Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100082098A1
US20100082098A1 US12581040 US58104009A US2010082098A1 US 20100082098 A1 US20100082098 A1 US 20100082098A1 US 12581040 US12581040 US 12581040 US 58104009 A US58104009 A US 58104009A US 2010082098 A1 US2010082098 A1 US 2010082098A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
valve
anchor
device
anchors
annulus
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12581040
Inventor
Niel F. Starksen
John To
Mariel Fabro
Michael F. Wei
Rodolfo A. Morales
Original Assignee
Starksen Niel F
John To
Mariel Fabro
Wei Michael F
Morales Rodolfo A
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/00234Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for minimally invasive surgery
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/0401Suture anchors, buttons or pledgets, i.e. means for attaching sutures to bone, cartilage or soft tissue; Instruments for applying or removing suture anchors
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/064Surgical staples, i.e. penetrating the tissue
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/064Surgical staples, i.e. penetrating the tissue
    • A61B17/0643Surgical staples, i.e. penetrating the tissue with separate closing member, e.g. for interlocking with staple
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/064Surgical staples, i.e. penetrating the tissue
    • A61B17/0644Surgical staples, i.e. penetrating the tissue penetrating the tissue, deformable to closed position
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/068Surgical staplers, e.g. containing multiple staples or clamps
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/068Surgical staplers, e.g. containing multiple staples or clamps
    • A61B17/0682Surgical staplers, e.g. containing multiple staples or clamps for applying U-shaped staples or clamps, e.g. without a forming anvil
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/24Heart valves ; Vascular valves, e.g. venous valves; Heart implants, e.g. passive devices for improving the function of the native valve or the heart muscle; Transmyocardial revascularisation [TMR] devices
    • A61F2/2442Annuloplasty rings or inserts for correcting the valve shape; Implants for improving the function of a native heart valve
    • A61F2/2445Annuloplasty rings in direct contact with the valve annulus
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/0487Suture clamps, clips or locks, e.g. for replacing suture knots; Instruments for applying or removing suture clamps, clips or locks
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/068Surgical staplers, e.g. containing multiple staples or clamps
    • A61B17/072Surgical staplers, e.g. containing multiple staples or clamps for applying a row of staples in a single action, e.g. the staples being applied simultaneously
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/00234Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for minimally invasive surgery
    • A61B2017/00238Type of minimally invasive operation
    • A61B2017/00243Type of minimally invasive operation cardiac
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B2017/00743Type of operation; Specification of treatment sites
    • A61B2017/00778Operations on blood vessels
    • A61B2017/00783Valvuloplasty
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B2017/00831Material properties
    • A61B2017/00867Material properties shape memory effect
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/0401Suture anchors, buttons or pledgets, i.e. means for attaching sutures to bone, cartilage or soft tissue; Instruments for applying or removing suture anchors
    • A61B2017/0409Instruments for applying suture anchors
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/0401Suture anchors, buttons or pledgets, i.e. means for attaching sutures to bone, cartilage or soft tissue; Instruments for applying or removing suture anchors
    • A61B2017/0414Suture anchors, buttons or pledgets, i.e. means for attaching sutures to bone, cartilage or soft tissue; Instruments for applying or removing suture anchors having a suture-receiving opening, e.g. lateral opening
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/0401Suture anchors, buttons or pledgets, i.e. means for attaching sutures to bone, cartilage or soft tissue; Instruments for applying or removing suture anchors
    • A61B2017/0427Suture anchors, buttons or pledgets, i.e. means for attaching sutures to bone, cartilage or soft tissue; Instruments for applying or removing suture anchors having anchoring barbs or pins extending outwardly from the anchor body
    • A61B2017/0437Suture anchors, buttons or pledgets, i.e. means for attaching sutures to bone, cartilage or soft tissue; Instruments for applying or removing suture anchors having anchoring barbs or pins extending outwardly from the anchor body the barbs being resilient or spring-like
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B17/0401Suture anchors, buttons or pledgets, i.e. means for attaching sutures to bone, cartilage or soft tissue; Instruments for applying or removing suture anchors
    • A61B2017/0464Suture anchors, buttons or pledgets, i.e. means for attaching sutures to bone, cartilage or soft tissue; Instruments for applying or removing suture anchors for soft tissue
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials
    • A61B2017/0496Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for suturing wounds; Holders or packages for needles or suture materials for tensioning sutures
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/068Surgical staplers, e.g. containing multiple staples or clamps
    • A61B17/072Surgical staplers, e.g. containing multiple staples or clamps for applying a row of staples in a single action, e.g. the staples being applied simultaneously
    • A61B2017/07214Stapler heads
    • A61B2017/07221Stapler heads curved
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/28Surgical forceps
    • A61B17/29Forceps for use in minimally invasive surgery
    • A61B2017/2901Details of shaft
    • A61B2017/2905Details of shaft flexible
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/0067Catheters; Hollow probes characterised by the distal end, e.g. tips
    • A61M25/0082Catheter tip comprising a tool
    • A61M2025/0096Catheter tip comprising a tool being laterally outward extensions or tools, e.g. hooks or fibres

Abstract

Devices, systems and methods facilitate positioning of a cardiac valve annulus treatment device, thus enhancing treatment of the annulus. Methods generally involve advancing an anchor delivery device through vasculature of the patient to a location in the heart for treating the valve annulus, contacting the anchor delivery device with a length of the valve annulus, delivering a plurality of coupled anchors from the anchor delivery device to secure the anchors to the annulus, and drawing the anchors together to circumferentially tighten the valve annulus. Devices generally include an elongate catheter having at least one tensioning member and at least one tensioning actuator for deforming a distal portion of the catheter to help it conform to a valve annulus. The catheter device may be used to navigate a subannular space below a mitral valve to facilitate positioning of an anchor delivery device.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    The present application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/792,681 (Attorney Docket No. 016886-001330US), filed on Mar. 2, 2004, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/741,130 (Attorney Docket No. 016886-001320US), filed on Dec. 19, 2003, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 10/656,797 (Attorney Docket No. 16886-001300US), filed on Sep. 4, 2003, and 10/461,043 (Attorney Docket No. 16886-000310US), filed on Jun. 13, 2003, the latter of which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Nos. 60/388,935 (Attorney Docket No. 016886-000300US), filed on Jun. 13, 2002; 60/429,288 (Attorney Docket No. 016886-000700US), filed on Nov. 25, 2002; 60/445,890 (Attorney Docket No. 016886-000800US), filed on Feb. 6, 2003; 60/459,735 (Attorney Docket No. 16886-000900US), filed on Apr. 1, 2003; and 60/462,502 (Attorney Docket No. 016886-001100US), filed on Apr. 10, 2003. The full disclosures of all of the above-listed references are hereby incorporated by reference.
  • [0002]
    The present application is related to U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 10/______ (Docket No. 16886-001340US); 10/______ (Attorney Docket No. 16886-001350US); 10/______ (Attorney Docket No. 16886-001360US); 10/______ (Attorney Docket No. 16886-001370US); and 10/______ (Attorney Docket No. 16886-001380US), all of which are filed concurrently herewith, and all of which are hereby fully incorporated by reference.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0004]
    The present invention relates generally to medical devices and methods. More particularly, the invention relates to devices, systems and methods for enhancing cardiovascular valve repair, especially the repair of heart valves such as the mitral and tricuspid valves.
  • [0005]
    In recent years, many advances have been made to reduce the invasiveness of cardiac surgery. In an attempt to avoid open, stopped-heart procedures, which may be accompanied by high patient morbidity and mortality, many devices and methods have been developed for operating on a heart through smaller incisions, operating on a beating heart, and even performing cardiac procedures via transvascular access. Different types of cardiac procedures, such as cardiac ablation techniques for treating atrial fibrillation, stenting procedures for atherosclerosis, and valve repair procedures for treating conditions such as mitral valve regurgitation have experienced significant technological advances. In implementing many minimally invasive cardiac surgery techniques, especially beating-heart techniques, one of the most significant challenges is positioning a treatment device (or multiple devices) in a desired location in or around the heart for performing the procedure. Another challenge, once a device is positioned, is to effectively deploy a given treatment into or on the target cardiac tissue.
  • [0006]
    One type of cardiac surgery which may benefit from less invasive techniques is heart valve repair. Traditional treatment of heart valve stenosis or regurgitation, such as mitral or tricuspid regurgitation, typically involves an open-heart surgical procedure to replace or repair the valve. Valve repair procedures typically involve annuloplasty, a set of techniques designed to restore the valve annulus shape and strengthen the annulus. Conventional annuloplasty surgery generally requires a large incision into the thorax of the patient (a thoracotomy), and sometimes a median sternotomy (cutting through the middle of the sternum). These open heart, open chest procedures routinely involve placing the patient on a cardiopulmonary bypass machine for sustained periods so that the patient's heart and lungs can be artificially stopped during the procedure. Finally, valve repair and replacement procedures are typically technically challenging and require a relatively large incision through the wall of the heart to access the valve.
  • [0007]
    Due to the highly invasive nature of open heart valve repair or replacement, many patients, such as elderly patients, patients having recently undergone other surgical procedures, patients with comorbid medical conditions, children, late-stage heart failure patients, and the like, are often considered too high-risk to undergo heart valve surgery and are relegated to progressive deterioration and cardiac enlargement. Often, such patients have no feasible alternative treatments for their heart valve conditions.
  • [0008]
    To obviate this situation, a number of devices and methods for repairing cardiac valves in a less invasive manner have been described. Some devices provide for heart valve repair through minimally invasive incisions or intravascularly, while others improve upon open heart surgical procedures on beating hearts, stopped hearts or both. As mentioned above, difficulties in performing minimally invasive intracardiac surgery include positioning a minimally invasive treatment device in a desired location for performing a procedure and effectively deploying a given treatment into or on the target cardiac tissue. In heart valve repair procedures, for example, it is often essential for a physician to secure one or more treatment devices to valve annulus tissue. Annular tissue tends to be more fibrous than surrounding muscular or valve leaflet tissue, thus providing a more suitable location for securing such treatment devices, such as anchors, to treat a heart valve. Positioning an anchor deliver device in a desired location adjacent the annular tissue may often be challenging, especially in an intravascular procedure when visualization of the location is limited.
  • [0009]
    Devices and methods that address these difficulties are described in U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 10/792,681, 10/741,130, 10/656,797, 10/461,043, 60/388,935, 60/429,288, 60/445,890, 60/462,502 and 60/524,622, which were previously incorporated by reference. For example, these references describe devices and methods for exposing, stabilizing and/or performing a procedure on a heart valve annulus, such as a mitral valve annulus. Many of the devices and methods previously described by the inventors have been found to be highly effective, but improvements are still being sought.
  • [0010]
    Therefore, it would be beneficial to have improved methods, devices and systems for enhancing heart valve annulus treatment procedures. Ideally, such methods, devices and systems would facilitate positioning of one or more devices in a left ventricle or elsewhere for performing a procedure on a heart valve annulus, visualizing the annulus and/or the like. Additionally, such methods, devices and systems would ideally be introduced intravascularly. At least some of these objectives will be met by the present invention.
  • [0011]
    2. Description of the Background Art
  • [0012]
    Published U.S. Application Nos. 2002/0156526, 2003/0220685, 2004/0019378, 2004/0003819, 2004/0030382 and 2004/0039442, and U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,629,534 and 6,619,291 describe catheter-based methods for performing annuloplasty. Published U.S. Application 2002/0042621 describes a heart valve annuloplasty system with constrictable plication bands which are optionally attached to a linkage strip. Published U.S. Application 2002/0087169 describes a remote controlled catheter system which can be used to deliver anchors and a tether for performing an annuloplasty procedure. Other patent publications of interest include WO01/26586; US2001/0005787; US2001/0014800; US2002/0013621; US2002/0029080; US2002/0035361; US2002/0042621; US2002/0095167; and US2003/0074012. U.S. patents of interest include U.S. Pat. No. 4,014,492; U.S. Pat. No. 4,042,979; U.S. Pat. No. 4,043,504; U.S. Pat. No. 4,055,861; U.S. Pat. No. 4,700,250; U.S. Pat. No. 5,366,479; U.S. Pat. No. 5,450,860; U.S. Pat. No. 5,571,215; U.S. Pat. No. 5,674,279; U.S. Pat. No. 5,709,695; U.S. Pat. No. 5,752,518; U.S. Pat. No. 5,848,969; U.S. Pat. No. 5,860,992; U.S. Pat. No. 5,904,651; U.S. Pat. No. 5,961,539; U.S. Pat. No. 5,972,004; U.S. Pat. No. 6,165,183; U.S. Pat. No. 6,197,017; U.S. Pat. No. 6,250,308; U.S. Pat. No. 6,260,552; U.S. Pat. No. 6,283,993; U.S. Pat. No. 6,269,819; U.S. Pat. No. 6,312,447; U.S. Pat. No. 6,332,893; and U.S. Pat. No. 6,524,338. Publications of interest include De Simone et al. (1993) Am. J. Cardiol. 73:721-722, and Downing et al. (2001) Heart Surgery Forum, Abstract 7025. All of the above cited references are hereby incorporated by reference in the present application.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0013]
    Devices, systems and methods of the present invention are generally used to facilitate transvascular, minimally invasive and other “less invasive” surgical procedures, by facilitating the delivery of treatment devices at a treatment site. “Less invasive,” for the purposes of this application, means any procedure that is less invasive than traditional, large-incision, open surgical procedures. Thus, a less invasive procedure may be an open surgical procedure involving one or more relatively small incisions, a procedure performed via transvascular percutaneous access, a transvascular procedure via cut-down, a laparoscopic or other endoscopic procedure, or the like. Generally, any procedure in which a goal is to minimize or reduce invasiveness to the patient may be considered less invasive. Furthermore, although the terms “less invasive” and “minimally invasive” may sometimes be used interchangeably in this application, neither these nor terms used to describe a particular subset of surgical or other procedures should be interpreted to limit the scope of the invention. Generally, devices and methods of the invention may be used in performing or enhancing any suitable procedure.
  • [0014]
    The present application typically describes devices, systems and methods for performing heart valve repair procedures, and more specifically heart valve annuloplasty procedures such as mitral valve annuloplasty to treat mitral regurgitation. Devices and methods of the invention, however, may be used in any suitable procedure, both cardiac and non-cardiac. For example, they may be used in procedures to repair any heart valve, to repair an atrial-septal defect, to access and possibly perform a valve repair or other procedure from (or through) the coronary sinus, to place one or more pacemaker leads, to perform a cardiac ablation procedure such as ablating around pulmonary veins to treat atrial fibrillation, and/or the like. In other embodiments, the devices and methods may be used to enhance a laparoscopic or other endoscopic procedure on any part of the body, such as the bladder, stomach, gastroesophageal junction, vasculature, gall bladder, or the like. Therefore, although the following description typically focuses on mitral valve and other heart valve repair, such description should not be interpreted to limit the scope of the invention as defined by the claims.
  • [0015]
    That being said, the present invention generally provides devices, systems and methods for enhanced treatment of a cardiac valve annulus such as a mitral valve annulus. Methods generally involve contacting an anchor delivery device with a length of a valve annulus, delivering a plurality of coupled anchors from the anchor delivery device to secure the anchors to the annulus, and drawing the anchors together to circumferentially tighten the annulus. One device generally includes an elongate catheter having a housing at or near the distal end for releasably housing a plurality of coupled anchors. The device may be positioned such that the housing abuts or is close to valve annular tissue, such as at an intersection of the left ventricular wall and one or more mitral valve leaflets of the heart. Some embodiments include self-securing anchors, which may change from undeployed to deployed configurations. Anchors may be drawn together to tighten the annulus by cinching a tether slidably coupled with the anchors and/or by a self-deforming member coupled with the anchors. Another device includes a steerable guide catheter for helping position the anchor delivery device for treating a valve annulus.
  • [0016]
    In many cases, methods of the present invention will be performed on a beating heart. Access to the beating heart may be accomplished by any available technique, including intravascular, transthoracic, and the like. Intravascular access to a heart valve may be achieved using any suitable route or method. To perform a procedure on a mitral valve, for example, in one embodiment a catheter may be advanced through a femoral artery, to the aorta, and into the left ventricle of the heart, to contact a length of the mitral valve. Alternatively, access may be gained through the venous system, to a central vein, into the right atrium of the heart, and across the interatrial septum to the left side of the heart to contact a length of the mitral valve. In either of these two types of intravascular access, the catheter will often easily be advanced, once it enters the left side of the heart, into a space defined by the left ventricular wall, one or more mitral valve leaflets, and chordae tendineae of the left ventricle. This space provides a convenient conduit for further advancement of the catheter to a desired location for performing mitral valve repair. In alternative embodiments, a catheter device may access the coronary sinus and a valve procedure may be performed directly from the sinus. Furthermore, in addition to beating heart access, methods of the present invention may be used for intravascular stopped heart access as well as stopped heart open chest procedures. Any suitable intravascular or other access method is contemplated within the scope of the invention.
  • [0017]
    In one aspect of the present invention, a device for performing a procedure on heart valve annulus includes: a flexible, elongate catheter having a proximal portion and a shaped distal portion, the distal portion having at least one aperture for allowing passage of tissue anchors; multiple tissue anchors releasably housed in the shaped distal portion; at least one cinchable tether slidably coupled with the tissue anchors; and at least one anchor delivery member housed in the distal portion for delivering the anchors out of the at least one aperture to engage tissue of the valve annulus.
  • [0018]
    In some embodiments, the shaped distal portion comprises at least a first curve. The first curve may have any suitable shape, radius of curvature or the like, such as in one embodiment where the first curve has a radius of curvature between 0.5 inches and 1.5 inches. In some embodiments, the shaped distal portion further comprises a second curve. The first and second curves may be adapted to orient a distal-most portion of the catheter at an angle of between 45° and 90°, relative to the proximal portion of the catheter immediately adjacent the distal portion. In some embodiments, the second curve has a radius of curvature approximating a radius of curvature of the heart valve. In an alternative embodiment, the second curve has a radius of curvature greater than a radius of curvature of the heart valve, wherein the greater radius of curvature causes the distal portion to press outward against the valve annulus. Optionally, at least one of the first and second curves may have the same shape as a corresponding curve in a guide catheter used for delivering the elongate catheter into contact with the valve annulus. For example, first and second curves in the elongate catheter may correspond to first and second corresponding curves in the guide catheter. In such embodiments, the elongate catheter, when advanced through the guide catheter, is oriented such that the at least one aperture contacts the valve annulus tissue.
  • [0019]
    Some embodiments of the device further include at least one stabilizing member coupled with the elongate catheter for maintaining the distal portion in contact with valve annulus tissue. In some embodiments, for example, the stabilizing member comprises a spiral-shaped member extending from the distal portion to press against heart wall tissue, thus urging the distal portion against the annulus tissue. Optionally, a distal end of the spiral-shaped member may be adapted to engage and press against a junction of one or more papillary muscles and heart wall tissue. In other embodiments, the stabilizing member comprises an arch-shaped shape-memory or spring-loaded member extending from the distal portion to press against heart wall tissue, thus urging the distal portion against the annulus tissue. In one embodiment, a portion of the arch-shaped member is adapted to engage and press against a junction of one or more papillary muscles and heart wall tissue. The device may optionally further include an expandable member coupled with the arch-shaped member for inflating to further press against the heart wall tissue. In other embodiment, the stabilizing member comprises multiple springs extending from the distal portion to press against heart wall tissue, thus urging the distal portion against the annulus tissue. Alternatively, the stabilizing member may include a curved balloon coupled with the distal portion of the catheter, the curved balloon having a greater radius of curvature than a radius of curvature of the valve annulus. Inflating the balloon thus urges the distal portion against the annulus tissue.
  • [0020]
    In some embodiments, the device further includes at least one termination member for enhancing attachment of a terminal tissue anchor to the heart valve annulus. In some embodiment, the termination member is slidably couplable with the tether. In some embodiments, the termination member is coupled with the tether via a termination catheter device. The termination member may include, for example, at least one deployable tissue attachment member deployable from a retracted configuration for delivery to an expanded configuration for attachment to the valve annulus tissue. The tissue attachment members may include a plurality of members, such as but not limited to barbs, points, needles, hooks, tines, rakes, wires, teeth and/or the like. In some embodiments, the tissue attachment members comprise a shape-memory or super-elastic material. The tissue attachment members may, for example, be disposed circumferentially about a cylindrical member adapted to slide over the tether. Alternatively, the tissue attachment members may be disposed along a portion of a cylindrical member adapted to slide over the tether.
  • [0021]
    In some embodiments, the tissue attachment members further include a pusher for pushing the tissue attachment member out of the elongate catheter and into the valve annulus tissue. In some embodiments, the tissue attachment members are adapted to engage the terminal tissue anchor. In one embodiment, the tissue attachment members are adapted to enter into the valve annulus tissue in a direction from the terminal tissue anchor toward the other tissue anchors. Optionally, the tissue attachment members may further include a fiber, matrix, textile or mesh disposed on at least a portion of the tissue attachment member for enhancing tissue in-growth over the tissue attachment member.
  • [0022]
    In some embodiments, each of the tissue anchors comprises at least one tissue engagement feature for preventing the anchors from being pulled out of the valve annulus tissue when the tether is cinched. For example, the tissue engagement feature(s) may include a barb on each end of each tissue anchor. Such a barb may face inward toward a center of the anchor or outward away from the center. In another embodiment, the tissue engagement features comprise a plurality of bends in each anchor. Optionally, each of the tissue anchors may include at least one support member for preventing the anchors from being pulled out of the valve annulus tissue when the tether is cinched. For example, the support member may comprise an attachment point of one arm of each anchor to another arm of each anchor, the attachment point positioned adjacent an eyelet of the anchor. Optionally, a constraining member may be disposed over the attachment point to provide further support. The constraining member may include, for example, a band, tie, sleeve, belt or the like. In some embodiments of the device, each of the tissue anchors comprises at least one tissue adhesion feature adapted to enhance attachment of the tissue anchors to the valve annulus tissue. For example, the tissue adhesion feature may comprise one or more materials disposed over at least part of each anchor, the material(s) selected to promote encapsulation of the anchors within the valve annulus tissue. In one embodiment, the anchor delivery member comprises an anchor contacting member for contacting and urging the anchors out of the at least one aperture and a pull cord coupled with the anchor contacting member for applying force to the anchor contacting member to contact and urge the anchors.
  • [0023]
    In another aspect of the invention, a device for constricting a valve annulus in a heart includes a plurality of slidably coupled tissue anchors, each anchor including at least one tissue attachment feature for enhancing attachment of the anchor to valve annulus tissue, and at least one cinchable tether slidably coupled with at least some of the tissue anchors and fixedly attached to at least a first of the anchors. The tissue attachment features may comprise any of a number of suitable features. In one embodiment, for example, a surface feature is included along at least a portion of each anchor, such as a porous, textured or coated surface. In other embodiments, the attachment feature comprises at least one circular or hooked portion of each anchor having a small radius of curvature. Alternatively or additionally, the attachment feature may comprise a barb at each end of each anchor.
  • [0024]
    In another aspect of the invention, a method of constricting a valve annulus in a heart involves: contacting a shaped distal portion of an anchor delivery catheter device with a length of the valve annulus; delivering a plurality of slidably coupled anchors from the anchor delivery device to secure the anchors to the annulus; drawing the anchors together to circumferentially tighten the valve annulus; and promoting attachment of the anchors to valve annulus tissue to help secure the anchors to the tissue over time. In some embodiments, contacting the distal portion comprises advancing the catheter device through a shaped introducer device, a shape of the shaped distal portion corresponding to a shape of the introducer device. In such embodiments, advancing the catheter device through the introducer devices may orient one or more apertures on the catheter device with the valve annulus tissue, so that the anchors are delivered into the tissue.
  • [0025]
    In some embodiments, the method includes stabilizing the distal portion of the catheter device against the valve annulus tissue. For example, stabilizing may involve deploying at least one stabilizing member from the distal portion of the catheter device to contact heart wall tissue of the heart. Optionally, the method may further include securing at least one termination member to the valve annulus tissue, to help maintain attachment of the coupled anchors to the tissue. In one embodiment, for example, securing the termination member involves sliding the termination member along a tether slidably coupled with the anchors and deploying tissue engagement means on the termination member from an unexpanded to an expanded configuration to engage the valve tissue. Some embodiments further include engaging the tissue engagement means with at least a terminal anchor of the plurality of anchors.
  • [0026]
    Promoting attachment of the anchors to the tissue may be achieved via any of a number of different methods in various embodiments. For example, in one embodiment promoting anchor attachment comprises contacting at least one surface feature of each anchor with the tissue. The surface features may include one or more of those described above, such as a porous surface, a roughened surface, a coated surface and/or an abrasive surface.
  • [0027]
    In another aspect of the present invention, a method for contacting a shaped distal portion of an anchor delivery catheter with a mitral valve annulus of a heart involves advancing the anchor delivery catheter through a shaped guide catheter into the left ventricle to contact the mitral valve. In this method, at least one bend in the shaped distal portion of the delivery device has approximately the same radius of curvature at least one corresponding bend in the guide catheter, so that advancing the distal portion of the delivery catheter through the at least one corresponding bend positions one or more anchor delivery apertures of the anchor delivery catheter in contact with the mitral valve annulus.
  • [0028]
    These and other aspects and embodiments are described more fully below with reference to the drawing figures.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0029]
    FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a heart with a flexible anchor delivery device being positioned for treatment of a mitral valve annulus, according to one embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0030]
    FIGS. 2A and 2B are cross-sectional views of a portion of a heart, schematically showing positioning of a flexible device for treatment of a mitral valve annulus, according to one embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0031]
    FIGS. 2C and 2D are cross-sectional views of a portion of a heart, showing positioning of a flexible anchor delivery device for treatment of a mitral valve annulus, according to one embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0032]
    FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a distal portion of an anchor delivery device, according to one embodiment of the invention;
  • [0033]
    FIG. 4. is a perspective view of a segment of a distal portion of an anchor delivery device, with anchors in an undeployed shape and position;
  • [0034]
    FIG. 5 is a different perspective view of the segment of the device shown in FIG. 4;
  • [0035]
    FIG. 6. is a perspective view of a segment of a distal portion of an anchor delivery device, with anchors in a deployed shape and position;
  • [0036]
    FIGS. 7A-7E are cross-sectional views of an anchor delivery device, illustrating a method for delivering anchors to valve annulus tissue, according to one embodiment of the invention;
  • [0037]
    FIGS. 8A and 8B are top-views of a plurality of anchors coupled to a self-deforming coupling member or “backbone,” with the backbone shown in an undeployed shape and a deployed shape;
  • [0038]
    FIGS. 9A-9C are various perspective views of a distal portion of a flexible anchor delivery device according to one embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0039]
    FIGS. 10A-10F demonstrate a method for applying anchors to a valve annulus and cinching the anchors to tighten the annulus, using an anchor delivery device according to an embodiment of the invention;
  • [0040]
    FIG. 11 shows a heart in cross-section with a guide catheter device advanced through the aorta into the left ventricle according to an embodiment of the invention;
  • [0041]
    FIG. 11A shows a distal end of an anchor delivery device passing through a guide catheter according to an embodiment of the invention;
  • [0042]
    FIG. 11B shows middle portions of an anchor delivery device and a guide catheter having corresponding orientation portions according to an embodiment of the invention;
  • [0043]
    FIGS. 12A-12D show various embodiments of support members for supporting an anchor delivery device against a valve annulus;
  • [0044]
    FIGS. 13A-13C show a device and method for facilitating termination and load distribution of a series of anchors according to one embodiment of the invention;
  • [0045]
    FIGS. 14A-14F demonstrate a method for advancing an anchor delivery device to a position for treating a heart valve according to an embodiment of the invention;
  • [0046]
    FIGS. 15A and 15B are side cross-sectional views of a guide catheter device for facilitating positioning of an anchor delivery device according to an embodiment of the invention;
  • [0047]
    FIGS. 16A-16E show improved tissue anchors according to various embodiments of the present invention;
  • [0048]
    FIGS. 17A-17C show a self-forming anchor attaching to tissue of a valve annulus according to one embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0049]
    FIG. 18 shows a self-forming anchor attaching to tissue of a valve annulus according to another embodiment of the present invention;
  • [0050]
    FIG. 19A shows an anchor device having a sleeve between two adjacent anchors according to one embodiment of the invention; and
  • [0051]
    FIG. 19B shows an anchor device having a sleeve between three anchors according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0052]
    Devices, systems and methods of the present invention are generally used to facilitate transvascular, minimally invasive and other “less invasive” surgical procedures, by facilitating the delivery of treatment devices at a treatment site. Although the following description focuses on use of devices and methods of the invention for mitral valve repair, the devices and methods may be used in any suitable procedure, both cardiac and non-cardiac. When used for treatment of a cardiac valve annulus, the inventive methods generally involve contacting an anchor delivery device with a length of the valve annulus, delivering a plurality of coupled anchors from the anchor delivery device, and drawing the anchors together to tighten the annulus. Devices include an elongate catheter having a housing at or near the distal end for releasably housing a plurality of coupled anchors, as well as delivery devices for facilitating advancement and/or positioning of an anchor delivery device. Devices may be positioned such that the housing abuts or is close to valve annular tissue, such as in a location within the left ventricle defined by the left ventricular wall, a mitral valve leaflet and chordae tendineae. Self-securing anchors having any of a number of different configurations may be used in some embodiments. Additional devices include delivery devices for facilitating delivery and/or placement of an anchor delivery device at a treatment site.
  • [0053]
    In many cases, methods of the present invention will be performed on a beating heart. Access to the beating heart may be accomplished by any available technique, including intravascular, transthoracic, and the like. In addition to beating heart access, the methods of the present invention may be used for intravascular stopped heart access as well as stopped heart open chest procedures.
  • [0054]
    Referring now to FIG. 1, a heart H is shown in cross section, with an elongate anchor delivery device 100 introduced within the heart H. Generally, delivery device 100 comprises an elongate body with a distal portion 102 configured to deliver anchors to a heart valve annulus. (In FIGS. 1, 2A and 2B, distal portion 102 is shown diagrammatically without anchors or anchor-delivery mechanism to enhance clarity of the figures.) In some embodiments, the elongate body comprises a rigid shaft, while in other embodiments it comprises a flexible catheter, so that distal portion 102 may be positioned in the heart H and under one or more valve leaflets to engage a valve annulus via a transvascular approach. Transvascular access may be gained, for example, through the internal jugular vein (not shown) to the superior vena cava SVC to the right atrium RA, across the interatrial septum to the left atrium LA, and then under one or more mitral valve leaflets MVL to a position within the left ventricle (LV) under the valve annulus (not shown). Alternatively, access to the heart may be achieved via the femoral vein and the inferior vena cava. In other embodiments, access may be gained via the coronary sinus (not shown) and through the atrial wall into the left atrium. In still other embodiments, access may be achieved via a femoral artery and the aorta, into the left ventricle, and under the mitral valve. This access route will be described in further detail below. Any other suitable access route is also contemplated within the scope of the present invention.
  • [0055]
    In other embodiments, access to the heart H may be transthoracic, with delivery device 100 being introduced into the heart via an incision or port on the heart wall. Even open heart surgical procedures may benefit from methods and devices of the invention. Furthermore, some embodiments may be used to enhance procedures on the tricuspid valve annulus, adjacent the tricuspid valve leaflets TVL, or any other cardiac or vascular valve. Therefore, although the following description typically focuses on minimally invasive or less invasive mitral valve repair for treating mitral regurgitation, the invention is in no way limited to that use.
  • [0056]
    With reference now to FIGS. 2A and 2B, a method for positioning delivery device 100 for treating a mitral valve annulus VA is depicted diagrammatically in a cross-sectional view. First, as in FIG. 2A, distal portion 102 is positioned in a desired location under a mitral valve leaflet L and adjacent a ventricular wall VW. (Again, distal portion 102 is shown without anchors or anchor-delivery mechanism for demonstrative purposes.) The valve annulus VA generally comprises an area of heart wall tissue at the junction of the ventricular wall VW and the atrial wall AW that is relatively fibrous and, thus, significantly stronger that leaflet tissue and other heart wall tissue.
  • [0057]
    Distal portion 102 may be advanced into position under the valve annulus by any suitable technique, some of which are described below in further detail. Generally, distal portion 102 may be used to deliver anchors to the valve annulus, to stabilize and/or expose the annulus, or both. In one embodiment, using a delivery device having a flexible elongate body as shown in FIG. 1, a flexible distal portion 102 may be passed from the right atrium RA through the interatrial septum in the area of the foramen ovale (not shown—behind the aorta A), into the left atrium LA and thus the left ventricle LV. Alternatively, flexible distal portion 102 may be advanced through the aorta A and into the left ventricle LV, for example using access through a femoral artery. Oftentimes, distal portion 102 will then naturally travel, upon further advancement, under the posterior valve leaflet L into a space defined above a subvalvular space 104 roughly defined for the purposes of this application as a space bordered by the inner surface of the left ventricular wall VW, the inferior surface of mitral valve leaflets L, and cordae tendineae CT connected to the ventricular wall VW and the leaflet L. It has been found that a flexible anchor delivery catheter, such as the delivery devices of the present invention, when passed under the mitral valve via an intravascular approach, often enters subvalvular space 104 relatively easily and may be advanced along space 104 either partially or completely around the circumference of the valve. Once in space 104, distal portion 102 may be conveniently positioned at the intersection of the valve leaflet(s) and the ventricular wall VW, which intersection is immediately adjacent or very near to the valve annulus VA, as shown in FIG. 2A. These are but examples of possible access routes of an anchor delivery device to a valve annulus, and any other access routes may be used.
  • [0058]
    In some embodiments, distal portion 102 includes a shape-changing portion which enables distal portion 102 to conform to the shape of the valve annulus VA. The catheter may be introduced through the vasculature with the shape-changing distal portion in a generally straight, flexible configuration. Once it is in place beneath the leaflet at the intersection between the leaflet and the interior ventricular wall, the shape of distal portion 102 is changed to conform to the annulus and usually the shape is “locked” to provide sufficient stiffness or rigidity to permit the application of force from distal portion 102 to the annulus. Shaping and optionally locking distal portion 102 may be accomplished in any of a number of ways. For example, in some embodiments, a shape-changing portion may be sectioned, notched, slotted or segmented and one of more tensioning members such as tensioning cords, wires or other tensioning devices coupled with the shape-changing portion may be used to shape and rigidify distal portion 102. A segmented distal portion, for example, may include multiple segments coupled with two tensioning members, each providing a different direction of articulation to the distal portion. A first bend may be created by tensioning a first member to give the distal portion a C-shape or similar shape to conform to the valve annulus, while a second bend may be created by tensioning a second member to articulate the C-shaped member upwards against the annulus. In another embodiment, a shaped expandable member, such as a balloon, may be coupled with distal portion 102 to provide for shape changing/deforming. In various embodiments, any configurations and combinations may be used to give distal portion 102 a desired shape.
  • [0059]
    In transthoracic and other embodiments, distal portion 102 may be shaped, and the method may simply involve introducing distal portion 102 under the valve leaflets. The shaped distal portion 102 may be rigid or formed from any suitable super-elastic or shape memory material, such as nitinol, spring stainless steel, or the like.
  • [0060]
    In addition to delivering anchors to the valve annulus VA, delivery device 100 (and specifically distal portion 102) may be used to stabilize and/or expose the valve annulus VA. Such stabilization and exposure are described fully in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/656,797, which was previously incorporated by reference. For example, once distal portion 102 is positioned under the annulus, force may be applied to distal portion 102 to stabilize the valve annulus VA, as shown in FIG. 2B. Such force may be directed in any suitable direction to expose, position and/or stabilize the annulus. For example, upward and lateral force is shown in FIG. 2B by the solid-headed arrow drawn from the center of distal portion 102. In other cases, only upward, only lateral, or any other suitable force(s) may be applied. With application of force to distal portion 102, the valve annulus VA is caused to rise or project outwardly, thus exposing the annulus for easier viewing and access. The applied force may also stabilize the valve annulus VA, also facilitating surgical procedures and visualization.
  • [0061]
    Some embodiments may include a stabilization component as well as an anchor delivery component. For example, some embodiments may include two flexible members, one for contacting the atrial side of a valve annulus and the other for contacting the ventricular side. In some embodiments, such flexible members may be used to “clamp” the annulus between them. One of such members may be an anchor delivery member and the other may be a stabilization member, for example. Any combination and configuration of stabilization and/or anchor delivery members is contemplated.
  • [0062]
    Referring now to FIGS. 2C and 2D, an anchor delivery device 108 is shown delivering an anchor 110 to a valve annulus VA. Of course, these are again representational figures and are not drawn to scale. Anchor 110 is shown first housed within delivery device 108 (FIG. 2C) and then delivered to the annulus VA (FIG. 2D). As is shown, in one embodiment anchors 110 may have a relatively straight configuration when housed in delivery device 108, perhaps with two sharpened tips and a loop in between the tips. Upon deployment from delivery device 108, the tips of anchor 110 may curve in opposite directions to form two semi-circles, circles, ovals, overlapping helices or the like. This is but one example of a type of self-securing anchor which may be delivered to a valve annulus. Typically, multiple coupled anchors 110 are delivered, and the anchors 110 are drawn together to tighten the valve annulus. Methods for anchor delivery and for drawing anchors together are described further below.
  • [0063]
    Although delivery device 108 is shown having a circular cross-sectional shape in FIGS. 2C and 2D, it may alternatively have any other suitable shape. In one embodiment, for example, it may be advantageous to provide a delivery device having an ovoid or elliptical cross-sectional shape. Such a shape may help ensure that the device is aligned, when positioned between in a corner formed by a ventricular wall and a valve leaflet, such that one or more openings in the delivery device is oriented to deliver the anchors into valve annulus tissue. To further enhance contacting of the valve annulus and/or orientation of the delivery device, some embodiments may further include an expandable member, coupled with the delivery device, which expands to urge or press or wedge the delivery device into the corner formed by the ventricle wall and the leaflet to contact the valve annulus. Such enhancements are described further below.
  • [0064]
    With reference now to FIG. 3, one embodiment of a portion of an anchor delivery device 200 suitably includes an elongate shaft 204 having a distal portion 202 configured to deliver a plurality of anchors 210, coupled with a tether 212, to tissue of a valve annulus. Tethered anchors 210 are housed within a housing 206 of distal portion 202, along with one or more anchor retaining mandrels 214 and an expandable member 208. Many variations may be made to one or more of these features, and various parts may be added or eliminated, without departing from the scope of the invention. Some of these variations are described further below, but no specific embodiment(s) should be construed to limit the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.
  • [0065]
    Housing 206 may be flexible or rigid in various embodiments. In some embodiments, for example, flexible housing 206 may be comprised of multiple segments configured such that housing 206 is deformable by tensioning a tensioning member coupled to the segments. In some embodiments, housing 206 is formed from an elastic material having a geometry selected to engage and optionally shape or constrict the valve annulus. For example, the rings may be formed from super-elastic material, shape memory alloy such as Nitinol, spring stainless steel, or the like. In other instances, housing 206 could be formed from an inflatable or other structure can be selectively rigidified in situ, such as a gooseneck or lockable element shaft, any of the rigidifying structures described above, or any other rigidifying structure.
  • [0066]
    “Anchors,” for the purposes of this application, is defined to mean any fasteners. Thus, anchors 210 may comprise C-shaped or semicircular hooks, curved hooks of other shapes, straight hooks, barbed hooks, clips of any kind, T-tags, or any other suitable fastener(s). In one embodiment, as described above, anchors may comprise two tips that curve in opposite directions upon deployment, forming two intersecting semi-circles, circles, ovals, helices or the like. In some embodiments, anchors 210 are self-deforming. By “self-deforming” it is meant that anchors 210 change from a first undeployed shape to a second deployed shape upon release of anchors 210 from restraint in housing 206. Such self-deforming anchors 210 may change shape as they are released from housing 206 and enter valve annulus tissue, to secure themselves to the tissue. Thus, a crimping device or other similar mechanism is not required on distal end 202 to apply force to anchors 210 to attach them to annular tissue.
  • [0067]
    Self-deforming anchors 210 may be made of any suitable material, such as a super-elastic or shape-memory material like Nitinol or spring stainless steel. In other embodiments, anchors 210 may be made of a non-shape-memory material and made be loaded into housing 206 in such a way that they change shape upon release. Alternatively, anchors 210 that are not self-deforming may be used, and such anchors may be secured to tissue via crimping, firing or the like. Even self-securing anchors may be crimped in some embodiments, to provide enhanced attachment to tissue. In some embodiments, anchors 210 may comprise one or more bioactive agent. In another embodiment, anchors 210 may comprise electrodes. Such electrodes, for example, may sense various parameters, such as but not limited to impedance, temperature and electrical signals. In other embodiments, such electrodes may be used to supply energy to tissue at ablation or sub-ablation amounts. Delivery of anchors may be accomplished by any suitable device and technique, such as by simply releasing the anchors by hydraulic balloon delivery as discussed further below. Any number, size and shape of anchors 210 may be included in housing 206.
  • [0068]
    In one embodiment, anchors 210 are generally C-shaped or semicircular in their undeployed form, with the ends of the C being sharpened to penetrate tissue. Midway along the C-shaped anchor 210, an eyelet may be formed for allowing slidable passage of tether 212. To maintain anchors 210 in their C-shaped, undeployed state, anchors 210 may be retained within housing 206 by two mandrels 214, one mandrel 214 retaining each of the two arms of the C-shape of each anchor 210. Mandrels 214 may be retractable within elongate catheter body 204 to release anchors 210 and allow them to change from their undeployed C-shape to a deployed shape. The deployed shape, for example, may approximate a complete circle or a circle with overlapping ends, the latter appearing similar to a key ring. Such anchors are described further below, but generally may be advantageous in their ability to secure themselves to annular tissue by changing from their undeployed to their deployed shape. In some embodiments, anchors 210 are also configured to lie flush with a tissue surface after being deployed. By “flush” it is meant that no significant amount of an anchor protrudes from the surface, although some small portion may protrude.
  • [0069]
    Tether 212 may be one long piece of material or two or more pieces and may comprise any suitable material, such as suture, suture-like material, a Dacron strip or the like. Retaining mandrels 214 may also have any suitable configuration and be made of any suitable material, such as stainless steel, titanium, Nitinol, or the like. Various embodiments may have one mandrel, two mandrels, or more than two mandrels.
  • [0070]
    In some embodiments, anchors 210 may be released from mandrels 214 to contact and secure themselves to annular tissue without any further force applied by delivery device 200. Some embodiments, however, may also include one or more expandable members 208, which may be expanded to help drive anchors 210 into tissue. Expandable member(s) 208 may have any suitable size and configuration and may be made of any suitable material(s). Hydraulic systems such as expandable members are known in the art, and any known or as yet undiscovered expandable member may be included in housing 206 as part of the present invention.
  • [0071]
    Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, a segment of a distal portion 302 of an anchor delivery device suitably includes a housing 306, multiple tensioning members 320 for applying tension to housing 306 to change its shape, two anchor retaining mandrels 314 slidably disposed in housing 306, multiple anchors 310 slidably coupled with a tether 312, and an expandable member 308 disposed between anchors 310 and housing 306. As can be seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, housing 306 may include multiple segments to allow the overall shape of housing 306 to be changed by applying tension to tensioning members 320. As also is evident from the drawings, “C-shaped” anchors 310 may actually have an almost straight configuration when retained by mandrels 314 in housing 306. Thus, for the purposes of this application, “C-shaped” or “semicircular” refers to a very broad range of shapes including a portion of a circle, a slightly curved line, a slightly curved line with an eyelet at one point along the line, and the like.
  • [0072]
    With reference now to FIG. 6, the same segment of distal portion 302 is shown, but mandrels 314 have been withdrawn from two mandrel apertures 322, to release anchors 310 from housing 306. Additionally, expandable member 308 has been expanded to drive anchors out of housing 306. Anchors 310, having been released from mandrels 314, have begun to change from their undeployed, retained shape to their deployed, released shape.
  • [0073]
    Referring now to FIGS. 7A-7E, a cross-section of a distal portion 402 of an anchor delivery device is shown in various stages of delivering an anchor to tissue of a valve annulus VA. In FIG. 7A, distal portion 402 is positioned against the valve annulus, an anchor 410 is retained by two mandrels 414, a tether 412 is slidably disposed through an eyelet on anchor 410, and an expandable member 408 is coupled with housing 406 in a position to drive anchor 410 out of housing 406. When retained by mandrels 414, anchor 410 is in its undeployed shape. As discussed above, mandrels 414 may be slidably retracted, as designated by the solid-tipped arrows in FIG. 7A, to release anchor 410. In various embodiments, anchors 410 may be released one at a time, such as by retracting mandrels 414 slowly, may be released in groups, or may all be released simultaneously, such as by rapid retraction of mandrels 414.
  • [0074]
    In FIG. 7B, anchor 410 has begun to change from its undeployed shape to its deployed shape (as demonstrated by the hollow-tipped arrows) and has also begun to penetrate the annular tissue VA. Empty mandrel apertures 422 demonstrate that mandrels 414 have been retracted at least far enough to release anchor 410. In FIG. 7B, expandable member 408 has been expanded to drive anchor 410 partially out of housing 406 and further into the valve annulus VA. Anchor 410 also continues to move from its undeployed towards its deployed shape, as shown by the hollow-tipped arrows. In FIG. 7D, anchor 410 has reached its deployed shape, which is roughly a completed circle with overlapping ends or a “key ring” shape. In FIG. 7E, delivery device 402 has been removed, leaving a tethered anchor in place in the valve annulus. Of course, there will typically be a plurality of tethered anchors secured to the annular tissue. Tether 412 may then be cinched to apply force to anchors 410 and cinch and tighten the valve annulus.
  • [0075]
    With reference now to FIGS. 8A and 8B, a diagrammatic representation of another embodiment of coupled anchors is shown. Here, anchors 510 are coupled to a self-deforming or deformable coupling member or backbone 505. Backbone 505 may be fabricated, for example, from Nitinol, spring stainless steel, or the like, and may have any suitable size or configuration. In one embodiment, as in FIG. 8A, backbone 505 is shaped as a generally straight line when held in an undeployed state, such as when restrained within a housing of an anchor deliver device. When released from the delivery device, backbone 505 may change to a deployed shape having multiple bends, as shown in FIG. 8B. By bending, backbone 505 shortens the longitudinal distance between anchors, as demonstrated by the solid-tipped arrows in FIG. 8B. This shortening process may act to cinch a valve annulus into which anchors 510 have be secured. Thus, anchors 510 coupled to backbone 505 may be used to cinch a valve annulus without using a tether or applying tethering force. Alternatively, a tether may also be coupled with anchors 510 to further cinch the annulus. In such an embodiment, backbone 505 will be at least partially conformable or cinchable, such that when force is applied to anchors 510 and backbone 505 via a tether, backbone 505 bends further to allow further cinching of the annulus.
  • [0076]
    Referring now to FIGS. 9A-9C, in one embodiment a flexible distal portion of an anchor delivery device 520 suitably includes a housing 522 coupled with an expandable member 524. Housing 522 may be configured to house multiple coupled anchors 526 and an anchor contacting member 530 coupled with a pull cord 532. Housing 522 may also include multiple apertures 528 for allowing egress of anchors 526. For clarity, delivery device 520 is shown without a tether in FIGS. 9A and 9C, but FIG. 9B shows that a tether 534 may extend through an eyelet, loop or other portion of each anchor 526, and may exit each aperture 528 to allow for release of the plurality of anchors 526. The various features of this embodiment are described further below.
  • [0077]
    In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 9A-9C, anchors 526 are relatively straight and lie relatively in parallel with the long axis of delivery device 522. Anchor contacting member 530, which may comprise any suitable device, such as a ball, plate, hook, knot, plunger, piston, or the like, generally has an outer diameter that is nearly equal to or slightly less than the inner diameter of housing 522. Contacting member 530 is disposed within the housing, distal to a distal-most anchor 526, and is retracted relative to housing 522 by pulling pull cord 532. When retracted, anchor contacting member 530 contacts and applies force to a distal-most anchor 526 to release cause that anchor 526 to exit housing 522 via one of the apertures 528. Contacting member 530 is then pulled farther proximally to contact and apply force to the next anchor 526 to deploy that anchor 526, and so on.
  • [0078]
    Retracting contacting member 530 to push anchors 526 out of apertures 528 may help cause anchors 526 to avidly secure themselves to adjacent tissue. Using anchors 526 that are relatively straight/flat when undeployed allows anchors 526 with relatively large deployed sizes to be disposed in (and delivered from) a relatively small housing 522. In one embodiment, for example, anchors 526 that deploy into a shape approximating two intersecting semi-circles, circles, ovals, helices, or the like, and that have a radius of one of the semi-circles of about 3 mm may be disposed within a housing 522 having a diameter of about 5 French (1.67 mm) and more preferably 4 French (1.35 mm) or even smaller. Such anchors 526 may measure about 6 mm or more in their widest dimension. In some embodiments, housing 522 may have a diametrical dimension (“d”) and anchor 526 may have a diametrical dimension (“D”) in the deployed state, and the ratio of D to d may be at least about 3.5. In other embodiments, the ratio of D to d may be at least about 4.4, and more preferably at least about 7, and even more preferably at least about 8.8. These are only examples, however, and other larger or smaller anchors 526 may be disposed within a larger or smaller housing 522. Furthermore, any convenient number of anchors 526 may be disposed within housing 522. In one embodiment, for example, housing 522 may hold about 1-20 anchors 526, and more preferably about 3-10 anchors 526. Other embodiments may hold more anchors 526.
  • [0079]
    Anchor contacting member 530 and pull cord 532 may have any suitable configuration and may be manufactured from any material or combination of materials. In alternative embodiments, contacting member 530 may be pushed by a pusher member to contact and deploy anchors 526. Alternatively, any of the anchor deployment devices and methods previously described may be used.
  • [0080]
    Tether 534, as shown in FIG. 9B, may comprise any of the tethers 534 or tether-like devices already described above, or any other suitable device. Tether 534 is generally attached to a distal-most anchor 526 at an attachment point 536. The attachment itself may be achieved via a knot, weld, adhesive, or by any other suitable attachment means. Tether 234 then extends through an eyelet, loop or other similar configuration on each on each of the anchors 526 so as to be slidably coupled with the anchors 526. In the embodiment shown, tether 534 exits each aperture 528, then enters the next-most-proximal aperture, passes slidably through a loop on an anchor 526, and exits the same aperture 528. By entering and exiting each aperture 528, tether 534 allows the plurality of anchors 526 to be deployed into tissue and cinched. Other configurations of housing 522, anchors 526 and tether 534 may alternatively be used. For example, housing 522 may include a longitudinal slit through which tether 534 may pass, thus allowing tether 534 to reside wholly within housing before deployment.
  • [0081]
    Expandable member 524 is an optional feature of anchor delivery device 520, and thus may be included in some embodiments and not in others. In other words, a distal portion of anchor delivery device 520 may include housing, contents of housing, and other features either with or without an attached expandable member. Expandable member 524 may comprise any suitable expandable member currently known or discovered in the future, and any method and substance(s) may be used to expand expandable member 524. Typically, expandable member 524 will be coupled with a surface of housing 522, will have a larger radius than housing 522, and will be configured such that when it is expanded as housing 522 nears or contacts the valve annulus, expandable member 524 will push or press housing 522 into enhanced contact with the annulus. For example, expandable member 524 may be configured to expand within a space near the corner formed by a left ventricular wall and a mitral valve leaflet.
  • [0082]
    With reference now to FIGS. 10A-10F, a method is shown for applying a plurality of tethered anchors 526 to a valve annulus VA in a heart. As shown in FIG. 10A, an anchor delivery device 520 is first contacted with the valve annulus VA such that openings 528 are oriented to deploy anchors 526 into the annulus. Such orientation may be achieved by any suitable technique. In one embodiment, for example, a housing 522 having an elliptical cross-sectional shape may be used to orient openings 528. As just described, contact between housing 522 and the valve annulus VA may be enhanced by expanding expandable member 524 to wedge housing within a corner adjacent the annulus.
  • [0083]
    Generally, delivery device 520 may be advanced into any suitable location for treating any valve by any suitable advancing or device placement method. Many catheter-based, minimally invasive devices and methods for performing intravascular procedures, for example, are well known, and any such devices and methods, as well as any other devices or method later developed, may be used to advance or position delivery device 520 in a desired location. For example, in one embodiment a steerable guide catheter is first advanced in retrograde fashion through an aorta, typically via access from a femoral artery. The steerable catheter is passed into the left ventricle of the heart and thus into the space formed by the mitral valve leaflets, the left ventricular wall and cordae tendineae of the left ventricle. Once in this space, the steerable catheter is easily advanced along a portion (or all) of the circumference of the mitral valve. A sheath is advanced over the steerable catheter within the space below the valve leaflets, and the steerable catheter is removed through the sheath. Anchor delivery device 520 may then be advanced through the sheath to a desired position within the space, and the sheath may be removed. In some cases, an expandable member coupled to delivery device 520 may be expanded to wedge or otherwise move delivery device 520 into the corner formed by the left ventricular wall and the valve leaflets to enhance its contact with the valve annulus. Of course, this is but one exemplary method for advancing delivery device 520 to a position for treating a valve, and any other suitable method, combination of devices, etc. may be used.
  • [0084]
    As shown in FIG. 10B, when delivery device 520 is positioned in a desired location for deploying anchors 526, anchor contacting member 530 is retracted to contact and apply force to a most-distal anchor 526 to begin deploying anchor 526 through aperture 528 and into tissue of the valve annulus VA. FIG. 10C show anchor 526 further deployed out of aperture 528 and into valve annulus VA. FIG. 10D shows the valve annulus VA transparently so that further deployment of anchors 526 can be seen. As shown, in one embodiment of the invention, anchors 526 include two sharpened tips that move in opposite directions upon release from housing 522 and upon contacting the valve annulus VA. Between the two sharpened tips, an anchor 526 may be looped or have any other suitable eyelet or other device for allowing slidable coupling with a tether 534.
  • [0085]
    Referring now to FIG. 10E, anchors 526 are seen in their fully deployed or nearly fully deployed shape, with each pointed tip (or “arm”) of each anchor 526 having curved to form a circle or semi-circle. Of course, in various embodiments anchors 526 may have any other suitable deployed and undeployed shapes, as described more fully above. FIG. 10F shows anchors 526 deployed into the valve annulus VA and coupled with tether 534, with the distal-most anchor 526 coupled attached fixedly to tether 524 at attachment point 536. At this stage, tether 534 may be cinched to tighten the annulus, thus reducing valve regurgitation. In some embodiments, valve function may be monitored by means such as echocardiogram and/or fluoroscopy, and tether 534 may be cinched, loosened, and adjusted to achieve a desired amount of tightening as evident via the employed visualization technique(s). When a desired amount of tightening is achieved, tether 534 is then attached to a most-proximal anchor 526 (or two or more most-proximal anchors 526), using any suitable technique, and tether 534 is then cut proximal to the most-proximal anchor 526, thus leaving the cinched, tethered anchors 526 in place along the valve annulus VA. Attachment of tether 534 to the most-proximal anchor(s) 526 may be achieved via adhesive, knotting, crimping, tying or any other technique, and cutting tether 534 may also be performed via any technique, such as with a cutting member coupled with housing 522.
  • [0086]
    In one embodiment, cinching tether 534, attaching tether 534 to most-proximal anchor 526, and cutting tether 534 are achieved using a termination device (not shown). The termination device may comprise, for example, a catheter advancable over tether 534 that includes a cutting member and a nitinol knot or other attachment member for attaching tether 534 to most-proximal anchor. The termination catheter may be advanced over tether 534 to a location at or near the proximal end of the tethered anchors 526. It may then be used to apply opposing force to the most-proximal anchor 526 while tether 534 is cinched. Attachment and cutting members may then be used to attach tether 534 to most-proximal anchor 526 and cut tether 534 just proximal to most-proximal anchor 526. Such a termination device is only one possible way of accomplishing the cinching, attachment and cutting steps, and any other suitable device(s) or technique(s) may be used.
  • [0087]
    In some embodiments, it may be advantageous to deploy a first number of anchors 526 along a first portion of a valve annulus VA, cinch the first anchors to tighten that portion of the annulus, move the delivery device 520 to another portion of the annulus, and deploy and cinch a second number of anchors 526 along a second portion of the annulus. Such a method may be more convenient, in some cases, than extending delivery device 520 around all or most of the circumference of the annulus, and may allow a shorter, more maneuverable housing 522 to be used.
  • [0088]
    In an embodiment similar to that shown in FIGS. 10A-10F, an analogous method may be used but anchors 526 may be driven out of delivery device 520 through a biocompatible material attached to delivery device 520, thereby attaching the biocompatible material to the valve annulus VA. For example, in one embodiment a Dacron strip may be attached to delivery device 520, extending along device 520 and covering apertures 528. Anchors 526 are then driven out of delivery device 520, through the Dacron strip, into the valve annulus VA, thus detaching the Dacron strip from device 520 and attaching it to the valve annulus VA. Such a biocompatible material may facilitate tissue ingrowth of anchors 526 and may enhance attachment generally to the valve annulus VA. In an alternative embodiment, multiple pieces of biocompatible material, such as separate pieces of material disposed over each of apertures 528, may be used. For example, in one embodiment multiple discs of Dacron material are disposed over multiple apertures 528.
  • [0089]
    In another embodiment, a distal portion of delivery device 520 may be detachable from a proximal portion of delivery device 520. Such an embodiment may be configured such that when anchors 526 are deployed from device 520, the distal portion of device 520 detaches from the proximal portion and is attached, via anchors 526, to the valve annulus VA. In one embodiment, for example, anchors 526 may pierce through the distal portion of device 520, rather than exiting device 520 through apertures 528. The distal portion may be detachable via any suitable means, such as perforations or the like.
  • [0090]
    Referring now to FIG. 11, a cross-sectional depiction of a heart H is shown with an anchor delivery device guide catheter 550 advanced through the aorta A and into the left ventricle LV. In a preferred embodiment, this access route to the subannular space and the valve annulus may used. Guide catheter 550 is generally a flexible elongate catheter which may have one or more curves or bends toward its distal end to facilitate placement of the distal end of catheter 550 in a subannular space 552. Subannular space 552, which has been described above in detail, is generally defined by the left ventricular wall, the mitral valve leaflets MVL, and cordae tendiniae, and travels along most or all of the circumference of the valve annulus. The distal end of guide catheter 550 may be configured to be positioned at an opening into space 552 or within space 552, such that subsequent catheter devices may be passed through guide catheter 550 into space 552. In some embodiments, it may be advantageous to provide guide catheter 550 with a curvable portion with a radius in an expanded/curved state that is greater than a radius of the valve annulus. For example, in one embodiment guide catheter 550 in the expanded state has a radius about 25%-50% larger that the valve annulus.
  • [0091]
    With reference now to FIG. 11A, a distal portion of guide catheter 550 is shown, with an anchor delivery device 558 extending through it and out of its distal end. As shown, in one embodiment guide catheter 550 includes at least one bend 551 or curvature, and anchor delivery device 558 is pre-shaped to include at least one corresponding bend 553, that has approximately the same radius of curvature as the bend 551 in guide catheter 550. In some embodiments (not shown), guide catheter 550 may have multiple bends 551, and anchor delivery device 558 may have multiple corresponding bends 553. In the embodiment shown, anchor delivery device 558 includes a proximal bend 553, which corresponds to the bend 551 in guide catheter 550, and a distal bend 555. By matching the radii of curvature of the proximal bend 553 and the guide catheter bend 551, the distal portion of anchor delivery device 558 becomes automatically oriented (when advanced through guide catheter 550) such that one or more anchor delivery apertures 557 are in contact with the valve annulus (not shown). Moreover, distal bend 555 may have a radius of curvature that matches approximately a radius of curvature of a valve annulus. Alternatively, distal bend 555 may have a radius of curvature greater than a valve annulus radius of curvature, such that the distal portion of anchor delivery device 558 tends to push radially outward, enhancing contact of the device 558 with valve annulus tissue. Such greater radii of curvature are described in greater detail below. Proximal bend 553 and distal bend 555 may therefore have any suitable angles relative to one another and relative to the more proximal portion of anchor delivery device 558. In some embodiments, anchor delivery device 558 is also steerable.
  • [0092]
    With reference now to FIG. 11B, in the embodiment described immediately above and/or in alternative embodiments, an anchor delivery device 588 and a guide catheter 590 may include one or more corresponding (or “registering”) bends or orientation portions 592 a, 592 b at other locations along their lengths. In other words, although bends 551, 553, 555 are shown in FIG. 11A at or near the distal ends of guide catheter 550 and anchor delivery device 558, similar bends could be formed at more proximal locations. For example, FIG. 11B shows guide catheter 590 with orientation portion 592 a having a chosen shape when relaxed. The chosen shape may lie along a two-dimensional or three-dimensional path. Anchor delivery device 588 has a corresponding orientation portion 592 b along its length which is complementary to the shape of orientation portion 592 a. The chosen shape may also be created by the application of energy, mechanical manipulation or the like. Such orientation portions 592 a, 592 b could be used for further registering or orienting delivery device 588 to a desired orientation. Typically, when orientation portions 592 a, 592 b are axially aligned, which can be indicated by orientation markers at the proximal ends of guide catheter 590 and anchor delivery device 588 external of the patient, proper rotary orientation can be sensed tactically by the physician to help insure the distal end of anchor delivery device 588 is properly oriented. Delivery device 588 may be rotated, advanced or moved in any suitable fashion within guide catheter 590 to achieve a desired orientation. The use of one or more complementary orientation portions 592 a, 592 b may be used with any of a number of various embodiments of guide catheters and anchor delivery devices.
  • [0093]
    In a number of cases, and with reference now to FIGS. 12A-12D, it may be advantageous to provide further support to an anchor delivery device 658, to support the device 658 against valve annulus tissue and/or to push the device 658 against valve annulus tissue to enhance contact with, and anchor delivery into, the tissue. In one embodiment, as shown in FIG. 12A, a helical support member 652 may be coupled with a distal end of anchor delivery device 658 and may be extended into the left ventricle of a heart (or other heart chamber in other embodiments) to contact the heart wall 651 and thus support anchor delivery device 658 against the valve annulus tissue. In alternative embodiments, helical support member 651 may extend out of a guide catheter 650 to contact the heart wall 651 and support anchor delivery device 658. Any suitable means may be used for extending helical member 652 into the left ventricle or other chamber. For example, helical member 652 is pushed out of guide catheter 650 in one embodiment, but may alternatively be extended out of anchor delivery device 658. Helical member 652 may be made of any suitable material, such as but not limited to Nitinol, stainless steel or the like.
  • [0094]
    In an alternative embodiment, pictured in FIG. 12B, a deployable U-shaped support member 662 may be movably coupled with a distal portion of an anchor delivery device 668, both of which are advanceable through a guide catheter 660. Upon being advanced out of the distal end of guide catheter 660, U-shaped member 662 may automatically spring out, or alternatively may be manually manipulated to extend outward, to contact the inner surface of the heart wall and/or to contact a papillary muscle 663. As shown in FIG. 12B, in one embodiment U-shaped member 663 contacts an intersection of a papillary muscle 663 with the heart wall, and thus provides upward support (solid-tipped arrows) to anchor delivery device 668. Again, such a U-shaped member 662 may automatically deform from a straight configuration for delivery through guide catheter 660 into a U-shaped configuration, such as if member 662 is made of Nitinol, spring stainless steel, or other shape memory or super-elastic material. Alternatively, U-shaped member 662 may be connected to anchor delivery device 668 at or near the distal end of the device 668 and may be pushed distally to force the U-shaped member 662 to expand into its U-shape. In an alternative embodiment, U-shaped member 662 may be attached proximally and may be pulled into its expanded configuration. Any suitable method for changing the shape of U-shaped member 662 from straight to U-shaped may be used in various embodiments.
  • [0095]
    As shown in FIG. 12C, U-shaped member 662 may optionally include an expandable member 667, such as an inflatable balloon. Expandable member 667 may be expanded to provide further force against and support of anchor delivery device 668, to enhance its contact with valve annulus tissue. In another embodiment, as shown in FIG. 12D, multiple spring members 672 may be coupled with a distal end of an anchor delivery device 678 to provide force against an inner surface of a heart wall (solid tipped arrows) to thus support anchor delivery device 678 against annulus tissue (hollow tipped arrows). Thus, various embodiments of the invention may include any of a number of suitable support devices for enhancing support of an anchor delivery device against valve annulus tissue, thus enhancing the ability of the delivery device to delivery tissue anchors into the annulus.
  • [0096]
    Referring now to FIGS. 13A-13C, in some embodiments it may be advantageous to provide one or more devices to enhance the attachment of a terminal tissue anchor 710 to valve annulus tissue VA. Typically, in attaching tissue anchors to valve annulus tissue VA, a first tethered anchor (not shown) is attached, and subsequent anchors are then attached, ending in a final or terminal anchor 710. A tether 718 is then cinched, to apply force between the attached anchors (hollow arrow), thus cinching the valve annulus VA. Tether 718 is then typically attached by any suitable means to terminal anchor 710 and then cut or otherwise detached proximal to the terminal anchor 710, leaving the cinched, tethered anchors in place, attached to the valve annulus VA. To relieve some of the tension placed on terminal anchor 710 and/or to provide additional attachment/anchoring strength to the terminal end of the tethered anchors, one or more locking members 714 may be deployed at or near the terminal end. For example, in one embodiment locking member 714 comprises a cylinder slidably disposed over tether 718, with prongs 712 extending from one end of the cylinder. Locking member 714 is deployed out of the distal end of a termination catheter, guide catheter or the like (not shown) and is then slid along tether 718, such that prongs 712 contact and enter into valve annulus tissue VA. In one embodiment, a pusher member 716, such as a ball slidably disposed over tether 718, may be used to push locking member 714 forward and into engagement with tissue, as shown in FIG. 13B and as designated by solid tipped arrows. In some embodiments, locking member 714 engages with terminal anchor 710, as shown in FIGS. 13B and 13C, though such engagement is not required. Once locking member 714 is fully engaged with valve tissue VA, tether 718 is cut proximal to locking member 714. In some embodiments, pusher member 716 remains in place, while in others it may be removed before cutting tether 718.
  • [0097]
    A number of different variations of locking members are contemplated in various embodiments. For example, a two-pronged member may be used, with the prongs deployable from a delivery position to and expanded configuration, and with the prongs optionally engaging with the terminal anchor 710. In another embodiment, multiple prongs may be aligned in a linear fashion along a locking member, such as in a rake-like configuration. Yet another embodiment include two prongs for engaging with the terminal anchor 710 and another prong for engaging with valve annulus tissue VA. Thus, any of a number of different embodiments may be employed as part of the present invention. Such locking members may be constructed from any suitable material or combination of materials, such as Nitinol, spring stainless steel and/or other shape memory or super-elastic materials.
  • [0098]
    FIGS. 14A-14F demonstrate a method for advancing an anchor delivery device to a position for treating a mitral valve MV. The mitral valve MV, including mitral valve leaflets MVL are represented diagrammatically from an inferior perspective looking up, to depict a method for delivering a device into subannular space 552. In FIG. 14A, first guide catheter 550 is show extending up to or into subannular space 552, as in FIG. 11. As shown in FIG. 14B, in one method a second guide catheter 554 may be advanced through first guide catheter 550 to pass through/along subannular space 554. This second guide catheter 554 is steerable in one embodiment, as will be described further below, to help conform second guide catheter 554 to subannular space 552.
  • [0099]
    Next, as in FIG. 14C, a guide sheath 556 may be passed over second guide catheter 554 to extend along subannular space. Sheath 556 is generally a flexible, tubular member that can be passed over second guide catheter 554 and within first guide catheter 550. To enhance passage and exchange, any of these and other described catheter members, sheath members, or the like may be manufactured from and/or coated with one or more friction resistant materials. Once sheath 556 is in place, second guide catheter 554 may be withdrawn, as shown in FIG. 14D. As shown in FIG. 14E, an anchor delivery device 558 may then be advanced through sheath 556 to a position for treating the mitral valve MV. Sheath 556 may then be withdrawn, as in FIG. 14F, leaving anchor delivery device 558 in place for performing a treatment. A valve annulus treatment may be performed, as described extensively above, and anchor delivery device 558 may be withdrawn. In some embodiments, anchor delivery device 558 is used to treat one portion of the valve annulus and is then moved to another portion, typically the opposite side, to treat the other portion of the annulus. In such embodiments, any one or more of the steps just described may be repeated. In some embodiments, anchor delivery device 558 is withdrawn through first guide catheter 550, and first guide catheter 550 is then withdrawn. In alternative embodiments, first guide catheter 550 may be withdrawn before anchor delivery device 558.
  • [0100]
    In various embodiments, alternative means may be used to urge anchor delivery device 558 into contact with the valve annulus. For example, in one embodiment an expandable member is coupled with anchor delivery device 558 and expanded within the subannular space 552. In an alternative embodiment, a magnet may be coupled with anchor delivery device 558, and another anchor may be disposed within the coronary sinus, in proximity to the first magnet. The two magnets may attract one another, thus pulling the anchor delivery device 558 into greater contact with the annulus. In another embodiment, anchor delivery device 558 in an expanded (or deployed) state may have a radius of curvature that is larger than the radius of curvature of the mitral valve annulus, thus causing device 558 to be urged against the annulus. In one embodiment, for example, the radius of curvature of device 558 in the expanded/deployed state is about 25%-50% larger than the radius of curvature of the mitral valve annulus.
  • [0101]
    Various embodiments may also include visualizing the annulus using a visualization member coupled with the anchor delivery device 558 or separate from the device 558. In some embodiments, anchors may be driven through a strip of detachable, biocompatible material, such as Dacron, that is coupled with anchor delivery device 558 but that detaches to affix to the valve annulus via the anchors. In some embodiments, the strip may then be cinched to tighten the annulus. In other embodiments, the anchors may be driven through a detachable, biocompatible, distal portion of the guide sheath 556, and guide sheath 556 may then remain attached to the annulus via the anchors. Again, in some embodiments, the detached sheath may be cinched to tighten the annulus.
  • [0102]
    Of course, the method just described is but one embodiment of a method for delivering an anchor delivery device to a location for treating a valve annulus. In various alternative embodiments, one or more steps may be added, deleted or modified while achieving a similar result. In some embodiments, a similar method may be used to treat the mitral valve from a superior/right atrial position or to treat another heart valve. Additionally, other devices or modifications of the system just described may be used in other embodiments.
  • [0103]
    With reference now to FIGS. 15A and 15B, one embodiment of a steerable catheter device 560 is shown. Steerable catheter device 560 may be used in a method such as that just described in reference to FIGS. 14A-14F, for example in performing a function similar to that performed by second guide catheter 554. In other embodiments, catheter device 560 may perform any other suitable function. As shown, catheter device 560 suitably includes an elongate catheter body having a proximal portion 562 and a distal portion 564. At least one tensioning member 568, such as but not limited to a tensioning cord, extends from proximal portion 562 to distal portion 564 and is coupled with the distal portion 564 and at least one tensioning actuator 570/572 on the proximal portion. Tensioning actuator 570/572 may include, for example, a knob 570 and a barrel 572 for wrapping and unwrapping tensioning member 568 to apply and remove tension. Tensioning member 568 is coupled with distal portion 564 at one or more connection points 580. In some embodiments, catheter device 560 includes a proximal housing 571, handle or the like, coupled to the proximal end of proximal portion 562 via a hub 576 or other means. Housing 571 may be coupled with tensioning actuator 570/572 and may include one or more arms 574 for infusing fluid or for other functions. In the embodiment shown, arm 574 and housing 571 include a lumen 567 that is in fluid communication with a fluid lumen 566 of the catheter body. Fluid may be introduced through arm 574 to pass through fluid lumen 566 to provide, for example, for contrast material at the distal tip of catheter device 560 to enhance visualization of device 560 during a procedure. Any other suitable fluid(s) may be passed through lumens 567/566 for any other purpose. Another lumen 578 may be included in distal portion 564, through which tensioning member 568 passes before attaching at a distal location along distal portion 564.
  • [0104]
    FIG. 15B shows catheter device 560 in a deformed/bent configuration, after tension has been applied to distal portion 564 by applying tension to tensioning member 568, via knob 570 and barrel 572. The bend in distal portion 564 will allow it to conform more readily to a valve annulus, while catheter device 560 in its straight configuration will be more amenable to passage through vasculature of the patient. Tensioning member 568 may be manufactured from any suitable material or combination of materials, such as but not limited to Nitinol, polyester, nylon, polypropylene and/or other polymers. Some embodiments may include two or more tensioning members 568 and/or two or more tensioning actuators 570/572 to provide for changes in shape of distal portion 564 in multiple directions. In alternative embodiments, knob 570 and barrel 572 may be substituted with any suitable devices, such as a pull cord, button, lever or other actuator. Various alternatives may also be substituted for tensioning member 568 in various embodiments. For example, shaped expandable members, shape memory members and/or the like may be used to change the shape of distal portion 564.
  • [0105]
    Generally, proximal portion 562 of the catheter body is less flexible than distal portion 564. Proximal portion 562 may be made of any suitable material, such as PEBAX, FEP, nylon, polyethylene and/or the like, and may include a braided material, such as stainless steel, to provide stiffness and strength. Distal portion 564 may be made of similar or other materials, but the braided material is typically not included, to provide for greater flexibility. Both proximal and distal portions 562/564 may have any suitable lengths, diameters, overall configurations and the like. In one embodiment the catheter body is approximately 140 cm in length and 6 French in diameter, but any other suitable sizes may be used in other embodiments. Either proximal portion 562, distal portion 564 or preferably both, may be made from or coated with one or more friction resistant or lubricating material to enhance passage of device 560 through an introducer catheter and/or to enhance passage of a sheath or other device over catheter device 560.
  • [0106]
    With reference now to FIGS. 16A-16E, another aspect of the present invention includes improved tissue anchors for enhancing anchor attachment to valve annulus tissue. Such improved anchors typically include one or more features to help prevent the anchors from pulling out of tissue, when the anchors are placed under tension from a cinched tether, and/or to help promote tissue ingrowth of the anchors to further enhance attachment. In one embodiment, as shown in FIG. 16A, a tissue anchor 810 includes outwardly facing hooks 812 or bends at the ends of the two arms of anchor 810. In another embodiment, as in FIG. 16B, a tissue anchor 820 includes inwardly facing hooks 822. In a related embodiment, shown in FIG. 16D, a tissue anchor 840 includes multiple bends 842. In any of these embodiments, hooks 812, 822 or bends 842 have been found to enhance attachment of anchors 810, 820, 840 to tissue and thus prevent anchor pullout. In another embodiment, shown in FIG. 16C, two arms of a tissue anchor 830 are attached at an attachment point 832. The attachment point 832 may be formed by any suitable technique, such as soldering or the like. In another embodiment, as in FIG. 16E, a belt 852 may be disposed over a tissue anchor 850 to hold the two arms of the anchor together. In either of the embodiments shown in FIGS. 16C and 16E, holding the two arms of the anchor together has be found to reduce pullout of the anchors 830, 850 from tissue.
  • [0107]
    In the embodiments just described or in alternative embodiments, tissue anchors may also have one or more features designed to enhance ingrowth and/or encapsulation of the anchors into annular tissue. Such features, for example, may include a coating, a porous and/or rough surface, an attachment such as a polyester band or belt, or any other suitable surface feature or added feature. By promoting encapsulation of tissue anchors, attachment strength of the anchors to tissue is enhanced.
  • [0108]
    Referring now to FIGS. 17A-17C, in many embodiments, self-forming anchors 900 are stored in the delivery device in a straightened configuration, coupled with a tether 902, as shown in FIG. 17A. Basically, anchors 900 are held or restrained in that straightened state, while their natural configuration is curved. Thus, when the straightened anchor 900 is released from the delivery device into tissue T, the anchor 900 actually pulls itself into the tissue T, as shown in FIG. 17B, due to the storage of potential energy in the straightened state and the tendency of each of the arms 901 of anchors 900 to drive the tip of the arm into the tissue as illustrated. Arms 901 are joined together at a junction 903. Each arm 901 is braced against the other arm so that forces exerted by tissue T on each arm 901 are opposed by the other arm 901 wherein the arms are joined to one another. This eliminates the need for an anchor driving device, such as required with staples, thus substantially simplifying the assembly and method. In addition, bracing arms 901 against one another also helps to reduce or eliminate problems associated with tissue deflection. As shown by the hollow-tipped arrows in FIG. 17B, the anchor 900 pulls itself into tissue T as it assumes its natural, curved shape, and exerts forces in vertical, horizontal and curved directions. Finally, after pulling itself into tissue and assuming its natural shape, as in FIG. 17C, anchor 900 is fully embedded in the tissue T.
  • [0109]
    In an alternative embodiment, as shown in FIG. 18, anchors 910 may have one curved arm and one straight arm. Such an anchor 910 will still pull itself into tissue T, thus embedding itself and positioning the tether 912 flush with the tissue T.
  • [0110]
    Referring now to FIG. 19A, some embodiments of a valve annulus anchor device may include anchors 922, a tether 924, a distal force applying member 927 coupled with the tether 924, a termination member 926 and one or more force distributing sleeves 920 disposed over the tether 924 and between adjacent anchors 922. In one embodiment, as shown, a separate sleeve 920 may be disposed between two adjacent anchors 922 a, 922 b. Additional sleeves 920 may optionally be disposed between other sets of two anchors, such as anchors 922 b and 922 c. In FIG. 19A, only three anchors 922 are shown for simplicity, but any number of anchors 922 and sleeves 920 between anchors may be used in various embodiments. Sleeve 920 acts to distribute force applied between two adjacent anchors 922, to help prevent such anchors 922 from pulling out of tissue when force is applied to tether 924. Sleeve 922 may be made of any suitable material, such as but not limited to metals, such as Nitinol, polymers, fabrics and the like. Sleeve 922 may be a solid cylindrical member, or alternatively may have patterned cut-outs, like a stent, or be made of ribbed, woven, braided, porous, nonporous or any other suitable material, pattern, configuration or the like. Sleeve 920 may be essentially rigid and axially incompressible, while in other embodiments it may be axially compressible. In one embodiment, sleeve 920 may be configured as two rings, disposed adjacent two anchors 922, with the rings being connected by a rod or shaft, so that tether 924 is not encircled by the sleeve 922.
  • [0111]
    With reference now to FIG. 19B, in an alternative embodiment, a sleeve 930 may be disposed over a tether 934 so as to extend between more than two anchors 932. Such a sleeve 930 may thus distribute force applied between a termination member 936 and a force applying member 937 so as to help prevent anchor pull-out from tissue. Such a sleeve 930 may include one or more openings through which one or more middle anchors may extend. Again, sleeve 930 may have any suitable configuration, size, shape or the like and be made of any suitable material or combination of materials. Sleeve 930 may extend between three, four, five or any suitable number of anchors 932 in various embodiments. In an alternative embodiment, sleeve 930 may be pierced by one or more of the anchors 932 and thus attached to valve annulus tissue.
  • [0112]
    Although the foregoing is a complete and accurate description of the present invention, the description provided above is for exemplary purposes only, and variations may be made to the embodiments described without departing from the scope of the invention. Thus, the above description should not be construed to limit the scope of the invention as described in the appended claims.

Claims (8)

1-42. (canceled)
43. A device for constricting a valve annulus in a heart, the device comprising:
a plurality of slidably coupled tissue anchors, each anchor including at least one tissue attachment feature for enhancing attachment of the anchor to valve annulus tissue; and
at least one cinchable tether slidably coupled with at least some of the tissue anchors and fixedly attached to at least a first of the anchors.
44. A device as in claim 43, wherein the at least one attachment feature comprises a porous surface along at least a portion of each anchor.
45. A device as in claim 43, wherein the at least one attachment feature comprises a textured surface along at least a portion of each anchor.
46. A device as in claim 43, wherein the at least one attachment feature comprises a coated surface along at least a portion of each anchor.
47. A device as in claim 43, wherein the at least one attachment feature comprises at least one circular or hooked portion of each anchor having a small radius of
curvature.
48. A device as in claim 43, wherein the at least one attachment feature comprises a barb at each end of each anchor.
49-59. (canceled)
US12581040 2002-06-13 2009-10-16 Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair Abandoned US20100082098A1 (en)

Priority Applications (11)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US38893502 true 2002-06-13 2002-06-13
US42928802 true 2002-11-25 2002-11-25
US44589003 true 2003-02-06 2003-02-06
US45973503 true 2003-04-01 2003-04-01
US46250203 true 2003-04-10 2003-04-10
US10461043 US6986775B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2003-06-13 Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US10656797 US7753922B2 (en) 2003-09-04 2003-09-04 Devices and methods for cardiac annulus stabilization and treatment
US10741130 US8287555B2 (en) 2003-02-06 2003-12-19 Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US10792681 US20040243227A1 (en) 2002-06-13 2004-03-02 Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US10901555 US7666193B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2004-07-27 Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US12581040 US20100082098A1 (en) 2002-06-13 2009-10-16 Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12581040 US20100082098A1 (en) 2002-06-13 2009-10-16 Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100082098A1 true true US20100082098A1 (en) 2010-04-01

Family

ID=46321606

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10901455 Active 2028-02-01 US7753858B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2004-07-27 Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US12581040 Abandoned US20100082098A1 (en) 2002-06-13 2009-10-16 Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US12824051 Abandoned US20110172754A1 (en) 2002-06-13 2010-06-25 Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10901455 Active 2028-02-01 US7753858B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2004-07-27 Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12824051 Abandoned US20110172754A1 (en) 2002-06-13 2010-06-25 Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US7753858B2 (en)

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040193191A1 (en) * 2003-02-06 2004-09-30 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20050107812A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2005-05-19 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20060025787A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-02-02 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20060039756A1 (en) * 2004-08-19 2006-02-23 Bernd Lemke Self-propelled device for milling road surfaces
US20070068392A1 (en) * 2005-09-27 2007-03-29 Kim Sung S Durable coffee pot system
US20080051810A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2008-02-28 John To Devices and methods for anchoring tissue
US20080234815A1 (en) * 2003-09-04 2008-09-25 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for cardiac annulus stabilization and treatment
US20080234728A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2008-09-25 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US7883538B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2011-02-08 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Methods and devices for termination
US8066766B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2011-11-29 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Methods and devices for termination
US8790367B2 (en) 2008-02-06 2014-07-29 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Multi-window guide tunnel
US9375312B2 (en) 2010-07-09 2016-06-28 Highlife Sas Transcatheter atrio-ventricular valve prosthesis
US9616197B2 (en) 2009-01-20 2017-04-11 Ancora Heart, Inc. Anchor deployment devices and related methods
US9861350B2 (en) 2010-09-03 2018-01-09 Ancora Heart, Inc. Devices and methods for anchoring tissue

Families Citing this family (83)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6440164B1 (en) * 1999-10-21 2002-08-27 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Implantable prosthetic valve
US6602288B1 (en) * 2000-10-05 2003-08-05 Edwards Lifesciences Corporation Minimally-invasive annuloplasty repair segment delivery template, system and method of use
US6602286B1 (en) 2000-10-26 2003-08-05 Ernst Peter Strecker Implantable valve system
DE60207893T2 (en) 2002-03-14 2006-08-17 Yeung, Jeffrey E., San Jose Suture anchors and adaptation device
US7007698B2 (en) * 2002-04-03 2006-03-07 Boston Scientific Corporation Body lumen closure
US6752828B2 (en) * 2002-04-03 2004-06-22 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Artificial valve
US7588582B2 (en) * 2002-06-13 2009-09-15 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Methods for remodeling cardiac tissue
US20060241656A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-10-26 Starksen Niel F Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US7758637B2 (en) * 2003-02-06 2010-07-20 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20050216078A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2005-09-29 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20040243227A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2004-12-02 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US7666193B2 (en) * 2002-06-13 2010-02-23 Guided Delivery Sytems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US7753858B2 (en) * 2002-06-13 2010-07-13 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US7416557B2 (en) * 2002-10-24 2008-08-26 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Venous valve apparatus and method
US6945957B2 (en) * 2002-12-30 2005-09-20 Scimed Life Systems, Inc. Valve treatment catheter and methods
US7534204B2 (en) * 2003-09-03 2009-05-19 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Cardiac visualization devices and methods
US7854761B2 (en) 2003-12-19 2010-12-21 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Methods for venous valve replacement with a catheter
US8128681B2 (en) 2003-12-19 2012-03-06 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Venous valve apparatus, system, and method
US7641686B2 (en) * 2004-04-23 2010-01-05 Direct Flow Medical, Inc. Percutaneous heart valve with stentless support
EP2422751A3 (en) * 2004-05-05 2013-01-02 Direct Flow Medical, Inc. Unstented heart valve with formed in place support structure
US7566343B2 (en) 2004-09-02 2009-07-28 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Cardiac valve, system, and method
US7854755B2 (en) 2005-02-01 2010-12-21 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Vascular catheter, system, and method
US20060173490A1 (en) * 2005-02-01 2006-08-03 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Filter system and method
US7670368B2 (en) * 2005-02-07 2010-03-02 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Venous valve apparatus, system, and method
US7780722B2 (en) * 2005-02-07 2010-08-24 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Venous valve apparatus, system, and method
US7867274B2 (en) * 2005-02-23 2011-01-11 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Valve apparatus, system and method
US7722666B2 (en) * 2005-04-15 2010-05-25 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Valve apparatus, system and method
US20060247672A1 (en) * 2005-04-27 2006-11-02 Vidlund Robert M Devices and methods for pericardial access
US9504461B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2016-11-29 Neotract, Inc. Anchor delivery system
US8491606B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2013-07-23 Neotract, Inc. Median lobe retraction apparatus and method
US8333776B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2012-12-18 Neotract, Inc. Anchor delivery system
US7645286B2 (en) * 2005-05-20 2010-01-12 Neotract, Inc. Devices, systems and methods for retracting, lifting, compressing, supporting or repositioning tissues or anatomical structures
US9364212B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2016-06-14 Neotract, Inc. Suture anchoring devices and methods for use
US8394113B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2013-03-12 Neotract, Inc. Coiled anchor device
US8945152B2 (en) * 2005-05-20 2015-02-03 Neotract, Inc. Multi-actuating trigger anchor delivery system
US7909836B2 (en) * 2005-05-20 2011-03-22 Neotract, Inc. Multi-actuating trigger anchor delivery system
US9549739B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2017-01-24 Neotract, Inc. Devices, systems and methods for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia and other conditions
US8668705B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2014-03-11 Neotract, Inc. Latching anchor device
US8628542B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2014-01-14 Neotract, Inc. Median lobe destruction apparatus and method
US8529584B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2013-09-10 Neotract, Inc. Median lobe band implant apparatus and method
US7896891B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2011-03-01 Neotract, Inc. Apparatus and method for manipulating or retracting tissue and anatomical structure
US8425535B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2013-04-23 Neotract, Inc. Multi-actuating trigger anchor delivery system
US7758594B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2010-07-20 Neotract, Inc. Devices, systems and methods for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia and other conditions
EP2344048B1 (en) 2008-07-30 2016-09-07 Neotract, Inc. Slotted anchor device
US8834492B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2014-09-16 Neotract, Inc. Continuous indentation lateral lobe apparatus and method
US8157815B2 (en) * 2005-05-20 2012-04-17 Neotract, Inc. Integrated handle assembly for anchor delivery system
US8603106B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2013-12-10 Neotract, Inc. Integrated handle assembly for anchor delivery system
US9149266B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2015-10-06 Neotract, Inc. Deforming anchor device
CA2610669A1 (en) * 2005-06-07 2006-12-14 Direct Flow Medical, Inc. Stentless aortic valve replacement with high radial strength
US8012198B2 (en) 2005-06-10 2011-09-06 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Venous valve, system, and method
US7569071B2 (en) 2005-09-21 2009-08-04 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Venous valve, system, and method with sinus pocket
US7799038B2 (en) * 2006-01-20 2010-09-21 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Translumenal apparatus, system, and method
US20080126131A1 (en) * 2006-07-17 2008-05-29 Walgreen Co. Predictive Modeling And Risk Stratification Of A Medication Therapy Regimen
US8430926B2 (en) * 2006-08-11 2013-04-30 Japd Consulting Inc. Annuloplasty with enhanced anchoring to the annulus based on tissue healing
US8388680B2 (en) * 2006-10-18 2013-03-05 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Methods and devices for catheter advancement and delivery of substances therethrough
US7935144B2 (en) * 2006-10-19 2011-05-03 Direct Flow Medical, Inc. Profile reduction of valve implant
US8133213B2 (en) * 2006-10-19 2012-03-13 Direct Flow Medical, Inc. Catheter guidance through a calcified aortic valve
WO2008091493A1 (en) 2007-01-08 2008-07-31 California Institute Of Technology In-situ formation of a valve
US20080177380A1 (en) * 2007-01-19 2008-07-24 Starksen Niel F Methods and devices for heart tissue repair
WO2008097556A1 (en) * 2007-02-05 2008-08-14 Boston Scientific Limited Systems and methods for valve delivery
ES2441801T3 (en) 2007-02-05 2014-02-06 Boston Scientific Limited Percutaneous valve and delivery system
US20080221599A1 (en) * 2007-03-06 2008-09-11 Starksen Niel F Devices, methods, and kits for gastrointestinal procedures
US8758366B2 (en) 2007-07-09 2014-06-24 Neotract, Inc. Multi-actuating trigger anchor delivery system
US8828079B2 (en) * 2007-07-26 2014-09-09 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Circulatory valve, system and method
CA2697364C (en) * 2007-08-23 2017-10-17 Direct Flow Medical, Inc. Translumenally implantable heart valve with formed in place support
US7892276B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2011-02-22 Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc. Valve with delayed leaflet deployment
US20090171456A1 (en) * 2007-12-28 2009-07-02 Kveen Graig L Percutaneous heart valve, system, and method
EP2339970A2 (en) 2008-07-30 2011-07-06 Neotract, Inc. Anchor delivery system with replaceable cartridge
US9544922B2 (en) * 2008-09-16 2017-01-10 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Quality of service scheme for collision-based wireless networks
EP2349019A4 (en) 2008-10-10 2016-06-15 Guided Delivery Systems Inc Termination devices and related methods
US8795298B2 (en) 2008-10-10 2014-08-05 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Tether tensioning devices and related methods
WO2010065912A1 (en) 2008-12-04 2010-06-10 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Method and apparatus for minimally invasive heart valve procedures
WO2010085457A1 (en) 2009-01-20 2010-07-29 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Diagnostic catheters, guide catheters, visualization devices and chord manipulation devices, and related kits and methods
US20100278944A1 (en) * 2009-05-04 2010-11-04 Naturex, S.A. Application of american ginseng to enhance neurocognitive function
WO2011146853A3 (en) * 2010-05-21 2012-01-05 Barosense, Inc. Tissue-acquisition and fastening devices and methods
DE102010053410A1 (en) * 2010-12-06 2012-06-06 Karl Storz Gmbh & Co. Kg Endoscopic instrument system
US20120158021A1 (en) * 2010-12-19 2012-06-21 Mitralign, Inc. Steerable guide catheter having preformed curved shape
US9161749B2 (en) 2011-04-14 2015-10-20 Neotract, Inc. Method and apparatus for treating sexual dysfunction
WO2013008204A9 (en) * 2011-07-12 2013-07-04 Maestroheart Sa System for tissue marking and treatment
US9668859B2 (en) 2011-08-05 2017-06-06 California Institute Of Technology Percutaneous heart valve delivery systems
CN105662505A (en) * 2011-12-12 2016-06-15 戴维·阿隆 Equipment for tightly binding cardiac valve ring
US9011531B2 (en) 2012-02-13 2015-04-21 Mitraspan, Inc. Method and apparatus for repairing a mitral valve
EP2967945A4 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-11-09 California Inst Of Techn Handle mechanism and functionality for repositioning and retrieval of transcatheter heart valves

Citations (86)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2108206A (en) * 1937-03-09 1938-02-15 Lillian Pearl Mecker Tenaculum
US3656185A (en) * 1969-02-04 1972-04-18 Rhone Poulenc Sa Cardiac valvular support prosthesis
US3727614A (en) * 1971-05-13 1973-04-17 Merck & Co Inc Multiple dosage inoculator
US4014492A (en) * 1975-06-11 1977-03-29 Senco Products, Inc. Surgical staple
US4069825A (en) * 1976-01-28 1978-01-24 Taichiro Akiyama Surgical thread and cutting apparatus for the same
US4494542A (en) * 1982-03-31 1985-01-22 Lee Mary K Suture cutter, extractor and method to cut and remove sutures
US4726371A (en) * 1982-02-09 1988-02-23 Gibbens Everett N Surgical cutting instrument
US5084058A (en) * 1990-04-25 1992-01-28 Mitek Surgical Products, Inc. Suture rundown tool and cutter system
US5103804A (en) * 1990-07-03 1992-04-14 Boston Scientific Corporation Expandable tip hemostatic probes and the like
US5383905A (en) * 1992-10-09 1995-01-24 United States Surgical Corporation Suture loop locking device
US5409483A (en) * 1993-01-22 1995-04-25 Jeffrey H. Reese Direct visualization surgical probe
US5409499A (en) * 1993-06-18 1995-04-25 Ethicon, Inc. Biocompatible suture knot clip
US5591194A (en) * 1994-02-18 1997-01-07 C. R. Bard, Inc. Telescoping balloon catheter and method of use
US5709695A (en) * 1994-08-10 1998-01-20 Segmed, Inc. Apparatus for reducing the circumference of a vascular structure
US5716370A (en) * 1996-02-23 1998-02-10 Williamson, Iv; Warren Means for replacing a heart valve in a minimally invasive manner
US5718725A (en) * 1992-12-03 1998-02-17 Heartport, Inc. Devices and methods for intracardiac procedures
US5725542A (en) * 1995-03-09 1998-03-10 Yoon; Inbae Multifunctional spring clips and cartridges and applicators therefor
US5728861A (en) * 1995-01-24 1998-03-17 Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation Bisphosphite compound and method for producing aldehydes
US5735290A (en) * 1993-02-22 1998-04-07 Heartport, Inc. Methods and systems for performing thoracoscopic coronary bypass and other procedures
US5741260A (en) * 1994-02-24 1998-04-21 Pioneer Laboratories, Inc. Cable system for bone securance
US5741301A (en) * 1996-02-28 1998-04-21 Pagedas; Anthony C. Self locking suture lock
US5860993A (en) * 1996-09-25 1999-01-19 Medworks Corp. Suture cutter
US5860992A (en) * 1996-01-31 1999-01-19 Heartport, Inc. Endoscopic suturing devices and methods
US5868733A (en) * 1995-02-14 1999-02-09 Daig Corporation Guiding introducer system for use in the treatment of accessory pathways around the mitral valve using a retrograde approach
US5879371A (en) * 1997-01-09 1999-03-09 Elective Vascular Interventions, Inc. Ferruled loop surgical fasteners, instruments, and methods for minimally invasive vascular and endoscopic surgery
US5885238A (en) * 1991-07-16 1999-03-23 Heartport, Inc. System for cardiac procedures
US5888240A (en) * 1994-07-29 1999-03-30 Baxter International Inc. Distensible annuloplasty ring for surgical remodelling of an atrioventricular valve and nonsurgical method for post-implantation distension thereof to accomodate patient growth
US6010531A (en) * 1993-02-22 2000-01-04 Heartport, Inc. Less-invasive devices and methods for cardiac valve surgery
US6015428A (en) * 1997-06-03 2000-01-18 Anthony C. Pagedas Integrally formed suture and suture lock
US6045497A (en) * 1997-01-02 2000-04-04 Myocor, Inc. Heart wall tension reduction apparatus and method
US6050936A (en) * 1997-01-02 2000-04-18 Myocor, Inc. Heart wall tension reduction apparatus
US6171329B1 (en) * 1994-12-19 2001-01-09 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Self-expanding defect closure device and method of making and using
US6197017B1 (en) * 1998-02-24 2001-03-06 Brock Rogers Surgical, Inc. Articulated apparatus for telemanipulator system
US6221084B1 (en) * 1999-01-15 2001-04-24 Pare Surgical, Inc. Knot tying apparatus having a notched thread cover and method for using same
US20020013621A1 (en) * 2000-07-27 2002-01-31 Robert Stobie Heart valve holder for constricting the valve commissures and methods of use
US20020026201A1 (en) * 1994-09-16 2002-02-28 Foerster Seth A. Methods for defining and marking tissue
US20020029080A1 (en) * 1997-12-17 2002-03-07 Myocor, Inc. Valve to myocardium tension members device and method
US6355030B1 (en) * 1998-09-25 2002-03-12 Cardiothoracic Systems, Inc. Instruments and methods employing thermal energy for the repair and replacement of cardiac valves
US20020035361A1 (en) * 1999-06-25 2002-03-21 Houser Russell A. Apparatus and methods for treating tissue
US20020042621A1 (en) * 2000-06-23 2002-04-11 Liddicoat John R. Automated annular plication for mitral valve repair
US6378289B1 (en) * 1999-11-19 2002-04-30 Pioneer Surgical Technology Methods and apparatus for clamping surgical wires or cables
US20030009196A1 (en) * 2001-06-08 2003-01-09 James Peterson Suture lock having non-through bore capture zone
US6514265B2 (en) * 1999-03-01 2003-02-04 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Tissue connector apparatus with cable release
US20030033006A1 (en) * 2000-02-09 2003-02-13 Peter Phillips Device for the repair of arteries
US20030032979A1 (en) * 1998-07-29 2003-02-13 Myocor, Inc. Transventricular implant tools and devices
US6524338B1 (en) * 2000-08-25 2003-02-25 Steven R. Gundry Method and apparatus for stapling an annuloplasty band in-situ
US6533753B1 (en) * 2000-04-07 2003-03-18 Philip Haarstad Apparatus and method for the treatment of an occluded lumen
US20030060813A1 (en) * 2001-09-22 2003-03-27 Loeb Marvin P. Devices and methods for safely shrinking tissues surrounding a duct, hollow organ or body cavity
US20030069593A1 (en) * 2001-08-31 2003-04-10 Tremulis William S. Method and apparatus for valve repair
US20030074012A1 (en) * 2000-10-10 2003-04-17 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Minimally invasive annuloplasty procedure and apparatus
US6551332B1 (en) * 2000-03-31 2003-04-22 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Multiple bias surgical fastener
US20030078603A1 (en) * 1999-03-01 2003-04-24 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Tissue connector apparatus and methods
US20030078465A1 (en) * 2001-10-16 2003-04-24 Suresh Pai Systems for heart treatment
US20040003819A1 (en) * 1999-04-09 2004-01-08 Evalve, Inc. Methods and apparatus for cardiac valve repair
US6676702B2 (en) * 2001-05-14 2004-01-13 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Mitral valve therapy assembly and method
US20040019378A1 (en) * 2001-04-24 2004-01-29 Hlavka Edwin J. Method and apparatus for performing catheter-based annuloplasty
US6689164B1 (en) * 1999-10-12 2004-02-10 Jacques Seguin Annuloplasty device for use in minimally invasive procedure
US6699263B2 (en) * 2002-04-05 2004-03-02 Cook Incorporated Sliding suture anchor
US6716243B1 (en) * 2000-09-13 2004-04-06 Quickie, Inc. Concentric passive knotless suture terminator
US20050021054A1 (en) * 2003-07-25 2005-01-27 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Sealing clip, delivery systems, and methods
US20050055087A1 (en) * 2003-09-04 2005-03-10 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for cardiac annulus stabilization and treatment
US20050055052A1 (en) * 2003-09-10 2005-03-10 Linvatec Corporation Knotless suture anchor
US20050065550A1 (en) * 2003-02-06 2005-03-24 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US6986775B2 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-01-17 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20060015144A1 (en) * 2004-07-19 2006-01-19 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Uterine artery occlusion staple
US6991643B2 (en) * 2000-12-20 2006-01-31 Usgi Medical Inc. Multi-barbed device for retaining tissue in apposition and methods of use
US20060025750A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-02-02 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20060025784A1 (en) * 2003-09-04 2006-02-02 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US6997931B2 (en) * 2001-02-02 2006-02-14 Lsi Solutions, Inc. System for endoscopic suturing
US7004958B2 (en) * 2002-03-06 2006-02-28 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Transvenous staples, assembly and method for mitral valve repair
US20060058817A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-03-16 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20060069429A1 (en) * 2001-04-24 2006-03-30 Spence Paul A Tissue fastening systems and methods utilizing magnetic guidance
US20070005081A1 (en) * 2005-06-30 2007-01-04 Findlay Thomas R Iii System, apparatus, and method for fastening tissue
US20070005394A1 (en) * 2005-06-07 2007-01-04 Up Todate Inc. Method and apparatus for managing medical order sets
US20070010857A1 (en) * 2005-07-05 2007-01-11 Mitralign, Inc. Tissue anchor, anchoring system and methods of using the same
US7166127B2 (en) * 2003-12-23 2007-01-23 Mitralign, Inc. Tissue fastening systems and methods utilizing magnetic guidance
US20070032820A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2007-02-08 Chen Chao-Chin Patent foramen ovale closure device
US20070038293A1 (en) * 1999-04-09 2007-02-15 St Goar Frederick G Device and methods for endoscopic annuloplasty
US20070049942A1 (en) * 2005-08-30 2007-03-01 Hindrichs Paul J Soft body tissue remodeling methods and apparatus
US20070055206A1 (en) * 2005-08-10 2007-03-08 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Methods and devices for deployment of tissue anchors
US20070051377A1 (en) * 2003-11-12 2007-03-08 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Cardiac valve annulus reduction system
US7189199B2 (en) * 1997-01-02 2007-03-13 Myocor, Inc. Methods and devices for improving cardiac function in hearts
US20080045982A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2008-02-21 John To Devices and methods for anchoring tissue
US20080045977A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2008-02-21 John To Methods and devices for termination
US7344544B2 (en) * 2005-03-28 2008-03-18 Cardica, Inc. Vascular closure system
US20100049213A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2010-02-25 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Devices and methods for termination

Family Cites Families (172)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3773034A (en) 1971-11-24 1973-11-20 Itt Research Institute Steerable catheter
US3727615A (en) 1971-11-26 1973-04-17 Kimberly Clark Co Soft, drapable nonwoven material
US3976079A (en) 1974-08-01 1976-08-24 Samuels Peter B Securing devices for sutures
FR2306671B1 (en) 1975-04-11 1977-11-10 Rhone Poulenc Ind
US3961419A (en) 1975-06-30 1976-06-08 Boris Schwartz Method of cutting and removing sutures
US4053979A (en) 1975-12-23 1977-10-18 International Paper Company Suture cutter
US4034473A (en) 1975-12-23 1977-07-12 International Paper Company Suture cutter
US4043504A (en) 1976-03-09 1977-08-23 Senco Products, Inc. Staple cartridge and feed means for use with a surgical stapling instrument
US4042979A (en) 1976-07-12 1977-08-23 Angell William W Valvuloplasty ring and prosthetic method
US4384406A (en) 1981-03-05 1983-05-24 Cordis Corporation Combination suture cutter and remover
US4445892A (en) 1982-05-06 1984-05-01 Laserscope, Inc. Dual balloon catheter device
US4619247A (en) 1983-03-31 1986-10-28 Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. Catheter
JPS6190079U (en) 1984-11-16 1986-06-11
US4758221A (en) 1986-02-18 1988-07-19 St. Louis University Catheter with a tip manipulation feature
GB8628090D0 (en) 1986-11-25 1986-12-31 Ahmad R Clipon surgical suture cutter
US4784133A (en) 1987-01-28 1988-11-15 Mackin Robert A Working well balloon angioscope and method
US4976710A (en) 1987-01-28 1990-12-11 Mackin Robert A Working well balloon method
US4961738A (en) 1987-01-28 1990-10-09 Mackin Robert A Angioplasty catheter with illumination and visualization within angioplasty balloon
US5437680A (en) 1987-05-14 1995-08-01 Yoon; Inbae Suturing method, apparatus and system for use in endoscopic procedures
US4850354A (en) 1987-08-13 1989-07-25 Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc. Surgical cutting instrument
US4845851A (en) 1987-12-09 1989-07-11 Milliken Research Corporation Synthetic suture cutting device
US5372138A (en) 1988-03-21 1994-12-13 Boston Scientific Corporation Acousting imaging catheters and the like
US4955377A (en) 1988-10-28 1990-09-11 Lennox Charles D Device and method for heating tissue in a patient's body
US5053047A (en) 1989-05-16 1991-10-01 Inbae Yoon Suture devices particularly useful in endoscopic surgery and methods of suturing
US4969893A (en) 1989-06-16 1990-11-13 Swor G Michael Disposable suture cutter and needle holder
US5290300A (en) 1989-07-31 1994-03-01 Baxter International Inc. Flexible suture guide and holder
US5221255A (en) 1990-01-10 1993-06-22 Mahurkar Sakharam D Reinforced multiple lumen catheter
US5133723A (en) 1990-04-25 1992-07-28 Mitek Surgical Products, Inc. Suture rundown tool and cutter system
US5769812A (en) 1991-07-16 1998-06-23 Heartport, Inc. System for cardiac procedures
US5289963A (en) 1991-10-18 1994-03-01 United States Surgical Corporation Apparatus and method for applying surgical staples to attach an object to body tissue
US5242456A (en) 1991-11-21 1993-09-07 Kensey Nash Corporation Apparatus and methods for clamping tissue and reflecting the same
US5522873A (en) 1991-12-26 1996-06-04 Webster Laboratories, Inc. Catheter having electrode with annular recess and method of using same
JP2002509448A (en) 1992-01-27 2002-03-26 メドトロニック インコーポレーテッド Annuloplasty and sewing ring
US5417700A (en) 1992-03-30 1995-05-23 Thomas D. Egan Automatic suturing and ligating device
US5312341A (en) 1992-08-14 1994-05-17 Wayne State University Retaining apparatus and procedure for transseptal catheterization
US5257975A (en) 1992-08-14 1993-11-02 Edward Weck Incorporated Cannula retention device
US5991650A (en) 1993-10-15 1999-11-23 Ep Technologies, Inc. Surface coatings for catheters, direct contacting diagnostic and therapeutic devices
WO1994008515A1 (en) 1992-10-09 1994-04-28 Li Medical Technologies, Inc. Suture throw rundown tool
WO1994015535A1 (en) 1993-01-07 1994-07-21 Hayhurst, John, O. Clip for suture
US5346500A (en) 1993-02-16 1994-09-13 Sood Suchart Suture cutting scissor apparatus
US5571215A (en) 1993-02-22 1996-11-05 Heartport, Inc. Devices and methods for intracardiac procedures
US5450860A (en) 1993-08-31 1995-09-19 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Device for tissue repair and method for employing same
US5358479A (en) 1993-12-06 1994-10-25 Electro-Catheter Corporation Multiform twistable tip deflectable catheter
US5423837A (en) 1993-12-14 1995-06-13 Advanced Surgical, Inc. Surgical knot pusher
CA2141911C (en) 1994-02-24 2002-04-23 Jude S. Sauer Surgical crimping device and method of use
US5520702A (en) 1994-02-24 1996-05-28 United States Surgical Corporation Method and apparatus for applying a cinch member to the ends of a suture
US5545168A (en) 1994-03-11 1996-08-13 Burke; Dennis W. Apparatus for both tensioning and crimping a surgical wire
US5364407A (en) 1994-03-21 1994-11-15 Poll Wayne L Laparoscopic suturing system
GB9405791D0 (en) 1994-03-23 1994-05-11 Univ London Device for use in cutting threads
FR2718645B1 (en) 1994-04-15 1996-07-12 Nycomed Lab Sa The dilatation catheter in rapid exchange.
US5630824A (en) 1994-06-01 1997-05-20 Innovasive Devices, Inc. Suture attachment device
US5452513A (en) 1994-06-29 1995-09-26 Eric Hulsman Suture cutter
WO1996009797A1 (en) 1994-09-28 1996-04-04 Innovasive Devices, Inc. Suture tensioning device
US5935149A (en) 1995-06-07 1999-08-10 Smith & Nephew Inc. Suturing tissue
DE69633411D1 (en) 1995-10-13 2004-10-21 Transvascular Inc A device for avoidance of arterial constrictions and / or to perform other interventions transvaskularer
US5626614A (en) 1995-12-22 1997-05-06 Applied Medical Resources Corporation T-anchor suturing device and method for using same
US5810853A (en) 1996-01-16 1998-09-22 Yoon; Inbae Knotting element for use in suturing anatomical tissue and methods therefor
US5972004A (en) 1996-02-23 1999-10-26 Cardiovascular Technologies, Llc. Wire fasteners for use in minimally invasive surgery and apparatus and methods for handling those fasteners
US5868703A (en) 1996-04-10 1999-02-09 Endoscopic Technologies, Inc. Multichannel catheter
US5752964A (en) 1996-04-16 1998-05-19 Mericle; Robert W. Surgical knot pusher with flattened spatulated tip
CA2252860C (en) 1996-05-28 2011-03-22 1218122 Ontario Inc. Resorbable implant biomaterial made of condensed calcium phosphate particles
US5919208A (en) 1996-06-27 1999-07-06 Valenti; Gabriele Suture block for surgical sutures
US5810848A (en) 1996-08-21 1998-09-22 Hayhurst; John O. Suturing system
US5848969A (en) 1996-10-28 1998-12-15 Ep Technologies, Inc. Systems and methods for visualizing interior tissue regions using expandable imaging structures
US5904651A (en) 1996-10-28 1999-05-18 Ep Technologies, Inc. Systems and methods for visualizing tissue during diagnostic or therapeutic procedures
US5766240A (en) 1996-10-28 1998-06-16 Medtronic, Inc. Rotatable suturing ring for prosthetic heart valve
US5752518A (en) 1996-10-28 1998-05-19 Ep Technologies, Inc. Systems and methods for visualizing interior regions of the body
US5827171A (en) 1996-10-31 1998-10-27 Momentum Medical, Inc. Intravascular circulatory assist device
US6149658A (en) 1997-01-09 2000-11-21 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Sutured staple surgical fasteners, instruments and methods for minimally invasive vascular and endoscopic surgery
US6074401A (en) 1997-01-09 2000-06-13 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Pinned retainer surgical fasteners, instruments and methods for minimally invasive vascular and endoscopic surgery
US5961539A (en) 1997-01-17 1999-10-05 Segmed, Inc. Method and apparatus for sizing, stabilizing and/or reducing the circumference of an anatomical structure
DE19704580C2 (en) 1997-02-07 1999-04-01 Storz Karl Gmbh & Co Surgical thread cutter
US5989284A (en) 1997-02-18 1999-11-23 Hearten Medical, Inc. Method and device for soft tissue modification
US5752966A (en) 1997-03-07 1998-05-19 Chang; David W. Exovascular anastomotic device
US5843169A (en) 1997-04-08 1998-12-01 Taheri; Syde A. Apparatus and method for stapling graft material to a blood vessel wall while preserving the patency of orifices
US6090096A (en) 1997-04-23 2000-07-18 Heartport, Inc. Antegrade cardioplegia catheter and method
DE69841237D1 (en) 1997-06-27 2009-11-26 Univ Columbia Apparatus for repairing circuit flaps
US5902321A (en) 1997-07-25 1999-05-11 Innovasive Devices, Inc. Device and method for delivering a connector for surgically joining and securing flexible tissue repair members
US20020087048A1 (en) 1998-02-24 2002-07-04 Brock David L. Flexible instrument
US7214230B2 (en) 1998-02-24 2007-05-08 Hansen Medical, Inc. Flexible instrument
US7169141B2 (en) 1998-02-24 2007-01-30 Hansen Medical, Inc. Surgical instrument
US5947983A (en) 1998-03-16 1999-09-07 Boston Scientific Corporation Tissue cutting and stitching device and method
US6099553A (en) 1998-05-21 2000-08-08 Applied Medical Resources Corporation Suture clinch
US6641593B1 (en) 1998-06-03 2003-11-04 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Tissue connector apparatus and methods
US6607541B1 (en) 1998-06-03 2003-08-19 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Tissue connector apparatus and methods
US6250308B1 (en) 1998-06-16 2001-06-26 Cardiac Concepts, Inc. Mitral valve annuloplasty ring and method of implanting
US6409743B1 (en) 1998-07-08 2002-06-25 Axya Medical, Inc. Devices and methods for securing sutures and ligatures without knots
US6423088B1 (en) 1998-07-08 2002-07-23 Axya Medical, Inc. Sharp edged device for closing wounds without knots
US6165183A (en) 1998-07-15 2000-12-26 St. Jude Medical, Inc. Mitral and tricuspid valve repair
US6168586B1 (en) 1998-08-07 2001-01-02 Embol-X, Inc. Inflatable cannula and method of using same
US6461327B1 (en) 1998-08-07 2002-10-08 Embol-X, Inc. Atrial isolator and method of use
US6648903B1 (en) 1998-09-08 2003-11-18 Pierson, Iii Raymond H. Medical tensioning system
US6066160A (en) 1998-11-23 2000-05-23 Quickie Llc Passive knotless suture terminator for use in minimally invasive surgery and to facilitate standard tissue securing
US6258118B1 (en) 1998-11-25 2001-07-10 Israel Aircraft Industries Ltd. Removable support device
DE69931018D1 (en) 1998-12-30 2006-06-01 Ethicon Inc Thread belay device
US6228096B1 (en) 1999-03-31 2001-05-08 Sam R. Marchand Instrument and method for manipulating an operating member coupled to suture material while maintaining tension on the suture material
US6752813B2 (en) 1999-04-09 2004-06-22 Evalve, Inc. Methods and devices for capturing and fixing leaflets in valve repair
WO2006116558A3 (en) 1999-04-09 2007-09-27 Evalve Inc Device and methods for endoscopic annuloplasty
US6723107B1 (en) 1999-04-19 2004-04-20 Orthopaedic Biosystems Ltd. Method and apparatus for suturing
US6602289B1 (en) 1999-06-08 2003-08-05 S&A Rings, Llc Annuloplasty rings of particular use in surgery for the mitral valve
US20050192629A1 (en) 1999-06-25 2005-09-01 Usgi Medical Inc. Methods and apparatus for creating and regulating a gastric stoma
US6669687B1 (en) 1999-06-25 2003-12-30 Vahid Saadat Apparatus and methods for treating tissue
WO2001015605A9 (en) 1999-08-30 2001-08-09 Applied Med Resources Improved surgical clip
US6231561B1 (en) 1999-09-20 2001-05-15 Appriva Medical, Inc. Method and apparatus for closing a body lumen
US6312447B1 (en) 1999-10-13 2001-11-06 The General Hospital Corporation Devices and methods for percutaneous mitral valve repair
US6849077B2 (en) 2000-02-11 2005-02-01 Evysio Medical Devices Ulc Stent delivery system and method of use
US6306149B1 (en) 2000-02-15 2001-10-23 Microline, Inc. Medical clip device with cyclical pusher mechanism
US6840246B2 (en) 2000-06-20 2005-01-11 University Of Maryland, Baltimore Apparatuses and methods for performing minimally invasive diagnostic and surgical procedures inside of a beating heart
US6913608B2 (en) 2000-10-23 2005-07-05 Viacor, Inc. Automated annular plication for mitral valve repair
US6419696B1 (en) 2000-07-06 2002-07-16 Paul A. Spence Annuloplasty devices and related heart valve repair methods
WO2002015795A3 (en) 2000-08-25 2002-06-06 Steven E Decker Suture cutter
US6602288B1 (en) 2000-10-05 2003-08-05 Edwards Lifesciences Corporation Minimally-invasive annuloplasty repair segment delivery template, system and method of use
US6890330B2 (en) 2000-10-27 2005-05-10 Viacor, Inc. Intracardiovascular access (ICVATM) system
WO2002045595A3 (en) 2000-12-06 2003-01-03 Wilson Cook Medical Inc Ligating band delivery apparatus
US7235086B2 (en) 2001-02-02 2007-06-26 Lsi Solutions, Inc. Crimping instrument with motion limiting feature
US7052487B2 (en) 2001-10-26 2006-05-30 Cohn William E Method and apparatus for reducing mitral regurgitation
CA2437824C (en) 2001-02-05 2008-09-23 Viacor, Inc. Apparatus and method for reducing mitral regurgitation
JP4578708B2 (en) 2001-03-26 2010-11-10 オリンパス株式会社 Clip apparatus of living tissue
US6524328B2 (en) 2001-04-12 2003-02-25 Scion International, Inc. Suture lock, lock applicator and method therefor
US7037334B1 (en) 2001-04-24 2006-05-02 Mitralign, Inc. Method and apparatus for catheter-based annuloplasty using local plications
US7101395B2 (en) 2002-06-12 2006-09-05 Mitral Interventions, Inc. Method and apparatus for tissue connection
US6793949B2 (en) * 2001-10-17 2004-09-21 Kraft Foods Holdings, Inc. Soluble particles with encapsulated aroma and method of preparation thereof
US6575971B2 (en) 2001-11-15 2003-06-10 Quantum Cor, Inc. Cardiac valve leaflet stapler device and methods thereof
US20050177180A1 (en) 2001-11-28 2005-08-11 Aptus Endosystems, Inc. Devices, systems, and methods for supporting tissue and/or structures within a hollow body organ
US7749157B2 (en) 2001-12-04 2010-07-06 Estech, Inc. (Endoscopic Technologies, Inc.) Methods and devices for minimally invasive cardiac surgery for atrial fibrillation
US6908478B2 (en) 2001-12-05 2005-06-21 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Anchor and pull mitral valve device and method
US7238203B2 (en) 2001-12-12 2007-07-03 Vita Special Purpose Corporation Bioactive spinal implants and method of manufacture thereof
JP4230915B2 (en) 2001-12-21 2009-02-25 シムチャ ミロ Transplant system for the annuloplasty ring
US6652562B2 (en) 2001-12-28 2003-11-25 Ethicon, Inc. Suture anchoring and tensioning device
US6764510B2 (en) 2002-01-09 2004-07-20 Myocor, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve treatment
US6976995B2 (en) 2002-01-30 2005-12-20 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Fixed length anchor and pull mitral valve device and method
US7048754B2 (en) 2002-03-01 2006-05-23 Evalve, Inc. Suture fasteners and methods of use
WO2003077730A8 (en) 2002-03-11 2004-12-02 John L Wardle Surgical coils and methods of deploying
US20030199974A1 (en) 2002-04-18 2003-10-23 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Annuloplasty apparatus and methods
US8105342B2 (en) 2002-05-08 2012-01-31 Apollo Endosurgery, Inc. Apparatus for ligating/suturing living tissues and system for resecting/suturing living tissues
WO2003101287A3 (en) 2002-05-30 2004-04-01 Univ Leland Stanford Junior Apparatus and method for coronary sinus access
US20050216078A1 (en) 2002-06-13 2005-09-29 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US8287555B2 (en) 2003-02-06 2012-10-16 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US7883538B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2011-02-08 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Methods and devices for termination
US7588582B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2009-09-15 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Methods for remodeling cardiac tissue
US20040243227A1 (en) 2002-06-13 2004-12-02 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20060241656A1 (en) 2002-06-13 2006-10-26 Starksen Niel F Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
CA2500512A1 (en) 2002-10-21 2004-05-06 Mitralign Incorporated Method and apparatus for performing catheter-based annuloplasty using local plications
US7316708B2 (en) 2002-12-05 2008-01-08 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Medical device delivery system
DE10259411A1 (en) 2002-12-19 2004-07-08 Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Gmbh Medical clip and apparatus for applying such a
US6866673B2 (en) 2002-12-20 2005-03-15 Ran Oren Suture manipulating and/or cutting implement
US7993368B2 (en) 2003-03-13 2011-08-09 C.R. Bard, Inc. Suture clips, delivery devices and methods
US7381210B2 (en) 2003-03-14 2008-06-03 Edwards Lifesciences Corporation Mitral valve repair system and method for use
WO2004082538A2 (en) 2003-03-18 2004-09-30 St. Jude Medical, Inc. Body tissue remodeling apparatus
US20040236372A1 (en) 2003-05-20 2004-11-25 Anspach William E. Suture clamp
US7534204B2 (en) 2003-09-03 2009-05-19 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Cardiac visualization devices and methods
US7556647B2 (en) 2003-10-08 2009-07-07 Arbor Surgical Technologies, Inc. Attachment device and methods of using the same
US20050228452A1 (en) 2004-02-11 2005-10-13 Mourlas Nicholas J Steerable catheters and methods for using them
US20050251205A1 (en) 2004-05-07 2005-11-10 Usgi Medical Inc. Apparatus and methods for positioning and securing anchors
US20050251159A1 (en) 2004-05-07 2005-11-10 Usgi Medical Inc. Methods and apparatus for grasping and cinching tissue anchors
US8057511B2 (en) 2004-05-07 2011-11-15 Usgi Medical, Inc. Apparatus and methods for positioning and securing anchors
US7390329B2 (en) 2004-05-07 2008-06-24 Usgi Medical, Inc. Methods for grasping and cinching tissue anchors
US20050251208A1 (en) 2004-05-07 2005-11-10 Usgi Medical Inc. Linear anchors for anchoring to tissue
US8216252B2 (en) 2004-05-07 2012-07-10 Usgi Medical, Inc. Tissue manipulation and securement system
US8308765B2 (en) 2004-05-07 2012-11-13 Usgi Medical, Inc. Apparatus and methods for positioning and securing anchors
US8444657B2 (en) 2004-05-07 2013-05-21 Usgi Medical, Inc. Apparatus and methods for rapid deployment of tissue anchors
US8257394B2 (en) 2004-05-07 2012-09-04 Usgi Medical, Inc. Apparatus and methods for positioning and securing anchors
US8206417B2 (en) 2004-06-09 2012-06-26 Usgi Medical Inc. Apparatus and methods for optimizing anchoring force
US7695493B2 (en) 2004-06-09 2010-04-13 Usgi Medical, Inc. System for optimizing anchoring force
US7736379B2 (en) 2004-06-09 2010-06-15 Usgi Medical, Inc. Compressible tissue anchor assemblies
CA2621462C (en) 2004-09-17 2013-01-08 0783963 Bc Ltd. Hydrocarbon processing devices and systems for engines and combustion equipment
US7635329B2 (en) 2004-09-27 2009-12-22 Evalve, Inc. Methods and devices for tissue grasping and assessment
US8109945B2 (en) 2005-02-04 2012-02-07 St. Jude Medical Puerto Rico Llc Percutaneous suture path tracking device with cutting blade
WO2006097931A3 (en) 2005-03-17 2007-07-26 Valtech Cardio Ltd Mitral valve treatment techniques
US8038687B2 (en) 2005-05-17 2011-10-18 St. Jude Medical Puerto Rico Llc Suture loop closure device
US8628541B2 (en) 2005-05-26 2014-01-14 Usgi Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for securing and deploying tissue anchors
CA2669195C (en) 2005-12-15 2013-06-25 Georgia Tech Research Corporation Systems and methods to control the dimension of a heart valve

Patent Citations (99)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2108206A (en) * 1937-03-09 1938-02-15 Lillian Pearl Mecker Tenaculum
US3656185A (en) * 1969-02-04 1972-04-18 Rhone Poulenc Sa Cardiac valvular support prosthesis
US3727614A (en) * 1971-05-13 1973-04-17 Merck & Co Inc Multiple dosage inoculator
US4014492A (en) * 1975-06-11 1977-03-29 Senco Products, Inc. Surgical staple
US4069825A (en) * 1976-01-28 1978-01-24 Taichiro Akiyama Surgical thread and cutting apparatus for the same
US4726371A (en) * 1982-02-09 1988-02-23 Gibbens Everett N Surgical cutting instrument
US4494542A (en) * 1982-03-31 1985-01-22 Lee Mary K Suture cutter, extractor and method to cut and remove sutures
US5084058A (en) * 1990-04-25 1992-01-28 Mitek Surgical Products, Inc. Suture rundown tool and cutter system
US5103804A (en) * 1990-07-03 1992-04-14 Boston Scientific Corporation Expandable tip hemostatic probes and the like
US5885238A (en) * 1991-07-16 1999-03-23 Heartport, Inc. System for cardiac procedures
US5383905A (en) * 1992-10-09 1995-01-24 United States Surgical Corporation Suture loop locking device
US5718725A (en) * 1992-12-03 1998-02-17 Heartport, Inc. Devices and methods for intracardiac procedures
US5409483A (en) * 1993-01-22 1995-04-25 Jeffrey H. Reese Direct visualization surgical probe
US5735290A (en) * 1993-02-22 1998-04-07 Heartport, Inc. Methods and systems for performing thoracoscopic coronary bypass and other procedures
US6010531A (en) * 1993-02-22 2000-01-04 Heartport, Inc. Less-invasive devices and methods for cardiac valve surgery
US5409499A (en) * 1993-06-18 1995-04-25 Ethicon, Inc. Biocompatible suture knot clip
US5591194A (en) * 1994-02-18 1997-01-07 C. R. Bard, Inc. Telescoping balloon catheter and method of use
US5741260A (en) * 1994-02-24 1998-04-21 Pioneer Laboratories, Inc. Cable system for bone securance
US5888240A (en) * 1994-07-29 1999-03-30 Baxter International Inc. Distensible annuloplasty ring for surgical remodelling of an atrioventricular valve and nonsurgical method for post-implantation distension thereof to accomodate patient growth
US5709695A (en) * 1994-08-10 1998-01-20 Segmed, Inc. Apparatus for reducing the circumference of a vascular structure
US20020026201A1 (en) * 1994-09-16 2002-02-28 Foerster Seth A. Methods for defining and marking tissue
US6171329B1 (en) * 1994-12-19 2001-01-09 Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc. Self-expanding defect closure device and method of making and using
US5728861A (en) * 1995-01-24 1998-03-17 Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation Bisphosphite compound and method for producing aldehydes
US5868733A (en) * 1995-02-14 1999-02-09 Daig Corporation Guiding introducer system for use in the treatment of accessory pathways around the mitral valve using a retrograde approach
US5725542A (en) * 1995-03-09 1998-03-10 Yoon; Inbae Multifunctional spring clips and cartridges and applicators therefor
US5860992A (en) * 1996-01-31 1999-01-19 Heartport, Inc. Endoscopic suturing devices and methods
US5716370A (en) * 1996-02-23 1998-02-10 Williamson, Iv; Warren Means for replacing a heart valve in a minimally invasive manner
US5741301A (en) * 1996-02-28 1998-04-21 Pagedas; Anthony C. Self locking suture lock
US5860993A (en) * 1996-09-25 1999-01-19 Medworks Corp. Suture cutter
US6050936A (en) * 1997-01-02 2000-04-18 Myocor, Inc. Heart wall tension reduction apparatus
US6045497A (en) * 1997-01-02 2000-04-04 Myocor, Inc. Heart wall tension reduction apparatus and method
US7189199B2 (en) * 1997-01-02 2007-03-13 Myocor, Inc. Methods and devices for improving cardiac function in hearts
US5879371A (en) * 1997-01-09 1999-03-09 Elective Vascular Interventions, Inc. Ferruled loop surgical fasteners, instruments, and methods for minimally invasive vascular and endoscopic surgery
US6015428A (en) * 1997-06-03 2000-01-18 Anthony C. Pagedas Integrally formed suture and suture lock
US20020029080A1 (en) * 1997-12-17 2002-03-07 Myocor, Inc. Valve to myocardium tension members device and method
US6197017B1 (en) * 1998-02-24 2001-03-06 Brock Rogers Surgical, Inc. Articulated apparatus for telemanipulator system
US20030032979A1 (en) * 1998-07-29 2003-02-13 Myocor, Inc. Transventricular implant tools and devices
US6355030B1 (en) * 1998-09-25 2002-03-12 Cardiothoracic Systems, Inc. Instruments and methods employing thermal energy for the repair and replacement of cardiac valves
US6221084B1 (en) * 1999-01-15 2001-04-24 Pare Surgical, Inc. Knot tying apparatus having a notched thread cover and method for using same
US20030078603A1 (en) * 1999-03-01 2003-04-24 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Tissue connector apparatus and methods
US6514265B2 (en) * 1999-03-01 2003-02-04 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Tissue connector apparatus with cable release
US20040039442A1 (en) * 1999-04-09 2004-02-26 Evalve, Inc. Methods and apparatus for cardiac valve repair
US20040030382A1 (en) * 1999-04-09 2004-02-12 Evalve, Inc. Methods and apparatus for cardiac valve repair
US20070038293A1 (en) * 1999-04-09 2007-02-15 St Goar Frederick G Device and methods for endoscopic annuloplasty
US20040003819A1 (en) * 1999-04-09 2004-01-08 Evalve, Inc. Methods and apparatus for cardiac valve repair
US20020035361A1 (en) * 1999-06-25 2002-03-21 Houser Russell A. Apparatus and methods for treating tissue
US20030018358A1 (en) * 1999-06-25 2003-01-23 Vahid Saadat Apparatus and methods for treating tissue
US7186262B2 (en) * 1999-06-25 2007-03-06 Vahid Saadat Apparatus and methods for treating tissue
US6689164B1 (en) * 1999-10-12 2004-02-10 Jacques Seguin Annuloplasty device for use in minimally invasive procedure
US6378289B1 (en) * 1999-11-19 2002-04-30 Pioneer Surgical Technology Methods and apparatus for clamping surgical wires or cables
US20030033006A1 (en) * 2000-02-09 2003-02-13 Peter Phillips Device for the repair of arteries
US6551332B1 (en) * 2000-03-31 2003-04-22 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Multiple bias surgical fastener
US6533753B1 (en) * 2000-04-07 2003-03-18 Philip Haarstad Apparatus and method for the treatment of an occluded lumen
US20020042621A1 (en) * 2000-06-23 2002-04-11 Liddicoat John R. Automated annular plication for mitral valve repair
US6702826B2 (en) * 2000-06-23 2004-03-09 Viacor, Inc. Automated annular plication for mitral valve repair
US20020013621A1 (en) * 2000-07-27 2002-01-31 Robert Stobie Heart valve holder for constricting the valve commissures and methods of use
US6524338B1 (en) * 2000-08-25 2003-02-25 Steven R. Gundry Method and apparatus for stapling an annuloplasty band in-situ
US6716243B1 (en) * 2000-09-13 2004-04-06 Quickie, Inc. Concentric passive knotless suture terminator
US20030074012A1 (en) * 2000-10-10 2003-04-17 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Minimally invasive annuloplasty procedure and apparatus
US6991643B2 (en) * 2000-12-20 2006-01-31 Usgi Medical Inc. Multi-barbed device for retaining tissue in apposition and methods of use
US6997931B2 (en) * 2001-02-02 2006-02-14 Lsi Solutions, Inc. System for endoscopic suturing
US20040019378A1 (en) * 2001-04-24 2004-01-29 Hlavka Edwin J. Method and apparatus for performing catheter-based annuloplasty
US20060069429A1 (en) * 2001-04-24 2006-03-30 Spence Paul A Tissue fastening systems and methods utilizing magnetic guidance
US6718985B2 (en) * 2001-04-24 2004-04-13 Edwin J. Hlavka Method and apparatus for catheter-based annuloplasty using local plications
US6676702B2 (en) * 2001-05-14 2004-01-13 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Mitral valve therapy assembly and method
US20030009196A1 (en) * 2001-06-08 2003-01-09 James Peterson Suture lock having non-through bore capture zone
US20030069593A1 (en) * 2001-08-31 2003-04-10 Tremulis William S. Method and apparatus for valve repair
US20030060813A1 (en) * 2001-09-22 2003-03-27 Loeb Marvin P. Devices and methods for safely shrinking tissues surrounding a duct, hollow organ or body cavity
US20030078465A1 (en) * 2001-10-16 2003-04-24 Suresh Pai Systems for heart treatment
US7004958B2 (en) * 2002-03-06 2006-02-28 Cardiac Dimensions, Inc. Transvenous staples, assembly and method for mitral valve repair
US6699263B2 (en) * 2002-04-05 2004-03-02 Cook Incorporated Sliding suture anchor
US20060025787A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-02-02 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US6986775B2 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-01-17 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20080045977A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2008-02-21 John To Methods and devices for termination
US20080051837A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2008-02-28 John To Methods and devices for termination
US7666193B2 (en) * 2002-06-13 2010-02-23 Guided Delivery Sytems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20060058817A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-03-16 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20060025750A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-02-02 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20050065550A1 (en) * 2003-02-06 2005-03-24 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20050021054A1 (en) * 2003-07-25 2005-01-27 Coalescent Surgical, Inc. Sealing clip, delivery systems, and methods
US20060025784A1 (en) * 2003-09-04 2006-02-02 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20050055087A1 (en) * 2003-09-04 2005-03-10 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for cardiac annulus stabilization and treatment
US20050055052A1 (en) * 2003-09-10 2005-03-10 Linvatec Corporation Knotless suture anchor
US20070051377A1 (en) * 2003-11-12 2007-03-08 Medtronic Vascular, Inc. Cardiac valve annulus reduction system
US20080045982A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2008-02-21 John To Devices and methods for anchoring tissue
US20080058868A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2008-03-06 John To Devices and methods for anchoring tissue
US20080045983A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2008-02-21 John To Devices and methods for anchoring tissue
US20080051832A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2008-02-28 John To Devices and methods for anchoring tissue
US20080051810A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2008-02-28 John To Devices and methods for anchoring tissue
US7166127B2 (en) * 2003-12-23 2007-01-23 Mitralign, Inc. Tissue fastening systems and methods utilizing magnetic guidance
US20060015144A1 (en) * 2004-07-19 2006-01-19 Vascular Control Systems, Inc. Uterine artery occlusion staple
US7344544B2 (en) * 2005-03-28 2008-03-18 Cardica, Inc. Vascular closure system
US20070032820A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2007-02-08 Chen Chao-Chin Patent foramen ovale closure device
US20070005394A1 (en) * 2005-06-07 2007-01-04 Up Todate Inc. Method and apparatus for managing medical order sets
US20070005081A1 (en) * 2005-06-30 2007-01-04 Findlay Thomas R Iii System, apparatus, and method for fastening tissue
US20070010857A1 (en) * 2005-07-05 2007-01-11 Mitralign, Inc. Tissue anchor, anchoring system and methods of using the same
US20070055206A1 (en) * 2005-08-10 2007-03-08 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Methods and devices for deployment of tissue anchors
US20070049942A1 (en) * 2005-08-30 2007-03-01 Hindrichs Paul J Soft body tissue remodeling methods and apparatus
US20100049213A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2010-02-25 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Devices and methods for termination

Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8066766B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2011-11-29 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Methods and devices for termination
US20050107812A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2005-05-19 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20050107811A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2005-05-19 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20060025787A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2006-02-02 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US9636107B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2017-05-02 Ancora Heart, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US9468528B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2016-10-18 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US9226825B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2016-01-05 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US9072513B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2015-07-07 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Methods and devices for termination
US8641727B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2014-02-04 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20080234701A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2008-09-25 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US8287557B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2012-10-16 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Methods and devices for termination
US20080234728A1 (en) * 2002-06-13 2008-09-25 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US7883538B2 (en) 2002-06-13 2011-02-08 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Methods and devices for termination
US8287555B2 (en) 2003-02-06 2012-10-16 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20040193191A1 (en) * 2003-02-06 2004-09-30 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for heart valve repair
US20080234815A1 (en) * 2003-09-04 2008-09-25 Guided Delivery Systems, Inc. Devices and methods for cardiac annulus stabilization and treatment
US8343173B2 (en) 2003-09-04 2013-01-01 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Delivery devices and methods for heart valve repair
US7922762B2 (en) 2003-09-04 2011-04-12 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Devices and methods for cardiac annulus stabilization and treatment
US20080051832A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2008-02-28 John To Devices and methods for anchoring tissue
US20080058868A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2008-03-06 John To Devices and methods for anchoring tissue
US20080051810A1 (en) * 2003-12-19 2008-02-28 John To Devices and methods for anchoring tissue
US20060039756A1 (en) * 2004-08-19 2006-02-23 Bernd Lemke Self-propelled device for milling road surfaces
US20070068392A1 (en) * 2005-09-27 2007-03-29 Kim Sung S Durable coffee pot system
US8790367B2 (en) 2008-02-06 2014-07-29 Guided Delivery Systems Inc. Multi-window guide tunnel
US9706996B2 (en) 2008-02-06 2017-07-18 Ancora Heart, Inc. Multi-window guide tunnel
US9616197B2 (en) 2009-01-20 2017-04-11 Ancora Heart, Inc. Anchor deployment devices and related methods
US9375312B2 (en) 2010-07-09 2016-06-28 Highlife Sas Transcatheter atrio-ventricular valve prosthesis
US9861350B2 (en) 2010-09-03 2018-01-09 Ancora Heart, Inc. Devices and methods for anchoring tissue

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US7753858B2 (en) 2010-07-13 grant
US20060025750A1 (en) 2006-02-02 application
US20110172754A1 (en) 2011-07-14 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6743239B1 (en) Devices with a bendable tip for medical procedures
US6960229B2 (en) Device and method for modifying the shape of a body organ
US7311729B2 (en) Device and method for modifying the shape of a body organ
US8277502B2 (en) Tissue anchor for annuloplasty device
US7335213B1 (en) Apparatus and methods for heart valve repair
US7632308B2 (en) Methods, devices, and kits for treating mitral valve prolapse
US7442207B2 (en) Device, system, and method for treating cardiac valve regurgitation
US7988725B2 (en) Segmented ring placement
US6746472B2 (en) Endoluminal anchor
US20040010305A1 (en) Device and method for modifying the shape of a body organ
US20130226289A1 (en) Percutaneous annuloplasty system with anterior-posterior adjustment
US20110184510A1 (en) Tricuspid valve repair using tension
US7241310B2 (en) Method and apparatus for reducing mitral regurgitation
US7766812B2 (en) Methods and devices for improving mitral valve function
US20080065205A1 (en) Retrievable implant and method for treatment of mitral regurgitation
US7655040B2 (en) Cardiac valve annulus reduction system
US20110166649A1 (en) Annuloplasty devices and methods of deliver therefor
US20110301698A1 (en) Method for guide-wire based advancement of a rotation assembly
US20120035712A1 (en) Method and apparatus for tricuspid valve repair using tension
US8545553B2 (en) Over-wire rotation tool
US20070093869A1 (en) Device, system, and method for contracting tissue in a mammalian body
US6695866B1 (en) Mitral and tricuspid valve repair
US20040186566A1 (en) Body tissue remodeling methods and apparatus
US7083628B2 (en) Single catheter mitral valve repair device and method for use
US7452325B2 (en) Catheter-based tissue remodeling devices and methods