US20100227673A1 - Craps variation with indicia matching - Google Patents

Craps variation with indicia matching Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100227673A1
US20100227673A1 US12/699,808 US69980810A US2010227673A1 US 20100227673 A1 US20100227673 A1 US 20100227673A1 US 69980810 A US69980810 A US 69980810A US 2010227673 A1 US2010227673 A1 US 2010227673A1
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outcome
outcome set
wager
dice
player
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US12/699,808
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Stan Dargue
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Stan Dargue
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Priority to US12/699,808 priority patent/US20100227673A1/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00157Casino or betting games
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3202Hardware aspects of a gaming system, e.g. components, construction, architecture thereof
    • G07F17/3216Construction aspects of a gaming system, e.g. housing, seats, ergonomic aspects
    • G07F17/322Casino tables, e.g. tables having integrated screens, chip detection means
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/3286Type of games
    • G07F17/3293Card games, e.g. poker, canasta, black jack
    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07FCOIN-FREED OR LIKE APPARATUS
    • G07F17/00Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services
    • G07F17/32Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting
    • G07F17/34Coin-freed apparatus for hiring articles; Coin-freed facilities or services for games, toys, sports or amusements, e.g. casino games, online gambling or betting depending on the stopping of moving members in a mechanical slot machine, e.g. "fruit" machines
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/04Dice; Dice-boxes; Mechanical dice-throwing devices

Abstract

A method, apparatus, and computer readable storage for a craps variation for use in a casino that can be played with dice or cards. The composition of the come out roll (not just the total) must be matched on subsequent rolls in order for a wager to win. When cards are used, the composition of the card values two dealt cards must be matched on a subsequent deal in order for the player's wager to win. If the suits are matched in addition to the card values then the player would win a bonus.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims benefit to provisional application 61/149,649 filed in the USPTO on Feb. 3, 2009, entitled, “Zero Baccarat Craps” which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present inventive concept relates to a casino table game, and more particularly, to a variation of casino craps
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Craps is a popular casino game, which is described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,394,901, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. The typical craps table layout is very confusing and can be intimidating for beginners.
  • What is needed is a craps version which has a more simple layout.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • It is an aspect of the present invention to provide exciting variations of craps that can be played in casinos.
  • The above aspects can be obtained by a method that includes (a) providing physical dice; (b) receiving a wager from a player; (c) rolling the dice to produce a first outcome set; (d) again rolling the dice to produce a second outcome set; (e) determining if the second outcome set meets a predetermined criteria, and if so, then taking the wager from the player and ending the game; and (f) determining if each outcome in the first outcome set matches each outcome in the second outcome set, and if so, then paying a payout on the wager and ending the game; and (g) continuing the again rolling the dice until the game ends.
  • These together with other aspects and advantages which will be subsequently apparent, reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Further features and advantages of the present invention, as well as the structure and operation of various embodiments of the present invention, will become apparent and more readily appreciated from the following description of the preferred embodiments, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings of which:
  • FIG. 1 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a craps game using special dice, according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 2 is a drawing of a sample layout of a craps game using special dice, according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 3 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a craps game using cards, according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 4 is a drawing of a sample layout of a craps game using cards, according to an embodiment;
  • FIG. 5A is a block diagram illustrating hardware that can be used to implement the methods described herein, according to an embodiment; and
  • FIG. 5B is a block diagram illustrating hardware that can be used to track players and display results, according to an embodiment.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Reference will now be made in detail to the presently preferred embodiments of the invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like elements throughout.
  • The present general inventive concept relates to a method, system, and computer readable storage which allows a casino to offer to player(s) a variation of casino craps.
  • The game can be played with two dice with the six sides (faces) as illustrated in Table I.
  • TABLE I
    Die 1: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 9
    Die 2: 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 0
  • The game proceeds as follows. The player makes a bet on any of the bets on the layout. The “point” bet is similar to the “pass line” in standard craps, but with some significant changes. Once the point bet is placed, the player rolls the dice the first time, which is called the “come out roll.” The numerical value of each die roll is added together, and if the combined total is greater than 10 then 10 is subtracted from the total. For example, if the player rolls a 9 and an 8, the total is 17 which then gets converted to 7.
  • If the initial point total of both dice is 9, then the player automatically wins an even money payout on the point bet. If the initial point total of both dice is 0 (e.g., 0+0, 9+1, 8+2, 7+3, 6+4) then the player “craps out” and loses the point bet.
  • Otherwise, the come out roll becomes the “point.” For example, if the come out roll is a 4, 7, then the point is a 4, 7 or a 7, 4 (the order does not matter). The “count” is a different concept than the point and the count is a single point total of both dice of the come out roll (with 10 subtracted from point totals over 10 as described above).
  • Now the player can roll again. The player's goal is to roll the point before rolling a point total of 0 (craps). In order to roll the point, the player must roll the same individual outcomes that were rolled on the come out roll (although not necessarily in the same order). If the player rolls the point first (before rolling a 0 or 10 total), the player wins the point bet. If the player rolls a 0 (or 10 total) first, then the player loses the point bet.
  • FIG. 1 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a craps game using special dice, according to an embodiment.
  • The method can begin with operation 100, which provides dice (as described above) to the player (or shooter), as well as the other required equipment (e.g., felt with layout, gaming table, etc.)
  • From operation 100, the method proceeds to operation 102, which receives the wager from the player. The player places his or her desired wagers on appropriate betting areas on the table layout. In FIG. 1, the player has placed a “point” wager and any optional side wagers. The “point” wager is analogous to the “pass” wager in craps.
  • From operation 102, the method proceeds to operation 104, which rolls the come out rolls (the first roll in a game). The outcome of the come out roll is marked on the table so that all spectators can immediately see what the come out roll was. The come out roll determines the point for the entire game, as well as the current count. However, the count changes after each roll, while the point will remain the same for the entire game.
  • From operation 104, the method proceeds to operation 106, which resolves side wagers (wagers that are not the point wager). Some side wagers can depend on the count, which is the numerical total of the die in the come out roll (with any total over 10 reduced by 10).
  • From operation 106, the method proceeds to operation 108, which evaluates the outcome of the come out roll. If the come out roll totals a 0 (or totals 10 which counts as 0), then the method proceeds to operation 110, and the player loses the point wager. The game ends here and a new game can begin (at operation 100).
  • If, in operation 108, the come out roll totals a 9, then the method proceeds to operation 112, wherein the player wins the point wager (and wins a payout on the point wager at even money or other payout). The game ends here and a new game can begin (at operation 100).
  • If, in operation 108, the come out roll does not total a 0 or a 9, then the method proceeds to operation 114, wherein the point is established by the come out roll. This can also be marked on the table, and/or recorded electronically. The come out roll can also be displayed on electronic signage associated with the table, such as an LED display.
  • From operation 114, the method proceeds to operation 116, wherein the player (shooter) rolls the dice again. Before the dice are rolled again, the players will have an opportunity to place side wagers which will be determined based on the next roll. The outcome of this dice roll determines a new count based on the outcome of the dice, but the point remains the same as determined in operation 104.
  • From operation 116, the method proceeds to operation 118, which resolves any side wagers placed. Side wagers can be placed based on the count, for example a player can bet on a count of 5 which will win if the count after the roll is 5 but loses if the count is not a 5.
  • From operation 118, the method proceeds to operation 120, which determines the outcome of the last roll. If the outcome of the last roll totals 0 or 10 (craps), then the method proceeds to operation 110, wherein the player loses the point wager placed in operation 102. If the outcome of the last roll matches the point, then the method proceeds to operation 112, wherein the player wins the point wager placed in operation 102. As stated herein, in order to match the point the outcomes of both dies must match the outcomes rolled on the come out roll (the point) (e.g., if the come out roll is 4, 9, and the last roll is 9,4 or 4, 9, then the point has been matched), subject to the following exception. In some circumstances, one of the two outcomes can be eliminated (see operations 122-124). If one of the two outcomes were eliminated, then in order to match the point only the outcome that has not yet occurred need to occur on the roll (in operation 116) in order to be considered to make the point.
  • If, in operation 120, the point has not been made and the player did not roll a 0, then the method proceeds to operation 122. In operation 122, it is determined whether one die (outcome) of the roll in operation 116 matches either of the die outcomes of the come out roll (operation 104). For example, if the come out roll is 3, 4 and the last roll is 4, 9, then the 4 matches (a “partial match”). If there is no partial match, then the method proceeds to operation 116, wherein the player (shooter) rolls the dice again and the point bet is still live until it is resolved (the method reaches either operation 110 or 112).
  • If in operation 122, there is a partial match, that is, one of the outcomes in operation 116 matches one of the outcomes from operation 104, then the method proceeds to operation 124, which eliminates the matched die outcome from the point. For example, if the come out roll is 3, 4 and the last roll is a 4, 9, then 4 is eliminated from the point. This elimination can be marked on the table and also recorded/displayed electronically. At this point, whenever the method reaches operation 120 in the game, the player now only needs to achieve a 3 on either of the two dice in order to make the point. From operation 124, the method returns to operation 116, wherein the player can try to make the point (at this point the player has two tries (each of the two dice) to make the one remaining outcome needed).
  • FIG. 2 is a drawing of a sample layout of a craps game using special dice, according to an embodiment. The layout can be imprinted on felt which can be physically attached to a gaming table.
  • A count row 200 is a row of possible counts that the player can bet on. Before each roll (operations 104, 116) the players can place bets on individual numbers. If the individual count bet on occurs, the player wins the bet, otherwise the player loses the bet. A payout row 202 lists respective payouts for each individual count.
  • A natural side bet betting circle 204 can be bet on before each roll and wins when the next roll is 0, 9 (or 9,0), otherwise it loses. A zeros betting circle 206 can be bet on before each roll and wins when the next roll is 0,0, otherwise it loses. A nines betting circle 210 can be bet on before each roll and wins when the next roll is 9,9, otherwise it loses. A craps betting circle 212 can be bet on before each roll and wins when the next roll is either 0,0 or has a count of 10, otherwise the bet loses.
  • A point betting circle 208 is the bet which is illustrated in the flowchart in FIG. 1, which is made in operation 102 and wins (paid a payout) in operation 112 and loses (taken by the house) in operation 110.
  • FIG. 3 is a flowchart illustrating an exemplary method of implementing a craps game using cards, according to an embodiment.
  • The method can begin with operation 300, which provides cards. Two standard deck of 52 cards can be used, or any other numbers of decks can be used (e.g., 1 to 10). Non-standard decks of cards can also be used (e.g., wild deck, etc.) The cards can be shuffled before each new game using an electronic card shuffler.
  • From operation 300, the method proceeds to operation 302, which receives a wager from a player. The player makes an ante wager and any optional side wagers.
  • From operation 302, the method proceeds to operation 304, which deals come out cards to the player. Typically, two cards are dealt face up. The “match point” is the composition of the dealt two cards including the suit. The “point” is the composition of the dealt two cards not including the suit. For example, if a king of hearts and 8 of clubs is dealt, the match point is the king of hearts and 8 of clubs. The point is a king and 8. The count is determined by adding up the numerical values of the cards and if the total is greater than nine then dropping the first digit (e.g., 8 remains 8, 18 becomes 8, 20 becomes 0, 21 becomes 1). In this example, the count is computed as follows: 10 (value of king) plus 8 equals 18 minus ten equals a count of 8.
  • From operation 302, the method proceeds to operation 304, which deals two come out cards face up.
  • From operation 304, the method proceeds to operation 306, which resolves any side wagers placed in operation 302 which are determined based on the outcome in operation 304. For example, the player can bet that the next two cards dealt will determine a particular count (e.g., any selected number from 1 through 9), and if the player is correct the player wins the side wager otherwise the player loses the side wager.
  • From operation 306, the method proceeds to operation 308 which determines the outcome of the come out cards. If the outcome is 0 (that is, values of both cards add up to 10 or 20), then this is considered “craps” and the method proceeds to operation 310, wherein the player loses the ante wager, ending the game. Cards are valued with aces counting as 1, 2 though 9 counting as their respective value, and tens, jacks, queens, and kings counting as 10. In another embodiment, aces can count as 11.
  • If in operation 308, it is determined that the count of the come out cards is not 0 (craps) then the method proceeds to operation 314, wherein the point is established as the come out cards (without suits). The match point is established as the come out cards (with the suits). The point and match point will not change throughout the entire game. The count is also established as the numerical total of the come out cards with the first digit dropped if the total is greater than equal to 10.
  • From operation 314, the method proceeds to operation 316, which deals two more cards. Before the cards are dealt, the players also have the opportunity to place side wagers on the layout. The goal for the ante wager is for the two more cards to match the match point or match the point. While both are considered a win, matching the match point would typically pay a higher amount than matching just the point. A new count is determined based on numerical total of the cards dealt in operation 316 (if the total is greater than 9 then the first digit is dropped).
  • From operation 316, the method proceeds to operation 318, which resolves any side wagers placed based on the outcome in operation 316. Side wagers can be placed (before the cards are dealt in operation 316) based on the count of the cards dealt in operation 316.
  • From operation 318, the method proceeds to operation 320, which evaluates the outcome of the last cards dealt in operation 316. If the cards dealt total 0 (with totals greater than 9 dropping their first digit), then the method proceeds to operation 310, wherein the player loses the ante wager. This can be considered “crapping out” as in craps.
  • If in operation 320, it is determined that the cards in the last deal match the point (determined in operation 304), then the method proceeds to operation 312. If the cards match the match point then they also match the point and thus proceed to operation 312. If a card in the point has been eliminated (operation 324 have previously been reached), then if the non-eliminated card in the point (or match point) matches one of the two cards dealt in operation 316, then this is considered a match of the point and would also proceed to operation 312.
  • If, in operation 320, there is no match of the point (and no craps dealt), then the method proceeds to operation 322, which determines whether one card in the cards dealt in operation 316 matches either of the cards dealt in operation 304 (the point). Suits would not matter when determining whether a card matches (e.g., a king of hearts would match a king of diamonds). If none of the cards match, then the method returns to operation 316, which deals two more cards and the method continues. The player is hoping to match the point (player wins the ante) before the cards dealt are 0 (player loses the ante).
  • If in operation 322, one card dealt in operation 316 does match (in rank, not necessarily suit) one of the come out cards (the point) dealt in operation 304, then the method proceeds to operation 324, which eliminates the matched card from the point. Thus, for example, if the point is (queen diamonds, four hearts) and the cards dealt in operation 316 are (5 hearts, queen hearts), then the queen is eliminated from the point and thus, in operation 320, the player only has to get one four (out of the two cards dealt) in operation 316 to make a match of the point (in operation 320) and win the game (operation 312).
  • If operation 312 is reached, the player has won the ante wager and the game ends. The player would have gotten here by one of three ways: a) matching the match point (the cards dealt in operation 316 match both the values and suits of the cards dealt in operation 304); b) matching the point (the cards dealt in operation 316 match the values of the cards dealt in operation 304 but the suits are not matched); c) matching a non-eliminated card (previously in the game one of the cards dealt in operation 316 matches one of the cards dealt in operation 304 of which such card is eliminated, and the remaining non-eliminated card from operation 304 matches one of the cards dealt in a subsequent operation 316). In the latter way (“c”), the suits are not required to be matched when individual cards are matched and eliminated.
  • Matching the match point (“a”) would typically pay a payout higher than matching the point (“b”).
  • It can also be appreciated that the order of operations in FIGS. 3 and 1 can be varied and the game flow is not limited to the particular order and configuration illustrated in the Figures. All features described herein can be optional as well (except if necessary to effectuate the method, such as the rolling of the dice in FIG. 1, etc.)
  • FIG. 4 is a drawing of a sample layout of a craps game using cards, according to an embodiment.
  • A card area 400 is used to deal the cards dealt in operation 316. The come out cards 401 are the cards dealt in operation 304 which establish the match point (and point). A count row 402 is used to place side bets that the next two cards dealt will be a particular count. A payout row 403 is used to designate the respective payouts for each count in the count row 402.
  • A zero count craps betting circle 404 is used to place a side bet that the next two cards dealt will be a count of 0 (e.g., point total of 10 or 20). A point betting circle 405 can be used to place a side bet that the next two dealt cards (in operation 316) will match the point (based on the cards dealt in operation 304), i.e., the card ranks will match regardless of the suits. The ante betting circle 406 is used to place the wager that pays as described in FIG. 3 (made in operation 302, wins a winning payout in operation 312, loses/taken by the house in operation 310). A match point betting circle 407 is used to place a side bet that the next two cards dealt (in operation 316) will match the match point (the cards dealt in operation 304), i.e., the suits will also match in addition to the card ranks. A pair the point betting circle 408 can be used for a side bet that the next two cards dealt will be a pair of a card value, the card value being one of the two card values dealt in operation 304 when the point is determined. All of the side bets can be placed at any point in time before the dealing of a pair of cards (in operation 304 or 316).
  • Of course, it can be appreciated that other table layouts aside from those illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 4 can be used, as well as other configurations and combinations of bets.
  • FIG. 5A is a block diagram illustrating hardware that can be used to implement the methods described herein, according to an embodiment. This hardware can be used to comprise an electronic gaming device (EGD) that can offer the methods described herein.
  • A processing unit 500 can be a microprocessor and associated structure (e.g., cache, bus, etc.) The processing unit 500 is programmed to execute stored instructions that implement the methods described herein. The processing unit 500 can be connected to an input device 500, such as a touch-screen, keyboard, mouse, etc. The processing unit 500 can also be connected to an output device 502 such as a touch screen, CRT, speaker, LCD display, etc. The processing unit 500 can also be connected to a network connection 503 that can connect to a computer communications network such as a LAN, WAN, wifi, Internet, etc. The processing unit 500 can also be connected to a ROM 505, a RAM 508, and a non volatile storage device 506 (e.g., hard disk, CD-ROM, EPROM, etc.) which can read a computer readable storage medium 507 (e.g., CD-ROM, etc.) The processing unit 500 can also be connected to a financial apparatus 504, which can comprise a bill acceptor and also payment mechanism (coin/cash dispenser), ticket-in-ticket-out (TITO) printer, etc. Thus, by operating the EGD, the player can insert money (either cash, a ticket, or a card to access electronic funds), play the methods described herein, and receive payment (e.g., by receiving cash or a cashless voucher that can be redeemed for cash).
  • FIG. 5B is a block diagram illustrating hardware that can be used to track players and display results, according to an embodiment.
  • In the version using physical indicia to play (e.g., dice, cards, felt, etc.) a standard gaming table 510 can be used to physically house the game and provide the layouts (printed on a felt on the table). The gaming table 510 can be electronically connected to an optional electronic display 518 (e.g., a CRT, LED display, LCD, etc.) which can be used to display results (e.g., the recent rolls or outcomes, etc.) A card reader 512 can be used to read a player's loyalty card in order to track points for that player's play. The card reader 512 can be connected to a computer communications network 514 which can then connect to an electronic database 516. The electronic database 516 is used to store players' playing history and earned points so that the players can be rewarded with complementaries (such as free room, food, etc.)
  • A first example of the game using dice will now be presented. A Jim places a $1 point wager. Jim (who is also the shooter) rolls a 4, 7. Thus, the point is 4, 7. The count is 1. Jim then rolls again and rolls a 2, 3. Since this does not match the point (and is also not a count of 0) then Jim rolls again. Jim then rolls a 7, 4. Since this matches the point, Jim wins his point wager and is paid $1. The game now ends and a new game (round) can begin.
  • As a second example, Joe places a $1 point wager. Joe rolls a 2, 5 as the come out roll. Joe then rolls a 5, 9. While Joe's roll does not match the come out roll, one die (5) matches one of the dies of the come out roll. Thus, the 5 is now eliminated (operation 124) and Joe continues to roll. Joe now rolls a 9, 2. Since the 2 matches (in operation 12) the non-eliminated die in the come out roll (2), Joe wins the ante wager. Had Joe rolled a count of 0 instead of the 9,2, then Joe would have lost the ante wager (operation 120).
  • As another example using cards, Tina places a $1 ante wager. The dealer deals (operation 304) a 8 hearts and 4 diamonds. The point is 8,4. The match point is 8 hearts, 4 diamonds. The count is 2. Tina now places a $2 side wager on a count of 8. The dealer then deals (operation 316) two more cards: queen diamonds, 3 hearts. The count of these two cards is a 1, which does not match Tina's side bet on 2, so Tina loses her $2 side wager. The dealer then deals the following cards: 5 hearts, 5 diamonds, for a count of 0. Since the outcome is 0 (operation 320), Tina loses the ante wager (operation 310).
  • As a further example using cards, Mike places a $1 ante wager. The dealer deals a 7 diamonds and a 4 spades. Mike declines to place a side bet. The dealer then deals a 4 spades, 7 diamonds. Mike wins the ante wager (and wins $2) since the match point (operation 320) was matched, and Mike will win a bonus because he matched the suits as opposed to just a match (wherein Mike would win $1).
  • As a final example, Amy places a $1 ante wager. The dealer then deals a ten diamonds 3 hearts on the come out deal (operation 304). The dealer then deals a 3 spades and a 2 diamonds. One of the cards (the 3 spades) matches one of the point cards (the three hearts, since the suits don't matter here). So, the 3 of hearts in the point/match point is eliminated, leaving only the ten diamonds. The dealer deals another hand: ten diamonds, 9 diamonds. Since the ten diamonds dealt matches the ten diamonds in the come out roll, Amy has won the ante wager. However, Amy wins a match but not a match point, since the first card matched (the three spades) did not match the same suit (three hearts). Thus, Amy wins $1 on the ante wager.
  • Further, the order of any of the operations described herein can be performed in any order and wagers can be placed/resolved in any order. Any embodiments herein can also be played in electronic form and programs and/or data for such can be stored on any type of computer readable storage medium (e.g. CD-ROM, DVD, disk, etc.)
  • The many features and advantages of the invention are apparent from the detailed specification and, thus, it is intended by the appended claims to cover all such features and advantages of the invention that fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation illustrated and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

Claims (20)

1. A method for playing a wagering game comprising:
providing physical dice;
receiving a wager from a player;
rolling the dice to produce a first outcome set;
again rolling the dice to produce a second outcome set;
determining if the second outcome set meets a predetermined criteria, and if so, then taking the wager from the player and ending the game; and
determining if each outcome in the first outcome set matches each outcome in the second outcome set, and if so, then paying a payout on the wager and ending the game; and
continuing the again rolling the dice until the game ends.
2. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the predetermined criteria comprise a total of both dice being 0, wherein if the total is greater than 9 then 10 is subtracted from the total.
3. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein if one of the first outcome set matches only one of the second outcome set, then the matching outcome is eliminated from the first outcome set, and upon further rolls, if the non-eliminated outcome from the first outcome set if matched by rolls in the second outcome set, then paying a payout on the wager and ending the game.
4. The method as recited in claim 1, further comprising receiving a side wager from a player on a subsequent count of a next roll, wherein the subsequent count is a numerical total of the outcomes in a next roll, wherein if the count is greater than 9 then the count has 10 subtracted from the count.
5. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the dice consist of two standard six sided dice.
6. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the dice comprise a first six sided die having indicia and point values of (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 9) and a second six sided die having indicia and point values of (9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 0).
7. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein if the first outcome set totals 0 or a multiple of 10, then the player loses the wager.
8. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein if the second outcome set totals 0 or a multiple of 10, then the player loses the wager.
9. A method for playing a wagering game comprising:
providing physical cards;
receiving a wager from a player;
dealing two cards to produce a first outcome set of two cards;
again dealing two cards to produce a second outcome set of two cards;
determining if the second outcome set meets a predetermined criteria, and if so, then taking the wager from the player and ending the game; and
determining if each card rank in the first outcome set matches each card rank in the second outcome set, and if so, then paying a payout on the wager and ending the game; and
continuing the again dealing two cards until the game ends.
10. The method as recited in claim 9, wherein if each card rank in the first outcome set matches each card rank in the second outcome set, and each respective suit in the first outcome matches each respective suit in the second outcome set, then the payout comprises a bonus payout.
11. The method as recited in claim 9, wherein if one card of the first outcome set matches only one card of the second outcome set, then the matching outcome is eliminated from the first outcome set, and upon further deals, if the non-eliminated card from the first outcome set if matched by cards in the second outcome set, then paying a winning payout on the wager and ending the game.
12. The method as recited in claim 9, wherein if a point total of the first outcome set is 0 or a multiple of 10, then the player loses the wager.
13. The method as recited in claim 9, wherein if a point total of the second outcome set is 0 or a multiple of 0, then the player loses the wager.
14. The method as recited in claim 9, wherein after dealing the first outcome set, a side wager is offered that both cards in a next second outcome set dealt will match the cards in the first outcome set in both rank and suit.
15. An electronic gaming device to play a wagering game, the device comprising:
a processing unit, executing instructions operable to perform:
receiving a wager from a player;
rolling the dice to produce a first outcome set;
again rolling the dice to produce a second outcome set;
determining if the second outcome set meets a predetermined criteria, and if so, then taking the wager from the player and ending the game; and
determining if each outcome in the first outcome set matches each outcome in the second outcome set, and if so, then paying a winning payout on the wager and ending the game; and
continuing the again rolling the dice until the game ends; and
an output device to output results of the processing unit.
16. The device as recited in claim 15, wherein the predetermined criteria comprise a total of both dice being 0, wherein if the total is greater than 9 then 10 is subtracted from the total.
17. The device as recited in claim 15, wherein if one of the first outcome set matches only one of the second outcome set, then the matching outcome is eliminated from the first outcome set, and upon further rolls, if the non-eliminated outcome from the first outcome set if matched by rolls in the second outcome set, then paying a payout on the wager and ending the game.
18. The device as recited in claim 15, further comprising receiving a side wager from a player on a subsequent count of a next roll, wherein the subsequent count is a numerical total of the outcomes in a next roll, wherein if the count is greater than 9 then the count has 10 subtracted from the count.
19. The device as recited in claim 15, wherein the dice consist of two standard six sided dice.
20. The device as recited in claim 15, wherein the dice comprise a first six sided die having indicia and point values of (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 9) and a second six sided die having indicia and point values of (9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 0).
US12/699,808 2009-02-03 2010-02-03 Craps variation with indicia matching Abandoned US20100227673A1 (en)

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