US20100223128A1 - Software-based Method for Assisted Video Creation - Google Patents

Software-based Method for Assisted Video Creation Download PDF

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US20100223128A1
US20100223128A1 US12/716,231 US71623110A US2010223128A1 US 20100223128 A1 US20100223128 A1 US 20100223128A1 US 71623110 A US71623110 A US 71623110A US 2010223128 A1 US2010223128 A1 US 2010223128A1
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template
images
image
bin
user
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US12/716,231
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John Nicholas Dukellis
Kaz Hashimoto
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BURNING MOON LLC
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John Nicholas Dukellis
Kaz Hashimoto
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Assigned to BURNING MOON, LLC reassignment BURNING MOON, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: DUKELLIS, JOHN NICHOLAS, HASHIMOTO, KAZ
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N5/00Details of television systems
    • H04N5/222Studio circuitry; Studio devices; Studio equipment ; Cameras comprising an electronic image sensor, e.g. digital cameras, video cameras, TV cameras, video cameras, camcorders, webcams, camera modules for embedding in other devices, e.g. mobile phones, computers or vehicles
    • H04N5/225Television cameras ; Cameras comprising an electronic image sensor, e.g. digital cameras, video cameras, camcorders, webcams, camera modules specially adapted for being embedded in other devices, e.g. mobile phones, computers or vehicles
    • H04N5/232Devices for controlling television cameras, e.g. remote control ; Control of cameras comprising an electronic image sensor
    • H04N5/23245Operation mode switching of cameras, e.g. between still/video, sport/normal or high/low resolution mode
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q30/00Commerce, e.g. shopping or e-commerce
    • G06Q30/02Marketing, e.g. market research and analysis, surveying, promotions, advertising, buyer profiling, customer management or rewards; Price estimation or determination
    • G06Q30/0241Advertisement
    • G06Q30/0251Targeted advertisement
    • G06Q30/0253During e-commerce, i.e. online transactions
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q30/00Commerce, e.g. shopping or e-commerce
    • G06Q30/06Buying, selling or leasing transactions
    • G06Q30/0601Electronic shopping
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q50/00Systems or methods specially adapted for specific business sectors, e.g. utilities or tourism
    • G06Q50/10Services
    • G06Q50/18Legal services; Handling legal documents
    • G06Q50/184Intellectual property management
    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11BINFORMATION STORAGE BASED ON RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN RECORD CARRIER AND TRANSDUCER
    • G11B27/00Editing; Indexing; Addressing; Timing or synchronising; Monitoring; Measuring tape travel
    • G11B27/02Editing, e.g. varying the order of information signals recorded on, or reproduced from, record carriers
    • G11B27/031Electronic editing of digitised analogue information signals, e.g. audio or video signals
    • G11B27/034Electronic editing of digitised analogue information signals, e.g. audio or video signals on discs
    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11BINFORMATION STORAGE BASED ON RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN RECORD CARRIER AND TRANSDUCER
    • G11B27/00Editing; Indexing; Addressing; Timing or synchronising; Monitoring; Measuring tape travel
    • G11B27/10Indexing; Addressing; Timing or synchronising; Measuring tape travel
    • G11B27/19Indexing; Addressing; Timing or synchronising; Measuring tape travel by using information detectable on the record carrier
    • G11B27/28Indexing; Addressing; Timing or synchronising; Measuring tape travel by using information detectable on the record carrier by using information signals recorded by the same method as the main recording
    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11BINFORMATION STORAGE BASED ON RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN RECORD CARRIER AND TRANSDUCER
    • G11B27/00Editing; Indexing; Addressing; Timing or synchronising; Monitoring; Measuring tape travel
    • G11B27/10Indexing; Addressing; Timing or synchronising; Measuring tape travel
    • G11B27/34Indicating arrangements
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N5/00Details of television systems
    • H04N5/222Studio circuitry; Studio devices; Studio equipment ; Cameras comprising an electronic image sensor, e.g. digital cameras, video cameras, TV cameras, video cameras, camcorders, webcams, camera modules for embedding in other devices, e.g. mobile phones, computers or vehicles
    • H04N5/225Television cameras ; Cameras comprising an electronic image sensor, e.g. digital cameras, video cameras, camcorders, webcams, camera modules specially adapted for being embedded in other devices, e.g. mobile phones, computers or vehicles
    • H04N5/232Devices for controlling television cameras, e.g. remote control ; Control of cameras comprising an electronic image sensor
    • H04N5/23293Electronic viewfinders
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N5/00Details of television systems
    • H04N5/222Studio circuitry; Studio devices; Studio equipment ; Cameras comprising an electronic image sensor, e.g. digital cameras, video cameras, TV cameras, video cameras, camcorders, webcams, camera modules for embedding in other devices, e.g. mobile phones, computers or vehicles
    • H04N5/262Studio circuits, e.g. for mixing, switching-over, change of character of image, other special effects ; Cameras specially adapted for the electronic generation of special effects

Abstract

The invention allows for a first set of persons to create and modify templates that contain visual effects, synchronization information, and possibly director assistance. These templates are utilized by a second set of persons to generate personalized motion photo videos from photographs, video segments, personal narratives or animation. Motion photo videos are a novel because they very quickly and inexpensively allow (1) persons to create and modify templates which are synchronized to music and may be easily populated with content by others, and (2) persons to select a song and associated pre-made template and create a high-quality synchronized custom video using hand-selected visual material to populate the template with included direction and without any required editing. Populated material in template can be further modified by additional persons instantly generate new, modified motion photo videos.

Description

  • This nonprovisional utility patent application claims the benefit of the priority date of provisional application No. 61/156,871 filed Mar. 2, 2009.
  • 1.0 BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY
  • The invention allows for a first set of persons to create and modify templates that contain visual effects, synchronization information, and possibly director assistance. These templates are utilized by a second set of persons to generate personalized motion photo videos from photographs, video segments, personal narratives or animation. Motion photo videos are a novel because they very quickly and inexpensively allow (1) persons to create and modify templates which are synchronized to music and may be easily populated with content by others, and (2) persons to select a song and associated pre-made template and create a high-quality synchronized custom video using hand-selected visual material to populate the template with included direction and without any required editing. Populated material in template can be further modified by additional persons instantly generate new, modified motion photo videos.
  • Professionally produced videos require a script of what images to shoot or create. Camera crews then must acquire the footage and the resulting images are processed and modified. Artists then edit content, including when to start and end segments and how to transition between segments in order to tightly synchronize the visual aspects with the specific audio track. Though results are good, the process is expensive, time-consuming, and requires significant technical expertise to use video-editing software. The invention described herein provides a method to significantly reduce the time, cost, and complexity of creating a sophisticated template containing a rich story and allowing further modification of the template for instant creation of videos with customized footage by unsophisticated users.
  • By use of the invention, users with commonly available electronics such as PCs, cameras, and camera-phones will be able to instantly or in real-time create videos that capture events, such as birthdays, vacations, and sports seasons, or moods, such as happiness of being with a friend or the feeling of missing somebody. Users can select, and possibly purchase, a popular song and have a ready-made template into which they can overlay their images for an instant finished product, creating their own customized multi-media video. Videos can also be produced without music though we describe the rest of the invention hereafter utilizing music for clarity of the explanation.
  • Users are guided through the video creation process by sets of instructions and image sequences that are pre-defined by template composers. Any person can be a template composer. These instructions are invaluable to ordinary users as it allows a coherent story to be personalized with their own visuals without the tedium of defining start, stop, and transition images or going through the effort of listing out the order or flow of images to create the story. There are no existing integrated tools that assist users in identifying which images to capture or insert and that allow instant placement of these images in a human-created pre-defined template with the goal of immediate production of a finished video, customized and further modifiable by the user. Existing computer systems require users to modify nearly all aspects of a video or they provide a basic template lacking synchronization defined by humans. The resulting task for the end user is either too complicated or so limiting that the user cannot modify critical aspects. Several automated tools allow for selection of images by a user that are automatically placed into a pre-defined template or a template that is not pre-defined. This invention specifically requires users to select images for placement into bins that are pre-specified. A bin can be considered an object in software that corresponds to a fixed slot of time and contains objects including an image, transition effects, text and/or annotated speech. These bins, and associated data about when and what occurs within the bin, allow for very tight synchronization with the audio source, as well as valuable instruction to the user who is determining which imagery to supply into the bin.
  • There are multiple components in the creation of an MPV: (1) template creation, (2) use of template to assist in the composition of photos in real-time with the purpose of instant MPV creation using existing camera technology or modified camera hardware or software technology for the capture of images to facilitate better MPVs, and (3) use of a template to compose an MPV with pre-existing images with the purpose of creating an MPV. This invention focuses on template creation (1) and use of a template to compose an MPV with pre-existing images with the purpose of creating an MPV (3).
  • 1.1 BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. D1 shows the template creation process by a template composer and subsequent personalization by an end user.
  • FIG. D2 shows an illustration of the time mesh scheduling of template events.
  • FIG. D3 show a taxonomy of template objects.
  • FIG. D4 shows a timing mesh that synchronizes music, images, and transitions.
  • FIG. D5 shows an inter-bin transition GUI based editor
  • FIG. D6 shows an intra-bin transition GUI based editor
  • FIG. D7 shows an intra-transition viewing and editing application with multiple overlapping bins.
  • FIG. D8 show a separated track view mode for bins.
  • FIG. D9 shows an image selection tool.
  • FIG. D10 shows a method to create a focal point or trajectory for the focal point during manipulation of an image during a transition effect.
  • FIG. D11 shows software utilizing pre-existing templates and images to fenerate MPVs.
  • FIG. D13 shows a flow for template enabled image selection and composition.
  • FIG. D16 shows an image screen selector.
  • FIG. D19 shows a camera-based title creation and share screen.
  • 2.0 DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • This invention describes the creation of a template and the subsequent creation of an MPV using a template to assist in the composition and selection of images. This invention focuses on the use of templates with pre-existing images or where images are provided to software utilizing a template to create an MPV. Section 2.1 describes the template creation process and the template object that results. Section 2.2 describes the use of the pre-made template by a user to create an MPV.
  • 2.1 TEMPLATE CREATION
  • Template composers use tools that offer features to define image starts, stops, and transitions, as well as editing features relating to focus, movement, and other operations to be performed on images. Template composers further edit instruction sets for end users by providing instructions about which images should be placed by users in a particular bin, offering wording and/or sample symbolic images. Users can then modify these templates in limited ways by substituting their own images, either acquiring images in real-time based on instructions, or by replacing sample images with already existing images selected by the user. This section begins with a summary of the template creation process in FIG. D1 and is then followed by detailed descriptions of several key components in the process.
  • FIG. D1 summarizes a typical process undertaken by a template composer in the creation of a template. The template composer first chooses a song and then, while listening to the song, cuts the timeline of the song into bins. Each bin is defined by where a new image will begin to appear and where an image will disappear. These bins are tied directly to the timeline of the song and can be edited graphically, with or without an image occupying the bin, for precision as defined below in an object called a time mesh. An image may be defined as a single digital image or photograph, a video object, or an animated video object. The most common use will likely be a single digital photograph per bin and that representation will be used in the following examples and description. However the invention envisions other forms of image related media being used and versions of the software will enable additional forms of images to be used.
  • The time mesh maintains a schedule of template object events. The template objects include bin objects in the form of images or transition effects such as fades, pans and zooms. The template objects also include audio tracks such as music in digital form where the events may include the song beginning and end. An embodiment of a time mesh could be a table where one column contains the event identification tag and another column that represents the time at which the event is executed.
  • Bins are not automatically determined by computer, but may utilize computational tools to assist in the creation of bin boundaries, such as bass patterns, drum beats, voice tracks, or volume levels as described in FIG. D2 (107). These characterizations of an audio signal would provide visual waveforms in organized rows to the template composer, allowing visual understanding of patterns in the music. Bins are more likely to follow the phrasing of a song rather than actual beats in order to make the transitions less routine and contain more feeling. A key element here is that a template composer ultimately determines where the bin boundaries occur, and can easily modify them in the time mesh defined in FIG. D2. This first step after selection of a song is referred to as “Cutting” and is defined in FIG. D1.
  • A template composer may begin the video at a different start time than the song, for example to avoid the crowd cheering at the beginning or to avoid a few second of blank space that exist on one digital copy but not on another, such that the song selected would have an accompanying fingerprint that identifies when the song starts; this fingerprint could be compared to other copies of the song to identify precisely where to begin the song, as well as ensuring the songs are played at the same speed and can arrive at a common endpoint even if one plays longer than another.
  • After completing cutting, the template composer performs inter-bin transitions, also referred to as blending, between bins to define how one bin fades in as another fades out. Blending can be any type of entry of one or more images and/or exit of one or more images. The template composer then creates intra-bin transitions that describes whether a photo zooms in or out, or changes color or undergoes another visual augmentation such as sharpen or fade to grey. The intra-bin transition data is fine tuned to the specific bin, such as placing a fast moving zoom or a fade from color to black and white to match the feeling of the song at that point. The intra-bin transition data is later fine-tuned to the particular image that is placed into a bin so that it captures the full artistic intent of the template composer, such as targeting a zoom on the eyes of a person in an image. Lyrics are then synchronized to the bins if not already included with the song, and the template composer inserts images manually or automatically based on lyrics or image search instructions inserted by the template composer. These images symbolize which types or examples of images an end user could insert to follow the storyline of the video, as appropriate for the specific bin. The template composer can insert additional information such as prompts, cues, or instructions about what images to insert into the bin. Some images inserted by the template composer can have cut-out sections where they serve as backgrounds for parts of images provided by an end user, such as a snowy background with a circle overlay where a person's head appears. The background template image can be inverted so that there are parts provided by the template composer, such as text or other visuals, that overlay over an end user's images. These steps can be completed in any order after the cut occurs, or they can occur simultaneously through use of tools that can capture movement of an individual and be decoded to cause the actions of cut, blend, and intra-bin transitions to occur. The template can then be packaged up and made available to a user who can swap images and perform very limited fine tuning to personalize the video to their liking.
  • 002 in FIG. D1 describes the actions of a user who has received the template on their PC or other electronic device. They are instructed along the series of images in the template about which images to capture or insert at a given bin. These images might originate in real-time from a camera, be supplied by the template composer along with the template, come from a user's existing image library, or originate from the Internet based on keyword information supplied by the template composer or lyrical data. Sliding these images into the template produces a ready-made video. After the user selects the images for each bin, the user can optionally add basic annotations to their liking or as described by the template composer. Finally, the user can upload the video to the Internet where it can be accessed later from other devices. It can be shared in this method by selecting friends with which to share the video or an Internet site on which it may be posted. The video in its entirety consists of the song, images (photos, video, or other imagery), and transition information, all synchronized to the time mesh.
  • FIG. D2 describes an embodiment of the time mesh and how it may be used to schedule the execution of template object events. The template objects may be organized or visualized along a time line in terms of the object type, such image tracks 101, transition tracks 103, time mesh 105, and audio tracks, 107. The template parent object has three main child objects, bins 150 153, time mesh 105 and music/audio objects 132 137. The time mesh object 105 may have two child objects, the event identification 128 and event execution time 130 objects. These two objects contain the schedule of events for all template events and may be stored in the form of a table. Another embodiment may use a time mesh with a single event id that references execution time and instructions. The time mesh may have multiple events with the same execution time when in reality the template and MPV software will order the instructions for the microprocessor. The result between two events executed with milliseconds will likely give the appearance of synchronization to the viewer, and computer processing may combine overlapping instructions when appropriate prior to providing visual or audio output so that the actual output is consistent with all the instruction sets. The events could also be staggered in time, for example in the milliseconds, for other embodiments.
  • The bin parent object 150 includes multiple child objects that include an image 120, inter-bin transitions 124 such as fades, intra-bin transitions 126 such as pans and zooms 126. A given bin 150 is defined by start 151 and end 152 events. In the example shown in FIG. D2, bin 2 overlaps with bin 1 with a fade in 184 as bin 1 fades out 180. The other bins 3-7 are shown here with hard transitions and no fades so that other features can be more easily identified. For example, the time mesh will contain an event id, for example B1S 148 and an event time 149 corresponding to the beginning of bin 1. The time mesh will track the beginning and end of all bins as shown in the figure as bin1 start BS1 and end BE1, bin 2 start B2S and end B2E and continues to bin 7 start BS7 and end BS7. Bins may overlap as shown in bin 5 160 and bin 6 164 where images may be superimposed, e.g. to form a sequence. It is not shown in this figure, but one embodiment might have audio objects that belong to a given parent bin object. One example is the a birthday related template where the last bin has a placeholder for the user to record their a personal birthday greeting. Since the audio object belongs to a given bin it can only be played during the fixed time slot defined for a given bin.
  • The bins will normally be sequenced with the music track but there may be cases where a bin contains a title slide 150 or a credits slide 170 that correspond to silence 137. The silence may be stored as entries in the time mesh or as shown here, the absence of a music track is treated as silence without an explicit time mesh entry. The bin can be considered as a container of objects including a specific image and data such as transition effects that generally applies to an image. The bin exists without any specific image and image data may be replaced or modified at any time. The inter-bin transition objects 124 control the effects associated with the transition of one image to another such as where one image fades out 184 or fades in 180. The fade transition events are recorded in the time mesh with the event id 181 and event execution time 181. The inter-bin transitions will normally overlap from one bin to another. The intra-bin transition objects control how a given bin manipulates an image in terms of composition, such as pans, zooms and color manipulations. One example is the use of pan to move a viewing window from the left of the image to the right where the time mesh contains the pan event id 191 and time 192 associated with the beginning 190 contains information regarding on how the pan is executed in terms of speed and perimeter of the bounding box being viewed. Another example has bins with or without images automatically changes the color throughout the duration of the bin beginning with one part of the color spectrum and gradually changing to another in order to display the intra-bin effect of zoom, pan, or rotate. This color change could be part of the finished video or serve as a tool for creation as it captures the energy of the transition in a visually changing form. The bins may include objects that can and cannot be altered by additional contributors or template users. An example is a non-modified bin at that beginning that adds a corporate branding image or icon with either silence or a short audio segment.
  • The music object 132 exists in digital form as a music file or a digital signature. A digital signature is a digital transformation, such as a wavelet transform, that identifies unique characteristics of a song related to synchronization with bin objects. The digital signature may be used to synchronize a downloaded version of the song to the time mesh by using pattern matching between the templated stored signature and a transformation of the downloaded song. The matching may be as simple as locating the beginning of the downloaded song and meshing it to the song begin event 133. The matching may include convolution of the two signals to find the best match. The matching may include stretching and scaling the two signatures to address situations where the template creation may be done with a different encoding of the song than the song that may be downloaded at a later date. The matching may also include cutting portions of a song, such as the beginning or end, to make the song used by the user consistent with the song used by the template composer, or merging bins or cutting bins out of the MPV to be consistent with the song provided by the user.
  • While the template architecture doesn't require an object oriented software architecture for implementation, a preferred embodiment uses it to allow for an extensible and flexible architecture. This architecture will allow modifications to be made and existing templates to be easily updated without breaking the existing template. For example, if a creator updates their images to use a new inter-bin transition effect the changes can be rolled out across the current template and all modifications thereof. It also allows for reuse of existing template objects for example a company may create several templates based on the advertising campaign with a template for specific products within a given line. In this embodiment, elements of the template for example opening and closing branding, campaign messages and transition effects can be consistent with the images and songs changing. It is also preferred that permissions on each object be maintained so that the template creator can control which objects can and cannot be modified by subsequent template creation contributors or by a template user.
  • A taxonomy of template objects is provided as an example in FIG. D3. In this example the parent template objects has three child objects: bin, time mesh and song. Each of these objects has child objects. For example, each bin object may have an id, image, transition effects and text associated with it. The inter-bin and intra-bin objects have transition effects as described as part of the discussion associated with FIG. D2.
  • Importantly, embodiments may contain instructions which are references to libraries or instruction sets. For example, a template object such as an inter-bin transition may contain a reference call to a particular type of fade. That fade operation may be pre-defined in a library on a particular computing device or camera, or may be able to reference a library or set of instructions online which provide functionality or further reference to where functionality may be attained. The template utilizes reference call made by the fade to the instructions defined in the referenced software or hardware. This structure allows templates to take advantage of pre-existing routines on specific devices. Further, this structure allows updates relating to templates or specific hardware to be made online and referenced by existing templates. A template may contain a reference to another place which contains a reference to yet another place, and this process may contain any number of further references until the actual machine instructions to perform the action are retrieved.
  • Another embodiment maintains a list of contributors where a given template parent object may have additional template children associated with a contributor's modification. In this scenario, the template database may maintain an ‘attribution’ list where each contributor is recognized and automatically added to previous contributors in that inheritance chain. The list may include links to Internet-accessible sites that contain further updates, such as for insertion of new material, or additional referencing, such as modifications that occurred after the creation of the MPV being viewed. Another embodiment allows for the attribution list to share in any commercial proceeds or licensing event.
  • FIG. D4 shows elements of the timing mesh in what is the resulting product of a template composer synchronizing music with images and transitions. It locks items independently to specific points in the song that are determined by the template composer and subsequent modification of parts generally occur independent of each other so that they may stay synchronized to the audio. 260 is a timeline of the song, 270 is a waveform characterizing the audio elements of the song. 250 is a slider to show which part of the song we can see in the box (the grey area indicates the part we see, the white is the entire video/song length). 200 indicates the lyrics that are synched to 220, the filmstrip of photos in order of when they appear. 230 is the previous image, 240 the transition to the next, and 250 the current image being shown. The dashed box around 240 and 250 is the element that is editable as described below. It can also extend to cover the preceding and following transition, or can encompass an image, an intermediate transition, and the following image, such that the encompassed area is editable as described below. 210, the checkboxes, allow certain elements to be displayed so that the composer can view or hide whichever of the aforementioned items are desired as such. They can be dragged up and down to reorder the elements described. 296 allows the filmstrip timeline to be increased or decreased in size, showing correspondingly less or more of the series and allowing easier editing. Template composers can drag sliders to navigate or use buttons as shown. Additionally, they may drag sides of the pictures or transitions to change where they occur in the timeline. The most important aspect of the timing mesh is that all elements here are synched to the timeline and not to each other, such that dragging an image left will change that image, but not the audio or any previous or subsequent images. They are instead locked into the timing mesh independently. The structure of the timing mesh also allows segments of an MPV to be cut and for the contained elements to be reindexed to a time mesh that starts at that segment time, as might occur when combining portions of two MPVs.
  • Template creation is facilitated by a graphical user interface (GUI) that provides visual aids to synchronize image selection and transitions to specific songs. Image transition selections can be described as two classes.
  • Inter-bin transitions describe visual effects associated with the switch from one image, video image sequence or animation to another one image, video image sequence or animation. An inter-bin transition may describe the type and rate of fade from one image to another. The inter-bin transition may be created or described through a graphical user interface (GUI) or could be described in an existing or new programming language.
  • An example of how a GUI might facilitate intra-bin transition is shown in FIG. D6. In this example the intra-bin editor 600 allows for a suggestion box that offers hints, with option for more explanation and image suggestions box. This can be hidden by clicking on the x in the box. Also can the user pull up additional hint information either by clicking on box, placing mouse over box. The main viewing window at 610 shows current image when paused and the changes in image (still or video) when play is pressed. The main viewing window may be in the form of a media player that allows the user to play, stop, pause, reverse or forward their way through a transition sequence.
  • The initial framing of the current image (with effects already in place) indicated at 620; might be zoomed in, altered, or have other visual effects contained within. The initial frame may allow the user to select the initial condition or state before pan and zoom effects are applied. The user can select point on image, indicated at 630, on which to focus, via an optional target tool. User can click to edit or link to, end image or can remove from tool. This also enables a point to stay static during a zoom in or out. The ending framing of image is indicated at 640. As in 630, user can click to edit in a number of ways to control the final state of the pan and zoom effects.
  • As shown at 650 the timeline from start of image to end of image and status indicator. The slider moves automatically with time. User can drag slider to desired point within an image transition or the MPV. A loop button for image transition is shown at 660.
  • The zoom or pan movement in an image might occur linearly, exponentially, logarithmically, or according to another parameter. Oftentimes linear movements do not correspond well to a perception of a consistent movement. Movements of any of the parameters might automatically scale to keep perceptual consistency in mind.
  • As a template composer creates the template, he might utilize a tool such as the image selector tool in FIG. D9. Images can be manually or automatically inserted onto the palette in 910, where each grey box represents a different picture. These images originate from the folders, websites, or other sources described in 900. 920 represents the image from 910 currently selected for insertion into the bin that is contained by the dashed rectangle on the film strip (as described in FIG. D2 at 220). A template composer simply drags an image from the palette into the film strip at the desired location and the image now occupies the bin. The information about transitions and timing already exists with the bin, regardless of the data, though some images may have target data pre-associated with them to assist with transitions, or can be analyzed such that target data is derived automatically where a face might be. There is a resizing button at the bottom of 910 so that images can be resized to fit more images or less images on the palette, as well as sliders to move throughout the palette. Other data may be inserted onto this screen, such as hint information just above 920 that will be supplied to the user to assist in the user's selection of images.
  • The synchronization of the inter-bin and intra-bin image transitions with music represents fixed points in time during the duration of the song and is managed as part of the time mesh. As indicated in FIGS. D4, D5 and D6, elements of the time mesh may be shown visually as a time line that ties the image selection, image transitions, music or lyrics together. Also as shown the GUI may incorporate the use of multiple tracks to aid the user in viewing simultaneous bin, image or song related events, as illustrated in FIGS. D7 and D8. Also the selection of transition effects may be aided by the use of a handheld device that a template creator can sway like a wand or conductor's baton. This may allow the creator to more easily translate how they process the music in their brain to the visual effects that define one or more bins. Other devices may include accelerometer based devices that capture motion, such as dancing or other bodily movement and translate those motions to visual effects during template creation.
  • FIG. D7 provides an embodiment of intra-transition viewing with multiple overlapping bins. 700 is a suggestion box which offers hints for both bins, with option for more explanation and image suggestions box. 710 is the main viewing window, shows current view in video that mixes multiple bins and utilizes the current inter and intra transition effects. This view changes when play is pressed as movie proceeds. Synched up to slider in 5 and timeline at bottom. 720 is the initial framing of the image in bin 1 (with effects already in place); might be zoomed in, altered, or have other visual effects contained within. 722 is the end framing of the image. 730 is the initial framing of the image in bin 2 (with effects already in place); might be zoomed in, altered, or have other visual effects contained within. 732 is the end framing. 740 is the timeline from start of image to end of image and status indicator. Slider moves automatically with time. User can drag slider to desired point. 750 is the main filmstrip showing non-overlapping bins. 760 is the second filmstrip showing bins that overlap with first. There can be multiple filmstrips here, where ever bins overlap (for multiple pictures at one time that are not simply transitioning from one to next). Transitions are shown before and after to indicate when image starts and when it ends, with transitions also covering inter-slide transitions of images before and after. Dashed box refers to section shown in viewer in 710 and consistent with full time bar in 740.
  • Another embodiment of displaying multiple tracks for a composer or user is described in FIG. D8.
  • FIG. D8 provides an example of how bins may be displayed vertically to give the User or Composer an easy method to view how bins proceed over time with respect to time placement of bins and transitions. 800 shows current images occupying given bins. Bins are listed in order from top to bottom. In User Mode, clicking on a bin in this section brings up a screen to assist User in selecting a picture. In Template Composer Mode, clicking on a bin allows the Composer to edit the fields that will be visible to the user, such as keywords, effect, image selection (for multiple images to be recommended), etc. 810 is an up and down arrows allow user to scroll up or down the list of tracks for editing. 820 denotes a visually placed time segment, listed by beats or by a pre-defined time period such as seconds. 830 is a bin, placed on the horizontal axis at the time it is to begin being shown, and the transition time in and out. The shaded boxes indicate transitions. The clear boxes are where the image is full (though likely involved in an intra-bin transition). In Composer Mode, bins can be dragged to a different time, stretched, copied, or modified in other ways. Clicking on a box allows the Composer to modify the bin and its characteristics. 840 is a timeline (horizontal) of the currently shown section; the current time being played (vertical shaded bar). 850 is a track-size slider allows the tracks to be shrunk in size so that more tracks can appear, allowing the composer or user to view the full set of tracks for a video or just the current set being viewed. 860 is a timeline size slider that allows larger or shorter periods of time to be represented by the timeline. Composers require fine tuning of tracks and this method can act like a microscope, or allow the full video to be viewed on one screen.
  • FIG. D9 also provides an idea of how an end user might drag their images into the filmstrip to personalize a template to their tastes. Certain features would likely be disabled for the end user that are accessible to the template composer, or which may be unlocked by an end user who assumes the role of a template composer. In the above it is assumed that the template composer and the end user are separate individuals, though they certainly could be the same individual. Additionally, any template composer could begin working from a pre-existing template, whether partially or fully complete, in order to modify the template to their liking. Any user could modify a template, whether in original form or already modified by another user, to suit their taste. For example, a friend may receive a video full of picture from a birthday party and choose to swap one picture of the birthday boy with an old picture of the birthday boy from childhood. There would likely be tracking data associated with changes over time and a possibly a repository in which the old versions and the associated data are stored. Access to different features of modification would depend on the licensing terms entered into by the various parties. For example it may be necessary to purchase a copy of the song or template in order to modify a friend's video, or even to purchase one or more copies of the song before it may be shared with others. Some of these rules might enable access to an existing copy of a song already residing on a friend's computer that would need to be referenced at run-time. The fingerprinting of the song in order to synchronize start times is of particular importance in this instance.
  • Elements from FIGS. D4, D5, D6, D7, D8, and D9 may be combined to display a set of data to allow composers and users to view and modify aspects of an MPV most efficiently for their specific purposes.
  • FIG. D10 illustrates the mathematics of a tool available to template composers and possibly end users which allows an image to have a point on the photo which stays static in it position on the screen while the photo is zoomed in or out. For example, a point between the eyes is selected as in the above illustration and while the image zooms out, the point between the eyes stays in exactly the same position on the screen. The target tool shown in FIG. D6 would allow these two points on the Start and End images to be locked together and move together if the user changes which part of the image is shown on the screen. For example, when locked, if the first image is moved down so that more of the head shows, the second would move in lock step to keep the point between the eyes consistent in the before and after. The second image would therefore be constrained in where it could move; its movement would require the first to also move. This tool could occur automatically, semi-automatically, or manually; the software may suggest points on the image using algorithms to detect likely targets, such as eyes or planets.
  • The next section provides an example of how a user might utilize the templates create by template composer. The template is used with a camera or camera equipped device to compose or capture images in real-time.
  • 2.2 IMAGE COMPOSITION AND SELECTION USING TEMPLATE OBJECTS
  • This section provides an example of how a user might utilize the templates created by a template composer to select images. As shown in FIG. D11, the template software or software associated with a template may provide four types of functions as part of the MPV creation process. The first function is that it provides ‘opportunity’ by allowing for one or more templates to be downloaded or shipped with the computing device and providing immediate access to the template at any time. The availability of multiple templates further provides the opportunity for the user to match a given setting or event with an appropriate template to create a personalized MPV.
  • The second function is that the template or software associated with a template will ‘assist’ the user in the composition of the image such as the placement of the primary subject relative to a background or landscape or the movement of the subject for a sequence or burst of images. The third function is that the template or software associated with a template may provide instructions to the user or the images regarding settings, such as depth of focus or flash settings, for one or more image captures. The fourth function is that the template or software associated with a template enables the user to view existing sample images on the digital display, view and select one or more captured images for a given bin thus replacing a given template sample image and finally viewing the finished MPV on the display. The template processing unit may be in the form of a software module that resides within memory and is executed on a digital device or it could be a separate integrated circuit component configured for template operations. The template software may be downloaded and the software associated with a template may be embedded into the digital device. The software associated with a template that may be embedded into the device will likely interpret a given template object to assist, capture, place images and view the final result. In either case, the template processing unit (constructed in software or hardware) communicates with the digital display and various selection or modification functions presented in FIGS. D4 through D9.
  • As described in Section 2.1, each template is associated with a particular song and has fixed bins for which a user will choose images. The preferred embodiment is that the song is available so that the user can hear the song while composing and capturing the images and that it may provide a richer experience. However in other cases the song may not be available for download or included with the template and the invention includes the use of the template without the song as well. The synchronization of the sample images and the music is done during template creation so the replacement of the sample images with new images for a given bin can still occur.
  • The resulting MPV can be sent from the computing device to another person's computing device. There are multiple ways to do this. One method is for User A to email the completed MPV to another person, Recipient B, who receives the MPV or a link to a server where the MPV may be downloaded. In the case where the template is associated with a commercially available song, User A may choose to purchase the song for the Recipient B and their MPV is downloaded with the associated song. User A may choose not to purchase the song and Recipient B receives a URL link to download the MPV and purchase the song. User A may choose not to purchase the song and Recipient B receives the MPV and is prompted to purchase the song when they try to play it. User A may choose not to purchase the song and Recipient B receives the MPV and already owns the song which resides on a device that is used to view the MPV. The invention includes the various combinations of transmitting MPV and the associated songs or the various combinations of sending links to locations where MPVs and songs may be downloaded.
  • FIG. D13 provides an embodiment of the process for an end user operating software that utilizes a template to create an MPV. In this case the user will select photos though other similar embodiments would include video, animations, text, or other visual materials. The user starts by choosing a song, mood, or theme 2000 for which to create a video. The user can view templates 2010 built on that song, mood, or theme to identify which template will be selected for modification. There may be multiple templates made by a variety of template composers that are all built upon an identical song. In 2020 the user selects the template to use, possibly including the purchase of the song and template at this stage. In 2030 the user views the instructions contained within the template about characteristics of the images to select for placement into a bin, a series of bins (most likely in the form of a list). In 2040 the user begins to look at the first bin which requires an image, and in 2050 instructions and lyrics about what the image should contain are included. Additionally, while in this bin the corresponding section of the song may play so that the user can feel mood of the music and hear lyrics. In 2060, a user takes one or more multiple pictures which are stored into the currently selected bin. One of these images will occupy the bin and that image will be selected in 2070 by the user. It may default to the last picture taken in the bin. Certain bins may require multiple images to be included and these could be selected from the bin. In 2080 the user proceeds to the next bin either automatically after selecting an image or manually indicating to proceed. After the last bin is filled, 2090 allows the user to view the full movie with their images. After viewing, in 2100 the user has the option to share, upload, or gift the video. In 2110 the user has the opportunity to further edit the video on a PC or other mobile device such as a digital camera, digital frame, mobile handset, or other electronic device that offers a user the ability to download the video and its parts and provide further commands for replacing images in various bins.
  • There may be additional steps in FIG. D13 and the listed steps may be skipped or performed in a different order. In one embodiment, there would be no lyrics or written suggestions, but there would be sample images in bins that the user would view but replace. In another embodiment, colors are used to indicate what types of images to place into different bins. In another embodiment, the user points to a group of images which are placed automatically into the bins in a random or semi-random order and the user is able to arrange them as they desire while watching the video with these images.
  • Other various optional steps are included in the dashed boxes in the right column in 2011 through 2081. For example in 2011 a user may view multiple templates for a given song at the same time in order to see the differences as they occur. One template video could be on the left and a second on the right. 2021 allows for purchase of a song or template at a given point in the process, which could also occur in 2041 when gifting to another person. 2051 allows a user to move between bins as they desire, allowing images to be captured out of order as the user desires. 2061 gives the user the opportunity to view all or a segment of the video at a given time, or could allow a given bin to loop through the various images in the bin so the user can see how they look. 2062 allows many images to be referenced to a bin for easy reference at a later point in time even though they are not the image being used in the MPV in the bin slot. The real-time reference to a bin is an improvement over the current requirement that a user taking many photos at a given time would have to perform the binning assignment to a set of photos later on as they decide which image to select, without the benefit of music and requiring the user to remember what goes where, particularly for photos taken out of sequence of the bins. 2062 helps organize the assignment of the images taken in 2061 and avoid confusion later. 2071 allows the user to find photos previously taken and place them into the selected bin, or allows the user to locate and select other symbolic images that may have been downloaded with the template for particular bins. The user may also choose an image from several that appear from a search on keywords relating to the bin or from previous images taken that reside in other folders. 2081 allows annotation of images or blank bins, or allows basic editing of selected images such as red-eye reduction, targeting which area to focus on in the image as it moves, or resizing the viewable part of an image.
  • 2.2.1 Opportunity
  • The opportunity function described in FIG. D11 relates to items 2000, 2010, 2011, 2020, and 2021 in FIG. D13. One embodiment is indicated in FIG. D12 as an system where the functions are already integrated either in hardware, software, or a combination. In one case digital device is sold to consumers pre-loaded with the ability view and select templates as well as create an MPV after selection. In another case a user download software that allows for template viewing and modification onto a more generalized device such as a mobile phone, game system, or personal computer that is capable of downloading software applications and already contains the necessary hardware to store, view, and utilize templates. There are also embodiments that utilize pre-existing functionality in the device, including pre-loaded software for the creation of MPVs, that utilize download features to further update software that resides locally on the device for the creation of MPVs or addition of templates.
  • In one embodiment the downloaded software may contain templates or portions of templates for the user to choose from locally on the device as in 2010. While not required, there would likely be navigational utilities to help in the selection of templates, guiding a user through the selection of moods, themes, or songs. As an example, a user may key in a mood such as happiness or melancholy. The device would then search for templates that are resident on the device or resident on a server to which it can communicate to select templates that have been identified with that particular mood. Templates, portions of the templates, or descriptive information about the templates, such as a song the template is based on, would then be delivered to the user. Different methods for ranking and ordering the templates would be employed, such as which is most popular by purchase in the last week, which has been rated highest by viewers, or which are associated with template composers that gained reputations for creating quality templates. The user would then receive an ordered list of templates organized one or several of these ranking methods that provide available templates to choose from. The user may then view these templates as in 2010 to see what they like best. While viewing a specific template, the software may provide other guides such as a suggestion that users who viewed particular templates ended up purchasing other templates, possibly including the percent of users who purchased each after viewing the current template.
  • A user might also choose to select a theme such as Christmas or Halloween. The user might undergo a similar process as indicated in mood, being provided a list of templates ranked by a variety of methods. The user might also utilize both a theme and a mood to select the templates to view. In one example a user selects “Halloween” and then “funny”, providing a list of templates that are closest to these parameters. Other templates that might be related to “Halloween” and “classic” but not related to “funny” would not be shown. Other criteria for any search might be that a template's cost is free, is within a certain price range, or is freely distributable to others. The same might apply to a template's music which might be free, within a certain price range, or be freely distributable. Other options may be available such as the ability to include advertising within an MPV in order to offset the cost of the template or music, or templates which are free if the user provides rights to freely distribute or showcase the finished MPV to a software provider. The intent of the navigational utilities is to provide an easy method for users to select a mood, theme, or song that fits their desired criteria as quickly as possible and that provides the most utility to the user, be it popularity, quality, or other criteria.
  • Another method for search might be by song. The software may provide users an list of templates, organized by any of a number of criteria, such as the highest-rated templates based on a particular song or artist, the most current Billboard chart toppers, the highest ranked in any of a number of musical genres such as Country Music or R&B, the most recently purchased templates, templates that have had the finished MPV most distributed, songs that have the most templates, templates ranked as highest quality by one or more groups, templates that are most relevant to purchases already made by the user or to a user's demographic as defined by the user, by the software provider, or by a third party such as a DJ in a genre or subscribed to by the user. Keywords are also obvious selection criteria for templates, and might include song names, musical artist names, musical album names, lyrics associated with the template, or synonyms of any of these. The software might provide results based on a match of keywords and other ranking criteria, such as a blend of the keyword and popularity.
  • Such a search selection of templates could occur directly on the device. Certain templates which are most likely to be purchased may be preloaded into the software and available for a user immediately, possibly with a purchase required. Other search results would likely come from a connection to a user's computer or to the Internet. The device user could browse the available templates or browse template information provided from the Internet, which would be delivered to the device as search criteria were provided to a server containing template information via the Internet. The user might then download selected templates for purchase or for previewing directly onto the device.
  • A computer may also be used for template selection. Software for template selection (and possibly MPV creation or template editing) might contain many preloaded templates ready for viewing or use. The user might view these on a PC and select which they would like to place onto the camera with the intent of creating an MPV. A computer might also allow for the downloading to a related device. For example a user might download an MPV or a template to a pre-registered device such as a camera or a digital frame that has another means of connecting to the Internet such as through wireless telephone networks, through wireless connections to a local area network, or where a device is connected, wired or wirelessly, to another computer accessible by the Internet such as that for a family member located elsewhere.
  • In many cases, a user will be required to log into an account prior to accessing or purchasing templates. The account might contain credits or value that a user has access to for the purchase of music, a template, or both. It might also contain MPVs that were purchased or created by the user, or gifted to the user by another, either as a rental or perpetually licensed gift, possibly with ability to view future variations or updates to a given MPV template.
  • Another embodiment for MPV creation allows the user to view pre-created video or image footage and select parts of the footage to insert into a selected template. In this instance, a user might download both a template and one or more hours of footage which they would watch. Such a device need not contain image capture since the raw image footage would already be provided. The template might offer suggestions about what images or video to place into the bins. The images or video might be further editable, such as cropping, rotating, or changing color. The user would then be able to create the MPV based on these images. High resolution images may reside on a server and be accessible during the MPV creation process or after a required purchase. In such a case the MPV creation software would note the time of a particular image in the video being watched and be able to reference the higher resolution image from this time data. The MPV could then be created on the device locally or on a server and delivered to the device or to the user's account for further distribution. The footage viewed by a user may or may not be related to particular template.
  • 2.2.2 Assist
  • The assist function described in FIG. D11 relates to items 2030, 2040, 2041, 2050, 2051, and 2070 in FIG. D13. The goal of the assist function is to improve the imagery captured and selected by users by providing users with educational information before and during the image capture and selection process. Information fed into the assist function is generally provided or chosen by the template composer. Some examples of features provided in the assist function are illustrated in FIGS. D11 and D13.
  • FIG. D16 provides an example of how a user might utilize the templates create by template composers, as indicated in the Personalization portion of FIG. D1. FIG. D16 illustrates a screen being utilized by a user who has already created images and wants to place them into an MPV. The user may have gone through the process of capturing images with a live camera and placed them into bins, may have images that came with the template, may have searched for additional images using a search engine, or may have accessed images previously taken by the user. This tool allows the user to easily view lots of images and select the proper image for the bin, then moving on to the next bin and repeating the process as needed. The selection process could occur on a portable device, such as a camera, to augment parts of an MPV that the user desires to modify with pre-existing pictures.
  • 2500 shows folders that contain images (still or video). Users can add more folders, including websites that contain images. 2502 displays a visual list of images from the folders listed in 2500. Images can be dragged into the Time-synched Energy Template to replace an existing image. Images can be grouped by “Your Images Taken” or by pre-loaded “Suggested Images” that are supplied with the template or taken from a web search based on keywords of the image. 2506 displays instruction for User of what type of image to select. 2508 shows lyrics for User of current bin. 2510 shows currently selected picture from 2502. 2508 displays lyrics for User. 2514 shows the timeline of images, including at least prior, current, and next. 2516 shows the current image occupying the current bin. It is consistent with 2510. 2518 shows the transition into current image occupying bin. 2520 shows controls for moving forward/backward in time or to next/prior bin. 2522 shows a view-size slider which allows images in 2514 to be made larger or smaller. 2524 shows a volume control slider. 2526 shows a menu button that brings up additional options including selecting images to show, moving bins, saving progress, changing screens, turning on or off optional features (e.g. lyrics) etc.
  • The assist function may provide additional features to those in FIG. D14, D15, and D16. Features, including some of those mentioned in the earlier Figures, include the following.
      • A list which can be viewed on a display, where each item refers to a bin and includes keywords. The list can be viewed on the device display, emailed, viewed on a PC, or viewed in another way.
      • The ability to view a library of images pre-selected for bins by template composers, images placed into bins of MPVs previously made by users, images from local or online libraries, images from online communities, images from linked friends in online communities, or images that have been processed and possess visual characteristics, any of which might or might not be tagged with keywords consistent with the template composer's instructed keywords.
      • The ability to view a list of images pre-selected by a template composer or third party which has instructions about the positive characteristics about the image, including what a user should try to do in composing an image for a particular bin.
      • The ability to view multiple images in a bin in an MPV at the same time, or to view images designated for a single bin in sequence in a loop, possibly included a prior and/or next image.
      • The auto-detection of characteristics within an image, such as a face that might fit into a pre-defined area of a background image
      • Instructions for a user to take multiple images that could be automatically cropped or super-imposed, possibly in a sequence over time. Images might be taken in certain portion of the viewfinder, or be full-sized images which are resized and placed into the prescribed position.
      • Instructions that can be toggled on or off to guide a user in the placement and sizing of a subject.
      • Lyrics that can be toggled on or off for a particular bin
      • Automatic selection of the point of focus on an image
      • Manual selection of the point of focus of an image using instructions on what to place the focus on, such as a building, a persons eyes, a river, or other object
      • Automatic selection of one image for each bin from a pool of images marked as belonging to a particular bin to be placed in the bin for the creation of an MPV, or the ability to watch an MPV that selects from a designated pool of images for each bin.
      • A service whereby an image can be uploaded and commented on, edited, or modified by a third party, providing the user with guidance about the quality of the image and what could improve the image.
      • A service whereby the images taken by a user, possibly many images that may or may not be designated for specific bins, would be transmitted to professionals or third-parties, possibly be edited or cut, and placed into bins to form an MPV for the user.
      • Any combination of the above.
    2.2.4 View
  • The view function described in FIG. D11 relates to items 2090 in FIG. D13. Users can view MPVs with sample images, view their own with final images, view with different images being placed into a single bin to help decide which to select, or viewed semi-randomly where images are placed into the MPVs according to some selection criteria such as bins containing multiple images or such as images in any available library matching tags on the bin. Viewing is also possible on other devices, such as digital picture frames, or through output to another device by sending a digital or analog output signal such as connecting the camera to a TV for viewing the MPV. Viewing may occur at variable rates of volume (including no volume), occur at variable rates of speed for faster or slower playback, utilize standard navigational icons including play, pause, go to end, go to beginning, fast forward, rewind, and varying degrees of fast forward and rewind. Users may also watch an MPV in a mode where the bins can be modified as they are watched, such as changing a point of focus or amount of zoom, or use accelerometers, gyroscopes, or other physical movement sensors to modify the MPV as it is being viewed, such as pulsing to a physical movement or panning based on turning the device. In some of the instances, images. higher resolution images, or a rendered video would need to be downloaded into the viewing device so that the MPV could be assembled or viewed.
  • 2.2.5 Share
  • Users may share an MPV in complete or partially complete form. One method is to email the MPV file and possibly associated files, as a movie file or collection of MPV-related files that would be accessed during playback for construction of the video. Another method is to upload MPV files to a server where they can be accessed by others, possibly through an account they have set up on the server. If license fees are required, users may have already paid for certain users to be able to view the video, or they may allow others to purchase necessary rights to view the video. Purchase fees might allow for ability to modify part or all of the MPV. An MPV on a server may also be rendered and shared as a non-modifiable movie or MPV file rather than modifiable MPV files. Users might also use other transfer techniques such as Bluetooth technology for wireless transmission or a USB cable to share from one device to another, or be allowed to burn files onto a CD so they can be transferred to another user.
  • FIG. D19 describes a likely scenario for a user has just completed personalizing an MPV with his own images. At this point a user may desire to place a title and share the MPV with friends. 2800 shows an area where User can change title of the video. 2810 shows an area where User can select email addresses of others to share video with. 2820 shows an area where User can upload video to backend service and User can access from other computer or device
  • There may be various other embodiments not described here that achieve the spirit of the invention to accomplish these desired tasks with the combined objectives of simplicity of use and maximum intensity of effect. The novel features and advantages of the invention are described in the next section and capture key elements of a larger set of embodiments that achieve the spirit of the invention.
  • 2.3 APPLICATIONS OF MPV BEYOND VIDEO USAGE
  • One application of MPVs beyond video creation and viewing is for video games. The user would either be able to take images in real time and receive a score for the sequence or individual images. Alternatively the user might be required to size and place a rectangle inside existing pictures in order to cut the images, after which the user would receive a corresponding score based on how well the image was cut. Many variations could play on this such as determining the rotation or the point of focus. Scoring an image could take place automatically or could rely on a service of live humans that rates the modified image or the chosen effect. Educational opportunities could arise from this as well, such that the game is marketed as an educational utility to help improve the image capture of aspiring photographers or children. Some of these may come with preloaded footage as described earlier such that the final images are demonstrated to the user as a collection of preferred images. In other games, there could be specific points where the user needs to cut a song according to some criteria they are judged against, such as certain beats or accents. Users might be required to move the device according to the effect that is happening such as down or up or rotated based on movement of an image.
  • Another videogame example is a treasure hunt, where children are directed to find and capture particular objects. Instructions might occur by audio instructions or written instructions, or use images that possess the desired quality the child is searching for such as “red” or “three” or “building” or “Mickey Mouse”. The child would then take photos of the items as each bin requests, and at the end of the exercise the video would be created automatically using the items captured, synched to some type of pre-defined music. Images of the child might be overlaid with the items found. Items might also need to fit within certain areas on a screen to ease in the video editing, and the direction or display screen would assist the user.
  • Videobooks are another application. Videobooks can either physically display several images from video sequences in a print form similar to a comic book, or may digitally offer video sequences similar to an advanced feature digital frame capable of displaying sound and music. For example, a user might be able to take screen shots every one second or take series of shots in close together in a video sequence and then compile with others so that a story from the book emerges in print form. There might be 20, 50, 100, or more photos in the sequence, likely arranged by bin. Lyrics or comments might be included for a given bin. Images would likely contain effects that had been performed in the MPV so that a series of images, for example, zooms in or pans in similarly to the MPV.
  • The portable device may also be used in the semi-automated creation of templates. Any type of sensors, such as accelerometers, could be used to capture human movement as a song occurs. That data could then be interpreted to provide cuts, pans, zooms, blends, and other effects. Input devices used to collect this data might be external to the device but plug into the device with a cable or use a wireless communication technology such as Bluetooth to send information to the device.

Claims (31)

1. The use of a template providing visual direction on a display to guide a user in the selection of an existing image or sequence of images to be placed in the template.
2. the method of 1. where the template is displayed using software residing on a processor enabled digital device such as a personal computer, web server, phone, or other computing device that provides a visual representation and where the template may include sample images and music synchronized with a given template.
3. the methods of 1 or 2 where multiple templates reside on the device and provide the user with a choice of one or more templates and where the templates may be related to a particular theme, song, mood or event.
4. the methods of 1, 2 or 3 where the template includes instructions specifying inter-image transitions such as image-to-image fades or intra-image transitions such as pan and zoom effects and where the transitions may be synchronized to music.
5. the methods of 1, 2, 3 or 4 where the templates are downloaded through a wired or wireless connection from a database of templates that may reside on a server or are downloaded via the internet to a client type computer.
6. the methods of 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 where the user is assisted in the selection of an image or sequence of images relative to subject positioning with regard to backgrounds, landscapes or other subjects
7. the methods of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 where the user is assisted by visual indicators shown on the display of the device, including the use of shapes to dictate the placement of a subject, such as position of the subjects eyes relative to a particular location and where the location may include a sample image with the location indicated.
8. the methods of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 where the template is synchronized with music and where the music is played for the user as part of importing images or image sequences into the template and where the combination of music and the template aids in the selection of an image, selection of a transition effect or some additional modification to the image, such as a transition from gray scale to color or transitions between multiple images taken in a sequence.
9. the methods of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 to arrange or organize a selection of previously captured images in a palette and where the images are selected according to criteria associated with the mood, song or theme of a given template and where keywords or labels associated with a set of images are used to select and arrange them for importing into a given template.
10. the methods of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 where the template suggests the use of multiple images taken at different settings where the settings may include depth of focus, shutter speed, ISO level, flash intensity or synchronization or focal point or where additional software recognizes or organizes images based on depth of focus, shutter speed, ISO level, flash intensity or synchronization or focal point.
11. the use of methods 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, or 10 where software is used to graphically display a template with a sample image and a media player is provided that synchronizes the images transitions to music and where additional images may be provided to show the beginning and end of the intra-image transitions such as a pan or zoom effect and where the media player may be used to view the inter-image transitions from sample image to sample image, such as fade effect, style or rate.
12. the use of methods 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 or 11 to generate a motion photo video consisting of a sequence of images synchronized to music, stored in the form of a software object, where the object may be a video or the set imported images with a computer instruction set to specify the template style or transition effects.
13. the transfer of a motion photo video in method 12 or template object used to generate a motion photo video in method 12 from one device to a another digital device such as a computer, phone, television, frame, digital book, printer, disk drive or digital media such as a DVD, CD, flash or USB based memory device through wired or wireless communication.
14. the embedding of the motion photo video or populated template object resulting from method in 12 in a personal or commercial webpage, either through the direction of the user or automated through software residing on a personal computer, web server, or other computing device.
15. the sending of the motion photo video or populated template object resulting from the method in 12 to another person via email where the object is sent or a link is sent where the object can be downloaded.
16. the use of methods 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 that includes the purchase of a song or some form of a digital media license for music, where the music is associated with or linked to a given template or where the sending of an object or link of an object to another person results in the purchase of a song or some form of a digital media license for music
17. the transfer of the motion photo video object resulting from method 12 through wired or wireless communications from one device to another.
18. the viewing of the motion photo video object resulting from method 12 on a display such as a television, digital frame, digital book, phone or personal computer display.
19. a strategy for selling music that includes the provision of a visual template synchronized to a particular song that allows images to be imported by a user, where the synchronization is in the form of software that specifies inter-image and intra-image transition effects.
20. a strategy for selling digital display devices for displaying the motion photo video object resulting from method 12 and where the display may include electronics that communicate with other electronic devices to receive the motion photo video object through a wired or wireless connection.
21. a strategy for advertising products or services by displaying or broadcasting the motion photo video resulting from method 12.
22. the use of method 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12 to create an advertisement that may be co-sold or co-branded with a particular song or that may be related to a specific template.
23. the method or 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, or 11 where one person creates the template specifying a sequence of visual effects and a second person utilizes the template to select images to which the visual effects are applied in order to generate a motion photo video resulting from method 12.
24. the method of 23 where a template may be created by one person, where the template may be modified by one or more additional persons, and where the images are selected by a third person, where the third person uses the modified template to select content to be placed into the template to create a motion photo video resulting from method 12.
25. the method of 23 or 24 where one person selects images to be placed into a template to generate a motion video resulting from method 12, and where a second person may replace one or more images in the resulting template object, and where a new motion photo video is generated from new content in template object by the process described in method 12.
26. the use of methods 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, or 11 where an update is applied to a template which causes the initial motion photo video created by earlier versions of the populated template object to be updated with the changes to the template object, which may include changes to timing, inter-transition bins or their effects, or other visual effects, where the same content used by the person to generate the initial motion photo video in method 13, along with the modified visual effects from the update, is used to generate the new motion photo video.
27. the use of method 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, or 11 where the template is generated with the aid of a a visual representation of the music, such as a frequency transformation, energy or volume profiles at a particular frequency, lyrics in text form, amplitude or volume of a vocal track, which assist the user in determining bin properties, inter-bin transitions or intra-bin transitions with respect to the music.
28. The use of a template software object that contains one or more bin software objects, each of which that has one or more child objects associated with it such as an image, inter-bin transitions, intra-bin transitions, speech annotations, background or text, where the bins are part of a template object which schedules the display of images with any visual effects associated with the bin at the time prescribed by the template software object or bin object, where the template object is used to create a motion photo video, and where images in bins may be determined by or replaced by users, manually or automatically, to alter how a template object is populated and generate new motion photo videos.
29. The use of method 28 where the properties of the bin software object, such as intra-bin transition effects or timing of the bin, may be modified by a person so that a third person may populate, manually or automatically, the modified template object with images or additional audio to generate a new motion photo video.
30. An apparatus, such as an accelerometer based device that aids the user in selecting visual effects such as intra-bin transitions or inter-bin transitions associated with the music as part of generating the template objects used in methods 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, or 29.
31. The licensing or selling of the template object created in methods 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 26, 27, or 28 by one person to another person.
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