US20100152978A1 - Machine Employing Cab Mounts and Method for Controlling Cab Mounts to Maintain Snubbing Height and Provide Mount Diagnostics - Google Patents

Machine Employing Cab Mounts and Method for Controlling Cab Mounts to Maintain Snubbing Height and Provide Mount Diagnostics Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100152978A1
US20100152978A1 US12/637,539 US63753909A US2010152978A1 US 20100152978 A1 US20100152978 A1 US 20100152978A1 US 63753909 A US63753909 A US 63753909A US 2010152978 A1 US2010152978 A1 US 2010152978A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
housing
mount
fluid
displacement
machine
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Abandoned
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US12/637,539
Inventor
Steven D. Jones
Ronald B. Warnat
Brett D. Ellen
Nathan S. Pauli
Michael S. Contratto
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Caterpillar Inc
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Caterpillar Inc
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Priority to US12249008P priority Critical
Application filed by Caterpillar Inc filed Critical Caterpillar Inc
Priority to US12/637,539 priority patent/US20100152978A1/en
Assigned to CATERPILLAR INC. reassignment CATERPILLAR INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CONTRATTO, MICHAEL S., JONES, STEVEN D., ELLEN, BRETT D., PAULI, NATHAN S., WARNAT, RONALD B.
Publication of US20100152978A1 publication Critical patent/US20100152978A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02FDREDGING; SOIL-SHIFTING
    • E02F9/00Component parts of dredgers or soil-shifting machines, not restricted to one of the kinds covered by groups E02F3/00 - E02F7/00
    • E02F9/20Drives; Control devices
    • E02F9/2025Particular purposes of control systems not otherwise provided for
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B62LAND VEHICLES FOR TRAVELLING OTHERWISE THAN ON RAILS
    • B62DMOTOR VEHICLES; TRAILERS
    • B62D33/00Superstructures for load-carrying vehicles
    • B62D33/06Drivers' cabs
    • B62D33/0604Cabs insulated against vibrations or noise, e.g. with elastic suspension
    • B62D33/0608Cabs insulated against vibrations or noise, e.g. with elastic suspension pneumatic or hydraulic suspension
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16FSPRINGS; SHOCK-ABSORBERS; MEANS FOR DAMPING VIBRATION
    • F16F13/00Units comprising springs of the non-fluid type as well as vibration-dampers, shock-absorbers, or fluid springs
    • F16F13/04Units comprising springs of the non-fluid type as well as vibration-dampers, shock-absorbers, or fluid springs comprising both a plastics spring and a damper, e.g. a friction damper
    • F16F13/06Units comprising springs of the non-fluid type as well as vibration-dampers, shock-absorbers, or fluid springs comprising both a plastics spring and a damper, e.g. a friction damper the damper being a fluid damper, e.g. the plastics spring not forming a part of the wall of the fluid chamber of the damper
    • F16F13/08Units comprising springs of the non-fluid type as well as vibration-dampers, shock-absorbers, or fluid springs comprising both a plastics spring and a damper, e.g. a friction damper the damper being a fluid damper, e.g. the plastics spring not forming a part of the wall of the fluid chamber of the damper the plastics spring forming at least a part of the wall of the fluid chamber of the damper
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16FSPRINGS; SHOCK-ABSORBERS; MEANS FOR DAMPING VIBRATION
    • F16F9/00Springs, vibration-dampers, shock-absorbers, or similarly-constructed movement-dampers using a fluid or the equivalent as damping medium
    • F16F9/10Springs, vibration-dampers, shock-absorbers, or similarly-constructed movement-dampers using a fluid or the equivalent as damping medium using liquid only; using a fluid of which the nature is immaterial
    • F16F9/14Devices with one or more members, e.g. pistons, vanes, moving to and fro in chambers and using throttling effect
    • F16F9/16Devices with one or more members, e.g. pistons, vanes, moving to and fro in chambers and using throttling effect involving only straight-line movement of the effective parts
    • F16F9/18Devices with one or more members, e.g. pistons, vanes, moving to and fro in chambers and using throttling effect involving only straight-line movement of the effective parts with a closed cylinder and a piston separating two or more working spaces therein
    • F16F9/20Devices with one or more members, e.g. pistons, vanes, moving to and fro in chambers and using throttling effect involving only straight-line movement of the effective parts with a closed cylinder and a piston separating two or more working spaces therein with the piston-rod extending through both ends of the cylinder, e.g. constant-volume dampers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16FSPRINGS; SHOCK-ABSORBERS; MEANS FOR DAMPING VIBRATION
    • F16F9/00Springs, vibration-dampers, shock-absorbers, or similarly-constructed movement-dampers using a fluid or the equivalent as damping medium
    • F16F9/32Details
    • F16F9/53Means for adjusting damping characteristics by varying fluid viscosity, e.g. electromagnetically
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60GVEHICLE SUSPENSION ARRANGEMENTS
    • B60G17/00Resilient suspensions having means for adjusting the spring or vibration-damper characteristics, for regulating the distance between a supporting surface and a sprung part of vehicle or for locking suspension during use to meet varying vehicular or surface conditions, e.g. due to speed or load
    • B60G17/015Resilient suspensions having means for adjusting the spring or vibration-damper characteristics, for regulating the distance between a supporting surface and a sprung part of vehicle or for locking suspension during use to meet varying vehicular or surface conditions, e.g. due to speed or load the regulating means comprising electric or electronic elements
    • B60G17/016Resilient suspensions having means for adjusting the spring or vibration-damper characteristics, for regulating the distance between a supporting surface and a sprung part of vehicle or for locking suspension during use to meet varying vehicular or surface conditions, e.g. due to speed or load the regulating means comprising electric or electronic elements characterised by their responsiveness, when the vehicle is travelling, to specific motion, a specific condition, or driver input
    • B60G17/0165Resilient suspensions having means for adjusting the spring or vibration-damper characteristics, for regulating the distance between a supporting surface and a sprung part of vehicle or for locking suspension during use to meet varying vehicular or surface conditions, e.g. due to speed or load the regulating means comprising electric or electronic elements characterised by their responsiveness, when the vehicle is travelling, to specific motion, a specific condition, or driver input to an external condition, e.g. rough road surface, side wind
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60GVEHICLE SUSPENSION ARRANGEMENTS
    • B60G2400/00Indexing codes relating to detected, measured or calculated conditions or factors
    • B60G2400/10Acceleration; Deceleration
    • B60G2400/102Acceleration; Deceleration vertical
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60GVEHICLE SUSPENSION ARRANGEMENTS
    • B60G2400/00Indexing codes relating to detected, measured or calculated conditions or factors
    • B60G2400/25Stroke; Height; Displacement
    • B60G2400/252Stroke; Height; Displacement vertical
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60NSEATS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR VEHICLES; VEHICLE PASSENGER ACCOMMODATION NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B60N2/00Seats specially adapted for vehicles; Arrangement or mounting of seats in vehicles
    • B60N2/02Seats specially adapted for vehicles; Arrangement or mounting of seats in vehicles the seat or part thereof being movable, e.g. adjustable
    • B60N2/0224Non-manual adjustment, e.g. with electrical operation
    • B60N2/0244Non-manual adjustment, e.g. with electrical operation with logic circuits
    • B60N2/0248Non-manual adjustment, e.g. with electrical operation with logic circuits with memory of positions
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16FSPRINGS; SHOCK-ABSORBERS; MEANS FOR DAMPING VIBRATION
    • F16F9/00Springs, vibration-dampers, shock-absorbers, or similarly-constructed movement-dampers using a fluid or the equivalent as damping medium
    • F16F9/32Details
    • F16F9/53Means for adjusting damping characteristics by varying fluid viscosity, e.g. electromagnetically
    • F16F9/532Electrorheological [ER] fluid dampers

Abstract

A machine employing controllable mounts and a method for controlling such mounts to maintain ideal snubbing height and provide mount diagnostics are disclosed. The controllable mount may include a housing, a pin, rheological fluid within the housing and coils provided proximate to the rheological fluid. The pin may be held in the housing with a limited degree of play by an elastomeric member and in so doing hold the pin at the ideal snubbing height. Over time the elastomeric member may degrade and begin to sag. Sensors associated with the housing may monitor this sag and if necessary energize a field across the rheological fluid or pressurize gas within the housing so as to adjust to the position of the pin back to the ideal snubbing height. The data gathered by the sensors can also be stored and used to determine the remaining serviceable life of the controllable mount and diagnose when it should be replaced.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This is a non-provisional application claiming priority under 35 USC 119(e) to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/122,490 filed on Dec. 15, 2008.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present disclosure generally relates to cab mounts and, more particularly, relates to machines employing cab mounts and methods for controlling cab mounts.
  • BACKGROUND
  • In many different heavy equipment machines, an operator cab is supported by a frame of the machine with cab mounts. Cab mounts are available in many different forms and configurations and generally try to isolate the cab from the undercarriage of the machine so as to limit the vibrational impact experienced by the operator when the machine moves or performs work. For example, with a loader traveling over rocky terrain, the chassis, undercarriage, and wheels/track of the loader may be jostled and bounced around considerably, but as the cab is not fixedly mounted to the frame, the play afforded by the cab mounts lessens the effect of that motion on the operator.
  • Such mounts can be as simple as a mechanical spring or an elastomeric shock absorber offering a fixed level of vibration damping. Other types of mounts are fluid or electro-chemical in nature. Magneto-Rheological (MR) and Electro-Rheological (ER) mounts are two examples of such mounts. Taking a MR mount as an example, generally it includes a housing containing MR fluid, a structure that moves through the MR fluid, and a coil for providing a magnetic field across the MR fluid. By directing current to the coils, not only is the magnetic field created through the MR fluid, but the apparent viscosity of the MR fluid is increased as well. As the structure moves through the MR fluid, increasing the apparent viscosity of the MR fluid makes the mount more rigid.
  • One example of a MR mount is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 7,063,191. The '191 patent discloses a hydraulic mount that includes a decoupler sub-assembly, a body filled with MR fluid, a pumping chamber and a diaphragm chamber. The body may be formed from a flexible, molded elastomer, such that vibrational inputs from the engine elastically deform the pumping chamber to cause fluid transfer between the pumping chamber and the diaphragm chamber through the decoupler sub-assembly for viscous damping. While somewhat effective, such a mount provides no feedback
  • Another example of a MR mount is disclosed in US Patent Application Publication No. 2007/0257408, published Nov. 8, 207 to Kenneth Alan St. Clair. et al. The '408 publication discloses a strut with a magneto-rheological fluid damper that includes a tubular housing filled with magneto-rheological fluid and a piston head movable within the tubular housing along its longitudinal length.
  • SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a machine is therefore disclosed which comprises a frame, an operator cab supported by the frame, a controllable mount operatively connecting the operator cab to the frame and including a housing, a pin mounted within the housing, an elastomeric member connecting the pin to the housing, a fluid within the housing, a sensor operatively associated with the housing and generating a signal indicative of relative displacement between the operator cab and the frame, and an electronic controller unit operatively associated with the sensor and causing the fluid to bias the pin away from engagement with the housing.
  • In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure a method of controlling a cab mount is disclosed wherein the method comprises connecting a cab to a frame of a machine using the cab mount, the cab mount having a housing and a pin movable relative to and connected to the housing by an elastomeric member, sensing a parameter indicative of the relative displacement between the cab and the frame, and adjusting a field across a rheological fluid within the housing until the sensed relative displacement is equal to a desired relative displacement.
  • In accordance with yet another aspect of the disclosure a control system for controlling a mount operatively connecting an operator cab to a machine frame is disclosed, wherein the control system comprises a processor operatively connected to the mount, the mount including a housing, a pin movable within the housing, a sensor adapted to generate a signal indicative of the relative displacement of the cab to the housing, a memory adapted to store historical displacement data, an algorithm stored in the memory and executed by the processor to compare the historical displacement data to sensed displacement data and correct actual displacement to equal desired displacement.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a machine constructed in accordance with the teachings of this disclosure;
  • FIG. 2 is a sectional view of a controllable mount constructed in accordance with the teachings of this disclosure;
  • FIG. 3 a chart depicting creep in an elastomeric member of the controllable mount during initial use, over time, and as corrected;
  • FIG. 4 is a schematic representation of a control system constructed in accordance with the teachings of this disclosure;
  • FIGS. 5 a-d are schematic representations of alternative embodiments for sensing mount displacement;
  • FIG. 6 is a block diagram of an operator interface constructed in accordance with the teachings of this disclosure;
  • FIG. 7 is a graph plotting frequency vs. spectral density, depicting historical data associated with a controllable mount, and identifying when a mount should be replaced or repaired;
  • FIG. 8 is a graph plotting frequency vs. amplitude, and depicting stacked algorithms controlling same in accordance with the teachings of this disclosure;
  • FIGS. 9 a-e are schematic representations of different mount location embodiments.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring now to the drawings, and with specific reference to FIG. 1, a machine constructed in accordance with the teachings of this disclosure is generally referred to by reference numeral 100. The machine 100 includes a frame 102 supporting an operator cab 104. As shown, the machine 100 is depicted as a track-type tractor, but is to be understood that the teachings of this disclosure can be employed with equal efficacy with other heavy industry and construction machines such as, but not limited to, backhoe loaders, wheel loaders, tracked loaders, articulated trucks, off-highway trucks, excavators, motor graders, fork-lifts, skid steers, or any other machine known in the art that includes a cab mounted to a frame.
  • Referring now to FIG. 2, a cross-sectional view illustrates an example of one embodiment of a controllable mount 106 for use with the machine 100 and method disclosed herein. As shown, the controllable mount 106 may include a housing 108 that may be mounted to the frame 102 (see FIG. 1) via a mounting flange 110. The housing 108 may include a first chamber 112 and a second chamber 114. As will be described in further detail herein, the first chamber 112 may be filled with a rheological fluid 116 such as a magneto-rheological (MR) fluid or an electro-rheological (ER) fluid. The second chamber 114 may be filled with a compressed fluid 118 such as compressed gas including compressed air.
  • The controllable mount 106 may also include a pin 120 that is partially disposed with the housing 108 and may be attached to the cab 104 at a mounting end 122. The pin 120 may be attached to the housing 108 by an elastomeric member 124 that permits the pin 120 limited axial movement along axis 126 and radial movement perpendicular to the axis 126. The elastomeric member 124 may dampen axial as well as radial motion between the pin 120 and the housing 108.
  • As shown, a damping plate 128 may be attached to the pin 120 and be disposed within the rheological fluid 116 of the first chamber 112. The damping plate 128 may include a plurality of apertures 130 to permit the rheological fluid 116 to pass through the damping plate 128. As the damping plate 128 is moved through the rheological fluid 116, the relative motion between the housing 108 and the pin 120 is damped. The level of damping may be adjusted by applying a magnetic or electric field to the rheological fluid 116. Moreover, by changing the strength of the magnetic or electric field, the apparent viscosity of the rheological fluid 116 is proportionally changed thereby providing a mechanism by which the degree of damping afforded by the controllable mount 106 can be tailored to the needs of the operator.
  • In order to generate the magnetic or electric field, coils 131 are provided proximate the rheological fluid 116. More specifically, the coils 131 may be mounted on the housing 108 laterally adjacent the first chamber 112. Leads 132 may extend from the coils 131 for connection to a controllable power supply 134. Alternatively, or additionally, the coils 131 may be mounted on the pin 120 and/or the damping plate 128.
  • The pin 120 may also include a plunger 136 that separates the first chamber 112 from the second chamber 114. The plunger 136 may include a seal 138 that seals against a shaft 140 of the housing 108. In such a configuration, the plunger 136 and the second chamber 114 act as a gas spring 142 for positioning the pin 120 at an ideal snubbing height 144, the importance of which will be described in further detail herein. The pressure of the compressed fluid 118 within the gas spring 142 may be adjusted by way of a valve 146. By adjusting the pressure of the compressed fluid 118, the biasing force of the gas spring 142 applied to the plunger 136 is adjusted as well. A first hose or tube 148 may be connected to the valve 146 to supply pressurized fluid 118 to the second chamber 114. The valve 146 may also include a second hose or tube 150 to return the pressurized fluid 118 within the second chamber 114 to a storage tank 152, or to be vented to atmosphere.
  • To assist in biasing the plunger 136 toward the ideal snubbing height 144, a mechanical spring 154 may also be used. The spring 154 may be disposed about a guide extension 156 of the pin 120 and extend between the guide extension 156 and a base 158 of the housing 108. The guide extension 156 may be positioned to contact the housing 108 and act as a first end stop for the controllable mount 106.
  • The controllable mount 106 may also include a sensor 160 for generating a signal indicative of the relative displacement between the cab 104 and the frame 102. In the current embodiment, it does so by determining the relative displacement between the housing 108 and the pin 120. The sensor 160 may include a strain gauge (not shown) disposed in a channel 162 provided in the elastomeric member 124. Alternatively, the channel 162 may be filled with a conductive elastomer 164 having an electrical conductivity and resistance that changes with elongation and contraction. More specifically, the strain placed on the conductive elastomer 164 may be correlated to the resistance exhibited by the conductive elastomer 164. Thus, as the resistance is measured, the relative displacement between the housing 108 and the pin 120 may be calculated. Leads 166 may be used to communicate data from the sensor 160 to an electronic control unit 168 (see FIG. 4).
  • The controllable mount 106 may also include a sensor 170 to monitor the pressure of fluid 118 within the second chamber 114. The pressure sensor 170 may be connected to the electronic control unit 168 as well with leads 172. In general, the pressure sensor 170 may be used to measure pressure spikes and thus wear on the elastomeric member 124. In so doing, the remaining life and serviceability of the controllable mount 106 can be calculated. In addition, failure of either sensor 160 or 170 may indicate that the controllable mount 106 needs replacement or repair.
  • As an alternative or addition to the sensor 160 within the elastomeric member 124, the pressure sensor 170 may also be used to determine the displacement of the pin 120 relative to the housing 108. More specifically, the displacement may be determined using the formula:

  • V n =P i *V i /P n
      • wherein:
        • Vn is the new volume;
        • Pi is the initial pressure;
        • Vi is the initial volume; and
        • Pn is the new pressure.
          Initial pressure and initial volume could be initially calibrated from a known position of the pin 120 and could correspond to the volume and pressure of the second chamber 114. New pressure and new volume could correspond to the displacement from the initial position. The new position may be determined from the new volume using the formula:

  • D=(V n −V i)/(π*R 2)
      • wherein:
        • D is the change in displacement;
        • R is the radius of the shaft 140;
        • Vi is again the initial volume; and
        • Vn is again the new volume.
          Temperature compensation may also be used to increase the accuracy of the displacement measurement. Alternatively, the displacement may be determined through stored tables where these calculations have already been determined.
  • This calculated displacement may then be used to provide feedback in a control algorithm executed by the electronic control unit 168 controlling the mount 106. More specifically, the calculated displacement data may be used to adjust the current applied to the coils 130 of the controllable mount 106 and hence adjust the apparent viscosity of the controllable mount 106 to provide improved performance.
  • In one embodiment, the apparent viscosity of the rheological fluid 116 is changed in direct relation to the displacement of the mount 106. Thus, as the pin 120 moves away from the ideal snubbing height 144, more current is applied to the coil and the apparent viscosity of the rheological fluid 116 increases to bias the pin 120 away from engagement with the housing 108. In so doing, the pin 120 and damping plate 128 encounter greater resistance to movement and thus this feedback control may be used to minimize occurrences where the pin 120 reaches an endstop, also known as bottoming or topping out.
  • In another embodiment, statistical analysis of the data from one or more sensors 160, 170 may be used to interpret the displacement of the controllable mount 106 over time and adapt the control of the controllable mount 106 to changes in weight in the cab, i.e., the weight of different operators, their tools and accessories, and the like. Initial pressure and initial volume may be determined and calibrated at the factory and during machine servicing.
  • This displacement data may also be statistically analyzed and kept for long term storage. The historical data may include average displacements, frequency domain, and power spectral density data. The historical statistical displacement data may be used to determine when to replace a specific mount. For example, if the controllable mount is operating outside of its historical average, the controllable mount would be deemed to need replacement. Additionally, the history may be taken over the life of the controllable mount to develop a long historical average. The long historical average may be compared to a medium history and a short history to provide a total error or a point by point error to look for problems in performance.
  • By tracking and maintaining a historical statistical average of displacement, the set and creep of the elastomeric member 124 may also be determined. As used herein, the “set” and “creep” of the elastomeric member 124 refers to changes in the elasticity of the elastomer. Initially, the elastomer will deform predictability and return to the same shape and strength. Over time and repetitive motion, however, the elastomer may begin to change at the molecular level so as not to exhibit the same elasticity. In the present application this can cause the elastomeric member 124 to begin to sag over time.
  • In graphical form, this means that as the elastomeric member 124 sags, sets, and begins to creep, the elastomeric member 124 may begin to behave nonlinearly as shown in FIG. 3. As shown, the elastomeric member 124 may initially behave in a generally linear fashion as indicated by line 174 between the end stops 176. However, over time, the elastomeric member 124 may take on a set and begin to creep as shown by line 178.
  • The electronic control unit 168 may be used to compensate for this change in the material properties, as well as, minimize the effects of creep. For example, the electronic control unit 168 may be used to adjust the current applied to the coils 130 and thereby correct for the change in the material properties of the elastomeric member 124, which is shown as dotted line 180. Thus more current may be applied to the coils 130 when negative displacement is determined and less where positive displacement is determined. In configurations where a pneumatic system is available to increase the gas pressure within the gas spring 142, the increased gas pressure may be used to compensate further and bias the pin 120 toward the ideal snubbing height 144.
  • Referring now to FIG. 4, a schematic diagram illustrates a control system 182 for a machine 100 on which the controllable mounts 106 may be used. As shown, the system 182 includes the electronic control unit 168 that is in electrical communication with machine sensors 186, an operator interface 188, and a power source 190. The electronic control unit 168 may include a processor 192 and a computer readable media or memory 194 for storing instructions. Machine sensors 186 may include a wide variety of sensors including accelerometers, inclinometers, temperature sensors, pressure transducers, and other sensors known in the art for use on the machine 100. The operator interfaces 188 may include joysticks, pedals, switches, buttons, touch screens, keypads, and other devices known in the art for receiving operator input.
  • The electronic control unit 168 may also be in electrical communication with a plurality of controllable mounts 106 used to mount the cab 104 to a machine frame 102. Such mounts 106 may include a right front controllable mount 198, a right rear controllable mount 200, a left rear controllable mount 202, and a left front controllable mount 204. The right front controllable mount 198, right rear controllable mount 200, left rear controllable mount 202, and left front controllable mount 204 may each include the features of controllable mount 106 described above, as well as other features of controllable mounts known in the art.
  • In one embodiment, the controllable mounts 106 may be identical. However, their physical positions on the machine frame 102 and cab 104 may be different and known via a wiring harness 206 provided between the controllable mounts 106 and the electronic control unit 168. For example, a series of switches 208 may be coded to indicate the position of each controllable mount 106 on the machine frame 102. If four mounts 106 are used, for example, the following codes of TABLE 1 may be used:
  • TABLE 1
    Position Switch 1 Switch 2
    Cab, forward, right 0 0
    Cab, forward, left 0 1
    Cab, rear, right 1 0
    Cab, rear, left 1 1
  • The harness codes may provide the switch functionality through two wires and a ground line (not shown) being run to each mount location as part of the wiring harness 206. The switches 208 of the above table are then provided for in each connector by connecting a respective wire to ground to provide a 1 and left open for a 0. This may be routed through the connector to the controllable mount 106 so that the controllable mount 106 can identify its position on the machine frame 102. This positional information may be used to tune and more precisely control the controllable mounts 106 on the machine frame 102.
  • In another embodiment, the controllable mounts 106 may be distinct and be configured to receive a specific connector from the wiring harness 206. Alternatively, a generic wiring harness 206 may be used and each controllable mount 106 may be given its address by a technician to communicate its position to the electronic control unit 168.
  • Optionally and as shown, the controllable mounts 106 may each include the gas spring 142 as discussed above in relation to FIG. 2. Each gas spring 142 may be pneumatically connected to a source of pressurized gas, such as a pump 210, and a source of low pressure gas, such as the tank 152. In the depicted embodiment, the electronic control unit 168 is shown as being in communication with the pump 210, but the control need not be electronic. For example a mechanical valve arrangement can be used. With the electronic embodiment, however, if the pressure of gas within the gas spring 142 of the right front controllable mount 198 is determined to be too low, for example, the electronic control unit 168 may command the pump 210 to provide pressurized gas and command a pneumatic valve (not shown) of the right front controllable mount 198 to open and receive the pressurized gas to increase the gas pressure within the gas spring 142. When the pressure of the gas spring 142 is sufficient, the electronic control unit 168 may close the valve and shut down the pump 210. Alternatively, in situations where the pressure is too high in the gas spring 142, the electronic control unit 168 may open the valve to the tank 152 and close the valve when the pressure has been sufficiently reduced.
  • Accurate mount displacement measurement permits the controllable mounts 106 to be maintained at or near the ideal snubbing height 144 for maximum effectiveness of the controllable mounts 106. By maintaining each mount at their ideal snubbing height 144 throughout their useful life, excessive loading and bottoming out/topping out of the mount 106 during machine operation may be minimized or prevented. Consequently, fewer replacement parts of the cab 104 and mounts 106 may be needed over the life of the machine 100. The present disclosure and its accommodating of different static loads of the cab 104 may permit different systems and options to be installed at different times without having to replace the mounts 106, thus providing a high degree of modularity and tailoring of the machine 100 to specific applications over the entire machine life while retaining the same mount package.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 5 a-d, in addition to the methods and systems discussed above, controllable mount displacement measurement can be achieved with other sensors including through the use of a Hall-effect sensor 214. For example, as shown in FIG. 5 a, a permanent magnet 216 may be positioned on the housing 108 of the controllable mount 106. A sensor chip 218 may be connected to the cab 104 and positioned to sense the relative position of the magnet 216. In another embodiment (FIG. 5 b), an expandable chamber 220 may house a laser 222 in one end and a receiver 224 in the other end. Each end may be attached to one of the cab 104 and the machine frame 102. As the chamber 220 expands and contracts with the relative movement of the cab 104 and frame 102, accurate mount displacement measurement may be achieved. In another embodiment, a bar code reader 226 may be positioned to read a stainless steel or other corrosion-resistant material bar code display 228, as depicted in FIG. 5 c. The display 228 may be attached to the frame 102 and the bar code reader 226 attached to the cab 104. In yet another embodiment, a rotary sensor 230 with a gear 232 disposed to move up and down a rack 234 (see FIG. 5 d) may also be used to determine the displacement.
  • In addition to diagnosing and correcting for creep or set in the elastomeric member 124, the controllable mounts 106 of the present disclosure also provide a mechanism by which machine feedback may be provided to the operator. For example, the controllable mounts 106 can be hardened and thereby selectively lower damping so as to pass more of the vibration and impact loads to the cab 104 from the machine frame 102. As indicated above, hardening the controllable mounts 106 occurs when an electrical current is provided to coils 131 and the apparent viscosity of the rheological fluid 116 is increased. Conversely, when machine feedback is not as desirable as comfort of the operator, the controllable mount 106 may be softened by removing or reducing the current to thereby decrease damping. The level of damping may be manually selected by the operator, programmed to change during specific intervals of machine operation, and/or based on sensor inputs as described in greater detail below.
  • Another feature of the present disclosure is that the operator interface 188 may permit the operator significant control over the controllable mounts 106. For example, as shown schematically in FIG. 6, the operator interface 188 may include an on/off switch 236 to enable an operator to turn the controllable mounts 106 off and thereby provide the softest ride at all times. In such a situation, the controllable mounts 106 would function simply as a viscous mount. Alternatively, an operator may adjust the control algorithm via an incremented switch 238, a touch screen 240, or a keypad 242 to scale the current flow provided by a control algorithm through the controllable mount 106. For example, the operator may scale the control algorithm to fifty percent (or other) in order to obtain a softer ride, which may result in a different dynamic rate and damping characteristics of the control system 182.
  • In another embodiment, the operator interface 188 may permit the operator to have to direct control over the current being applied to each controllable mount 106. For example, four slider bars 244 (or a different number if a different number of controllable mounts are used) may respectively represent the four respective mounts 106 and allow the operator to move the slider 244 on the operator interface 188 to fit his or her personal preferences. The operator interface 188 may be the touch screen 240 to allow direct control, or a mouse 246 or joystick 248 may be used to move a cursor over the screen 240 to make the desired changes to the controllable mount settings.
  • Further, the control of the controllable mounts 106 may be accessible through the menu or operating system 250 of the machine 100. In some embodiments, control of the controllable mounts 106 may be accessible only to a service technician via password protection or may be preprogrammed as part of an operator identification device 252 that would adjust settings to the specific operator. This may be achieved through the use of an RFID identification card 254, or operator information stored on such items as a cell phone 256, flash drive 258, personal digital assistant 260, or other computer readable media or device.
  • The operator interface 188 may also permit the operator to input or automatically input the geographical location of the machine 100 as well as road and worksite material conditions. Consequently, the electronic control unit 168 may adjust or implement a control algorithm to best compensate for the individual terrain characteristics of the worksite and thereby provide for the best ride. For example, if a rocky worksite is being traversed, the electronic control unit 168 may increase the current flow to the coils 131 to a higher level in each controllable mount 106 in order to provide the more damping to the cab 104 and operator. In one example, the machine 100 may operate at fifty percent of maximum current while traveling over the rocky terrain, and zero percent over a smooth worksite.
  • In a different configuration, and operator may also specify the type of machine task being performed, in which case different control algorithms 262 programmed to best damp vibrations when appropriate and allow feedback at other times may take over. For example, if the selected task is loading trucks from a pile of material, a loading algorithm 264 may be selected. The loading algorithm 264 may provide the controllable mounts 106 with fifty percent (or other) maximum current while moving between the truck and the pile, but during bucket loading and when the bucket is raised above a predetermined height, the electronic control unit 168 may increase the current flow to one hundred percent in order to provide machine feedback and thus provide better operator control.
  • In another example, an operator may indicate that the machine 100 is a motor grader and the task to be performed is fine grading. The electronic control unit 168 may then cause the controllable mounts 106 to be hard while the transmission of the machine 100 is in a forward gear, and soft while in a reverse gear. During fine grading, operators desire as much feedback as possible in order to more quickly complete the job within specified tolerances. Additionally, or alternatively, the controllable mounts 106 may be tuned to the desire of the operator for selected operational settings. For example, the operator may direct the electronic control unit 168 to pass one hundred percent current during fine grading, zero percent doing roading, and fifty percent during snow removal.
  • In other example, a wheel loader may keep the controllable mounts 106 soft during roading and moving around a worksite, but harden the controllable mounts 106 when the bucket is raised so that the operator can better feel the operation of the machine. In yet another example, the controllable mounts of a track-type tractor may be kept as soft as possible with zero current being passed through the coils 131 while the machine 100 is being moved with the bucket and ripper up. The same machine 100 may be programmed to pass the maximum current when either of those implements is performing a task.
  • Similarly, if the machine 100 is an excavator, when a large load is being placed, the controllable mounts 106 may be hardened so as to provide the operator with valuable feedback. In contrast, when the excavator is being moved, zero current can be passed through the controllable mounts 106 to provide a softer, more comfortable ride to the operator. Commonly with excavators, the controllable mounts 106 may always be soft, except when transients occur during dumping, digging or other events.
  • The teachings of the present disclosure can also be employed for detecting track slippage in a track-type tractor. By setting the controllable mounts 106 to a high current setting, the operator is provided with increased feedback. This feedback may indicate to the operator that track slippage is occurring. In such an event, the operator may choose to cease operations so that maintenance can be performed and thus minimize undercarriage wear.
  • The control system 182 of the present disclosure may also employ any of the control algorithms 262 to most effectively and expeditiously balance feedback and comfort. In addition to the loading algorithm 264 mentioned above, a predictive algorithm 266 may be used by the electronic control unit 168 to control the controllable mounts 106. The controllable mounts 106 may be tuned to the specific machine use and task being performed, such as dozing, ripping, grading, or excavating, or to the desired setting such as improved ride, noise reduction or operator comfort. Specific machine use and task may be entered by the operator as indicated above, or may be determined from the position of a blade, ripper, bucket or other implements 268 of the machine 100 as sensed by an implement position sensor 269. Alternatively, they may be inferred from the operator interface 188, hydraulic pressures gauges 270, worksite maps 272, global positioning system information 274, laser grading inputs 276, topographical maps 278, inclinometers 280, determined pitch rates 282, steering signals 284, altimeters 285, articulation joint position 286, and thermometers 287. For example, shock loads may be anticipated from the position of a truck in a loading zone and thus the controllable mount 106 may be adjusted accordingly to absorb as much of the impact from loading as possible.
  • Alternatively, when the bucket of a wheel loader, tracked loader, excavator or other machine using buckets is lowered and positioned for engagement with a pile, the controllable mounts 106 may be initially softened and then hardened when the hydraulic cylinder pressures exceed a predetermined threshold to provide feedback to the operator while minimizing the impact of the bucket engaging the pile. In addition, speed of the machine 100 can be used to predict the desired settings for the controllable mounts 106. For example, at higher speeds, as sensed by a speedometer 288, the controllable mounts 106 may be softer and then hardened when the machine slows 100. This hardening and softening may also be dependent on a transmission 289 of the machine (100), specifically a gear in which the machine 100 is operating. In first gear a fifty percent (or other) current may be passed through the coils 131 and in a second gear forty percent may be passed. In third gear, twenty five percent current may be passed and in fourth gear zero percent may be passed. Harder mounts at lower speeds would provide the operator with a better feedback, while higher speeds would provide greater comfort.
  • The predictive algorithm 266 may also use the sensed speed of the implement to control the controllable mounts 106. For example, when a blade is lowered the initial contact with the ground can jar the operator. Thus, when the blade is being dropped, the controllable mounts 106 may be softened in anticipation of the impact and hardened after contact has been made to improve feedback and control. Generally, the control algorithm 262 may also be set up to control the vibrational, heave, pitch, roll and yaw modes as well. The predictive algorithm 266 may also be used to predict that when an implement 268 is not in use and the machine 100 is moving at a relatively high rate of speed, this may mean that roading is taking place and the controllable mounts 106 should be adjusted for maximum comfort.
  • A historical algorithm 290 may also be used. More specifically, a histogram of the performance of each controllable mount 106 may be obtained from the sensors associated with each controllable mount 106. The histogram may be used to continuously tune each individual controllable mount 106 to current conditions. In other words, the electronic control unit 168 uses the sensor histories to adapt the controllable mount 106 to current performance, thus providing improved performance over time and use. For example, peak pressure and frequency may be kept to develop a history of performance to identify when to harden and soften with decay rate. If the controllable mount 106 undergoes very little movement over a past history, it can soften itself up to avoid unnecessary harshness and wasting of energy. As more motion is seen, the controllable mount 106 can then increase damping. For example, if while the machine is roading, high frequency small displacement vibration is sensed, the controllable mounts 106 can soften up to minimize noise, increase comfort, and save energy. When the machine 100 begins encountering rough terrain, the electronic control unit 168 may increase current to change the damping of the controllable mount 106 to compensate for the larger low frequency displacement.
  • In order to prevent failure of one of the controllable mounts 106 from causing damage to the other controllable mounts 106 and/or other machine systems through continued use, the sensor data collected from sensors associated with the controllable mount 106 may be collected and used by the historical algorithm 290 to provide a history of operation which may then be used to determine operating tolerances. The current sensor data may be used to provide the power spectral density of the controllable mount 106 and determine if the controllable mount 106 should be replaced. For example, and referring to FIG. 7, the dotted lines 292 may represent the tolerances for acceptable operation for the controllable mount 106 and the solid line 294 may represent the actual running power spectral density. A spike 296 outside of a tolerance zone 298 or an average error which exceeds the tolerance zone 298 may indicate that the controllable mount 106 should be replaced. In an alternative, the displacement and acceleration of the cab 104 relative to the mount 106 or the exact displacement of the mount components could be used to follow the life of the controllable mount 106 and feed the historical algorithm 290 to control the stiffness of the controllable mount 106.
  • These control algorithms 262 and the others discussed herein may be implemented as stacked algorithms 300 as well. For example, the electronic control unit 168 may use a default algorithm 302, an end stop algorithm 304, and a resonant control algorithm 306. The default algorithm 302 may use the controllable mount history to adjust the current to performance needs. All three algorithms may be calculated together and priority may be given to the algorithm that provides the highest force control over the controllable mount 106 under the current circumstances. For example, and referring to FIG. 8, the machine 100 may be roading during which the default algorithm 302 may be used to control the controllable mount 106. If the machine 100 moves over a pothole, that will provide an impulse to the control system 182 which if undamped is represented by line 308. Line 310 represents the effect produced by the stacked algorithms 300 in response to the impulse. The default algorithm 302 may control until the endstop algorithm 304 may then be given priority to control the controllable mount 106. After the endstop algorithm 304 has acted, the resonant control algorithm 306 may be given priority to dampen out a resonance caused by the impact with the pothole. The default algorithm 302 may resume control of the controllable mount 106 once the resonance has been controlled.
  • In addition to operator selected control and the control to provide operator feedback, the electronic control unit 168 may be used to provide cab 104 leveling and adjustment. Specifically, static load adjustment and ride height adjustment may be attained by adjusting the gas spring 142 to bias the pin 120 of each mount 106 away from engagement with the housing 108 and toward its ideal snubbing height 144. This therefore avoids having the pin 120 engage the housing 108 in “topping out” or “bottoming out” fashion. The electronic control unit 168 may monitor the relative displacement and adjust the gas spring 142 by adding or releasing gas. If the sensors 160, 170 indicates that the mount 106 is at or near the ideal snubbing height 144, no action is taken by the electronic control unit 168 to adjust the pressure within the gas spring 142.
  • This adjustment of the controllable mount 106 may be beneficial to compensate for different sized operators who may or may not be carrying tools, food and other equipment in the cab 104. The different loads may move the controllable mounts 106 away from the ideal snubbing height 144. In some applications, the machine 100 may be operating on a slope and thus the downside controllable mounts may bear a larger portion of the load. Thus, the downside controllable mounts may not be located at their ideal snubbing heights 144. The pneumatic chamber 114 of each mount 106 may thus be individually adjusted to return each mount 106 to the ideal snubbing height 144.
  • Changes in altitude and ambient temperature may also move the controllable mounts 106 from their ideal snubbing heights 144. For example, a machine 100 that has been operating in zero degree temperatures at sea level and then taken into the mountains and used at six thousand feet above sea level in fifty degree temperatures may have mounts that are no longer disposed at their ideal snubbing heights 144. The present disclosure may therefore adjust for this change in altitude and ambient temperature to return the mounts 106 to their ideal snubbing heights 144.
  • A mixed mount arrangement may also be used to provide reduced cost and complexity while providing many of the benefits associated with controllable mounts. For example, as shown in FIGS. 9 a-e, controllable mounts 106 may be used at some locations to provide controllability to the cab response while using lower cost mounts to help support/attach the cab 104 at other locations. In one embodiment (see FIG. 9 a), where pitching of the cab 104 is desired to be controlled, two passive mounts 312 may be positioned at a front 314 of the cab 104 and two controllable mounts 106 may be positioned at rear locations 316. Thus, through selective hardening of the controllable mounts 106, the pitch and roll motion may be controlled. The configuration may also be reversed as in FIG. 9 b with two passive mounts 312 positioned at the rear 316 of the cab 104 and two controllable mounts 106 positioned at the front 314 of the cab 104. As used herein, passive mounts have dampening characteristics that cannot be altered during operation and include, for example, viscous and rubber mounts.
  • Alternatively, a three-point system may also be possible with a single passive mount 312 in front 314 and two controllable mounts 106 positioned at the rear 316 of the cab 104, as shown in FIG. 9 c, so that the structure is less expensive and easier to manufacture for plane and positional alignment. In yet another embodiment (see FIG. 9 d), two passive mounts 312 may be mounted near an inertial pitch axis 318 with a third controllable mount 106 being mounted away from the axis 318.
  • Another cab mounting arrangement may be used with machines 100 that include an external roll-over protection structure 320. For example, as shown in FIG. 9 e), passive mounts 312 may be mounted between the cab 104 and the frame 102 of the machine 100. One or more controllable mounts 106 may be disposed above the cab 104 and mounted between the cab 104 and the external roll-over protection structure 320. In this configuration, the passive mounts 312 provide noise reduction and the overhead controllable mounts 106 may provide ride control.
  • INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY
  • From the foregoing, it can be seen that the teachings of this disclosure have applicability in a variety of industrial situations, particularly with machines to which operator cabs are mounted. Such machines may include, but are not limited to, track-type tractors, wheel loaders, track loaders, excavators, motor graders, articulated trucks, off-highway trucks, skid steers, skidders, and the like. The machines may employ a controllable mount so as to isolate the vibrations generated by the undercarriage and engine of the machine from the cab and thus the operator within the cab.
  • In addition, by providing a mount such as that disclosed herein, the ideal snubbing height of the pin within the housing can be maintained. In so doing, excessive loading and bottoming out or topping out of the mount during machine operation can be minimized or eliminated. This in turn can help to extend the serviceable life of the mount. Moreover, by monitoring the relative displacement of the pin with regard to the housing, a diagnostic can be generated indicating when an elastomeric member of the mount, or the mount itself, should be replaced.
  • The teachings of the present disclosure may also be used to construct a machine that provides increased feedback to the operator. By stiffening the mounts, the operator will more acutely feel vibrations which can prove valuable in performing tasks, such as fine grading, plowing, or excavating, or sensing conditions such as track slippage. Conversely, when roading the mounts can be relaxed to decrease feedback and thus provide better operator comfort.
  • The present disclosure also has applicability in providing a machine mount control system wherein an operator can select a desired hardness or feedback level through an appropriate operator interface. Such an operator interface can also allow the operator to select the type of task being performed and the control system can then set the mount accordingly.
  • Sensors can also monitor the positions or speeds of the machine or implements to then predict the type of task being performed. Once predicted, the appropriate mount settings can be used. Such a predictive algorithm approach can not only use machine sensed parameters, but utilize global positioning satellite and other mapping technology as well to predict the task and desired mount settings.

Claims (20)

1. A machine, comprising:
a frame;
an operator cab supported by the frame;
a controllable mount operatively connecting the operator cab to the frame, the controllable mount including:
a housing;
a pin mounted within the housing;
an elastomeric member connecting the pin to the housing;
a fluid within the housing;
a sensor operatively associated with the housing and generating a signal indicative of relative displacement between the operator cab and the frame;
an electronic controller unit operatively associated with the sensor and causing the fluid to bias the pin away from engagement with the housing.
2. The machine of claim 1, wherein the fluid is a rheological fluid and further including coils operatively associated with the housing and adapted to create a field across the rheological fluid, the signal generated by the electronic controller unit causing the strength of the field and thus the biasing force of the rheological fluid to change.
3. The machine of claim 2, wherein the housing includes a first chamber and a second chamber with rheological fluid in the first chamber, and further including a compressed fluid in the second chamber, the signal generated by the electronic controller unit causing the pressure of compressed fluid within the second chamber and thus the biasing force of the compressed fluid to change.
4. The machine of claim 1, wherein the fluid assists the elastomeric member in maintaining the pin at a desired snubbing height.
5. The machine of claim 1, further including a memory, the memory storing historical data concerning the controllable mount, the electronic controller unit adapted to compare actual sensed data about the controllable mount to the historical data and generate a signal indicating the controllable mount should be changed based on the comparison.
6. The machine of claim 1, wherein the sensor is a strain gauge operatively associated with the elastomeric member.
7. The machine of claim 1, wherein the sensor includes a channel within the elastomeric member filled with a conductive elastomer.
8. The machine of claim 1, wherein the sensor is selected from the group of sensors consisting of Hall-Effect sensors, laser sensors, bar code readers, and rotary sensors.
9. The machine of claim 4, wherein the sensor is operatively associated with the second chamber and adapted to generate a signal indicative of the pressure of the compressed fluid within the second chamber.
10. The machine of claim 9, wherein the electronic controller unit calculates actual displacement based on the sensor signal, compares the actual displacement to an initial displacement, and the signal generated by the electronic controller unit changes the pressure within the second chamber until the actual displacement equals the initial displacement.
11. A method of controlling a cab mount, comprising:
connecting a cab to a frame of a machine using the cab mount, the cab mount having a housing and a pin movable relative to and connected to the housing by an elastomeric member;
sensing a parameter indicative of the relative displacement between the cab and the frame; and
adjusting a field across a rheological fluid within the housing until the sensed relative displacement is equal to a desired relative displacement.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein the rheological fluid is in a first chamber of the housing, and adjusting the fluid involves directing more or less current through coils positioned proximate the rheological fluid so as to change the apparent viscosity of the rheological fluid.
13. The method of claim 12, wherein the pin further includes a damping plate positioned in the rheological fluid.
14. The method of claim 12, wherein the rheological fluid is one of a magneto-rheological fluid and an electro-rheological fluid.
15. The method of claim 12, wherein the sensing is performed using an electronic control unit, the electronic control unit executing a control algorithm adapted to generate a diagnostic signal indicating when the elastomeric member has set and begun to creep beyond an acceptable level.
16. The method of claim 11, further including pressurized fluid within a second chamber of the housing and adjusting the fluid involves increasing or decreasing the pressure of the pressurized fluid so as to raise or lower the pin.
17. The method of claim 16, wherein the pin further includes a plunger and the housing further includes a seal, the pin being positioned within a middle of the seal at a desired snubbing height, the desired snubbing height being reached when the measured displacement is equal to the desired displacement.
18. A control system for controlling a mount operatively connecting an operator cab to a frame of a machine, comprising:
a processor operatively connected to the mount, the mount including a housing with a pin movable within the housing;
a sensor adapted to generate a signal indicative of the relative displacement of the cab to the housing;
a memory adapted to store historical displacement data;
an algorithm stored in the memory and executed by the processor to compare the historical displacement data to sensed displacement data and correct actual displacement to equal desired displacement.
19. The control system of claim 18, wherein the mount includes rheological fluid within a first chamber of the housing and coils positioned relative to the rheological fluid, and the algorithm corrects the actual displacement to be equal to the desired displacement by increasing or decreasing a level of current flowing through the coils.
20. The control system of claim 18, wherein the mount includes a pressurized fluid within a second chamber of the housing and the algorithm corrects the actual displacement to be equal to the desired displacement by increasing or decreasing the pressure of the pressurized fluid.
US12/637,539 2008-12-15 2009-12-14 Machine Employing Cab Mounts and Method for Controlling Cab Mounts to Maintain Snubbing Height and Provide Mount Diagnostics Abandoned US20100152978A1 (en)

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US12/637,539 US20100152978A1 (en) 2008-12-15 2009-12-14 Machine Employing Cab Mounts and Method for Controlling Cab Mounts to Maintain Snubbing Height and Provide Mount Diagnostics
CN2009801548538A CN102282318A (en) 2008-12-15 2009-12-15 Using the machine and control cab mounts the cab mounts to hold the brake member mounting height and provides diagnostic methods
JP2011540974A JP2012512341A (en) 2008-12-15 2009-12-15 Carburetor mount control method for keeping the machine using a carburetor mount, and the snubbing height, and provides a mount diagnosis
PCT/US2009/068109 WO2010071781A2 (en) 2008-12-15 2009-12-15 Machine employing cab mounts and method for controlling cab mounts to maintain snubbing height and provide mount diagnostics
DE112009003187T DE112009003187T5 (en) 2008-12-15 2009-12-15 Cab mounts onset machine and method for controlling cab mounts for maintaining Abfanghöhe and providing support diagnoses

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US12/637,555 Active 2031-05-31 US8682539B2 (en) 2008-12-15 2009-12-14 Machine employing cab mounts and method for controlling cab mounts based on machine operation
US12/637,567 Abandoned US20100152980A1 (en) 2008-12-15 2009-12-14 Machine Employing Cab Mounts and Method for Controlling Cab Mounts to Based on Machine Location
US12/637,167 Expired - Fee Related US8678478B2 (en) 2008-12-15 2009-12-14 Machine configurations employing passive and controllable cab mounts
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US12/637,167 Expired - Fee Related US8678478B2 (en) 2008-12-15 2009-12-14 Machine configurations employing passive and controllable cab mounts
US12/637,588 Active 2033-06-13 US9051710B2 (en) 2008-12-15 2009-12-14 Machine employing cab mounts and method for controlling cab mounts based on operator input

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