US20100107564A1 - Patched Drinking Water Bag - Google Patents

Patched Drinking Water Bag Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100107564A1
US20100107564A1 US12/556,273 US55627309A US2010107564A1 US 20100107564 A1 US20100107564 A1 US 20100107564A1 US 55627309 A US55627309 A US 55627309A US 2010107564 A1 US2010107564 A1 US 2010107564A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
patch
bag
puncturing
method
attached
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Abandoned
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US12/556,273
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Henry J. Macler, JR.
Jeffrey E. Macler
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International Packaging Innovations LLC
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International Packaging Innovations LLC
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Priority to US9545908P priority Critical
Application filed by International Packaging Innovations LLC filed Critical International Packaging Innovations LLC
Priority to US12/556,273 priority patent/US20100107564A1/en
Assigned to INTERNATIONAL PACKAGING INNOVATIONS, LLC reassignment INTERNATIONAL PACKAGING INNOVATIONS, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: MACLER, JEFFREY E., MACLER, HENRY J., JR.
Publication of US20100107564A1 publication Critical patent/US20100107564A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D75/00Packages comprising articles or materials partially or wholly enclosed in strips, sheets, blanks, tubes, or webs of flexible sheet material, e.g. in folded wrappers
    • B65D75/52Details
    • B65D75/54Cards, coupons, or other inserts or accessories
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D75/00Packages comprising articles or materials partially or wholly enclosed in strips, sheets, blanks, tubes, or webs of flexible sheet material, e.g. in folded wrappers
    • B65D75/52Details
    • B65D75/58Opening or contents-removing devices added or incorporated during package manufacture
    • B65D75/5861Spouts
    • B65D75/5872Non-integral spouts
    • B65D75/5877Non-integral spouts connected to a planar surface of the package wall

Abstract

A system and method for pull-off sanitation patches for bagged water dispersion systems.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION(S)
  • This application claims benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/095,459, filed Sep. 9, 2008, the entire disclosure of which is herein incorporated by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • This disclosure relates to the field of sanitation devices and/or methods for water dispersion systems. In particular, to the field of pull-off sanitation patches for bagged water dispersion systems.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • A pathogen is a biological agent that causes disease or illness to its host. While there are several substrates and pathways whereby pathogens can invade a host, human consumption of contaminated drinking water is a common pathway whereby pathogenic microorganisms are directly transmitted to a human host.
  • While the occurrence of waterborne diseases in developed countries is generally low due to a good system of water treatment, distribution and monitoring, waterborne diseases are among the leading causes of morbidity in low and middle income countries, commonly referred to as developing countries. Further, waterborne diseases can even become a problem for developed countries with advanced water treatment systems in the wake of natural or humanitarian disasters (such as tornados, hurricanes, earthquakes, war, etc.) when such water treatment systems are destroyed or rendered unusable.
  • While many pollutants threaten water supplies, the most widespread, especially in underdeveloped countries, is the discharge of raw sewage into natural waters. This method of sewage disposal is most common in underdeveloped countries, but is also prevalent in quasi-developed countries such as China, India, and Iran.
  • Sanitation is the hygienic means of preventing human contact from the hazards of wastes and pathogenic organisms to promote health. There are many known forms of sanitation. In fact, hygienic means of sanitation and prevention can be by using engineering solutions (e.g., sewerage and wastewater treatment), simple technologies (e.g., latrines, septic tanks), or even by personal hygiene practices (e.g., simple handwashing with soap). Despite known methods of sanitation, it is estimated that up to 5 million people die each year from preventable waterborne diseases as a result of inadequate sanitation and hygiene practices.
  • Sanitation of potable water sources is a serious problem in developing countries, where sewage disposal into water sources is quite common, and in westernized countries in the wake of natural disasters when an area's infrastructure has been significantly damaged or rendered unusable.
  • In these situations, emergency water distribution systems are utilized to deliver safe potable drinking water to emergency situations and areas in the developing world that lack adequate and reliable potable water supplies. While the water transmitted to at-risk populations via emergency water distribution systems is safe for human consumption, there is a significant risk that the emergency water source itself can become contaminated when the water is being dispersed to individuals.
  • For example, bagged water dispersion systems, due to their inherent transportability and ease to distribute, are a commonly used modality for emergency water distribution to at-risk populations. Usually, the water in such bagged water dispersion systems is accessed via puncturing the bag with a spigot-type device. Once punctured, individuals utilize the spigot to obtain potable water from the bag. U.S. Provisional Patent Applications, Ser. Nos. 61/085,234 and 61/092,536, the entire disclosures of which are herein incorporated by reference, provide some exemplary embodiments of such water dispensing devices and methods.
  • Although a puncturing/spigot method reduces contamination of water from a device for accessing the water whereby the water is open to the air and human contact, there is still a risk for contamination in the puncturing/spigot method at the time of puncturing.
  • As emergency bagged water is usually transported long distances, through many points of human contact before it reaches the at-risk populations or disaster area; it is not unusual for the bagged water to come in contact with a number of different human pathogens during transport.
  • For example, in situations where there has been a natural disaster, such as a hurricane, tornado, tsunami, flood, earthquake, or other form of natural disaster that has historically caused great damage both in terms of loss of human life and destruction of human communities, there is generally vast destruction of a given community's established infrastructural system. In such situations, it is common for there to be sewage contamination of the community's regular potable water supply due to destruction of sanitation plants and bursting pipes, among other means. Further, roadways, mass transit systems and other forms of transportation are usually rendered unusable. Accordingly, transport of emergency supplies, such as potable bagged water, must be accomplished in this environment where there is rampant contamination of existing water supplies and few transportation options. As such, prior to reaching its end destination, potable bagged water being transported to these areas is usually handled by a number of different individuals (who do not have access to potable water to clean and sanitize their hands) and multiple different transport vehicles including ATVs, trucks and airplane carriers. Further, during transport it is not unlikely for the potable bagged water to come in contact with mud, dirt, unsanitized water and other natural elements that could be carriers of pathogens. There are similar concerns of exposure to contaminants when transporting bagged water to at-risk populations in the wake of human disasters, such as war zones, refugee camps, etc.
  • Exposure to pathogens is also a concern when transporting bagged water in developing countries to areas that might not have a viable and reliable potable water source. In these situations, it is not uncommon for emergency supplies to be transported by more rudimentary/indigenous methods. Such methods include, but are not limited to, transportation by pack animal, cart, or human carrier. Similar to transport of emergency supplies in the wake of a natural disaster, transport of emergency supplies under such circumstances could expose the surface of the bagged water to mud, contaminated water, and any contaminants on the human hands or pack animals which transport the bags.
  • The aforementioned exposure to pathogens during transport can result in such pathogens, dirt or other particulate adhering to or being located on the surface of the bagged water system. These surface pathogens and other contaminants can become a problem at the time of puncturing as follows.
  • At the time of puncturing, the spiked tip/grommet is spiked or thrust through the surface of the bag at a particular point. Due to the thrusting force of the spike/grommet, the surface of the bag at the point of puncturing is perforated and may be forced into the bag, and thus into contact with the potable water supply stored in said bag. Accordingly, there is a risk of any contaminating agents that may be located on the surface of the bag at the point of puncturing getting “thrust” into contact with the potable water stored inside the bag at the time of puncturing.
  • To prevent this contamination, it is common for a user to wipe off and sanitize the portion of the bag that will be punctured prior to the act of puncturing to clean the surface area the bag of all potential pathogens and to reduce the risk of any water contamination at the time of puncturing. This form of sanitation however requires a sanitary water source, antiseptic wipe, soap, or other sanitizing supplies that are usually not readily available in the wake of a natural disaster or in certain areas of the developing world; areas where a bagged water dispersion system is likely to be used. In addition, these additional sanitation supplies add to the cost of the bagged water dispersion system, which is especially an issue in the developing world where the communities and aid organizations are often under economic strain.
  • Further, this form of “wiping-off” or cleansing sanitation is not foolproof and is susceptible to common human errors such as failure to use a strong enough sanitizer and failure to remove all contaminants from the surface of the bag at the point of puncturing, among others. Considering the fact that such bagged emergency water dispersion systems are utilized in emergency situations were resources are scarce, stress can be high and speed can be important, the risk of human error in improperly sanitizing a bagged water source prior to puncturing is quite high.
  • Accordingly, there is a need for a simpler and more robust form of sanitation for emergency bagged water systems of sanitation that reduces if not eliminates the human error factor of the present forms of sanitation and decreases the risk of contamination of the bagged water supply at the time of puncturing.
  • SUMMARY
  • The following is a summary of the invention in order to provide a basic understanding of some aspects of the invention. This summary is not intended to identify key or critical elements of the invention or to delineate the scope of the invention. The sole purpose of this section is to present some concepts of the invention in a simplified form as a prelude to the more detailed description that is presented later.
  • Because of these and other problems in the art, described herein are, among other things, a method for the sanitation of potable bagged fluid dispersion systems, comprising the steps of: (1) attaching a patch to the exterior surface area of a bag of potable fluid at a point of attachment sanitized for contaminants; (2) removing the patch from the bag; and puncturing the bag at a sanitized point of attachment with a puncturing/spigot device; wherein the attachment of the patch prevents most contaminants from adhering to the bag at a point of puncturing and entering the bag at the step of puncturing.
  • In one embodiment of this method, the patch is attached to the bag at the time of manufacturing.
  • In another embodiment of this method, the patch is attached to the bag in a sanitary environment.
  • In yet another embodiment of this method, the patch is attached to the bag via an adhesive; and the adhesive forms a tight seal between the patch and the bag to generally inhibit any contaminants from coming into contact with the surface area of said bag that the patch covers once the patch is attached to the bag. This adhesive can be either natural or synthetic.
  • In another embodiment of this method, a pathogenic killing substance is located on a lower surface of said patch.
  • In still yet another embodiment of this method, the patch is made of a material from the group consisting of: plastics, elastics, paper, woven fabric, or combinations thereof.
  • It is also contemplated, in one embodiment of this method, that the patch will cover the entire surface area of one side of said bag.
  • In still another embodiment of this method, it is contemplated that the patch contains an easily graspable point; wherein the easily graspable point makes it easier for a user to grasp the patch and remove it from the bag during the step of removing.
  • In another embodiment, the patch is comprised of two or more pieces; wherein the patch is removed in the step of removing by pulling said two or more pieces in separate directions.
  • In another embodiment of this method, it is contemplated that the puncturing/spigot device is attached to the patch. Further, a potable fluid additive could also be attached to the patch.
  • In another embodiment of this method, the patch is comprised of at least two layers, wherein a bottom layer is attached to the bag via a permanent adhesive and an upper layer is attached to the bottom layer via a method of temporary attachment; wherein at said step of removing the upper layer of the patch is removed, revealing the bottom layer of the patch and the bag is punctured at the bottom layer at the step of puncturing. This method of temporary attachment, in one embodiment, is a perforated area on the upper layer. In another embodiment of this method, there is a pathogenic killing substance located between the bottom and the upper layer. In still yet another embodiment, there are markings on the bottom layer of the patch to designate a point of puncturing at the step of puncturing.
  • Also disclosed herein is a system for providing a sanitized transportable potable fluid, comprising: a bag of potable fluid; a patch; and a puncturing/spigot device; wherein a user removes the patch from the bag; wherein once the patch is removed, the user punctures the bag with the puncturing/spigot device at a surface area of the bag that was previously covered by the patch and dispenses fluid therefrom; and wherein the patch generally prevents contaminants from attaching to the surface area of the bag covered by the patch such that the probability of contaminants coming into contact with the potable fluid in the bag when the user punctures the bag are diminished.
  • Further, disclosed herein is a method of providing potable fluid in emergency situations and to at-risk populations comprising: transporting a patched bag of potable fluid and a puncturing/spigot device to the required emergency site; removing the patch from a surface area of the bag of potable fluid; puncturing the bag of potable fluid at the surface area that was previously covered by the patch with the puncturing/spigot device; and dispensing fluid therefrom; wherein the patch generally prevents contaminants from attaching to the surface area of the bag covered by the patch such that the probability of contaminants coming into contact with the potable fluid in the bag when the user punctures the bag are diminished
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of an embodiment of the patched water bag.
  • FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of an embodiment of a user grasping the grasping portion of the patch to remove said patch from the water bag.
  • FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of an embodiment of a user puncturing the patched water bag with the spigot dispensing device at the sanitized point of puncturing after the patch has been removed.
  • DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT(S)
  • The following detailed description illustrates by way of example and not by way of limitation. Described herein, among other things, is a system of assisting with the sanitation of the potable water supply of a bagged water system (such as one used in an emergency) via a patch that is affixed to the bag that generally prevents most contaminants from adhering to the bag at the proposed point of puncturing. The patch can be affixed to the bag at the proposed point of puncturing or may be affixed to encapsulate and protect a larger surface area of the bag.
  • FIG. 1 shows an embodiment of the patched drinking bag (89). In this embodiment, the patch (45) is attached to the bag (116) at the time of manufacturing. The patch (45) can be attached to the bag (116) either before or after the water has been placed into the bag (116) and the bag (116) has been hermetically sealed. This application also contemplates attachment of the patch (45) to the bag (116) after the time of manufacturing, any time prior to when the bag (116) is transported to an at-risk area, or any time a person skilled in the art would recognize as an opportune time to attach the patch (45).
  • In an embodiment, the patch is attached to the bag (116) in a generally sanitary environment and the bag (116) is generally sanitized for all potential pathogens and other contaminants prior to attachment. Sanitation, sanitary, and sanitized, for the purposes of this application, mean the removal of most of the harmful pathogens or other disease causing agents on the surface of the bag (116), thereby significantly limiting the risk of contamination to the potable water source inside the bag (116) that could occur at the time of puncturing. The use of such terms is not intended to imply that the surface has all such potential pathogens removed or even that the area is sanitized to a medically “safe” level. Attachment of the patch (45) to the bag (116) in such a setting however is not required, and this application contemplates attachment of the patch (45) to the bag (116) at any time and in any setting, so long as the point of attachment is generally sanitized for pathogens or other contaminants.
  • In an embodiment, the patch (45) is attached to the bag via an adhesive method known to those skilled in the art. The adhesive functions to form a tight seal in between the patch (45) and the bag (116), inhibiting any contaminants from coming in contact with the surface area of the bag (116) that the patch (45) covers once the patch (45) is attached to the bag (116). In an embodiment, this adhesive can be either natural or synthetic. However, any adhesive known now or in the future to those of skill in the art that could function to form a tight seal between the patch (45) and the bag (116) while inhibiting any contaminants from coming into contact with the surface area of the bag (116) that the patch (45) covers is contemplated.
  • In an embodiment, the adhesive is temporary such that when a pulling force is exerted on the corner of the patch (15), the patch (45) can be easily pulled off of the surface of the bag (116) without harming said surface.
  • In another embodiment, the adhesive is permanent. In this embodiment, the patch (45) is comprised of two or more layers. The bottom layer is permanently attached to the bag (116) via the permanent adhesive. The second layer is attached to the first layer via a temporary adhesive or other method of temporary attachment known to those skilled in the art. The second layer of the patch (45) can be either the same size or shape as the first layer of the patch (45), or larger or smaller in size.
  • At the time the bag (116) needs to be punctured, the second layer of the patch (45) is grasped by a user and pulled away from the bag, revealing the generally sanitary first layer of the patch (45).
  • In another embodiment of the multi-layer patch (45), the first layer is attached to the bag (116) by a method of attachment known to those skilled in the art. Further, the second layer is attached to the first layer via a permanent or temporary adhesive, or other method of attachment known to those skilled in the art. In such an embodiment, there is a perforated area on the second layer of the patch (45). This application contemplates a perforated area of any given shape or size. At the time of puncturing, a user would grasp the edge of the perforated area of the second layer of the patch (45) and pull, causing the second layer to tear along the path designated by the perforation such that a portion of the second layer of the patch (45) is removed, revealing the first generally sanitary layer of the patch (45).
  • In an embodiment, the patch (45) can be made of any material known to those skilled in the art for making a patch (45). Such materials include, but are not limited to, plastics, elastics, paper, woven fabric, or combinations thereof.
  • In an embodiment as seen in FIG. 1, the patch (45) is generally a rectangular or square shape smaller than the surface of the bag (116), but larger than the space taken up by the spiked puncturing/spigot device (52) after said spiked puncturing/spigot device (52) has punctured the bag (116). This shape and size however is not exclusive and this application contemplates any size or shape patch (45) that can cover a given surface area of the bag (116) needed for puncturing to protect said area from possible contaminants. For example, in another embodiment of the patch (45) it is contemplated that the patch (45) will cover the entire surface area of one side of the bag (116). It is also contemplated that more than one patch (45) may be used conjointly on the surface area of the bag. It is contemplated that these patches (45) can be placed anywhere on the surface area of the bag (116). The patches (45) can be adjacent to each other, overlap, be located on opposite sides of the bag (116) or arranged in any manner known to those of skill in the art for arranging patches (45) on a bag (116).
  • In an embodiment, the lower surface of the patch (45) is covered with an anti-bacterial or some other form of sanitizing and pathogenic killing substance. In an embodiment of the multi-layered patch (45), the anti-bacterial and pathogenic killing substance is located between each layer of the patch (45) and serves to reduce the presence of pathogens in the area under the patch (45).
  • In another embodiment of the patch (45), the patch (45) contains an easily graspable point (15), such that it is easier for a user to grasp the patch (45) and remove it from the bag (116) with little effort at the time of puncturing. FIG. 2 shows a user grasping the graspable point (15) of the patch (45), and pulling said graspable point (15) away from the surface of the bag (116) to expose the generally sanitized point of puncturing (454). This easily graspable point (15) can be any easily graspable point known to those skilled in the art, including but not limited to an upturned corner of the patch (45), an o-ring or alternatively shaped grasping device that rises above the patch (45), and/or a raised area of the patch (45) that can be easily grasped by a user.
  • While in FIG. 1 the patch (45) is a singular piece, in other embodiments the patch (45), or the layers of the patch (45) in the multi-layered patch (45), can be in two or more pieces. In this embodiment, the two or more pieces of the patch (45) can be removed by a user at the time of puncturing by pulling the two or more pieces in separate directions, removing the patch (45) to reveal the generally sanitized portion of the bag (116) for puncturing (454).
  • In yet another embodiment of the patch (45), there are markings on the generally sanitized layer of the patch (45) to designate the point of puncturing (454) to a user. These markings only further reduce the potential for human error at the time of puncturing, as they direct a user to the specific place where the bag (116) should be punctured, a place which is generally sanitized due to the patch (45) and has reduced risk of contamination if the bag (116) punctured there.
  • In another embodiment of the patch (45), it is contemplated that a device for puncturing the bag (116), known to those of skill in the art will be encapsulated within or attached to the patch (45). For example, in one such embodiment, the patch (45) will comprise a multi-layer patch (45). The upper layer of this multi-layer patch (45) will be comprised of a vacuum-sealed pouch. Inside the vacuum-sealed pouch will be a spiked fluid dispensing device known to those of skill in the art. As such, a user will have easy access to the fluid dispensing device.
  • In another embodiment of the patch (45), it is contemplated that a nutritional supplement, drink mix, or other potable water additive will be encapsulated within or attached to the patch (45). For example, in one embodiment, the patch (45) will comprise a multi-layer patch (45). The upper layer of this multi-layer patch (45) will be comprised of a pouch or other packaged area known to those of skill in the art. Therein will be located a nutritional drink supplement. In this embodiment, after the patch (45) has been removed and the fluid therein distributed, the nutritional supplement located within the upper layer of the patch (45) can be added to each individual serving of fluid post-dispersion.
  • In other embodiments, it is contemplated that any tool, supplement or device known to those of skill in the art to be used in emergency situations where the potable emergency water systems described herein would be utilized is contemplated as being encapsulated within or attached to the patch (45) in various embodiments. Furthermore, it is contemplated that more than one tool, supplement or device may be attached to the bag (116) via a patch (45) at one time. For example, in one embodiment, it is contemplated that both a nutritional supplement and a spiked fluid dispensing device will be attached to the bag (116) via a patch (45).
  • At the time of puncturing, the patched water bag (89) is utilized as follows. In a first step, the patched water bag (89) is transported to an at-risk area. Needing to access the water, a user obtains the puncturing/spigot device (52) that will be utilized to puncture the patched water bag (89). In an embodiment of the patched water bag (89), it is contemplated that the puncturing/spigot device (52) is attached to the outside of the patch (45). This attachment can be by an adhesive, via a pocket or pouch, hook and loop fastener or any other method of attachment known to those skilled in the art. This attachment of the puncturing/spigot device (52) prevents the puncturing/spigot device (52) from being lost and/or misplaced in the panic of the emergency situation, i.e., a user is ensured of receiving all of the components needed to dispense the potable water stored inside the bag (116). The device (52) can also be maintained in a generally sanitary condition by providing it within a sealed pouch or similar type of carrying device. Alternatively, the patch (45) itself may hold the device (52) to the bag (89) in the generally sanitized area (454) so that the device (52) is also maintained simultaneously in a generally sanitized condition for use. The removal of the patch (45) in this situation will also free the device (52) and make it accessible for the puncturing of the bag (89).
  • The user will hold the patched water bag (89) with one hand, attach the patched water bag (89) to a hanging place of attachment or otherwise position the bag (89) for puncturing. Then the user will grasp the grasping portion (15) of the patch (45) and remove the upper layer of the patch (45) (or the patch (45) as a whole depending on embodiment) by exerting a pulling force on the grasping portion (15) of the upper layer of the patch (45), pulling the upper layer of the patch (45) away from said bag (116). FIG. 2 shows a user grasping the grasping portion (15) to remove the patch (45) from the surface of the bag (116).
  • Once the patch (45) is removed, the user will immediately puncture the bag (116) with the puncturing/spigot device (52) on the newly exposed generally sanitized portion of the bag (454) that was previously covered by the patch (45). FIG. 3 shows a user puncturing the bag (116) at the generally sanitized point of puncturing (454) with the puncturing/spigot device (52) after removal of the patch (45) from the surface of the bag (116).
  • The user will then distribute the potable water via the puncturing/spigot dispensing device (52) that was utilized to puncture the bag (116).
  • While the invention has been disclosed in connection with certain preferred embodiments, this should not be taken as a limitation to all of the provided details. Modifications and variations of the described embodiments may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, and other embodiments should be understood to be encompassed in the present disclosure as would be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art.

Claims (19)

1. A method for the sanitation of potable bagged fluid dispersion systems, comprising the steps of:
attaching a patch to the exterior surface area of a bag of potable fluid at a point of attachment sanitized for contaminants;
removing said patch from said bag ; and
puncturing said bag at said sanitized point of attachment with a puncturing/spigot device;
wherein the attachment of said patch prevents most contaminants from adhering to said bag at a point of puncturing and entering said bag at said step of puncturing.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein said patch is attached to said bag at the time of manufacturing.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein said patch is attached to said bag in a sanitary environment.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein said patch is attached to said bag via an adhesive; wherein said adhesive forms a tight seal between said patch and said bag to generally inhibit any contaminants from coming into contact with said surface area of said bag that said patch covers once said patch is attached to said bag.
5. The method of claim 4, wherein said adhesive is natural.
6. The method of claim 4, wherein said adhesive is synthetic.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein said patch is comprised of at least two layers, wherein a bottom layer is attached to said bag via a permanent adhesive and an upper layer is attached to said bottom layer via a method of temporary attachment; wherein at said step of removing said upper layer of said patch is removed, revealing said bottom layer of said patch and said bag is punctured at said bottom layer at said step of puncturing.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein said method of temporary attachment is a perforated area on said upper layer.
9. The method of claim 7, wherein a pathogenic killing substance is located between said bottom and said upper layer.
10. The method of claim 7, wherein there are markings on said bottom layer of said patch to designate a point of puncturing at said step of puncturing.
11. The method of claim 1, wherein a pathogenic killing substance is located on a lower surface of said patch.
12. The method of claim 1, wherein said patch is made of a material from the group consisting of: plastics, elastics, paper, woven fabric, or combinations thereof.
13. The method of claim 1, wherein said patch covers the entire surface area of one side of said bag.
14. The method of claim 1, wherein said patch contains an easily graspable point; wherein said easily graspable point makes it easier for a user to grasp said patch and remove it from said bag during said step of removing.
15. The method of claim 1, wherein said patch is comprised of two or more pieces; wherein said patch is removed in said step of removing by pulling said two or more pieces in separate directions.
16. The method of claim 1, wherein said puncturing/spigot device is attached to said patch.
17. The method of claim 1, wherein a potable fluid additive is attached to said patch.
18. A system for providing a sanitized transportable potable fluid, comprising:
a bag of potable fluid;
a patch; and
a puncturing/spigot device;
wherein a user removes said patch from said bag;
wherein once said patch is removed, said user punctures said bag with said puncturing/spigot device at a surface area of said bag that was previously covered by said patch and dispenses fluid therefrom; and
wherein said patch generally prevents contaminants from attaching to said surface area of said bag covered by said patch such that the probability of contaminants coming into contact with said potable fluid in said bag when said user punctures said bag are diminished.
19. A method of providing potable fluid in emergency situations and to at-risk populations comprising:
transporting a patched bag of potable fluid and a puncturing/spigot device to the required emergency site;
removing said patch from a surface area of said bag of potable fluid;
puncturing said bag of potable fluid at said surface area that was previously covered by said patch with said puncturing/spigot device; and
dispensing fluid therefrom;
wherein said patch generally prevents contaminants from attaching to the surface area of said bag covered by said patch such that the probability of contaminants coming into contact with said potable fluid in said bag when said user punctures said bag are diminished.
US12/556,273 2008-09-09 2009-09-09 Patched Drinking Water Bag Abandoned US20100107564A1 (en)

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US9545908P true 2008-09-09 2008-09-09
US12/556,273 US20100107564A1 (en) 2008-09-09 2009-09-09 Patched Drinking Water Bag

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CN102462381A (en) * 2010-11-16 2012-05-23 绳帆 Bagged water taking device
WO2013049974A1 (en) * 2011-10-02 2013-04-11 Li Wanhong Portable water fetching device of bagged water

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CN102462381A (en) * 2010-11-16 2012-05-23 绳帆 Bagged water taking device
WO2013049974A1 (en) * 2011-10-02 2013-04-11 Li Wanhong Portable water fetching device of bagged water

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WO2010030664A2 (en) 2010-03-18

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