivery in finished cooked state
US20060113305A1 (en) * 2004-10-26 2006-06-01 Erica Ferrazzi Reclosable food package
US7204069B2 (en) * 2005-05-09 2007-04-17 Yu Chi Liao Container sealing device
US7641835B2 (en) * 2005-08-11 2010-01-05 Edison Nation, Llc Trashcan having improved bag retention member
US20070042147A1 (en) * 2005-08-16 2007-02-22 Altman Carl E Lid stock using oriented fluoropolymers
US20070044917A1 (en) * 2005-08-25 2007-03-01 Yixin Jiang Plastic Container with In-Mold Label and Method for Manufacturing the Same
US20070095828A1 (en) * 2005-10-28 2007-05-03 Edward Schapiro Snack food container
US20070122599A1 (en) * 2005-11-02 2007-05-31 Rubbermaid Incorporated Food storage wrap
US20070163990A1 (en) * 2005-12-08 2007-07-19 Roberto Escobosa Container comprising an in-mold label positioned proximate to a surface topography
US20070145001A1 (en) * 2005-12-22 2007-06-28 Tilton Andrew T Removable and reclosable lid for jar for a food product

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3397814A (en) Composite lid
US6047819A (en) Clam shell container with graphic insert
US4448345A (en) Composite lid
US3215300A (en) Dispensing container
US4756446A (en) Double-walled container
US6116501A (en) Stackable, self-supporting container with lid-alignment feature
US4238047A (en) Composite closure member
US20060060578A1 (en) Secure locking container
US3679088A (en) Press type closure
US20060060493A1 (en) Tamper resistant seals for transparent or other egg cartons
US20060228057A1 (en) Evacuatable container
US3604368A (en) Pallet and method of manufacture
US7244223B2 (en) Food bag release valve
US4407427A (en) Integral hinge covers for waste container
US20070267374A1 (en) Container Having a Rim or other Feature Encapsulated by or Formed From Injection-Molded Material
US6648159B2 (en) Collapsible three-dimensional enclosure, and a method of manufacturing thereof
US20090250372A1 (en) Container With Injection-Molded Feature And Tool For Forming Container
US20040262322A1 (en) Container having a rim or other feature encapsulated by or formed from injection-molded material
US20100108693A1 (en) Insulated double-walled disposable plastic cup
US7222745B2 (en) Plastic boxes and methods for making same
US6805659B2 (en) Method of making one-piece lidded container and containers made by the same
WO2008125784A1 (en) Heat sealable seal
US20040074902A1 (en) Containers and container assemblies with releasable locking feature
US20060105650A1 (en) Foam product having outer skin and method for producing the same
US8308021B2 (en) Disposable storage container