US20100186334A1 - Metal roofing shingle, metal roofing shingle system, and method of installing - Google Patents

Metal roofing shingle, metal roofing shingle system, and method of installing Download PDF

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US20100186334A1
US20100186334A1 US12360369 US36036909A US20100186334A1 US 20100186334 A1 US20100186334 A1 US 20100186334A1 US 12360369 US12360369 US 12360369 US 36036909 A US36036909 A US 36036909A US 20100186334 A1 US20100186334 A1 US 20100186334A1
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shingle
segment
edge segment
metal
roof
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US12360369
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Charles T. Seem
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Seem Charles T
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D1/00Roof covering by making use of tiles, slates, shingles, or other small roofing elements
    • E04D1/12Roofing elements shaped as plain tiles or shingles, i.e. with flat outer surface
    • E04D1/18Roofing elements shaped as plain tiles or shingles, i.e. with flat outer surface of metal
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D1/00Roof covering by making use of tiles, slates, shingles, or other small roofing elements
    • E04D1/28Roofing elements comprising two or more layers, e.g. for insulation
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D15/00Apparatus or tools for roof working
    • E04D15/02Apparatus or tools for roof working for roof coverings comprising tiles, shingles, or like roofing elements
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D3/00Roof covering by making use of flat or curved slabs or stiff sheets
    • E04D3/40Slabs or sheets locally modified for auxiliary purposes, e.g. for resting on walls, for serving as guttering; Elements for particular purposes, e.g. ridge elements, specially designed for use in conjunction with slabs or sheets
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49616Structural member making
    • Y10T29/49623Static structure, e.g., a building component
    • Y10T29/49629Panel

Abstract

The present invention is directed to a metal roofing shingle system comprising universal flashing installed as either a ridge cap, hip flashing, or valley flashing and including non-visible double-flanged interlock joints that extend beneath the underside surface of the flashing, the interlock joints are adapted to couple with metal shingles; each metal shingle having a planar segment, a first longitudinal edge segment opposite a second longitudinal edge segment that includes a non-visible double-flanged interlock joint that extends beneath the bottom surface of the shingle, and a first transverse edge segment opposite a second transverse edge segment that includes a non-visible double-flanged compression joint that extends beneath the bottom surface of the shingle; and shingle shaping tools.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to a sheet metal roofing system for installation on a pitched roof beginning at the ridge and ending at the eave, and in particular, it is directed to a sheet metal roofing system that includes a) metal shingles with self-sealing, non-visible interlock joints that provide watertight connections between adjacent shingles without the application of sealant materials, b) universal flashing that includes non-visible interlocking joints adapted to couple with the metal shingles when the universal flashing member is installed as either a ridge cap, hip flashing, or valley flashing, and c) shingle shaping tools that reshape edges of the metal shingles; the combination non-visible interlocking joints, reshaped shingle edges, and an applied paint system providing a sheet metal roofing system having the appearance of slate shingles, terracotta tiles, or like roofing materials.
  • Water penetration between adjacent metal shingles is a well known problem in the art. Such water problems are most severe in roofs having a moderate pitch, for example between about a 2 in 12 and 4 in 12 roof pitch. The shallower the pitch, the greater the potential for a roof leak. Roof leaks can occur by capillary action, among other reasons, and such water penetration is both difficult to detect and difficult to prevent. There have been various attempts in the past to overcome roof leak problems associated with metal roofing shingles. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 1,519,350 discloses a sheet metal shingle installed from the roof ridge to the eve. The metal shingle includes interlocking joints along the top or weather surface that couple adjacent shingles together. Such exposed joints between shingles are pelted with rain, sleet, and snow and are prone to water penetration. The patent also discloses a ridge cap section that is distinctively different from the valley flashing used with the metal shingles.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 3,394,515 shows a deformable gasket in a channel along a side edge of a roofing panel. The gasket forms a seal with an interlocking edge of an adjacent panel.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,349,801 discloses metal shingles where it is necessary to apply a sealant material, at the job sight, along the joints that interlock adjacent shingles, and the patent specifically teaches that it is important to form a good bond between the applied sealant and the shingle surface. This creates the possibility of having a poor quality seal and potential roof leakage that the present invention overcomes.
  • Accordingly, there is a long felt need in the art for a metal roofing shingle system with universal flashing and unexposed interlocking joints that resist water penetration without a need for on site applied caulks, sealants, adhesives, or the like, as well as providing a roofing system that is especially suited for application on a shallow pitched roof.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Accordingly, it is a first object of the present invention to provide a watertight metal roofing shingle system having metal roofing shingles installed starting at the roof ridge cap and ending at the roof eave edge.
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide a watertight metal roofing shingle system having no exposed connection joints between adjacent the metal roofing shingles so that the finished metal roofing system has an uninterrupted slate like appearance.
  • It is still another object of the present invention to provide a metal roofing shingle system that includes universal flashing with interlock joints that couple to the metal roofing shingles.
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide a metal roofing shingle system whereby, in one embodiment, the universal flashing member is installed as a ridge cap and the interlock joints extend along the underside surface of the ridge cap so that the coupled shingle connection is not visible and is unexposed to weather conditions.
  • In another embodiment, the universal flashing member is installed as hip flashing along the external angle formed by two different sloping roof sections and the interlock joints extend along the underside surface of the ridge cap so that the coupled shingle connection is not visible and is unexposed to weather conditions.
  • In still another embodiment, the universal flashing member is installed inverted as valley flashing along the angle where two different roof sections intersect, the inverted interlock joints coupling with intersecting metal roofing shingles to prevent both water and wind damage.
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide a metal roofing shingle with unexposed, interlocking compression joints that provide a watertight connection between adjacent shingles.
  • It is still another object of the present invention to provide a metal roofing shingle with unexposed, interlocking compression joints that provide a watertight connection between adjacent shingles without the application of gaskets, or applied beads of caulk, or like materials.
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide a metal roofing shingle system having unexposed interlocking joints, in combination with modified gable end and eve edge treatments, and in combination with selected paint systems, that furnish a faux slate or a faux terracotta tile roof system.
  • It is still another object of the present invention to provide a lightweight sheet metal roofing system that suitable for installation over existing asphalt roofing shingles.
  • In satisfaction of the foregoing objects and advantages, the present invention provides a metal roofing shingle system comprising universal flashing installed as either a ridge cap, hip flashing, or valley flashing and including non-visible double-flanged interlock joints and interlock compression joints that extend along the underside of the flashing, the interlock joints adapted to couple with metal shingles; metal shingles having a planar segment, a first longitudinal edge segment opposite a second longitudinal edge segment that includes a double-flanged interlock joint extending beneath the bottom surface of the planar segment, and a first transverse edge segment opposite a second transverse edge segment, that includes a double-flanged compression joint that extends beneath the bottom surface of the planar segment; and shingle shaping tools to modified metal roofing shingles positioned adjacent the roof gable ends and eve edges.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a plan view showing the top surface of a shingle blank used to manufacture metal shingles in the present metal roofing shingle system.
  • FIG. 2 is a plan view showing the bottom surface of the shingle blank in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 is plan view showing the top surface of a shingle manufactured from the blank in FIGS. 1 and 2.
  • FIG. 4 is a cross-section taken through the lines 4-4 of FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 5 is a cross-section taken through the lines 5-5 of FIG. 3 and showing a conjoined adjacent shingle.
  • FIG. 6 is an isometric view of the manufactured shingle shown in FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 7 is an isometric showing the conjoined shingles along the interlock compression joint in FIG. 5.
  • FIG. 8 is an isometric view similar to FIG. 7 conjoined with an adjacent course of shingles.
  • FIG. 9 is a plan view of an exemplary roof showing the universal flashing used in ridge, hip, and valley roofing arrangements.
  • FIG. 9A is an enlarged section of the roof shown in FIG. 9.
  • FIG. 10 is an isometric view of a gable roof showing a starter, second, and third course of shingles.
  • FIG. 11 is a cross-section taken along the lines 11-11 of FIG. 9 showing universal flashing installed as a ridge cap or installed as hip flashing.
  • FIG. 12 is a cross-section taken along the lines 12-12 of FIG. 9 showing universal flashing inverted and installed as valley flashing.
  • FIG. 13 is an isometric view taken along the lines 13-13 in FIG. 9 showing the preferred gable end treatment of a typical first shingle in a course of shingles installed on a gable roof.
  • FIG. 14 is an isometric view showing the preferred gable end treatment of a typical last shingle in a course of shingles installed on a gable roof.
  • FIG. 15 is an isometric view of a typical shingle trimmed for installation along a roof eve.
  • FIG. 16 is an isometric view showing a typical shingle trimmed to interlock with the valley flashing in FIG. 12.
  • FIG. 17 is an isometric view showing a typical shingle trimmed to interlock with universal flashing installed as hip flashing.
  • FIG. 18 is an oblique view showing a shingle-shaping tool used to modify shingles positioned adjacent the gable ends or eve edges of a roof.
  • FIG. 18A-18B is a cross-section view showing a shingle being shaped using the tool in FIG. 18.
  • FIG. 19 is an oblique view showing a second shingle-shaping tool used to modify shingles that intersect with valley flashing.
  • FIG. 19A-19B is a cross-section view showing a shingle being shaped using the tool shown in FIG. 19.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • There have been various attempts in the past to provide metal roofing shingles, for example, shingles manufactured from sheet steel, aluminum, copper or other like metallic materials, to improve service life, insulation characteristics, and appearance in metal roof systems. Such past attempts have had marginal success. State of the art metal shingles are prone to water penetration between adjacent shingles. This is because past mechanical connections between adjacent metal shingles extend along the top or external surface of the shingles where they are exposed to weather conditions. Such exposed joints or connections require the on-sight application of caulks or gaskets along the connection joints to provide watertight integrity. Moreover, the need to apply caulks, adhesives, or like sealants at the job sight is problematic in that, unreliable workers may forget to apply the required sealant, may apply an ineffective amount of sealant material, or apply a poor quality caulk bead. Furthermore, environmental conditions at the job sight, for example rain drizzle or fog that causes shingle dampness, or surface deposits from falling and/or wind blown pollens, or debris from atmospheric conditions, and the like, prevent proper adhesion between the on sight applied sealants and the shingle surfaces. In time, such poor quality mechanical connections result in water leaks that are difficult to locate and repair. Finally, the exposed connection joints associated with metal roofing systems of the past detract from shingle appearance, and the exposed seams fail to provide a slate like appearance along the finished roof.
  • Referring to the preferred embodiment of the present metal roofing shingle system, FIGS. 1-6 illustrate the manufacture of a metal shingle used in the present invention from a sheet metal blank 1A to the finished metal roofing shingle 1B. Referring in particular to FIGS. 1 and 2, the metal blank 1A includes a planar segment 2 with a top surface 3, and a bottom or bottom surface 4, the top and bottom surfaces respectively exposed to and shielded from environmental conditions after the finished shingle is installed on a roof. The planer surface 2 is defined by a boundary that includes a first longitudinal edge segment 5 a opposite a bend line 6, and a first transverse edge segment 7 a opposite a second bend line 8. A longitudinal fold tab 9, located between the second bend line 8 and a location within the first transverse edge segment 7 a, extends outward from the first bend line 6. In a similar manner, a transverse fold tab 10 extends outward, along the length of bend line 8. Optional insulation material 11 is applied to the bottom surface 4 of the blank within the boundary that defines the planar segment 2.
  • Referring to FIGS. 3-7, during the manufacture of the metal shingle 1B, beginning with blank 1A shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the transverse fold tab 10 is folded to form a transverse double-flanged compression joint 16 (FIGS. 3 and 5) by bending fold tab 10 along bend line 8 to provide a first flange 17 that extends beneath and parallel to the bottom surface 4 of planar segment 2. Folded tab 10 is then doubled back to provide a second or compression flange 18 that extends outward from below the now folded second transverse edge segment 7 b, the compression flange extending at an upward angle with respect to the planar segment 2.
  • In a similar manner, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, the longitudinal fold tab 9 is folded into the longitudinal double-flanged interlock joint 12 shown in FIG. 4 after the compression joint 16 is formed so that the compression joint overlaps the folded tab 9. Interlock joint 12 is formed by bending fold tab 9 along bend line 6 to provide a first flange 13 that extends beneath and parallel to the bottom surface 4 of planar segment 2, and then tab 9 is doubled back to provide a second flange 14 parallel to the first flange 13, the second flange extending outward from below planar segment 2. The exposed portion of the second flange 14 provides a nailing hem 15 for fixing the finished shingle to a roof. As mentioned above, the double-flanged compression joint 16 is formed first so that it overlaps interlock joint 12 and nailing hem 15 as shown at reference number 16 a in FIGS. 3, 6, 7, and 8. This overlapping construction enables proper insertion of adjacent shingles into interlock joint 12 and provides unrestricted water shedding along the exterior surfaces of interlocked shingles, and from one course of shingle to the next lower course of shingle.
  • Referring to FIGS. 5 and 7, during roof installation, the upward angle of the compression flange 18 causes the flange to compress against the bottom surface 4 of a conjoined adjacent shingle when the first transverse edge segment 7 a of a shingle is inserted between flanges 17 and 18 of a second transverse edge segment 7 b. The compressed second flange 18 forces the top surface 3 of the inserted shingle against the first flange 17 of compression joint 16 and provides a watertight seal there between. In instances where optional insulation material 11 is applied to the bottom surface 4, as shown in FIG. 5, the compression flange 18, compresses the insulation material as shown at 19, to provide an improved watertight seal along the length of the double-flanged compression joint 16. Accordingly, compression joint 16 eliminates any need for applying an on sight sealant such as a bead of caulk, it eliminates a potential for a poor quality sealed joint as heretofore mentioned above, and because the compression joint 16 extends along the bottom surface 4 of the planar segment, it is not visible along the finished roof, and it is not directly exposed to weather conditions. Accordingly, the compression joint, in combination with modified gable and eve edge treatments herein described and shown below in FIGS. 13-15, and in combination with selected colored paint systems, provide a faux slate, including Vermont slate, roof, or a faux terracotta tile roof, or other like material faux roof. In addition, the modified gable end and eve edge treatments provide additional watertight integrity along their respective edges, and the modified edge treatments also prevent or reduce wind damage along the installed shingles because their rounded or angled edges prevent the wind from lifting and penetrating underneath the shingles.
  • FIG. 9 is a plan view showing the present metal roofing shingle system installed on various roof configurations including a main or gable roof 21, a dormer 22, and a hip roof 23. In the main or gable roof section 21 the universal flashing 20 is installed as a ridge cap 20 a that extends along the roof peak or purlin between the gable end 24 and the hip roof 23. Likewise, universal flashing is installed as a ridge cap 20 a that extends from gable end 25 of dormer 22 and intersects the ridge cap 20 a installed along the main roof 21. In addition, the dormer construction includes inverted universal flashing installed as valley flashing 20 b along the change in direction where the planes of the main roof and dormer roof form an angle between the two different roof sections. Finally, FIG. 9 also shows the universal flashing installed as hip flashing 20 c along the external angle formed along the two sloping sides of the hip roof 23 that intersect the main roof 21.
  • Referring to the enlarged cross-section in FIG. 11, the universal flashing 20 is a structural shape comprising a first leg 26 a attached to a second leg 26 b. Each leg 26 a and 26 b includes a double-flanged interlock joint 27 similar to the above interlock joints described for the metal shingles. Accordingly, each interlock joint 27 includes a first flange 28 that extends beneath its respective leg 26 a or 26 b, i.e. the bottom surface 4 a of flashing 20, and flange 28 is doubled back to provide a second flange 29 that extends outward from beneath the bottom surface 4 a to provide a nailing hem 30 for fixing the universal flashing to the roof deck with fasteners 31. When installed as a ridge cap 20 a, as shown in FIGS. 9, 10 and 11, the universal flashing is placed along the peak of the roof where two sloped roof decks 25 a and 25 b intersect. Proper ridge cap placement is critical to insure that the last course of shingles 32 x (FIG. 9) is parallel with the eve 33 when the last course of shingles is installed, and fasteners 31 are driven through the nailing hem 30 to fix the ridge cap 20 a to the roof.
  • The first course of metal shingles 32 a (FIGS. 9-11), along one side of the roof, is installed by placing a full shingle 1B along the rake or pitched edge of the gable end 24 with the nailing hem 15 aligned along drip line 34 of the roof so that a portion of the first transverse edge segment 7 a extends beyond or outboard of the gable end, and with its first longitudinal edge segment 5 a inserted between the first and second flanges 28 and 29 respectively of interlock joint 27 provided in ridge cap 20 a. The overhanging portion of segment 7 a is either a straight or a planar surface, or it is formed into an angular shape or into a preferred curvilinear shape to provide the appearance of thickness as shown in FIG. 13. After the first shingle is properly aligned along the rake of the roof and positioned parallel to the ridge cap 20 a and eve 33, fasteners 31 are driven through nailing hem 30 to fix the shingle to the roof. Additional full shingles are installed along the length of the first course to the opposite gable end with each first longitudinal edge segment 5 a conjoined with interlock joint 27 of ridge cap 20 a as shown in FIGS. 9-11, and with each first transverse edge segment 7 a inserted into the compression joint 16 that extends along the second transverse edge segment 7 b of an adjacent shingle as shown in FIG. 7. It should be understood that, although the preferred embodiment teaches installing a full shingle 1B as the first shingle in the first course of shingles 32 a, the first shingle can be a half shingle 1B/2 (FIG. 8) without departing from the scope of the present invention.
  • Referring again to FIGS. 8, 9, and 13, the first shingle in each course of shingles beginning at the second course 32 b, through 32 x comprise either a full shingle 1B or a half shingle 1B/2, as required, whereby the half shingles are trimmed to provide a shortened nailing hem 30 a and the trimmed portion is folded to provide a modified transverse edge segment 7 c similar to the trimmed-off transverse edge segment 7 b. The modified segment 7 c is trimmed to a length so that aligns segment 7 c with a centerline X-X extending through the prior installed full first shingles. For example, referring in particular to FIG. 8, in course 32 b, segment 7 c of half shingle 1B/2 aligns with the centerline X-X extending through the first full shingle 1B in course 32 a. The alternating pattern of full and half shingles is repeated in following courses downward to the eve 33 of the roof, and each shingle is fixed to the roof with fasteners driven through nailing hem 30 as described above.
  • As mentioned above, in the preferred embodiment of the present metal roofing shingle system, the first transverse edge segment 7 a that extends outboard of the gable end of the roof, in each course of shingles, is shaped using the tool shown in FIG. 18. The tool forms a curvilinear shaped edge 35 a (FIG. 13) that simulates a thick shingle so that the installed shingles, in combination with an appropriate factory applied paint system, provides the appearance of slate shingles, terracotta tiles, or other desirable roof shingle material. In addition, the shaped overhanging shingle edge provides an additional weather tight seal along the drip edge 36 of the roof and prevents or reduces the likelihood of wind damage (FIGS. 9 and 10).
  • The last shingle in each course of shingles, along the opposite gable end, is trimmed, as shown in FIG. 14 to provide a modified transverse edge segment 7 d, as similar to modified segment 7 c, and the trimmed-off portion 7 b is discarded. The last shingle is trimmed so that the nailing hem 30 b is aligned along the drip line of the gable end, and so that the modified second transverse edge segment 7 d extends beyond the gable end at a distance about equal to the overhang at the opposite gable end as shown in FIGS. 9-10.
  • Referring once again to FIG. 14, the last shingle in each course 32 a through 32 x that extends to an opposite gable end is trimmed to provide a shortened nailing hem 30 b and the edge treatment of modified longitudinal edge segments 7 d corresponds with the edge treatment along first transverse edge segments 7 a. The modified longitudinal edge segment 7 d extends beyond the gable end rake so that the preferred curvilinear edge 35 b simulates a thick shingle and provides an additional weather seal along the gable end drip edge.
  • As shown in FIGS. 9 and 15, each shingle in the last course of shingles 32 x, whether the last course is started with a full shingle or started with a half shingle, is trimmed to provide a modified longitudinal edge segment 5 c that is shaped to correspond with the gable edge treatment provided along the first and last shingles in previous courses, and the trimmed-off section 5 b is discarded. Each shingle is trimmed so that the modified longitudinal edge segments 5 c extends over the drip edge 36 to prevent water damage or seepage behind the soffit, and the overhanging shaped edge simulates faux slate or faux terracotta shingles as mentioned above.
  • In a similar manner, as shown in FIGS. 9, 12, and 16, when shingle courses intersect valley flashing 20 b, the first transverse edge segment 7 a or the second transverse edge segment 7 b, depending on which side a particular shingle intersects the valley, is trimmed-off to provide angled edge segments 37 a and 37 b that correspond with the angle between two sloping roof sections, for example the angle between the main roof section 21 and the dormer roof 22 in FIG. 9. The trimmed edges are bent using the shaping tool shown in FIG. 19 to form a hooked edge 38 a or 38 b that fixedly couples with its respective double-flanged interlock joint 27 extending along the length of the inverted universal flashing installed as valley flashing 20 b. The fixed connection between the hooked edges 38 a and/or 38 b of the shingle and the inverted valley flashing interlock joints 27 prevents or reduces wind damage along shingles that intersect the valley flashing and improves watertight integrity without a need for applying a sealant. Each course of shingles that intersects valley flashing is fixed to the roof with fasteners as described above.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 9, 11 and 17, universal flashing 20 is installed as hip flashing 20 c along the external angle formed by the two sloping sides of the hip roof 23 and the main roof 21. When shingles intersect the hip flashing 20 c the first transverse edge segment 7 a and/or the second transverse edge segment 7 b, depending on which side the shingle intersects the flashing, is trimmed-off to provide angled edge segments 39 a and/or 39 b that correspond with the external angle formed between the hip roof and main roof. Referring specifically to FIG. 9, the trimmed edge segments 39 a and/or 39 b are conjoined with the interlock joints 27 of the hip flashing 20 c by inserting the angled shingle segments between the first and second flanges 28 and 29 respectively of interlock joint similar to the ridge cap installation shown in FIG. 11. However, in this instance the trimmed transverse segments 39 a and/or 39 b are inserted into interlock joint 27 rather than the longitudinal segment 5 a shown in FIG. 11.
  • Referring to FIGS. 18 through 19B, the metal shingle roof system includes shingle-shaping tools 40 and 50. Shaping tool 40 is adapted to provide the curvilinear transverse segment edges 35 a or 35 b (FIGS. 13 and 14) as well as the curvilinear longitudinal edge segment 5 c that overhangs the roof eve (FIG. 15). Shingle-shaping tool 40 comprises an elongated shaping jaw 41 having a first leg 42 and a second leg 43, and an elongated round bar or tube 44 fixed to the second leg 43 at a location that provides a space or gap 45 between bar 44 and leg 42. A handle 46 is attached to the angle member 41. Gap 45 is sized to releasably fix the above mentioned metal shingle segments 35 a, 35 b, or 5 c between bar 44 and leg 42 as shown in FIG. 18A. Referring to FIG. 18B, either the tool 40 or the metal shingle 1B is manipulated to press or roll the inserted segment along the circumference of bar 44 to form a curved or rounded edge segment that corresponds with the shape of bar 44.
  • Shingle-shaping tool 50 is adapted to provide the hooked interlock edge 38 a or 38 b along the trimmed angled edge segments 37 a and 37 b (FIG. 16) that correspond with the angle of the valley flashing 20 b installed between two sloping roof sections (FIG. 9). Shingle-shaping tool 50 comprises an elongated shaping jaw 51 with a first leg 52 and a second leg 53, and a bar 54 fixed perpendicular to the first leg 52 at a location that provides a space or gap 55 between bar 54 and leg 53. A handle 56 is attached to the angle member 51. Gap 55 sized to enable the above mentioned metal shingle segments 37 a or 37 b to rotate within gap 55, as shown in FIG. 18B, when either the tool 50 or the metal shingle 1B is manipulated to bend the shingle segments about bar 54 and form the hooked interlock edge 38 a or 38 b that couples with the double-flanged interlock joints 27 along the inverted valley flashing 20 b (FIG. 12).
  • As such, an invention has been disclosed in terms of preferred embodiments and alternate embodiments thereof, which fulfills each one of the objects of the present invention as set forth above and provides a new metal shingle roof system, an improved metal shingle, and a method of installation. Of course, various changes, modifications, and alterations from the teachings of the present invention may be contemplated by those skilled in the art without departing from the intended spirit and scope thereof. It is intended that the present invention only be limited by the terms of the appended claims.

Claims (30)

  1. 1. A metal roofing shingle system, comprising:
    a) universal flashing including;
    i) a first leg with a double-flanged interlock joint adapted to couple with metal shingles, said interlock joint having an outward extending nailing hem for attachment to a roof, and
    ii) a second leg with a double-flanged interlock joint adapted to couple with metal shingles, said interlock joint having an outward extending nailing hem for attachment to a roof,
    whereby said universal flashing selectively provides a ridge cap or hip flashing when attached to the roof, or valley flashing when attached inverted; and
    b) metal shingles, each metal shingle comprising;
    i) a planar segment defined by a top surface and a bottom surface,
    ii) a first transverse edge segment opposite a second transverse edge segment, the second transverse edge segment including a double-flanged compression joint having a first flange that extends beneath said bottom surface, said double-flanged compression joint including a compression flange that extends outward from beneath said bottom surface at an upward angle to said planar segment, and
    iii) a first longitudinal edge segment opposite a second longitudinal edge segment, the second longitudinal edge segment including a double-flanged interlock joint that having a first flange that extends beneath said bottom surface, and a nailing hem that extends outward from beneath said bottom surface in parallel with said first flange for attachment to a roof.
  2. 2. The metal roofing shingle system recited in claim 1 whereby, the first longitudinal edge segment of each metal shingle when installed in a first course of shingles is inserted between the flanges of a double-flanged interlock joint of the universal flashing when installed as a ridge cap.
  3. 3. The metal roofing shingle system recited in claim 1 whereby, the first longitudinal edge segment of each metal shingle when installed in a second or following course of shingles is inserted between the flanges of a double-flanged interlock joint extending beneath the second longitudinal edge segment in an adjacent course of shingles.
  4. 4. The metal roofing shingle system recited in claim 1 whereby, the first transverse edge segment of a metal shingle is inserted into the double-flanged compression joint of an adjacent shingle, causing the compression flange to forcibly engages the bottom surface of said inserted shingle to provide a watertight seal along said compression joint.
  5. 5. The metal roofing shingle system recited in claim 4, comprising, insulation material fixed to the bottom surface of said planar segment, the insulation material compressed when said compression flange forcibly engages said bottom surface of said inserted shingle.
  6. 6. The metal roofing shingle system recited in claim 1, comprising: a metal roof shingle manufactured from a metal shingle blank, said shingle blank comprising:
    a) a planar segment defined by a top surface and a bottom surface;
    b) a first transverse edge segment opposite a second transverse edge segment having a transverse fold tab; and
    c) a first longitudinal edge segment opposite a second longitudinal edge segment having a longitudinal fold tab;
    whereby the transverse fold tab on the second transverse edge segment is folded to form a double-flanged compression joint that extends beneath the bottom surface of said planar segment, said double-flanged compression joint including a compression flange that extends outward from beneath said bottom surface at an upward angle to said planar segment; and
    whereby the longitudinal fold tab on the second longitudinal edge segment is folded to form a double-flanged interlock joint that extends beneath the bottom surface of said planar segment, said double-flanged interlock joint overlapped by said folded second transverse edge segment, and said double-flanged interlock joint including a nailing hem that extends outward from beneath said bottom surface for attachment to a roof; said second transverse edge segment and said second longitudinal edge segment folded to manufacture the metal roof shingle.
  7. 7. The metal roofing shingle system recited in claim 6 comprising: insulation material fixed to the bottom surface of the planar segment of said shingle blank.
  8. 8. The metal roofing shingle system recited in claim 6, additionally comprising: a shingle shaping tool for shaping said shingle blanks into shingles including an elongated shaping jaw comprising an angle shaped member having a first leg fixed to a second leg, and a circular shaped member fixed to said first leg and extending along the length thereof, said circular shaped member fixed at a position to provide a gap between said circular shaped member and said second leg, said gap sized to releasably fix a shingle edge therein when said shingle is shaped about the circular shaped member surface to form a curvilinear shingle edge.
  9. 9. The metal roofing shingle system recited in claim 6, additionally comprising: a shingle shaping tool for shaping said shingle blanks into shingles including an elongated shaping jaw comprising an angle shaped member having a first leg fixed to a second leg, and a rectangular shaped member fixed to said first leg and extending along the length thereof, said rectangular shaped member fixed at a position to provide a gap between said rectangular shaped member and said second leg, said gap sized to loosely hold a shingle edge therein so that said shingle edge rotates within said gap when said shingle is shaped about said rectangular shaped member to form a hooked shingle edge.
  10. 10. A metal roof shingle manufactured from a metal shingle blank, said shingle blank comprising:
    a) a planar segment defined by a top surface and a bottom surface;
    b) a first transverse edge segment opposite a second transverse edge segment; and
    c) a first longitudinal edge segment opposite a second longitudinal edge segment;
    whereby the second transverse edge segment is folded to form a double-flanged compression joint that extends beneath the bottom surface of said planar segment, said double-flanged compression joint including a compression flange that extends outward from beneath said bottom surface at an upward angle to said planar segment; and
    whereby the second longitudinal edge segment is folded to form a double-flanged interlock joint having a first flange that extends beneath the bottom surface of said planar segment, said double-flanged interlock joint overlapped by said folded second transverse edge segment, and said double-flanged interlock joint including a nailing hem that extends outward from beneath said bottom surface in parallel with said first flange for attachment to a roof; said second transverse edge segment and said second longitudinal edge segment folded to manufacture the metal roof shingle.
  11. 11. The metal roof shingle recited in claim 10 comprising:
    insulation material fixed to the bottom surface of said planar segment.
  12. 12. The metal roof shingle recited in claim 10 comprising at least one paint coat applied to the top surface of said planar segment.
  13. 13. The metal roof shingle recited in claim 12 whereby, said at least one paint coat is colored.
  14. 14. The metal roof shingle recited in claim 12 whereby, said at least one paint coat is colored to simulate slate shingles.
  15. 15. The metal roof shingle recited in claim 12 whereby, said at least one paint coat is colored to simulate terracotta shingles.
  16. 16. A metal roof shingle comprising:
    a) a planar segment defined by a top surface and a bottom surface;
    b) a first transverse edge segment;
    c) a second transverse opposite said first transverse edge segment, said second transverse edge Segment folded to form a double-flanged compression joint that extends beneath the bottom surface of said planar segment, said double-flanged compression joint including a compression flange that extends outward from beneath said bottom surface at an upward angle to said planar segment;
    d) a first longitudinal edge segment; and
    e) a second longitudinal edge segment opposite said first longitudinal edge segment, the second longitudinal edge segment folded to form a double-flanged interlock joint having a first flange that extends beneath the bottom surface of said planar segment, said double-flanged interlock joint overlapped by said folded second transverse edge segment, and said double-flanged interlock joint including a nailing hem that extends outward from beneath said bottom surface in parallel with said first flange for attachment to a roof
  17. 17. The metal roof shingle recited in claim 16 comprising:
    insulation material fixed to the bottom surface of said planar segment.
  18. 18. The metal roof shingle recited in claim 16 comprising:
    a paint system applied to the top surface of said planar segment.
  19. 19. The metal roof shingle recited in claim 16 whereby, said paint system is colored.
  20. 20. The metal roof shingle recited in claim 16 whereby, said paint system is colored to simulate slate shingles.
  21. 21. The metal roof shingle recited in claim 16 whereby, said paint system is colored to simulate terracotta shingles.
  22. 22. A method of installing a metal roofing shingle system, comprising:
    a) providing universal flashing including a first leg with an integral double-flanged interlock joint extending along a length thereof, and a second leg fixed to said first leg and including an integral double-flanged interlock joint extending along a length thereof, each said double-flanged interlock joint adapted to couple with metal shingles, each said double-flanged interlock joint including an outward extending nailing hem for attachment to a roof, and b) providing metal roof shingles comprising:
    i) a planar segment defined by a top surface and a bottom surface,
    ii) a first transverse edge segment opposite a second transverse edge segment, the second transverse edge segment folded to provide a double-flanged compression joint that extends beneath the bottom surface of said planar segment, said double-flanged compression joint including a compression flange that extends outward from beneath said bottom surface at an upward angle to said planar segment, and
    iii) a first longitudinal edge segment opposite a second longitudinal edge segment, the second longitudinal edge segment folded to provide a double-flanged interlock joint having a first flange that extends beneath the bottom surface of said planar segment, said double-flanged interlock joint including a nailing hem that extends outward from beneath said bottom surface in parallel with said first flange for attachment to a roof, said folded second longitudinal edge segment being overlapped by said folded transverse edge segment;
    c) attaching said universal flashing as a ridge cap by driving fasteners through said nailing hems extending along the first leg and along the second leg of said universal flashing and into the roof;
    d) installing a first course of metal roof shingles, each shingle having its first longitudinal edge segment inserted between the flanges of one of said interlock joints provided in said universal flashing attached as a ridge cap, each shingle, with the exception of a first shingle in said first course, having its first transverse edge segment inserted between the flanges of the double-flanged compression joint of an adjacent shingle, the compression flange forcibly engaging the bottom surface of said first longitudinal edge segment, each conjoined shingle fixed to the roof by driving fasteners through said nailing hem;
    e) installing a second course through a last course of metal roof shingles, each shingle having the first longitudinal edge segment inserted between the flanges of the double-flanged interlock joint provided along the folded second longitudinal edge segment of an adjacent shingle, and each shingle, with the exception of a first shingle in each second through a last course of shingles, having its first transverse edge segment inserted between the flanges of the double-flanged compression joint of an adjacent shingle, said compression flange forcibly engaging the bottom surface of said conjoined first longitudinal edge segment, each shingle in said second through a last course of shingles fixed to the roof by driving fasteners through said nailing hem.
  23. 23. The method of installing the metal roofing shingle system in claim 22, further comprising: positioning the first shingle in each first through last course of shingles at a location that extends the first transverse edge segment outboard of a gable end of the roof; and trimming the second transverse edge segment of the last shingle in each course of shingles so that the trimmed second transverse edge segment of each said last shingle extends outboard of a second gable end at an equal distance to said first transverse edge segment.
  24. 24. The method of installing the metal roofing shingle system in claim 23, further comprising: forming a shaped edge that extends beneath the bottom surface of said extended first transverse edge segment, and forming a shaped edge that extends beneath the bottom surface of said extended trimmed second transverse edge segment.
  25. 25. The method of installing the metal roofing shingle system in claim 24 whereby, each said shaped edge is curvilinear.
  26. 26. The method of installing the metal roofing shingle system in claim 22, further comprising: trimming each second longitudinal edge segment of each shingle installed in the last course of shingles so that each trimmed second longitudinal edge segment extends outboard of an eve edge of the roof.
  27. 27. The method of installing the metal roofing shingle system in claim 26, further comprising: forming a shaped edge that extends beneath the bottom surface of each trimmed second longitudinal edge segment extending outboard of the eve edge.
  28. 28. The method of installing the metal roofing shingle system in claim 27 whereby, each shaped edge extending outboard of the eve edge is curvilinear.
  29. 29. The method of installing the metal roofing shingle system in claim 22, further comprising:
    a) inverting and attaching said universal flashing as valley flashing by driving fasteners through said nailing hems provided along the first leg and along the second leg of said universal flashing and into two different sloped roof sections;
    b) trimming each second longitudinal edge of each metal shingle that intersects the valley flashing, said second longitudinal edge trimmed at an angle that corresponds with said slope between the two different roof sections;
    c) forming a hook along each trimmed edge; and
    d) interlocking said hook edge of each trimmed shingle with one of the integral double-flanged interlock joints exposed along the inverted universal flashing.
  30. 30. The method of installing the metal roofing shingle system in claim 22, further comprising:
    a) attaching said universal flashing as hip flashing by driving fasteners through said nailing hems provided along the first leg and along the second leg of said universal flashing and into two different sloped roof sections;
    b) trimming the first longitudinal edge of each first shingle in a course of shingles at an angle that corresponds with said slope between the two different roof sections; and
    c) trimming the second longitudinal edge of each last shingle in a course of shingles at an angle that corresponds with said slope between the two different roof sections.
US12360369 2009-01-27 2009-01-27 Metal roofing shingle, metal roofing shingle system, and method of installing Abandoned US20100186334A1 (en)

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US8915036B2 (en) 2013-03-08 2014-12-23 Quality Edge, Inc. Formed interlocking roofing panels
USD747500S1 (en) 2013-11-13 2016-01-12 Quality Edge, Inc. Slate metal roof panel
US9267289B2 (en) 2013-03-08 2016-02-23 Quality Edge, Inc. Formed interlocking roofing panels
USD754885S1 (en) 2013-10-14 2016-04-26 Quality Edge, Inc. Shake metal roof panel
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