US20100101214A1 - Diagnostic methods for selective catalytic reduction (scr) exhaust treatment system - Google Patents

Diagnostic methods for selective catalytic reduction (scr) exhaust treatment system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100101214A1
US20100101214A1 US12327945 US32794508A US2010101214A1 US 20100101214 A1 US20100101214 A1 US 20100101214A1 US 12327945 US12327945 US 12327945 US 32794508 A US32794508 A US 32794508A US 2010101214 A1 US2010101214 A1 US 2010101214A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
theta
scr
ammonia
diagnostic
nh
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12327945
Inventor
Andrew D. Herman
Ming-Cheng Wu
David D. Cabush
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Delphi Technologies Inc
Original Assignee
Delphi Technologies Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N3/00Exhaust or silencing apparatus having means for purifying, rendering innocuous, or otherwise treating exhaust
    • F01N3/08Exhaust or silencing apparatus having means for purifying, rendering innocuous, or otherwise treating exhaust for rendering innocuous
    • F01N3/10Exhaust or silencing apparatus having means for purifying, rendering innocuous, or otherwise treating exhaust for rendering innocuous by thermal or catalytic conversion of noxious components of exhaust
    • F01N3/18Exhaust or silencing apparatus having means for purifying, rendering innocuous, or otherwise treating exhaust for rendering innocuous by thermal or catalytic conversion of noxious components of exhaust characterised by methods of operation; Control
    • F01N3/20Exhaust or silencing apparatus having means for purifying, rendering innocuous, or otherwise treating exhaust for rendering innocuous by thermal or catalytic conversion of noxious components of exhaust characterised by methods of operation; Control specially adapted for catalytic conversion ; Methods of operation or control of catalytic converters
    • F01N3/2066Selective catalytic reduction [SCR]
    • F01N3/208Control of selective catalytic reduction [SCR], e.g. dosing of reducing agent
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N11/00Monitoring or diagnostic devices for exhaust-gas treatment apparatus, e.g. for catalytic activity
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N11/00Monitoring or diagnostic devices for exhaust-gas treatment apparatus, e.g. for catalytic activity
    • F01N11/002Monitoring or diagnostic devices for exhaust-gas treatment apparatus, e.g. for catalytic activity the diagnostic devices measuring or estimating temperature or pressure in, or downstream of the exhaust apparatus
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N9/00Electrical control of exhaust gas treating apparatus
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N9/00Electrical control of exhaust gas treating apparatus
    • F01N9/005Electrical control of exhaust gas treating apparatus using models instead of sensors to determine operating characteristics of exhaust systems, e.g. calculating catalyst temperature instead of measuring it directly
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2550/00Monitoring or diagnosing the deterioration of exhaust systems
    • F01N2550/02Catalytic activity of catalytic converters
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2560/00Exhaust systems with means for detecting or measuring exhaust gas components or characteristics
    • F01N2560/02Exhaust systems with means for detecting or measuring exhaust gas components or characteristics the means being an exhaust gas sensor
    • F01N2560/021Exhaust systems with means for detecting or measuring exhaust gas components or characteristics the means being an exhaust gas sensor for measuring or detecting ammonia NH3
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2570/00Exhaust treating apparatus eliminating, absorbing or adsorbing specific elements or compounds
    • F01N2570/18Ammonia
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2610/00Adding substances to exhaust gases
    • F01N2610/02Adding substances to exhaust gases the substance being ammonia or urea
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2610/00Adding substances to exhaust gases
    • F01N2610/14Arrangements for the supply of substances, e.g. conduits
    • F01N2610/1453Sprayers or atomisers; Arrangement thereof in the exhaust apparatus
    • F01N2610/146Control thereof, e.g. control of injectors or injection valves
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2900/00Details of electrical control or of the monitoring of the exhaust gas treating apparatus
    • F01N2900/04Methods of control or diagnosing
    • F01N2900/0402Methods of control or diagnosing using adaptive learning
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2900/00Details of electrical control or of the monitoring of the exhaust gas treating apparatus
    • F01N2900/04Methods of control or diagnosing
    • F01N2900/0408Methods of control or diagnosing using a feed-back loop
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2900/00Details of electrical control or of the monitoring of the exhaust gas treating apparatus
    • F01N2900/04Methods of control or diagnosing
    • F01N2900/0411Methods of control or diagnosing using a feed-forward control
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2900/00Details of electrical control or of the monitoring of the exhaust gas treating apparatus
    • F01N2900/04Methods of control or diagnosing
    • F01N2900/0412Methods of control or diagnosing using pre-calibrated maps, tables or charts
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2900/00Details of electrical control or of the monitoring of the exhaust gas treating apparatus
    • F01N2900/06Parameters used for exhaust control or diagnosing
    • F01N2900/14Parameters used for exhaust control or diagnosing said parameters being related to the exhaust gas
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2900/00Details of electrical control or of the monitoring of the exhaust gas treating apparatus
    • F01N2900/06Parameters used for exhaust control or diagnosing
    • F01N2900/14Parameters used for exhaust control or diagnosing said parameters being related to the exhaust gas
    • F01N2900/1402Exhaust gas composition
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2900/00Details of electrical control or of the monitoring of the exhaust gas treating apparatus
    • F01N2900/06Parameters used for exhaust control or diagnosing
    • F01N2900/16Parameters used for exhaust control or diagnosing said parameters being related to the exhaust apparatus, e.g. particulate filter or catalyst
    • F01N2900/1621Catalyst conversion efficiency
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N2900/00Details of electrical control or of the monitoring of the exhaust gas treating apparatus
    • F01N2900/06Parameters used for exhaust control or diagnosing
    • F01N2900/16Parameters used for exhaust control or diagnosing said parameters being related to the exhaust apparatus, e.g. particulate filter or catalyst
    • F01N2900/1622Catalyst reducing agent absorption capacity or consumption amount
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/10Internal combustion engine [ICE] based vehicles
    • Y02T10/20Exhaust after-treatment
    • Y02T10/24Selective Catalytic Reactors for reduction in oxygen rich atmosphere
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/10Internal combustion engine [ICE] based vehicles
    • Y02T10/40Engine management systems
    • Y02T10/47Exhaust feedback

Abstract

In an internal combustion engine system having an exhaust aftertreatment system including a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, diagnostic methods involve the intrusive perturbation of a target surface coverage parameter theta to determine the state of health of the SCR catalyst or an ammonia concentration sensor. An adaptive learning block adapts the target theta based on the use of NH3 sensing feedback from a mid-brick positioned ammonia concentration sensor to pull in system variation. A further diagnostic monitors the amount of adaptation and when the adaptive learning excessively learns, the diagnostic assumes that some system-level degradation must have occurred and the diagnostic will notify the overall emissions control monitor.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional application Ser. No. 61/108,172 filed Oct. 24, 2008 entitled “DIAGNOSTIC METHODS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) EXHAUST TREATMENT SYSTEM and EXHAUST GAS TREATMENT SYSTEM AND METHODS FOR OPERATING THE SAME” (attorney Docket No. DP-318283), the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to diagnostics and more particularly to diagnostic methods for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) based engine exhaust treatment systems.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    The relevant background includes the fields of exhaust gas treatment systems and diagnostics therefore. As to the former field of endeavor, there have been a variety of exhaust gas treatment systems developed in the art to minimize emission of undesirable constituent components of engine exhaust gas. It is known to reduce NOx emissions using a SCR catalyst, treatment device that includes a catalyst and a system that is operable to inject material such as ammonia (NH3) into the exhaust gas feedstream ahead of the catalyst. The SCR catalyst is constructed so as to promote the reduction of NOx by NH3 (or other reductant, such as aqueous urea which undergoes decomposition in the exhaust to produce NH3). NH3 or urea selectively combine with NOx to form N2 and H2O in the presence of the SCR catalyst, as described generally in U.S. Patent Publication 2007/0271908 entitled “ENGINE EXHAUST EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM PROVIDING ON-BOARD AMMONIA GENERATION”. For diesel engines, for example, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia is perhaps the most selective and active reaction for the removal of NOx in the presence of excess oxygen. The NH3 source must be periodically replenished and the injection of NH3 into the SCR catalyst requires precise control. Overinjection may cause a release of NH3 (“slip”) out of the tailpipe into the atmosphere, while underinjection may result in inadequate emissions reduction (i.e., inadequate NOx conversion to N2 and H2O).
  • [0004]
    These systems have been amply demonstrated in the stationary catalytic applications. For mobile applications where it is generally not possible (or at least not desirable) to use ammonia directly, urea-water solutions have been proven to be suitable sources of ammonia in the exhaust gas stream. This has made SCR possible for a wide range of vehicle applications.
  • [0005]
    Increasingly stringent demands for low tail pipe emissions of NOx have been placed on heavy duty diesel powered vehicles. Liquid urea dosing systems with selective catalytic NOx reduction (SCR) technologies have been developed in the art that provide potentially viable solutions for meeting current and future diesel NOx emission standards around the world. Ammonia emissions may also be set by regulation or simply as a matter of quality. For example, proposed future European emission standards (e.g., EU 6) for NH3 slip targets specify 10 ppm average and 30 ppm peak. However, the challenge described above remains, namely, that such treatment systems achieve maximum NOx reduction (i.e., at least meeting NOx emissions criteria) while at the same time maintaining acceptable NH3 emissions, particularly over the service life of the treatment system.
  • [0006]
    In addition to the substantive emissions standards described above, vehicle-based engine and emission systems typically also require various self-monitoring diagnostics to ensure tailpipe emissions compliance. In this regards, U.S. federal and state on-board diagnostic regulations (e.g., OBDII) require that certain emission-related systems on the vehicle be monitored, and that a vehicle operator be notified if the system is not functioning in a predetermined manner. Automotive vehicle electronics therefore typically include a programmed diagnostic data manager or the like service configured to receive reports from diagnostic algorithms/circuits concerning the operational status of various components or systems and to set/reset various standardized diagnostic trouble codes (DTC) and/or otherwise generate an alert (e.g., MIL). The intent of such diagnostics is to inform the operator when performance of a component and/or system has degraded to a level where emissions performance may be affected and to provide information (e.g., via the DTC) to facilitate remediation.
  • [0007]
    Over the service life of the above-described exhaust treatment systems, various constituent components can wear, degrade or the like, possibly impairing overall performance. For example, degradation of either the SCR catalyst or the dosing system may impair the treatment system in meeting either or both of the NOx and NH3 emission standards. Open loop control does not appear to provide an adequate solution. It would be advantageous to provide diagnostic routines to detect any such degradation.
  • [0008]
    There is therefore a need for diagnostic methods that minimize or eliminate one or more of the problems set forth above.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0009]
    The invention has particular utility in an internal combustion engine including an exhaust gas treatment system having selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst.
  • [0010]
    In one aspect of the invention, a method of performing a diagnostic is provided. The method includes a number of steps. The first step includes introducing a reductant (e.g., aqueous urea) into an exhaust gas stream in an amount based on a target surface coverage parameter theta. The next step involves perturbing the target theta parameter of in accordance with a diagnostic function. Next, measuring an operating characteristic of the exhaust gas treatment system. Finally, determining a state of health of a component of the treatment system based on an evaluation of the diagnostic function and the measured operating characteristic.
  • [0011]
    In one embodiment, the component under diagnosis is the SCR catalyst. Through perturbation of the target theta about a nominal level, an expected level of excess NH3 is expected to be in the exhaust stream (at the SCR catalyst). The NH3 concentration level is measured as the measured “operating characteristic”. A healthy SCR catalyst will exhibit a relatively small magnitude perturbation in the NH3 sensed feedback. However, for an SCR catalyst that has lost ammonia storage capability, the NH3 sensed feedback exhibits a much larger magnitude, indicating degraded SCR catalyst performance.
  • [0012]
    In another embodiment, the state of health of an NH3 sensor is determined. Likewise, if the measured NH3 sensing feedback tracks with the target theta perturbation, then the NH3 sensor is healthy. Otherwise, where the NH3 concentration does not track the target theta perturbation, the NH3 sensor is unhealthy.
  • [0013]
    In another aspect of the invention, a diagnostic method is provided that determines when NH3 sensing feedback-based adaptive learning for adjusting the target theta values excessively learns. When this condition is detected, a fault or error is generated by the diagnostic.
  • [0014]
    A system is also presented.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0015]
    The present invention will now be described by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings:
  • [0016]
    FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic and block diagram showing an exhaust treatment system in which the diagnostic methods of the invention may be practiced.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 2 is a block diagram showing an overview of the dosing control that includes an SCR model as well as improvements in diagnostic methods.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 3 is a signal flow mechanization schematic showing inputs and outputs of the SCR model.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 4 is a simplified diagram showing typical target theta (θ) values or curves as a function of temperature.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 5 is a flowchart showing a method of using theta perturbation for diagnostics.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 6 is a combination chart showing a first embodiment of the method of FIG. 5 involving theta perturbation for determining an SCR catalyst state of health.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 7 is a combination chart showing a second embodiment of the method of FIG. 5 involving theta perturbation for determining an NH3 sensor state of health.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 8 is a flowchart showing a diagnostic method for generating a fault when theta adaptation exceeds control authority.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0024]
    Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference numerals are used to identify identical components in the various views, FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic and block diagram showing an exemplary diesel cycle internal combustion engine 10 whose combustion exhaust gas 12 is fed to an exhaust gas treatment system 14. The exhaust gas is represented as a stream flowing through the exhaust gas treatment system 14 and is shown as a series of arrows designated 12 EO (engine out), 12 1, 12 2, 12 3 and 12 TP (tail pipe). It should be understood that while the invention will be described in connection with an automotive vehicle (i.e., mobile) embodiment, the invention may find useful application in stationary applications as well. In addition, embodiments of the invention may be used in heavy-duty applications (e.g., highway tractors, trucks and the like) as well as light-duty applications (e.g., passenger cars). Moreover, embodiments of the invention may find further useful application in various types of internal combustion engines, such as compression-ignition (e.g., diesel) engines as well as spark-ignition engines.
  • [0025]
    In the illustrative embodiment, the engine 10 may be a turbocharged diesel engine. In a constructed embodiment, the engine 10 comprised a conventional 6.6-liter, 8-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine commercially available under the DuraMax trade designation. It should be understood this is exemplary only.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 1 also shows an engine control unit (ECU) 16 configured to control the operation of the engine 10. The ECU 16 may comprise conventional apparatus known generally in the art for such purpose. Generally, the ECU 16 may include at least one microprocessor or other processing unit, associated memory devices such as read only memory (ROM) and random access memory (RAM), a timing clock, input devices for monitoring input from external analog and digital devices and controlling output devices. The ECU 16 is operable to monitor engine operating conditions and other inputs (e.g., operator inputs) using the plurality of sensors and input mechanisms, and control engine operations with the plurality of output systems and actuators, using pre-established algorithms and calibrations that integrate information from monitored conditions and inputs. It should be understood that many of the conventional sensors employed in an engine system have been omitted for clarity. The ECU 16 may be configured to calculate an exhaust mass air flow (MAF) parameter 20 indicative of the mass air flow exiting engine 10.
  • [0027]
    The software algorithms and calibrations which are executed in the ECU 16 may generally comprise conventional strategies known to those of ordinary skill in the art. Overall, in response to the various inputs, the ECU 16 develops the necessary outputs to control the throttle valve position, fueling (fuel injector opening, duration and closing), spark (ignition timing) and other aspects, all as known in the art.
  • [0028]
    In addition to the control of the engine 10, the ECU 16 is also typically configured to perform various diagnostics. For this purpose, the ECU 16 may be configured to include a diagnostic data manager or the like, a higher level service arranged to manage the reports received from various lower level diagnostic routines/circuits, and set or reset diagnostic trouble code(s)/service codes, as well as activate or extinguish various alerts, all as known generally in the art. For example only, such a diagnostic data manager may be pre-configured such that certain non-continuous monitoring diagnostics require that such diagnostic fail twice before a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is set and a malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) is illuminated. As shown in FIG. 1, the ECU 16 may be configured to set a corresponding diagnostic trouble code (DTC) 24 and/or generate an operator alert, such an illumination of a MIL 26. Although not shown, in one embodiment, the ECU 16 may be configured so as to allow interrogation (e.g., by a skilled technician) for retrieval of such set DTCs. Generally, the process of storing diagnostic trouble codes and subsequent interrogation and retrieval is well known to one skilled in the art and will not be described in any further detailed.
  • [0029]
    With continued reference to FIG. 1, the exhaust gas treatment system 14 may include a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) 28, a diesel particulate filter (DPF) 30, a dosing subsystem 32 including at least (i) a reductant (e.g., urea-water solution) storage tank 34 and (ii) a dosing unit 36, and a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst 38. In addition, FIG. 1 shows various sensors disposed in and/or used by the treatment system 14. These include a DOC inlet temperature sensor 39 configured to generate a DOC inlet temperature signal 41 (TDOC-IN), a NOx sensor 40 configured to generate a NOx signal 42 (NOx) indicative of a sensed NOx concentration, a first exhaust gas temperature sensor 44, located at the inlet of the SCR catalyst 38, configured to generate a first temperature signal 46 (TIN), an optional second exhaust gas temperature sensor 48 configured to generate a second temperature signal 50 (TOUT), a first pressure sensor 52 configured to generate a first pressure signal 54 (PIN), a second pressure sensor 56 configured to generate a second pressure signal 58 (POUT), and an ammonia (NH3) concentration sensor 60 configured to generate an ammonia concentration signal 62 indicative of the sensed NH3 concentration. In many commercial vehicles, a NOx sensor 64 is provided for generating a second NOx signal 66 indicative of the NOx concentration exiting the tail pipe. However, such is shown for completeness only.
  • [0030]
    The DOC 28 and the DPF 30 may comprise conventional components to perform their known functions.
  • [0031]
    The dosing subsystem 32 is responsive to an NH3 Request signal produced by a dosing control 80 and configured to deliver a NOx reducing agent at an injection node 68, which is introduced in the exhaust gas stream in accurate, controlled doses 70 (e.g., mass per unit time). The reducing agent (“reductant”) may be, in general, (1) NH3 gas or (2) a urea-water solution containing a predetermined known concentration of urea. The dosing unit 32 is shown in block form for clarity and may comprise a number of sub-parts, including but not limited to a fluid delivery mechanism, which may include an integral pump or other source of pressurized transport of the urea-water solution from the storage tank, a fluid regulation mechanism, such as an electronically controlled injector, nozzle or the like (at node 68), and a programmed dosing control unit. The dosing subsystem 32 may take various forms known in the art and may comprise commercially available components.
  • [0032]
    The SCR catalyst 38 is configured to provide a mechanism to promote a selective reduction reaction between NOx, on the one hand, and a reductant such as ammonia gas NH3 (or aqueous urea, which decomposes into ammonia, NH3) on the other hand. The result of such a selective reduction is, as described above in the Background, N2 and H2O. In general, the chemistry involved is well documented in the literature, well understood to those of ordinary skill in the art, and thus will not be elaborated upon in any greater detail. In one embodiment, the SCR catalyst 38 may comprise copper zeolite (Cu-zeolite) material, although other materials are known. See, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 6,576,587 entitled “HIGH SURFACE AREA LEAN NOx CATALYST” issued to Labarge et al., and U.S. Pat. No. 7,240,484 entitled “EXHAUST TREATMENT SYSTEMS AND METHODS FOR USING THE SAME” issued to Li et al., both owned by the common assignee of the present invention, and both hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety. In addition, as shown, the SCR catalyst 38 may be of multi-brick construction, including a plurality of individual bricks 381, 382 wherein each “brick” may be substantially disc-shaped. The “bricks” may be housed in a suitable enclosure, as known.
  • [0033]
    The NOx concentration sensor 40 is located upstream of the injection node 68. The NOx sensor 40 is so located so as to avoid possible interference in the NOx sensing function due to the presence of NH3 gas. The NOx sensor 40, however, may alternatively be located further upstream, between the DOC 28 and the DPF 30, or upstream of the DOC 28. In addition, the exhaust temperature is often referred to herein, and for such purpose, the temperature reading from the SCR inlet temperature sensor 44 (TIN) may be used.
  • [0034]
    The NH3 sensor 60 may be located, in certain embodiments, at a mid-brick position, as shown in solid line (i.e., located anywhere downstream of the inlet of the SCR catalyst 38 and upstream of the outlet of the SCR catalyst 38). As illustrated, the NH3 sensor 60 may be located at approximately the center position. The mid-brick positioning is significant. The sensed ammonia concentration level in this arrangement, even during nominal operation, is at a small yet detectable level of mid-brick NH3 slip, where the downstream NOx conversion with this detectable NH3 can be assumed in the presence of the rear brick, even further reducing NH3 concentration levels at the tail pipe to within acceptable levels. Alternatively, in certain embodiments, the NH3 sensor 60 may be located at the outlet of the SCR catalyst 38. The remainder of the sensors shown in FIG. 1 may comprise conventional components and be configured to perform in a conventional manner known to those of ordinary skill in the art.
  • [0035]
    The dosing control 80 is configured to generate the NH3 Request signal that is sent to the dosing unit 36, which represents the command for a specified amount (e.g., mass rate) of reductant to be delivered to the exhaust gas stream. The dosing control 80 includes a plurality of inputs and outputs, designated 18, for interface with various sensors, other control units, etc., as described herein. Although the dosing control 80 is shown as a separate block, it should be understood that depending on the particular arrangement, the functionality of (the dosing control 80 may be implemented in a separate controller, incorporated into the ECU 16, or incorporated, in whole or in part, in other control units already existing in the system (e.g., the dosing unit). Further, the dosing control 80 may be configured to perform not only control functions described herein but perform the various diagnostics also described herein as well. For such purpose, the dosing control 80 may include conventional processing apparatus known in the art, capable of executing pre-programmed instructions stored in an associated memory, all performing in accordance with the functionality described herein. That is, it is contemplated that the control and diagnostic processes described herein will be programmed in a preferred embodiment, with the resulting software code being stored in the associated memory. Implementation of the invention, in software, in view of the foregoing enabling description, would require no more than routine application of programming skills by one of ordinary skill in the art. Such a control may further be of the type having both ROM, RAM, a combination of non-volatile and volatile (modifiable) memory so that the software can be stored and yet allow storage and processing of dynamically produced data and/or signals.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 2 is a block diagram showing an overview of the dosing control 80 of FIG. 1. The basic strategy is to control the dosing rate (e.g., urea-water solution) so as to ensure that the there is adequate ammonia stored in the SCR catalyst 38 to achieve (i) a high NOx conversion rate (i.e., conversion of NOx into N2 and H2O), with (ii) a low occurrence or no occurrence at all of ammonia (NH3) slips exceeding predetermined maximum thresholds.
  • [0037]
    Overall, the dosing control 80 is configured to generate an NH3 Request, which is communicated to the dosing unit 36 (i.e., shown as the “NH3/Urea Dosing”). In the illustrative embodiment, the NH3 Request is indicative of the mass flow rate at which the dosing subsystem 32 is to introduce the urea-water solution into the exhaust gas stream. The control variable used in implementing the dosing control strategy is a so-called ammonia surface coverage parameter theta (θNH3), which corresponds to the NH3 surface storage fraction associated with the SCR catalyst 38. In other words, the ammonia surface coverage parameter theta (θNH3) indicates the amount of ammonia—NH3 stored in the SCR catalyst 38. One aspect of the operation of the dosing control 80 involves an SCR model 82.
  • [0038]
    FIG. 3 is a signal flow mechanization schematic showing inputs and outputs of the SCR model 82. The SCR model 82 is a chemistry-based SCR model, and is shown with a theta control block 84, and a “NO and NO2” predictor block 86. The SCR model 82 is configured to model the physical SCR catalyst 38 and compute real time values for the ammonia surface coverage parameter theta (θNH3). The theta control block 84 is configured to compare the computed theta (θNH3) against a target value for theta (“Target θNH3”), which results in a theta error. The theta control block 84 is configured to use a control strategy (e.g., a proportional-integral (PI) control algorithm) to adjust the requested NH3 dosing rate (“NH3 Request”) to reduce the theta error. The theta control block 84 also employs closed-loop feedback, being responsive to ammonia sensing feedback by way of the ammonia sensor 60. The theta control block 84 may use NH3 feedback generally to adapt target theta values to account for catalyst degradation, urea injection malfunction or dosing fluid concentration variation that may be encountered during real-world use. As will be described, the NH3 sensing feedback is also used for various control and diagnostic improvements. The predictor block 86 receives the DOC inlet temperature signal 41 (TDOC-IN), the NOx sensor signal 42 and the exhaust flow signal 90 as inputs and is configured to produce data 88 indicative of the respective NO and NO2 concentration levels (engine out) produced by the engine 10. The predictor block 86 may comprise a look-up table (LUT) containing NO and NO2 data experimentally measured from the engine 10.
  • [0039]
    The SCR model 82 may be configured to have access to a plurality of signals/parameters as needed to execute the predetermined calculations needed to model the catalyst 38. In the illustrative embodiment, this access to sensor outputs and other data sources may be implemented over a vehicle network (not shown), but which may be a controller area network (CAN) for certain vehicle embodiments. Alternatively, access to certain information may be direct to the extent that the dosing control 80 is integrated with the engine control function in the ECU 16. It should be understood that other variations are possible.
  • [0040]
    The SCR model 82 may comprise conventional models known in the art for modeling an SCR catalyst. In one embodiment, the SCR model 82 is responsive to a number of inputs, including: (i) predicted NO and NO2 levels 88; (ii) an inlet NOx amount, which may be derived from the NOx indicative signal 42 (best shown in FIG. 1); (iii) an exhaust mass air flow (MAF) amount 90, which may be either a measured value or a value computed by the ECU 16 and shown as exhaust MAF parameter 20 in FIG. 1; (iv) an SCR inlet temperature, which may be derived from the first temperature signal 46 (TIN); (v) an SCR inlet pressure, which may be derived from the first pressure signal 54 (PIN); and (vi) the actual amount of reductant (e.g., NH3, urea-water solution shown as “NH3 Actual” in FIG. 2) introduced by the dosing subsystem 32. The actual NH3 amount helps ensure that the model provides accurate tracking of the reductant dosing. In one embodiment, values for theta (θNH3) are updated at a frequency of 10 Hz, although it should be understood this rate is exemplary only. There are a plurality of modeling approaches known in the art for developing values for a surface coverage parameter theta (θNH3), for example as seen by reference to the article by M. Shost et. al, “Monitoring, Feedback and Control of Urea SCR Dosing Systems for NOx Reduction: Utilizing an Embedded Model and Ammonia Sensing”, SAE Technical Paper Series 2008-01-1325.
  • [0041]
    Referring again to FIG. 2 the dosing control 80 includes additional blocks. In particular, a target theta parameter (Target θNH3) block 92 is shown, which is configured to provide a value for the target theta parameter (Target θNH3) preferably as function of temperature (e.g., exhaust gas temperature, such as the SCR inlet temperature TIN). The target θNH3, which is determined as a function of the SCR catalyst inlet temperature TIN, is conventionally set-up based on the following considerations: (1) desire to achieve a maximum possible NOx conversion efficiency with acceptable NH3 slip levels (30 ppm peak, 10 ppm average) for a given emission test cycle, and (2) recognition that limits must be set for the theta values at low temperatures to prevent potential high NH3 slips upon sudden temperature ramp up in off-cycle tests. In other words, in a pure ammonia storage control mode (i.e., theta parameter control), different emission cycles may call for different theta values in order to achieve the best NOx conversion within the confines of the applicable NH3 slip limits.
  • [0042]
    FIG. 4 is a diagram showing exemplary target theta θNH3 curves determined for both the Euro Stationary Cycle (ESC) and the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emission cycles using Cu-zeolite catalysts. As a practical matter, however, only one curve can be used in real world situations. The values from one of the target theta curves may be stored in a look-up table (LUT) or the like for run-time use by the theta control block 84 of the dosing control 80. Such values may take the form of (temperature, theta value) data pairs.
  • [0043]
    As shown in FIG. 2, the theta control 84 further includes a comparator 94 (e.g., a summer, or equivalent) configured to generate the theta error signal described above, indicative of the difference between the target theta (Target θNH3) and the computed theta (θNH3) from the SCR model. A PI control 96 is configured to produce an output signal configured to reduce the magnitude of the theta error. A high level control block 98 is responsive to various inputs to produce the NH3 Request signal, which is communicated to the dosing subsystem 32.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 2 also shows, in block form, a number of additional control and diagnostic features. These additional control and diagnostic features may be arranged to work together in some embodiments to achieve maximum NOx conversion while maintaining acceptable NH3 slip levels under various driving conditions (i.e., in vehicle applications). The dosing control 80 thus includes a number of functional blocks to implement these features: a theta perturbation diagnostic block 100, an adaptive learning diagnostic block 102, a transient compensation control block 104 and an NH3 slip control block 106.
  • [0045]
    The theta perturbation diagnostic block 100 is configured to perturb the target theta parameter in accordance with a small diagnostic function and to measure the resulting response to determine the state of health of one or more components of the exhaust treatment system 14.
  • [0046]
    The adaptive learning diagnostic block 102 includes a diagnostic feature that monitors how much adaptation has been applied in adjusting the target theta parameter and generates an error when the level of adaptation exceeds predetermined upper and lower limits. The logic in operation is that at some level, the ability to adapt target theta values to overcome errors (e.g., reagent mis-dosing, reagent quality problems, SCR catalyst degradation) will reach its control limit for maintaining emissions. When this control limit is exceeded, the diagnostic generates an error.
  • [0047]
    The transient compensation block 104 is configured generally to reduce NH3 dosing when specified exhaust transients are detected, such as sudden increases in exhaust mass air flow or when an exhaust temperature gradient is in an “increasing” state. The NH3 slip control block 106 is configured to selectively shut-off NH3 dosing when the measured NH3 slip level (mid-brick sensor) exceeds a predetermined trip level at a time when certain other exhaust conditions are satisfied (e.g., temperature gradient is in the “increasing” state). These features are described in greater detail in co-pending patent application entitled “EXHAUST GAS TREATMENT SYSTEM AND METHODS OF OPERATING THE SAME”, (Attorney Docket No. DP-318318), filed on even date herewith, owned by the common assignee of the present invention, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • [0048]
    Theta Perturbation Diagnostics. FIG. 5 is a flowchart showing a diagnostic method involving theta perturbation to determine a state of health of one or more different components of the exhaust treatment system 14. As described in the Background, one challenge for SCR-based exhaust treatment system developers is to incorporate sufficient robustness in the control scheme to maintain performance throughout the service life of the exhaust treatment system. However, the performance of various components can degrade over time and with usage, even beyond that correctable by a robust control scheme. Accordingly, it would be desirable to know the state of health of one or more individual components in order to take appropriate diagnostic or control action. For example, such diagnostic, upon determining a degradation of a component, may be configured to issue an alert to the operator (e.g., such as turning on a MIL 26FIG. 1) indicating that a component has degraded in performance to the point where it is not correctable by the control system and hence may have emissions implications. Additionally, the diagnostic may further be configured to set a diagnostic trouble code (e.g., DTC 24FIG. 1) to facilitate troubleshooting by a technician. As an overview, FIG. 5 shows a flowchart describing the general diagnostic method, while FIGS. 6 and 7 will be used to describe particular applications of this general method to determine the state of health of an SCR catalyst (FIG. 6) and an ammonia concentration sensor (FIG. 7). The general method includes steps 110, 112, 114 and 116.
  • [0049]
    The method begins in step 110. Step 110 involves introducing a reductant (e.g., ammonia gas or urea-water solution, as described above) into the exhaust stream in an amount based on the target ammonia surface coverage parameter theta (target θNH3). This basic control approach has already been described above in connection with FIGS. 2-4. In addition, it has been described above that the dosing control 80 utilizes a calculated theta parameter (feedforward control—θNH3) in conjunction with closed-loop control via ammonia concentration level as feedback from ammonia sensor 60, preferably located at a mid-brick position of the catalyst 38. The method proceeds to step 112.
  • [0050]
    In step 112, the diagnostic method involves perturbing the target theta parameter in accordance with a known, predetermined diagnostic function. Preferably, this is performed during steady-state engine operating conditions so any observed variations in the sensed NH3 concentration level signal can be safely attributed to the perturbation. In this regard, applying a known, intrusive theta perturbation about the nominal target theta parameter value can be expected to result in a predictable response, which response can be measured and later evaluated to determine the state of health. The method then proceeds to step 114.
  • [0051]
    In step 114, the diagnostic method involves measuring an operating characteristic, preferably of a component of or associated with the exhaust treatment system. In the particular SCR catalyst and NH3 sensor embodiments to be described below, this step of the method involves measuring the NH3 concentration level sensor output. It should be understood, however, that other sensor outputs may be measured or other operating characteristics can form the basis for determining the state of health. The method then proceeds to step 116.
  • [0052]
    In step 116, the diagnostic method involves determining the state of health of the component based on an evaluation of both (i) the original diagnostic function which formed the basis for the theta perturbation, and (ii) the measured operation characteristic that results from the theta perturbation (or that is the result of the theta perturbation). The evaluation may involve an assessment of the (i) the signal amplitude or magnitude of the measured, resultant operating characteristic in view of perturbing diagnostic function, as compared to expected levels; (ii) the relative phasing (or delay time) of the measured, resultant operating characteristic compared to expected phasing; as well as (iii) frequency of perturbation switch between the measured, resultant operating characteristic relative to the perturbing diagnostic function. In addition, it should be understood that while the illustrative embodiments use a periodic perturbing function (e.g., triangle wave), other functions are possible, for example only, use of a step function.
  • [0053]
    Diagnostic for SCR Catalyst State of Health. FIG. 6 is a combination chart showing responses of an ammonia concentration sensor to theta perturbation where the responses indicate, respectively, a healthy and an unhealthy SCR catalyst. The X-axis shows time (seconds), while the Y-axis at left shows ammonia concentration (ppm) and the Y-axis at right shows the theta parameter value. The SCR catalyst can degrade over time and with usage, particularly its ammonia storage capability. To determine whether the SCR catalyst may have become degraded in its ammonia storage capability, the theta perturbation block 100 (best shown in FIG. 3) is configured to perturb the target theta parameter (target θNH3) such than an excess of ammonia would be expected to be present and available to be sensed by the ammonia concentration sensor 60 (located at the mid-brick position). One predicate condition before using the NH3 sensor to check the SCR catalyst is to first confirm proper operation of the NH3 sensor itself. This predicate check may be performed using conventional methods, or may be performed using the theta perturbation method described below in connection with FIG. 7. Accordingly, upon confirmation that the ammonia sensor is functioning properly, if the magnitude of the measured ammonia concentration exceeds an expected level, then this finding implies that the SCR catalyst has lost some of its ammonia storage capability. Furthermore, a reduction in NOx conversion efficiency would be expected. As described above, appropriate diagnostic action may be taken, such as issuing operator alerts or setting diagnostic trouble codes. In addition, the diminished ammonia storage capability may be communicated to the dosing control 80, which may in turn be configured to use this information in its theta control strategy.
  • [0054]
    FIG. 6 shows the results of a simulation conducted to show how SCR catalyst degradation may be detected. In particular, the simulation makes use of a six inch SCR catalyst, which for purposes of the simulation was considered to provide the nominal amount (i.e., 100%) of ammonia storage. To simulate a loss in ammonia storage capability, a three inch SCR catalyst was used for comparison. The three-inch SCR catalyst can be taken as indicative of the degraded performance for a six-inch SCR catalyst. In FIG. 6, the target ammonia surface coverage parameter theta (target θNH3), was perturbed in accordance with a predetermined, known diagnostic function, and is shown by reference numeral 118. The selected diagnostic function may be a periodic signal, which oscillates above and below the nominal value for theta (target θNH3) for the operating condition shown. In the illustrative embodiment, the diagnostic function is a triangle waveform, although many other types of waveforms may be used. The response of the ammonia concentration sensor, for the well performing catalyst, namely the six-inch SCR catalyst, is shown as trace 120. As shown, the ammonia concentration sensor output signal indicates a low ammonia concentration, having a magnitude designated by reference numeral 122. The response of the ammonia sensor for the three-inch SCR catalyst (“degraded”) is shown as trace 124, which has a significantly greater magnitude (designated 126) than that of the normal SCR catalyst (trace 120). The increased magnitude can be attributed to a loss of ammonia storage capability in the “degraded” SCR catalyst, which may in real-world applications impact NOx emissions performance (tail pipe). To quantify this evaluation, a maximum expected magnitude threshold may be established, which may be no less than the magnitude 122, for example. From this, a “good”/“bad” evaluation may be made. Alternatively, a more specific measure of the degradation can be obtained by comparing the measured magnitude with the expected magnitude and arriving at a ratio, percentage or other more descriptive measure of storage capability (or loss thereof, e.g., 90% of full capability).
  • [0055]
    Diagnostic For Ammonia Concentration Sensor State of Health. FIG. 7 is a combination chart showing respective responses of a healthy and an unhealthy NH3 concentration sensor. The X-axis shows time (seconds), while the Y-axis at left shows ammonia concentration (ppm) and the Y-axis at right shows the theta parameter value. In this embodiment, the theta perturbation varies the amount of ammonia provided to the SCR catalyst, and the valuation involves determining whether the ammonia sensor can detect the resulting variations in ammonia concentration. The performance of the ammonia sensor to properly detect changes in NH3 concentration will allow distinguishing a properly functioning ammonia sensor from an improperly functioning one, for either control purposes or for diagnostic purposes. Again, preferably, the diagnostic is performed under substantially steady-state engine operating conditions (i.e., constant exhaust flow and temperature) so that any variation in the sensor response can be properly attributed to just the theta perturbation.
  • [0056]
    FIG. 7 shows a trace 128 of the target ammonia surface coverage theta parameter (target θNH3) as varied by the theta perturbation block 100 about a nominal value in accordance with a diagnostic function (e.g., triangle wave in the illustrative embodiment). The diagnostic function is configured and applied so that an excess of NH3 is expected to be present in the SCR catalyst for detection by the ammonia concentration sensor 60 (located at a mid-brick position). Trace 130 illustrates the response of a properly functioning ammonia concentration sensor while trace 132 shows the response of a malfunctioning (or degraded performance) ammonia concentration sensor. When the ammonia sensor does not measure the predicted concentration level of ammonia in the exhaust gas stream, based on the perturbed target theta parameter (target θNH3), then the diagnostic determines that an ammonia sensor performance issue exists. Note, the measured operating characteristic here may include a magnitude, or may be a relative phase between the theta perturbation and the response, or may be a tracking characteristic. As shown in FIG. 7, a point 134, on the perturbed target theta parameter trace 128, which is a local maximum on the trace, results in a corresponding local maximum in the output of a properly functioning NH3 sensor, for example as shown at point 1342. Likewise, a point 136, on the perturbed target theta parameter trace 128, which is a local minimum on the trace, results in a corresponding local minimum in the output of a properly functioning NH3 sensor, for example as shown at point 1362. Note, that this correspondence in the phasing in absent in output of the degraded sensor, as shown in trace 132.
  • [0057]
    Diagnostic—Target Theta Adaptation Exceeds Control Authority. FIG. 8 is a flowchart showing a further diagnostic method to detect when adaptation of the target theta map (i.e., values) exceeds the control authority limits for such adaptation. While developers of SCR-based exhaust treatment systems face challenges in configuring systems that meet both NOx emission standards as well as NH3 slip targets, such challenges are heightened when one considers the additional requirement of in-use compliance over the service life of the system. The adaptive learning block 102 (FIG. 3) is generally configured to account for and insert compensation into the target theta values for catalyst degradation, urea injection malfunction or dosing fluid concentration variation that may be encountered during real-world use. The adaptive learning block 102 is responsive to the ammonia concentration signal 62 produced by sensor 60, preferably located at a mid-brick position. The adaptive learning block 102 is configured to use the NH3 sensing feedback to adapt (or adjust) the target theta parameter (Target θNH3), thereby “pulling in” system variation that may occur in the field. The ability of the adaptation block 102 to adjust for dosing errors and the like enables some level of control authority to bring the system to near nominal levels. At some point, however, the ability to adapt target theta to overcome errors due to reagent mis-dosing into the exhaust gas stream, the quality of the reagent being introduced (e.g., the aqueous urea concentration level) and the state of the SCR catalyst, will reach its control limit for maintaining emissions desired performance. Accordingly, when the adaptive learning block 102 excessively learns (i.e., adapts the target theta parameter beyond a high or low threshold, the diagnostic assumes that some system-level degradation must have occurred, and the diagnostic may be configured to notify the overall emissions control monitor.
  • [0058]
    FIG. 8 is a flowchart of the logic of the this diagnostic in the context of a simplified adaptation scheme. The diagnostic is configured for detecting and reporting excessive adaptation. The method begins in step 138, where the most recent, measured ammonia (NH3) concentration level is provided by the mid-brick positioned sensor, and which will be used as feedback in the adaptation. The method then proceeds to step 140.
  • [0059]
    In step 140, the method is configured to determine whether the ammonia concentration level sensed by the ammonia sensor 60 (mid-brick) exceeds predetermined bounds. Predetermined bounds may be a defined window extending higher (“upper bound”) and lower (“lower bound”) than the expected ammonia concentration, to account for small variations that are deemed not significant enough to require adaptation of the target theta parameter (Target θNH3). If the answer in this decision step is “NO” then the method branches to step 142 (“Keep theta values”). Step 142 means that the dosing control 80 will follow the existing target θNH3 values (e.g., as shown in curve form in FIG. 4), but as modified by any previous adaptations. Otherwise, if the answer is “YES” (i.e., the measured NH3 concentration is out of bounds-outside the window defined above), then the method branches to step 144. Following step 144 means that adaptation may be possible.
  • [0060]
    In step 144, the method is configured to determine whether the measured NH3 concentration is lower than the lower bound described above. If the answer is “YES”, then the method branches to step 146.
  • [0061]
    In step 146, the adaptation method is configured to increase the then-existing Target θNH3 values by a predetermined step (e.g., a compensation factor>1). The method then proceeds to step 148.
  • [0062]
    In step 148, the method determines whether the compensation factor (as increased) is still within an upper limit (i.e., does not exceed the upper limit). If the answer is “YES”, then the adaptation has not exceeded its control authority and the method returns to the beginning. However, if the answer in decision block 148 is “NO” then the method branches to step 150 (“Generate an error”). In this situation, the net, accumulated positive-going adjustment to the target theta due to the adaptation logic has exceeded the control authority limit. As alluded to above, the control authority limits (both upper and lower) may be selected such that if exceeded, the logic can infer than there has been a compromise in one or more of the components of the exhaust treatment system 14. These compromises in performance may be due to problems in the dosing delivery, quality issues with the urea-water solution, or perhaps a decrease in the ammonia storage capability of the SCR catalyst. In step 150, the diagnostic may set a diagnostic trouble code, may activate an alert to an operator, or take such other action may be appropriate.
  • [0063]
    Otherwise, in step 144, if the measured ammonia concentration exceeds the upper bounds, thereby requiring adaptation, then the method branches to step 152.
  • [0064]
    In step 152, the method is configured to decrease the then-existing target θNH3 values by a predetermined step (e.g., a compensation factor<1). The method then proceeds to step 154.
  • [0065]
    In step 154, the method determines whether the compensation factor (as decreased) is still within the lower limit (i.e., is still higher than the lower limit). If the answer is “YES”, then the adaptation has not exceeded its control authority and the method returns to the beginning. However, if the answer in decision block 154 is “NO” then the method branches to step 150 (“Generate an error”; See the description of step 150 above).
  • [0066]
    While particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, numerous variations and alternate embodiments will occur to those skilled in the art. Accordingly, it is intended that the invention be limited only in terms of the appended claims.

Claims (17)

  1. 1. In an internal combustion engine having an exhaust treatment system having a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, a method of performing a diagnostic on the exhaust treatment system, comprising the steps of:
    introducing a reductant into an exhaust gas stream in an amount based on at least a target surface coverage parameter theta (θ);
    perturbing theta in accordance with a diagnostic function;
    measuring an operating characteristic of the treatment system;
    determining a state of health of a component of the treatment system based on the diagnostic function and the measured operating characteristic.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1 wherein said reductant is selected from the group comprising ammonia (NH3) and urea, said measuring step including the substep of measuring an ammonia concentration level.
  3. 3. The method of claim 2 wherein said one component comprises the SCR catalyst, said state of health including an ammonia storage capability of the SCR catalyst, said step of determining the state of health including the sub-steps of:
    comparing the measured ammonia concentration level with a predetermined threshold;
    determining a state of health fault based on an amount that the measured ammonia concentration exceeds the predetermined threshold.
  4. 4. The method of claim 3 further including the step of setting an SCR catalyst fault.
  5. 5. The method of claim 3 wherein said diagnostic function comprises one selected from the group (including a periodic function and a non-periodic function) a periodic function, said step of determining the state of health further includes the substep of determining whether the measured ammonia concentration level correlates to the diagnostic function.
  6. 6. The method of claim 3 further comprising the steps of:
    providing an ammonia concentration sensor for measuring ammonia concentration; and
    verifying proper operation of the ammonia concentration sensor.
  7. 7. The method of claim 6 further comprising the step of:
    positioning the ammonia concentration sensor in a sensing location selected from the group comprising a mid-brick position of the SCR catalyst and a rear-brick position of the SCR catalyst.
  8. 8. The method of claim 5 wherein said theta parameter is controlled in accordance with a control strategy configured to increase NOx conversion in the SCR catalyst and reduce NH3 emission from the SCR catalyst, said diagnostic function being configured to result in a detectable excess of NH3 emission from the SCR catalyst.
  9. 9. The method of claim 2 wherein said determining a state of health step includes the sub-step of:
    comparing an aspect of the measured operating characteristic and the diagnostic function wherein the aspect is selected from the group comprising (i) a signal amplitude; (ii) a phase or time delay; and (iii) a frequency difference.
  10. 10. The method of claim 2 wherein said one component comprises an ammonia concentration sensor, said diagnostic function comprising a periodic function, said step of determining the state of health including the sub-steps of:
    comparing a correlation factor by comparing the measured ammonia concentration level with periodic function;
    determining a state of health fault based on the correlation factor.
  11. 11. The method of claim 10 further including the step of setting an ammonia concentration sensor fault.
  12. 12. The method of claim 11 further comprising the step of:
    positioning the ammonia concentration sensor in a sensing location selected from the group comprising a mid-brick position of the SCR catalyst and a rear-brick position of the SCR catalyst.
  13. 13. In an internal combustion engine having an exhaust treatment system having a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst, a method of performing a diagnostic on the exhaust treatment system, comprising the steps of:
    introducing a reductant into an exhaust gas stream in an amount based on at least a surface coverage parameter theta (0) selected so as to increase NOx conversion and reduce NH3 emission from the SCR catalyst;
    adapting the theta parameter based on a measured NH3 level emitted from the SCR catalyst;
    generating an exhaust system fault when an adaptation amount for the theta parameter exceeds a predetermined threshold.
  14. 14. The method of claim 13 wherein said generating step includes the sub-steps of:
    establishing respective upper and lower adaptation limits;
    generating the fault when the adaptations of the theta parameter exceeds one of the upper and lower adaptation limits.
  15. 15. The method of claim 14 wherein said reductant comprises one of ammonia and aqueous urea, said step adapting step includes the sub-steps of:
    defining a base value for the theta parameter based on an inlet temperature of the SCR catalyst;
    determining a compensation factor based on a measured NH3 concentration level emitted from the SCR catalyst; and
    determining the adapted theta parameter value in accordance with the base value and the compensation factor.
  16. 16. The method of claim 15 wherein said sub-step of determining a compensation factor includes the sub-step of:
    determining when the measured NH3 concentration level exceeds an upper bound and increasing the compensation factor.
  17. 17. The method of claim 16 wherein said sub-step of determining a compensation factor includes the sub-step of:
    determining when the measured NH3 concentration level is less than a lower bound and decreasing the compensation factor.
US12327945 2008-10-24 2008-12-04 Diagnostic methods for selective catalytic reduction (scr) exhaust treatment system Abandoned US20100101214A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10817208 true 2008-10-24 2008-10-24
US12327945 US20100101214A1 (en) 2008-10-24 2008-12-04 Diagnostic methods for selective catalytic reduction (scr) exhaust treatment system

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12327945 US20100101214A1 (en) 2008-10-24 2008-12-04 Diagnostic methods for selective catalytic reduction (scr) exhaust treatment system
EP20090173180 EP2180157B1 (en) 2008-10-24 2009-10-15 Diagnostic method for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) exhaust treatment system

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100101214A1 true true US20100101214A1 (en) 2010-04-29

Family

ID=41528591

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12327945 Abandoned US20100101214A1 (en) 2008-10-24 2008-12-04 Diagnostic methods for selective catalytic reduction (scr) exhaust treatment system

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US20100101214A1 (en)
EP (1) EP2180157B1 (en)

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100218484A1 (en) * 2009-02-27 2010-09-02 Tino Arlt Method and device for controlling an scr-exhaust gas after-treatment system of an internal combustion engine
US20110120095A1 (en) * 2009-11-20 2011-05-26 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. System and method for monitoring catalyst efficiency and post-catalyst oxygen sensor performance
US20110308233A1 (en) * 2010-06-18 2011-12-22 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Selective catalytic reduction (scr) catalyst depletion control systems and methods
US20120067028A1 (en) * 2010-02-22 2012-03-22 Clerc James C Aftertreatment catalyst degradation compensation
US20120079812A1 (en) * 2009-06-18 2012-04-05 Ud Trucks Corporation Exhaust gas purification apparatus of engine and exhaust gas purification method of engine
US20120144809A1 (en) * 2009-06-11 2012-06-14 Agco Sa Catalytic converter module
EP2500557A2 (en) 2011-03-15 2012-09-19 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for identifying Gas sensor faults
WO2013053088A1 (en) * 2011-10-09 2013-04-18 潍柴动力股份有限公司 Apparatus and method for after-treatment of exhaust emission from diesel engine
US8454916B2 (en) 2010-06-18 2013-06-04 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst depletion control systems and methods
US20130152545A1 (en) * 2011-12-14 2013-06-20 Caterpillar Inc. Diesel eission fluid quality detection system and method
WO2013134539A1 (en) * 2012-03-07 2013-09-12 Cummins Inc. Method and algorithm for performing an nh3 sensor rationality diagnostic
US20140114598A1 (en) * 2010-07-23 2014-04-24 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Integrated Nodes, Computer Readable Media and Program Products, and Computer-Implemented Methods For Providing An Integrated Node For Data Acquisition, Verification and Conditioning, and for Remote Subsystem Control
US8793976B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2014-08-05 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Sulfur accumulation monitoring systems and methods
WO2014134273A1 (en) * 2013-02-27 2014-09-04 Cummins Ip, Inc. Apparatus, method and system for diagnosing reductant delivery performance
WO2015048099A1 (en) * 2013-09-25 2015-04-02 Cummins Inc. Scr aftertreatment management to mitigate slip events
US9115630B1 (en) 2014-05-02 2015-08-25 Cummins Inc. Diagnostic for a mid-catalyst NH3 sensor
WO2016022338A1 (en) * 2014-08-07 2016-02-11 Cummins Emission Solutions, Inc. Nox sensor diagnosis system and method
US9599006B2 (en) 2011-08-30 2017-03-21 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Catalyst oxygen storage capacity adjustment systems and methods
US9623378B2 (en) 2010-08-18 2017-04-18 Emitec Gesellschaft Fuer Emissionstechnologie Mbh Method for operating an exhaust gas treatment device and motor vehicle having the device
US20170106338A1 (en) * 2015-10-19 2017-04-20 Paccar Inc Reductant dosing control using prediction of exhaust species in selective catalytic reduction
US9650981B1 (en) 2015-12-28 2017-05-16 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Adjustment of measured oxygen storage capacity based on upstream O2 sensor performance
US9771888B2 (en) 2013-10-18 2017-09-26 GM Global Technology Operations LLC System and method for controlling an engine based on an oxygen storage capability of a catalytic converter
US9790835B1 (en) 2016-04-25 2017-10-17 Cummins Emission Solutions Inc. Catalyst failure detection based combined ammonia to NOx ratios, conversion inefficiency values and ammonia slip values

Families Citing this family (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2968715B1 (en) * 2010-12-14 2015-10-02 Peugeot Citroen Automobiles Sa method of diagnosing a selective catalytic reduction system for a vehicle and corresponding vehicle
DE102011011441B3 (en) * 2011-02-16 2012-06-14 Mtu Friedrichshafen Gmbh A method for dynamic breakdown detection for SCR catalysts
WO2013161032A1 (en) * 2012-04-26 2013-10-31 トヨタ自動車株式会社 System for determining abnormality in exhaust emission control device for internal combustion engine
DE102014208095B4 (en) * 2014-04-29 2016-06-30 Mtu Friedrichshafen Gmbh A method for detecting aging of a heterogeneous catalyst, the exhaust gas aftertreatment system for an internal combustion engine and the internal combustion engine

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6576587B2 (en) * 2001-03-13 2003-06-10 Delphi Technologies, Inc. High surface area lean NOx catalyst
US20040098968A1 (en) * 2002-11-21 2004-05-27 Van Nieuwstadt Michiel J. Exhaust gas aftertreatment systems
US20040098974A1 (en) * 2002-11-21 2004-05-27 Nieuwstadt Michiel J. Van Exhaust gas aftertreatment systems
US20060010857A1 (en) * 2004-07-14 2006-01-19 Eaton Corporation Hybrid catalyst system for exhaust emissions reduction
US20070044456A1 (en) * 2005-09-01 2007-03-01 Devesh Upadhyay Exhaust gas aftertreatment systems
US20070044457A1 (en) * 2005-09-01 2007-03-01 Devesh Upadhyay Exhaust gas aftertreatment systems
US20070137181A1 (en) * 2005-12-16 2007-06-21 Devesh Upadhyay Exhaust gas aftertreatment systems
US7240484B2 (en) * 2003-12-29 2007-07-10 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Exhaust treatment systems and methods for using the same
US20070175208A1 (en) * 2003-01-02 2007-08-02 Daimlerchrysler Ag Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment Installation and Method
US20080022659A1 (en) * 2006-07-25 2008-01-31 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Method and Apparatus for Urea Injection in an Exhaust Aftertreatment System
US20080022658A1 (en) * 2006-07-25 2008-01-31 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Method and Apparatus for Monitoring a Urea Injection System in an Exhaust Aftertreatment System

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7472545B2 (en) 2006-05-25 2009-01-06 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Engine exhaust emission control system providing on-board ammonia generation

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6576587B2 (en) * 2001-03-13 2003-06-10 Delphi Technologies, Inc. High surface area lean NOx catalyst
US20040098968A1 (en) * 2002-11-21 2004-05-27 Van Nieuwstadt Michiel J. Exhaust gas aftertreatment systems
US20040098974A1 (en) * 2002-11-21 2004-05-27 Nieuwstadt Michiel J. Van Exhaust gas aftertreatment systems
US6981368B2 (en) * 2002-11-21 2006-01-03 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Exhaust gas aftertreatment systems
US20070175208A1 (en) * 2003-01-02 2007-08-02 Daimlerchrysler Ag Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment Installation and Method
US7240484B2 (en) * 2003-12-29 2007-07-10 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Exhaust treatment systems and methods for using the same
US20060010857A1 (en) * 2004-07-14 2006-01-19 Eaton Corporation Hybrid catalyst system for exhaust emissions reduction
US20070044456A1 (en) * 2005-09-01 2007-03-01 Devesh Upadhyay Exhaust gas aftertreatment systems
US20070044457A1 (en) * 2005-09-01 2007-03-01 Devesh Upadhyay Exhaust gas aftertreatment systems
US20070137181A1 (en) * 2005-12-16 2007-06-21 Devesh Upadhyay Exhaust gas aftertreatment systems
US20080022659A1 (en) * 2006-07-25 2008-01-31 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Method and Apparatus for Urea Injection in an Exhaust Aftertreatment System
US20080022658A1 (en) * 2006-07-25 2008-01-31 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Method and Apparatus for Monitoring a Urea Injection System in an Exhaust Aftertreatment System

Cited By (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8459009B2 (en) * 2009-02-27 2013-06-11 Continental Automotive Gmbh Method and device for controlling an SCR-exhaust gas after-treatment system of an internal combustion engine
US20100218484A1 (en) * 2009-02-27 2010-09-02 Tino Arlt Method and device for controlling an scr-exhaust gas after-treatment system of an internal combustion engine
US20120144809A1 (en) * 2009-06-11 2012-06-14 Agco Sa Catalytic converter module
US20120079812A1 (en) * 2009-06-18 2012-04-05 Ud Trucks Corporation Exhaust gas purification apparatus of engine and exhaust gas purification method of engine
US20110120095A1 (en) * 2009-11-20 2011-05-26 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. System and method for monitoring catalyst efficiency and post-catalyst oxygen sensor performance
US8516796B2 (en) * 2009-11-20 2013-08-27 GM Global Technology Operations LLC System and method for monitoring catalyst efficiency and post-catalyst oxygen sensor performance
US20120067028A1 (en) * 2010-02-22 2012-03-22 Clerc James C Aftertreatment catalyst degradation compensation
US8429898B2 (en) * 2010-06-18 2013-04-30 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst depletion control systems and methods
US8454916B2 (en) 2010-06-18 2013-06-04 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst depletion control systems and methods
US20110308233A1 (en) * 2010-06-18 2011-12-22 Gm Global Technology Operations, Inc. Selective catalytic reduction (scr) catalyst depletion control systems and methods
US9723060B2 (en) * 2010-07-23 2017-08-01 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Integrated nodes, computer readable media and program products, and computer-implemented methods for providing an integrated node for data acquisition, verification and conditioning, and for remote subsystem control
US20140114598A1 (en) * 2010-07-23 2014-04-24 Saudi Arabian Oil Company Integrated Nodes, Computer Readable Media and Program Products, and Computer-Implemented Methods For Providing An Integrated Node For Data Acquisition, Verification and Conditioning, and for Remote Subsystem Control
US9623378B2 (en) 2010-08-18 2017-04-18 Emitec Gesellschaft Fuer Emissionstechnologie Mbh Method for operating an exhaust gas treatment device and motor vehicle having the device
US9097192B2 (en) * 2011-03-15 2015-08-04 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for identifying gas sensor faults
US20120234077A1 (en) * 2011-03-15 2012-09-20 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for identifying gas sensor faults
EP2500557A2 (en) 2011-03-15 2012-09-19 Delphi Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for identifying Gas sensor faults
US9599006B2 (en) 2011-08-30 2017-03-21 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Catalyst oxygen storage capacity adjustment systems and methods
WO2013053088A1 (en) * 2011-10-09 2013-04-18 潍柴动力股份有限公司 Apparatus and method for after-treatment of exhaust emission from diesel engine
US20130152545A1 (en) * 2011-12-14 2013-06-20 Caterpillar Inc. Diesel eission fluid quality detection system and method
US8793976B2 (en) 2012-01-19 2014-08-05 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Sulfur accumulation monitoring systems and methods
WO2013134539A1 (en) * 2012-03-07 2013-09-12 Cummins Inc. Method and algorithm for performing an nh3 sensor rationality diagnostic
US9429062B2 (en) 2012-03-07 2016-08-30 Cummins Inc. Method and algorithm for performing an NH3 sensor rationality diagnostic
WO2014134273A1 (en) * 2013-02-27 2014-09-04 Cummins Ip, Inc. Apparatus, method and system for diagnosing reductant delivery performance
US9546585B2 (en) 2013-02-27 2017-01-17 Cummins Ip, Inc. Apparatus, method, and system for diagnosing reductant delivery performance
WO2015048099A1 (en) * 2013-09-25 2015-04-02 Cummins Inc. Scr aftertreatment management to mitigate slip events
US9771888B2 (en) 2013-10-18 2017-09-26 GM Global Technology Operations LLC System and method for controlling an engine based on an oxygen storage capability of a catalytic converter
US9115630B1 (en) 2014-05-02 2015-08-25 Cummins Inc. Diagnostic for a mid-catalyst NH3 sensor
US9606092B2 (en) 2014-08-07 2017-03-28 Cummins Emission Solutions, Inc. NOx sensor diagnosis system and method
GB2542535A (en) * 2014-08-07 2017-03-22 Cummins Emission Solutions Inc NOx sensor diagnosis system and method
WO2016022338A1 (en) * 2014-08-07 2016-02-11 Cummins Emission Solutions, Inc. Nox sensor diagnosis system and method
US20170106338A1 (en) * 2015-10-19 2017-04-20 Paccar Inc Reductant dosing control using prediction of exhaust species in selective catalytic reduction
US9650981B1 (en) 2015-12-28 2017-05-16 GM Global Technology Operations LLC Adjustment of measured oxygen storage capacity based on upstream O2 sensor performance
US9790835B1 (en) 2016-04-25 2017-10-17 Cummins Emission Solutions Inc. Catalyst failure detection based combined ammonia to NOx ratios, conversion inefficiency values and ammonia slip values

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
EP2180157A3 (en) 2010-07-21 application
EP2180157A2 (en) 2010-04-28 application
EP2180157B1 (en) 2012-04-18 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US20080066455A1 (en) Method and Apparatus to Control Injection of a Reductant into an Exhaust Gas Feedstream
US6722120B2 (en) Method and device for the control of an exhaust gas treatment system
US20100024397A1 (en) APPARATUS, SYSTEM, AND METHOD FOR REDUCING NOx EMISSIONS FROM AN ENGINE SYSTEM
US20080250774A1 (en) Reductant injection control strategy
US20090272099A1 (en) Apparatus, system, and method for determining the degradation of an scr catalyst
US20100024390A1 (en) APPARATUS, SYSTEM, AND METHOD FOR REDUCING NOx EMISSIONS ON AN SCR CATALYST
US6769246B2 (en) Method and device for controlling an exhaust gas aftertreatment system
US20100101213A1 (en) On-board-diagnosis method for an exhaust aftertreatment system and on-board-diagnosis system for an exhaust aftertreatment system
US20060086080A1 (en) Engine exhaust gas cleaning method and system
US20080066454A1 (en) Apparatus and Method to Inject a Reductant into an Exhaust Gas Feedstream
US8091416B2 (en) Robust design of diagnostic enabling conditions for SCR NOx conversion efficiency monitor
US20090293451A1 (en) Exhaust control system having diagnostic capability
US20080103684A1 (en) Diagnosis Method for an Exhaust Gas Post-Treatment System
US20080216463A1 (en) Device for Removing Nitrogen Oxides From Internal Combustion Engine Waste Gas and Method for Dosing an Aggregate of Internal Combustion Engine Waste Gas
US20080264037A1 (en) Apparatus for deterioration diagnosis of an oxidizing catalyst
US20050103099A1 (en) Diesel aftertreatment systems
US20110061372A1 (en) Intrusive scr efficency testing systems and methods for vehicles with low temperature exhaust gas
US20100132356A1 (en) Purification System for Variable Post Injection in LP EGR and Control Method for the Same
US7610750B2 (en) Method and apparatus for monitoring a urea injection system in an exhaust aftertreatment system
US20100326051A1 (en) Operating and Diagnostic Method for an SCR Exhaust-Gas Aftertreatment System
EP1176295A2 (en) Apparatus and method for diagnosing reducing-agent supplying device in internal combustion engine
US20090288394A1 (en) Integrated engine and exhaust after treatment system and method of operating same
US20110023456A1 (en) Method and system for verifying the operation of an scr catalyst
US20090049899A1 (en) Diagnostic method for an exhaust aftertreatment system
JP2012031826A (en) Failure detection system for exhaust emission control device

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: DELPHI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.,MICHIGAN

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HERMAN, ANDREW D., MR.;WU, MING-CHENG, MR.;CABUSH, DAVIDD., MR.;REEL/FRAME:021943/0499

Effective date: 20081201