US20100081649A9 - Treatment of cancers with methylol-containing compounds and at least one electrolyte - Google Patents

Treatment of cancers with methylol-containing compounds and at least one electrolyte Download PDF

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US20100081649A9
US20100081649A9 US11313846 US31384605A US2010081649A9 US 20100081649 A9 US20100081649 A9 US 20100081649A9 US 11313846 US11313846 US 11313846 US 31384605 A US31384605 A US 31384605A US 2010081649 A9 US2010081649 A9 US 2010081649A9
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taurolidine
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combination
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US20060160792A1 (en )
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Rolf Pfirrmann
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Geistlich Sohne A G fur Chemische Industrie
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61KPREPARATIONS FOR MEDICAL, DENTAL, OR TOILET PURPOSES
    • A61K31/00Medicinal preparations containing organic active ingredients
    • A61K31/33Heterocyclic compounds
    • A61K31/395Heterocyclic compounds having nitrogen as a ring hetero atom, e.g. guanethidine, rifamycins
    • A61K31/54Heterocyclic compounds having nitrogen as a ring hetero atom, e.g. guanethidine, rifamycins having six-membered rings with at least one nitrogen and one sulfur as the ring hetero atoms, e.g. sulthiame
    • A61K31/549Heterocyclic compounds having nitrogen as a ring hetero atom, e.g. guanethidine, rifamycins having six-membered rings with at least one nitrogen and one sulfur as the ring hetero atoms, e.g. sulthiame having two or more nitrogen atoms in the same ring, e.g. hydrochlorothiazide
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S514/00Drug, bio-affecting and body treating compositions
    • Y10S514/885Immune response affecting drug
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S514/00Drug, bio-affecting and body treating compositions
    • Y10S514/908Leukemia

Abstract

A method of inhibiting growth of a tumor cell in a mammal may include steps of administering to the mammal a first solution including a tumor-inhibiting methylol-containing compound, the first solution further including a first combination having a plurality of physiologically acceptable electrolytes or a second combination having at least one amino acid in combination with at least one physiologically acceptable electrolyte. Alternatively, another solution may be administered to the mammal containing a tumor-inhibiting methylol-containing compound, while concurrently administering to the mammal a further solution including the first combination with the plurality of physiologically acceptable electrolytes or the second combination with at least one said amino acid in combination with at least one physiologically acceptable electrolyte.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 10/950,672, filed Sep. 28, 2004, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 10/253,907, filed Sep. 25, 2002, which also claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/324,533, filed Sep. 26, 2001, which also is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 10/934,474, filed Sep. 7, 2004, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 10/109,058, filed Mar. 29, 2002, which also claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/280,748, filed Apr. 3, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/281,710, filed Apr. 6, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/281,711, filed Apr. 6, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/281,712, filed Apr. 6, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/281,713, filed Apr. 6, 2001, U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/284,933, filed Apr. 20, 2001, and U.S. Provisional Application 60/284,934, filed Apr. 20, 2001. This application further is a continuation-in-part of U.S. Ser. No. 10/424,102, filed Apr. 28, 2003, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,815,441 B1, which is a divisional of U.S. application Ser. No. 09/583,902, filed Jun. 1, 2000, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,479,481 B1, which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/137,421 filed Jun. 4, 1999, and which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/151,050 filed Aug. 27, 1999, and which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/167,681 filed Nov. 29, 1999, and which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/174,607, filed Jan. 5, 2000 and which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/182,200 filed Feb. 14, 2000.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The invention relates to the use of methylol-containing compounds, such as taurolidine and taurultam, for the treatment of cancer.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Methylol transfer agents, such as the antibacterial and anti-toxin drug taurolidine and the related product taurultam, have been shown to exert a modifying effect on the toxicity of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) which is used, inter alia, in the treatment of tumors. Furthermore, the action of methylol transfer agents has been shown to be selective in that the growth of normal cell-lines was not significantly inhibited.
  • Taurolidine acts by transferring three methylol groups at the site of action, taurultam being an intermediate metabolite which itself transfers a single methylol group with liberation of the very well tolerated compound taurinamide. Thus, the two compounds act by essentially the same mechanism. It should be noted that methylol transfer is to be contrasted with methyl transfer which is characteristic of many highly toxic anti-tumor drugs. Taurolidine and taurultam have low toxicity and are not cytotoxic against normal cells.
  • Programmed cell death is an evolutionary conserved biological principle in the regulation of cell numbers. Sensitive cells contain death receptors which are activated when the appropriate ligands are secreted from neighboring cells. A prominent system in programmed cell death is Fas-ligand mediated apoptosis. Fas, also known as CD 95/APO-l, is a cell surface receptor and a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily which mediates apoptosis in sensitive cells upon oligomerization by the Fas-ligand (FasL).
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In accordance with the present invention, a method of inhibiting growth of a tumor cell in a mammal comprises:
  • A) Administering to said mammal a first solution comprising a tumor-inhibiting methylol-containing compound, said first solution further comprising a first combination comprising a plurality of physiologically acceptable electrolytes or a second combination comprising at least one amino acid in combination with at least one physiologically acceptable electrolyte; or
  • B) administering to said mammal another solution containing said tumor-inhibiting methylol-containing compound, and concurrently administering to said mammal a further solution comprising said first combination comprising said plurality of physiologically acceptable electrolytes or said second combination comprising at least one said amino acid in combination with at least one said physiologically acceptable electrolyte.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The present invention relates to the ability of methylol transfer agents, such as taurolidine, to induce cell toxicity, and to enhance Fas-ligand mediated apoptosis in combination therapy. Both taurolidine and its congener taurultam enhance the apoptotic effect of Fas-ligand in cancer cells at drug concentrations which per se show practically no effect on cell viability. In the human malignant glioma cell line LN-229 cell viability was reduced directly following incubation with taurolidine or taurultam alone. This effect enhanced the destruction of LN-229 cells by Fas-ligand. Thus, the use of methylol transfer agents to induce apoptotic cell death provides a means for treating cancer.
  • The two cell lines LN-18 and LN-229 represent validated model systems for apoptotic cell death with different sensitivities to Fas-ligand. These cell lines were therefore used to test the potential interaction of such compounds with the apoptotic pathway. The viability of the human malignant glioma cells LN-18 and LN-229 is differently affected by taurultam and taurolidine. The LN-18 cells, which are highly sensitive to Fas-ligand induced apoptosis, remained unaffected by taurultam at all concentrations tested (5, 20, 100 μg/ml) (Example 6). Taurolidine was able to only slightly reduce the viability of LN-18 cells at the highest concentration tested (100 μg/ml). Thus, the threshold for the destruction of LN-18 cells was reached at 0.01% of taurolidine. In contrast, LN-229 cells showed a much higher sensitivity to these drugs. In contrast to LN-18 cells, both taurultam and taurolidine by themselves (100 μg/ml) strongly decreased the viability of LN-229 cells. Taurolidine (100 μg/ml) caused a dramatic death of LN-229 cells (70%) and taurultam (100 μg/ml) was able to reduce the viability of LN-229 cells by 30%. At the highest concentration tested (100 μg/ml), taurolidine alone was about as effective as the Fas-ligand in inducing cell death. Thus, taurolidine and taurultam have the ability to destroy human malignant cells.
  • In accordance with the present invention, a method of treating cancer is provided, whereby apoptotic death of a neoplastic cell may be induced by contacting said cell with an apoptosis-inducing amount of a methylol-containing compound.
  • One embodiment comprises administration of a methylol transfer agent in at least two dosing cycles, each cycle comprising an administration phase and a non-administration (rest) phase, the administration phase comprising administration, preferably by infusion, of a daily dose of the methylol transfer agent for about 1 to 8 days, followed by a non-administration (rest) phase of about 1 to 14 days during which no methylol transfer agent is administered.
  • In another embodiment, liver cancer is treated by intravenous infusion of solutions containing a methylol transfer agent, by direct administration through a catheter installed into a hepatic vessel, such as the hepatic artery, the portal vein, or the gastroduodenal artery.
  • In another embodiment, tumors of the central nervous system, such as glioma/glioblastoma, are treated.
  • Preferred methylol transfer agents are taurolidine, taurultam, and mixtures thereof.
  • The method may be carried out by administering to a mammal suffering from cancer, compositions containing an active methylol-containing compound, at a dose sufficient to induce death of neoplastic cells by apoptosis. By “methylol-containing compound,” or “methylol transfer agent,” is meant a compound which contains or is capable of producing a methylol molecule under physiological conditions. A methylol-containing compound is characterized as having a R—CH2—OH group in which R is an alkyl, aryl or hetero group. The invention also includes the use of compounds capable of producing or being converted into a compound containing a R—CH2—OH structure.
  • Methylol transfer agents include methylol-containing compounds such as taurolidine and taurultam, and their derivatives. The compounds taurolidine and taurultam are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,210,083. Other suitable methylol-containing compounds include taurinamide derivatives and urea derivatives. Examples of derivatives of taurolidine, taurultam, taurinamide and urea useful in the present invention can be found in WO 01/39763A2. Particularly preferred methylol transfer agents for utilization in accordance with the present invention are taurolidine, taurultam, biologically active derivatives thereof and mixtures thereof.
  • Alternatively, the compound is a taurinamide derivative, or a urea derivative. Examples of derivatives of taurolidine, taurultam, taurinamide and urea useful in the present invention can be found in WO 01/39763A2.
  • Other methylol-containing compounds suitable for inducing apoptotic death of cancer cells include but are not limited to 1,3,-dimethylol-5,5-dimethylhydantoin, hexamethylene tetramine, or noxythiolin. By derivative of taurolidine or taurultam is meant a sulfonamide compound which possesses at least 10% of the neoplastic activity of taurolidine or taurultam, respectively. A sulfonamide compound is one having a R2N—SO2R′ formula. Derivatives of the compounds described herein may differ structurally from a reference compound, e.g., taurolidine or taurultam, but preferably retain at least 50% of the biological activity, e.g., induction of apoptotic cell death, of the reference compound. Preferably, a derivative has at least 75%, 85%, 95%, 99% or 100% of the biological activity of the reference compound. In some cases, the biological activity of the derivative may exceed the level of activity of the reference compound. Derivatives may also possess characteristics or activities not possessed by the reference compound. For example, a derivative may have reduced toxicity, prolonged clinical half-life, or improved ability to cross the blood-brain barrier.
  • Treatment of an autologous tumor, e.g., a tumor of the central nervous system (CNS), is carried out by administering to a mammal, e.g., a human patient, a methylol-containing compound. The compound is administered systemically, e.g., orally or intravenously, or infused directly to the site of the tumor, e.g., to the brain or cerebrospinal fluid. An erodible or resorbable solid matrix such as a wafer or sponge can be implanted directly into brain tissue.
  • Cancers to which the present invention may be applicable include glioma, neuroblastoma, astrocytoma, carcinomatous meningitis, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, central nervous system (CNS) cancer, lung cancer, gastric cancer, esophageal cancer, urinary bladder cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, melanoma, renal cell cancer and metastases thereof. Other cancers against which the method of the present invention is effective include other carcinomas, sarcomas or lymphomas, cancers of the head and neck, liver cancer, breast cancer, mesothelioma and pancreatic cancer.
  • Particularly preferred embodiments involve treatment of cancers selected from the group consisting of glioma, neuroblastoma, astrocytoma, central nervous system (CNS) cancer, and liver cancer, as well as inhibition of tumor metastases thereof.
  • It is particularly beneficial to use taurolidine and/or taurultam, at concentrations sufficient to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, to prevent the spread of metastases, especially following surgical removal of tumors. The mammalian subjects are typically humans.
  • The invention also includes the use of taurolidine and/or taurultam, at concentrations sufficient to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, for the treatment or prophylaxis of tumors in mammalian subjects.
  • The invention further includes the use of taurolidine and/or taurultam, at concentrations sufficient to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, for the preparation of pharmaceutical compositions for the treatment or prophylaxis of tumors in mammalian subjects by induction of apoptosis.
  • Effective dosage amounts of a methylol transfer agent in accordance with the present invention may comprise pharmaceutical dosage units within the range of about 0.1-1,000 mg/kg, preferably 150-450 mg/kg per day, and most preferably 300-450 mg/kg per day. Alternatively, the dosages can be administered on a grams/day basis, from about 2-60 g/day. Preferred doses may be in the range of about 2.5-30 g/day taurolidine, 4-60 g/day taurultam, or a mixture thereof. Most preferred doses are in the range of about 10-20 g/day taurolidine, 20-40 g/day taurultam, or a mixture thereof.
  • Suitable formulations for injection or infusion may comprise an isotonic solution containing one or more solubilizing agents, e.g., polyols such as glucose, in order to provide solutions of increased taurolidine or taurultam concentration. Such solutions are described in EP 253662B1. The concentration of taurolidine or taurultam in such solutions may be in the range 1-60 g/liter.
  • Methylol transfer agents are generally poorly soluble in water. Thus, it is often required to administer relatively large volumes of aqueous solutions containing taurolidine or taurultam, for example 10 g to 30 g of taurolidine and/or taurultam. Preferred solutions for administration in accordance with the present invention contain from about 0.5-2% taurolidine and/or taurultam. It may be convenient to administer these compounds by infusion in view of the relatively large volumes concerned, conveniently at intervals throughout the day.
  • In accordance with one embodiment, tumor cell growth in a mammal is inhibited by administering to the mammal a first solution comprising a tumor-inhibiting methylol-containing compound, the first solution further comprising a first combination including a plurality of physiologically acceptable electrolytes or a second combination comprising at least one amino acid in combination with at least one physiologically acceptable electrolyte.
  • In accordance with a second embodiment, tumor cell growth in a mammal is inhibited by administering to the mammal another solution containing the tumor-inhibiting methylol-containing compound, and concurrently administering to the mammal a further solution comprising the first combination including the plurality of physiologically acceptable electrolytes, or the second combination comprising at least one amino acid in combination with at least one physiologically acceptable electrolyte.
  • The methylol-containing compound preferably is taurolidine, taurultam or a mixture thereof. When the first above-mentioned solution is administered, the first solution preferably contains the first combination or the second combination at a concentration sufficient to render the first solution substantially isotonic. When the above-mentioned another solution is administered, prior to administration to the mammal, the above-mentioned another solution preferably is blended with the further solution so as to form a mixed solution which is substantially isotonic. A “Y” connector can be utilized for such blending so as to connect a separate bottle of a solution containing the methylol-containing compound with a separate bottle containing the solution of electrolytes or at least one amino acid and at least one electrolyte, to thereby combine the different solutions into a single IV line for delivery to a patient.
  • The present invention may utilize stable aqueous solutions containing taurolidine at a concentration within the range of about 1.5-3% by weight. The solutions are rendered stable by including therein a stability-enhancing effective amount of at least one physiologically acceptable electrolyte so that the resulting solution is substantially isotonic. Suitable electrolyte(s) provide ions selected from the group consisting of Na+, K+, Mg++, Cl, H2PO4 , Acetate, HCO3 , and mixtures thereof. In preferred embodiments, the electrolyte(s) are selected from the group consisting of NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, NaHCO3, and mixtures thereof.
  • In preferred embodiments, taurolidine is present in the solution within a range of about 1.5-2.5% by weight, more preferably within the range of about 1.7-2.3% by weight, even more preferably within the range of about 1.8-2.2% by weight, still more preferably within the range of about 1.9-2.1% by weight, most preferably about 2% by weight.
  • For example, one composition for use in accordance with the present invention comprises an isotonic ringer solution including about 2% by weight taurolidine. An alternative to use of ringer solution is full electrolyte solution, which contains phosphates not present in ringer solution.
  • In particularly preferred embodiments, a composition for use in accordance with the present invention additionally includes sufficient physiologically acceptable colloidal material (colloid) so as to also effectively render the inventive solution iso-oncotic. The colloidal material can be polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), hydroxy ethyl starch (HES), or the like. Preferred colloidal materials include low molecular weight PVP, having an average molecular weight within the range of about 1,000-15,000, preferably within the range of about 1,000-13,000, more preferably about 9,000. A particularly preferred PVP for use in accordance with the present invention is Kollidon or Povidone. Preferred amounts of colloidal material in the solution are within the range of about 1-10% by weight, preferably about 3-7% by weight, most preferably about 5% by weight.
  • One preferred solution for use in accordance with the present invention includes the following in percentages by weight in water for injection:
  • 2% taurolidine
  • 5% Kollidon
  • 0.4% NaCl
  • 0.005% KCl
  • 0.0066% CaCl2
  • 0.005% NaHCO3
  • Isotonic taurolidine solutions for use in accordance with the present invention also can be prepared so as to include at least one amino acid, wherein the amounts of other electrolytes added to the solution are reduced in proportion to the amount of the one or more amino acid(s) added, so as to maintain isotonicity. Preferred amounts of amino acid(s) in the solution are within the range of about 0.1-3% by weight, more preferably within the range of about 0.2-2% by weight, still more preferably within the range of about 0.3-1% by weight, even more preferably within the range of about 0.4-0.6% by weight, most preferably about 0.5% by weight. Taurine is particularly preferred. One exemplary composition in accordance with this embodiment, in water for injection, is as follows in percentages by weight:
  • 2% taurolidine
  • 5% Kollidon
  • 0.5% taurine
  • 0.26% NaCl
  • 0.0033% KCl
  • 0.004% CaCl2
  • 0.003% NaHCO3
  • Solutions for use in accordance with the invention may have a pH within the range of about 7.1-7.9. The above solution before sterilization has a pH of about 7.8, and after sterilization has a pH of about 7.2-7.38. Ideally, a solution in accordance with the present invention has a pH of about 7.4.
  • In yet another embodiment, taurultam is substituted for amino acid(s) such as taurine in isotonic taurolidine solutions according to the invention. For example, about 0.1-1% by weight taurultam may be substituted for amino acid(s) such as taurine in isotonic 1.5-3% taurolidine solutions, preferably about 0.2-0.5% by weight taurultam.
  • Administration, preferably by infusion, of the total daily dose can be carried out at a consistent rate over 24 hours, or according to a more rapid infusion schedule of the dose in portions, with breaks between each portion of the dose, e.g. infusion of 250 ml of a 2% taurolidine solution (5 g dose) over 2 hours, followed by a brief break of 4 hours, repeated over the course of a 24 hour infusion period to achieve a total daily dose of 20 g. Alternatively, 250 ml of a 2% taurolidine solution may be infused over one hour, with a one hour break between dose portions, and repeated until the daily dose is achieved, such that the total daily dose is provided over the course of less than 24 hours (i.e., approximately half the day), with no infusion occurring during the remainder of the day.
  • In accordance with one embodiment, four bottles (250 ml each) of 2% taurolidine solution are administered intravenously to patients with cancer, at a rate of 40 drops per minute, one bottle every six hours. The therapy cycle generally is an administration phase of daily infusions for one week, followed by a rest phase of two weeks. Total treatment generally is at least two such cycles. Efficacy of taurolidine 2% solution administered intravenously has been found to be particularly good with 25-28 bottles of 250 ml taurolidine 2% solution being instilled per cycle.
  • In accordance with a second embodiment of the invention, the administration phase comprises a daily regimen whereby 250 ml of taurolidine 2% solution is administered over the course of 2 hours, followed by a four hour break, repeated over 24 hours to achieve the total daily dose.
  • In accordance with a third embodiment of the invention, the administration phase comprises a daily regimen whereby 250 ml of 2% taurolidine solution is infused over one hour, followed by a one-hour break, and repeated until the daily dose is achieved. If the total dose is 20 g (for example), this regimen would provide the daily dose with four 250 ml infusions of 2% taurolidine over a 7 hour time span. No infusion occurs for the remainder of the day. Infusion rates can be lengthened (e.g., to 250 ml over 90 or 120 minutes) if the patient shows an elevated liver count.
  • In particularly preferred embodiments, patients are subjected to dosing cycles having an administration phase of at least 1 day, more preferably at least 3 continuous days, and up to about 8 continuous days, each administration phase being followed by a non-administration phase of about 1 day to about 4 weeks, e.g., 1-14 days, or even 3, 4 or more weeks, during which the methylol-containing compound is not administered to the patient. During each administration phase, the methylol-containing compound is administered each day. For example, administration phases of 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and/or 8 days can be utilized, and non-administration phases of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and/or 14 days may be utilized. At least 2 dosing cycles are utilized, preferably 5-10 or more dosing cycles are utilized. For example, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 or more sequential dosing cycles can be utilized. Such a regimen has shown surprising and unexpected results with patients. In one particularly preferred embodiment, 6 dosing cycles, each with administration phases of 5 days are utilized, with each administration phase separated by a non-administration phase of 2 days. Preferably, during each day of administration, 250 ml of taurolidine 2% solution is intravenously administered to the patient 4 times daily. Such a regimen has surprisingly and unexpectedly resulted in a marked tumor size reduction with disappearance of perifocal edema in a patient with inoperable glioblastoma infiltration of the basal ganglia.
  • In another embodiment, a non-administration phase may be 1, 2, 3, 4 or more weeks in length, e.g., about 2-4 weeks. For example, in patients with recurrent cancers such as of the stomach and pancreas may be administered sequential dosing cycles having an administration phase of 3-8 continuous days, e.g., 7 days, with, for example, 250 ml taurolidine 2% solution infused 4 times daily, followed by a non-administration phase of 1, 2, 3, 4, or more weeks, e.g., 3 weeks. As in the previous embodiments, at least 2 dosing cycles are utilized, preferably 5-10 or more dosing cycles.
  • In a further embodiment, concomitant administration of anti-convulsants and/or anti-oedema therapy and/or antibiotics and/or fluid and electrolyte replacement is carried out.
  • 1. Anti-Convulsants
  • Preferably, the patient should be stabilized on anti-convulsive medications prior to treatment, to avoid complications during the treatment. This can conveniently be administered in part on an out-patient basis, as well as to prevent any emergency stabilization on an undesired medication. Valproinic acid is the agent of first choice; the dose should be determined in accordance with blood level checks and administered in 2 single doses. Normally, a dose of 1200 mg to 1500 mg is required. If a treatment with valproinic acid is not sufficient, a combination treatment with lamotrigin is possible. In case of allergies or if valproinic acid is not tolerated, the primary stabilization is to be done with lamotrigin. Phenyloin and carbamazepin are contra-indicated.
  • 2. Anti-Oedema Therapy
  • An anti-oedema therapy may also be administered, but only if absolutely necessary, because otherwise focal neurological symptoms may occur or become intensified, or intracerebral pressure may symptoms develop. Dexamethason should be given before or after the taurolidine was administered. The anti-oedema therapy should be administered with dexamethason, using the lowest possible dose. To protect the stomach a concomitant therapy with ranitidine 1×150 mg/day may be given. If stomach problems are observed with this therapy, an alternative treatment with antra 1-2×20 mg/day should be administered.
  • In cases of massively elevated intracerebral pressure and insufficient effectiveness of dexamethason, a therapy with mannitol, in particular at a dosage of up to 4×250 ml/day, is possible.
  • 3. Antibiotic Therapy
  • A calculated antibiotic treatment with one of the subsequently listed antibiotics may be given, until the arrival of the sensitivity test.
  • Urinary Tract Infection:
  • primary: Cotrimoxazol
  • alternative: Doxycyclin
  • Pneumonia:
  • primary: Erythromycin
  • alternative: Doxycyclin
  • The following antibiotics should only be used if absolutely necessary (in the most severe, life-threatening infections) and if the sensitivity situation warrants it: Chino lone, penicillin, cephalosporin
  • 4. Fluid and Electrolyte Replacement in Connection with Intravenous Taurolidine 2% Therapy
  • An amount of 250 ml of full electrolyte solution is preferably be given at the same time and with the same infusion speed parallel to the infusion with 250 ml taurolidine 2%. Electrolytes and blood count should be monitored twice per day, and the central vein pressure should be checked once daily.
  • If a hypernatraemia is observed, first, it should be determined whether dehydration is the cause. Diuretic agents should only be used if fluid is replaced at the same time and after dehydration was ruled out as the reason.
  • The methylol-containing compound is administered alone or in combination with one or more additional antineoplastic agents. In one preferred embodiment, the supplemental agent kills tumors cells by a mechanism other than apoptosis. For example, an antimetabolite, a purine or pyrimidine analogue, an alkylating agent, crosslinking agent (e.g., a platinum compound), and intercalating agent, and/or an antibiotic is administered in a combination therapy regimen. The supplemental drug is given before, after, or simultaneously with the methylol-containing agent. For example, the methylol transfer agent can be co-administered with a fluoro-pyrimidine, such as 5-fluoro-uracil (5-FU). Effective daily dosage amounts of a fluoro-pyrimidine may be in the range of about 0.1-1,000 mg per pharmaceutical dosage unit. Effective dosage amounts of 5-FU also may be in the range of about 100-5,000 mg/m2 body surface area, preferably about 200-1,000 mg/m2 body surface area, more preferably about 500-600 mg/m2 body surface area. 5-FU typically is provided in 250 mg or 500 mg ampules for injection, or 250 mg capsules for oral administration.
  • In another embodiment, the apoptotic effect of methylol transfer agents can be enhanced by co-administration with a Fas-ligand. A Fas-ligand polypeptide is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,858,990. Therapeutically effective amounts of Fas-ligand generally will be within a range of about 0.01-1,000 mg/kg patient body weight, preferably about 0.1-200 mg 1 kg patient body weight, most preferable about 0.2-20 mg/kg patient body weight. The therapeutically effective amounts can be administered as dosages once per day, or multiple times per day such as two, three, four or more times per day.
  • In LN-18 cells taurultam (100 μg/ml) clearly enhanced apoptosis induced by 0.4 or 2.0 vol. % Fas-ligand. Example 1. This is the more striking as taurultam by itself did not impair the cell viability at this concentration. Thus, taurultam is able to enhance the effectiveness of the Fas-ligand induced apoptotic pathway. The same holds for taurolidine (100 μg/ml), although taurolidine alone did reduce cell viability at this concentration. Example 1. These results support the view that the apoptotic affect of taurultam and taurolidine is enhanced by Fas-ligand. When taurultam or taurolidine at a concentration of 100 μg/ml are combined with Fas-ligand, the total cell loss represents itself as the sum of that of Fas-ligand and of taurolidine or taurultam alone. Thus, the cytotoxicity of taurultam and taurolidine at this concentration appears to be additive to the Fas-mediated apoptosis. At lower concentrations, the apoptopic effect of taurolidine and taurultam are greatly enhanced, beyond an additive effect, by co-administration with the Fas-ligand.
  • The invention also includes treating a drug resistant tumor, e.g., a multiple drug resistant (MDR) tumor, in a mammal by administering to the mammal a methylol-containing compound. The tumor to be treated is a carcinoma or sarcoma. The drug resistant tumor is selected from the group consisting of a solid tumor, a non-solid tumor, and a lymphoma. For example, the drug resistant tumor is a breast cancer, ovarian cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer, CNS cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, urinary bladder cancer, lymphoma, leukemia, or sarcoma.
  • According to another embodiment, a solution containing taurolidine and/or taurultam further contains taurin, in an amount within a range of about 1-20 g/l, preferably about 5 g/l.
  • A further embodiment provides methods for treating both primary liver tumors and metastases thereof, by direct administration of a solution containing a methylol transfer agent to the liver through a catheter installed in a hepatic vessel. By administering the methylol transfer agent in a solution that assists in maintaining liver function and non-ischemic conditions, therapy is directed to the affected organ, without unduly subjecting the organ to undue stress.
  • For treatment of primary liver tumors, the solution of methylol transfer agent may be administered through the hepatic artery, such that the therapeutic agent is carried into the organ for maximum effect. Alternatively, the solution can be supplied via the gastroduodenal artery, for delivery to the liver through the hepatic artery. The preferred solution for use in this embodiment is one that assists in maintaining liver function and minimizing stress to the organ associated with infusion of large volumes of methylol transfer agent solution. Solutions which may be used in the present invention are set forth in the Examples.
  • EXAMPLE 1 Isotonic Solution 2% Taurolidine
  • One suitable composition for intravenous drop infusion is shown below.
  • Isotonic sterile solution, 100 ml:
  • 2.0 g Taurolidine
  • 5.0 g PVP 16 PF UP aqua dest. ad solut. 100 ml. PH 7.2-7.3
  • Sterile-filtered and steam sterilization.
  • EXAMPLE 2 Isotonic Taurolin® Solution 2% Taurolidine with Taurin and electrolytes
  • Another suitable composition for intravenous drop infusion is shown below.
  • Isotonic sterile solution, 100 ml:
  • 2.0 g Taurolidine
  • 5.0 g PVP 17 PF UP
  • 0.5 g Taurin
  • 0.3 g Sodium chloride
  • Sterile-filtered and steam sterilization
  • EXAMPLE 3 Isotonic Taurolin® Ringer Solution 2% Taurolidine with Taurin and Electrolytes
  • Another suitable composition for intravenous drop infusion is shown below.
  • Isotonic sterile solution, 100 ml:
  • 2.0 g Taurolidine
  • 5.0 g PVP 17 PF UP
  • 0.5 g Taurin
  • 0.26 g Sodium chloride
  • 0.0033 g Potassium chloride
  • 0.004 g Calcium chloride 2H2O
  • 0.003 g Sodium hydrogen carbonate
  • Sterile-filtered and steam sterilization
  • EXAMPLE 4 Taurolin® Ringer-Lactate 2% Taurolidine with Taurin and Electrolytes
  • Another suitable composition for intravenous drop infusion is shown below.
  • Isotonic sterile solution, 100 ml:
  • 2.0 g Taurolidine
  • 5.0 g PVP 17 PF UP
  • 0.5 g Taurin
  • 0.20 g Sodium chloride
  • 0.013 g Potassium chloride
  • 0.009 g Calcium chloride 2H2O
  • 0.0033 g Sodium lactate 50% solution (Pharmacopeia Europea)
  • Sterile-filtered and steam sterilization
  • EXAMPLE 5 Taurultam Solution
  • One preferred solution comprises:
    Lactobionic acid 35.830 g
    Adenosine 1.340 g
    Raffinose Pentahydrate 17.830 g
    Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) PL 40/0.5 50.000 g
    Glutathione 0.929 g
    Allopurinol 0.136 g
    Taurultam 10.000 g
    Kcl 5.200 g
    MgSO4 7H2O 1.230 g
    NaOH 25% GV to pH 7.8
    NaOH pellets Merck 6482
    Distilled water 900 ml
  • The solution was sterilized from 16 minutes at 121° C. The pH after sterilization was 7.2, and pH of ready to use solution was 7.47.
  • EXAMPLE 6 Inducement of Apoptosis
  • Taurolidine and taurultam were tested for their ability to enhance apoptosis or induce cell death, alone and in combination with the Fas-ligand, in human malignant glioma cell lines. The two cell lines LN-18 and LN-229 represent validated model systems for apoptotic cell death with different sensitivities to Fas-ligand (Schlappbach and Fontana, 1997). These cell lines were therefore used to test the potential interaction of taurultam or taurolidine with the apoptotic pathway.
  • 1) Reagents
  • Taurolidine (Batch Nr. 41692/7) and taurultam (Batch E/39024/4) were provided by Geistlich Pharma AG, Wolhusen, Switzerland. DME-Culture Medium and fetal bovine serum (FBS) were purchased from Gibco BRL, Basel, Switzerland. The cell proliferation assay WST-1 was purchased from Roche Diagnostics, Rotkreuz, Switzerland. Fas-ligand (supernatant from an overexpression system) and the human glioma cell lines LN-18 and LN-229 were kindly provided by Prof. A. Fontana, Institute of Clinical Immunology, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland
  • 2) Cell Lines
  • The cell lines LN-18 and LN-229 were cultured at 37° C. and 5% CO2 in DMEM containing 5% FBS and 2 mM glutamin (10 cm plates NUNCLON 15035). In the experiments in which Fas-ligand was tested by itself, about 1×104 cells were plated per well in 96-well plates (NUNCLON 167008) resulting in a confluency of about 60% on the following day (17 h incubation). In all other experiments about 1.5×104 cells were plated which resulted in a confluency of about 90% on the following day (17 h incubation). Fas-ligand was added as supernatant indicated as % volume (vol %) of total culture volume.
  • 3) Cell Viability Test
  • LN-18 and LN-229 cells were incubated in 50 μl medium in the absence or presence of either Fas-ligand, taurultam, taurolidine or respective combinations thereof. After a 17 h incubation the cell viability was determined by adding 50 μl medium containing a double concentrated WST-1 reagent. The coloration resulting from the activity of the mitochondrial succinate reductase, was measured in an ELISA reader at 450 nm using a reference wavelength of 690 nm.
  • The human malignant glioma cell lines LN-18 and LN-229 were used to test the ability of taurolidine and taurultam to affect cell viability and/or to enhance Fas-ligand induced apoptosis. The two human malignant glioma cell lines, LN-18 and LN-229 had previously been reported to display different sensitivity to the apoptotic effect of Fas-ligand (Schlappbach and Fontana, 1997).
  • 1) Sensitivity of LN-18 and LN-229 to Fas-Ligand
  • In a first set of experiments it was investigated whether the different sensitivity of LN-18 and LN-229 to Fas-ligand was reproduced under our experimental conditions. The two cell lines were incubated over night (17 h) in 96 well plates containing 1×104 cells per well with increasing concentrations of Fas-ligand (3.1, 6.25, 12.5, 25.0 and 50 vol. %). In the absence of Fas-ligand the cells reached about 60% confluency after overnight incubation. In the presence of Fas-ligand LN-18 was extremely sensitive, displaying more than 90% loss of cell viability in the presence of only 6.25 vol. % Fas-ligand. Even at 3.1%, an approximately 85% reduction in cell viability was observed. In contrast, the viability of LN-229 cells was not greatly affected by 6.25 vol. % Fas-ligand (approximately 10% reduction) and was reduced only at higher concentrations with a maximum of 40% cell loss in the presence of the highest concentration of Fas-ligand tested (50 vol. %).
  • 2) Influence of Taurultam on Fas-Ligand Induced Apoptosis in LN-18-Cells
  • LN-18 cells were incubated for 17 h with increasing concentrations of taurultam (5, 20, 100 μg/ml) in the absence and presence of two concentrations of Fas-ligand (0.4 vol. % and 2.0 vol. %). Taurultam by itself even at the highest concentration tested (100 μg/ml) did not affect the cell viability (an approximately 5% reduction was observed at 5 and 20 μg/ml, and viability actually appeared to increase at 100 μg/ml). In the presence of 0.4 vol. % Fas-ligand alone cell viability was reduced by only about 10%, an effect which remained unchanged in the presence of 5 or 20 μg/ml taurultam. However cell viability was strongly decreased when 0.4 vol. % Fas-ligand was coincubated with of 100 μg/ml taurultam. When the Fas-ligand was added at a higher concentration (2.0 vol. %) apoptosis was induced in 60% of the cells by Fas-ligand alone. This effect was also increased by taurultam at 100 μg/ml but not at 5 or 20 μg/ml. Thus, taurultam is able to enhance the apoptotic effect of Fas-ligand in LN-18 cells at a concentration (100 μg/ml) which by itself did not affect cell viability.
  • 3) Influence of Taurolidine on Fas-Ligand Induced Apoptosis in LN-18 Cells
  • LN-18 cells were incubated for 17 h with either 0.4 or 2.0 vol. % Fas-ligand in the absence and presence of increasing concentrations of taurolidine (5, 20, 100 μg/ml). Taurolidine by itself did not appreciably affect cell viability yielding a reduction by only 10% at the highest concentration tested (100 μg/ml). In the presence of Fas-ligand alone (0.4% or 2.0%) the cell viability was affected in the same way as described above. The cell viability was further reduced by taurolidine but only at the highest concentration tested (100 μg/ml). Thus, taurolidine was able to enhance the effect of Fas-ligand on LN-18 cells at a concentration (100 μg/ml) which did not appreciably affect cell viability per se.
  • 4) Influence of Taurultam on Fas-Ligand Induced Apoptosis in LN-229 Cells
  • The incubation of LN-229 cells for 17 h with taurultam alone had no effect at and 20 μg/ml but reduced cell viability by 35% at 100 μg/ml. When the LN-229 cells were incubated with Fas-ligand alone (10% or 50%) the cell viability was reduced by only about 20% in the presence of a high concentration of Fas-ligand (50 vol. %). When taurultam was added at concentrations which were inactive per se (5 and 20 μg/ml) no change in the effectiveness of the Fas-ligand (10 or 50 vol. %) was observed. It was only at the highest concentration of taurultam (100 μg/ml) that Fas-ligand induced cell loss was further enhanced. Thus, the results with LN-229 demonstrate the ability of taurultam to enhance the destruction of cells in the presence of Fas-ligand.
  • 5) Influence of Taurolidine on Fas-Ligand Induced Apoptosis in LN-229 Cells
  • The exposure of LN-229 cells to taurolidine alone for 17 h caused a strong loss of cell viability by about 70% at the highest concentration tested (100 μg/ml). Thus, LN-229 cells were more sensitive to taurolidine than LN-18 cells. When co-incubated with Fas-ligand (10 vol. %) cell destruction was enhanced by taurolidine at 100 μg/ml. At 50 vol. % Fas-ligand the effect was more pronounced and apparent even for taurolidine 20 μg/ml.
  • EXAMPLE 7 Use and Application of Taurolidine and/or Taurultam for the Treatment and/or Prophylaxis of Tumors of the Central Nervous System
  • 1. Tumor Cells Used for the Experiments
  • For experiments, C6 glial tumor cells, HT22 neuronal tumor cells, U373 human glioma/glioblastoma tumor cells and cells derived from patients with glioblastoma were used.
  • 2. Preparation of Patient-Derived Tumor Cells
  • Tumor cells derived from patients with glioblastoma were obtained intraoperatively. Tumor tissue was stored in RPMI 1640 medium without FCS. Tissue was then sub cultured in 15 ml Falcon flasks; adding 0.025% trypsin with PBS, followed by incubation at 37° C. After this, RPMI 1640 with FCS was added and centrifugation performed. The next step was incubation with DNAse, resuspension and dissociation, followed by washing step in medium to remove DNAse. Cells were then cultured in Falcon flasks.
  • 3. Method of Anti-Neoplastic Action of Taurolidine and/or Metabolites
  • Ultrastructurally, shrinkage of cytoplasm, condensation and marginalization of chromatin could be observed. These changes were already apparent at 30 minutes of incubation with 0.1 μg/ml taurin and increased strikingly over time and with concentration of taurolidine. Mitochondria were not affected ultrastructurally. Flow cytometry showed an initial increase in the G0/G1 peak and S-phase starting at 30 minutes. These initial changes were followed by a decrease in forward light and side scatter. In addition, concentration-dependent fragmentation of DNA started at 60 minutes. Following 24 hours, fragmentation of the DNA was nearly complete. At concentrations of 2.0 μg/ml taurolidine and more, the changes in cell size was only marginal.
  • The described results in combination with the results of special dying methods (Leucostat preparation) suggests an apoptotic mechanism of tumor cell death. Normal brain cells were not affected by incubation with taurolidine or taurultam in concentrations of up to 4 μg/ml for up to 5 days.
  • EXAMPLE 8 Two-Cycle Dosing Schedule for Treating Patients with Cancer Using Intervenous Taurolidine 2%
  • Four bottles (250 ml each) of 2% taurolidine solution are administered intravenously to patients with cancer, at a rate of 40 drops per minute, one bottle every six hours. The dosing cycle consists of an administration phase of daily infusions for one week, followed by a non-administration phase of two weeks, then followed by another administration phase of four bottles per day as previously indicated. Efficacy of taurolidine 2% solution administered intravenously has been found to be particularly good with 25-28 bottles of 250 ml taurolidine 2% solution being instilled per cycle.
  • EXAMPLE 9 Four-Cycle Dosing Schedule for Treating Patients with Malignant Gliomas Using Intravenous Taurolidine 2%
  • The treatment comprises a minimum of 4 cycles. Each cycle is 7 days long, and is comprised as follows:
  • 1. First Cycle
  • a. Intravenous infusion of 250 ml taurolidine 2% and 250 ml full electrolyte solution via the central vein catheter with an infusion time of 60 minutes.
  • b. If this therapy causes an elevated liver count, it is necessary to increase the infusion time to 90 or 120 minutes.
  • c. 60-minute break
  • d. Repeat the therapies under a or b and c for a total of 6 times per day.
  • e. At an infusion time of 60 minutes the duration of the daily infusion program per 250 ml of taurolidine is 11 hours, at 90 minutes of infusion time 14 hours, and at 120 minutes of infusion time 17 hours. No drug is administered for the remainder of the time.
  • f. rest phase
  • 2. Subsequent Cycles
  • a. Intravenous infusion of 250 ml taurolidine 2% and 250 ml full electrolyte solution via the central vein catheter with an infusion time of 60 minutes.
  • b. If this therapy causes an elevated liver count, it is necessary to increase the infusion time to 90 or 120 minutes.
  • c. 60 minute break
  • d. Repeat the therapies under a or b and c for a total of 4 times per day.
  • e. At an infusion time of 60 minutes the duration of the daily infusion program per 250 ml of taurolidine is 7 hours, at 90 minutes of infusion time 9 hours, and at 120 minutes of infusion time 11 hours. No drug is administered for the remainder of the time.
  • EXAMPLE 10 Therapy of Glioblastoma with Taurolidine (Single Case Observation)
  • The following is a case involving treatment of a single individual with a single treatment cycle.
  • Patient: “F.D.,” male, 59 years
  • Diagnosis: large (8×8×8 cm) malignant glioma bifrontal with affection of the corpus callosum (“butterfly glioma”).
  • Procedure prior to treatment with taurolidine: Patient was referred to Neurosurgical departments in Heidelberg and Wurzburg, operation was refused, radiation and chemotherapy were refused by the patient.
  • Prior treatment: oral corticosteroids.
  • Planned Treatment: Taurolidine intravenously
  • Chief complaints on admission: Diffuse headache, urinary incontinence, blurred vision, motor aphasia, gait disturbance, impaired memory.
  • Neurological examination on admission: Awake-somnolent, alert, impaired vision, nearly complete motor aphasia, apraxia, gait disturbance, urinary incontinence, severe mnesic and concentration deficits
  • Karnofsky index on admission: 20-30
  • MRI at Day 1 of treatment (pre treatment): Bifrontal space occupying lesion (ca. 8×8×8 cm) with irregular shape and ring like contrast enhancement and destructive affection of the corpus callosum. The marked space occupying effect leads to disappearance of nearly all reserve spaces.
  • Treatment
  • Day 1: Informed consent; Blood samples; MRI.
  • Day 2: Insertion of a central venous line; Chest X-ray.
  • Days 3-8: Intravenous administration of 4×250 ml of 2% taurolidine/day within 2 hours, followed by an interval of 4 hours; Blood samples twice daily; Substitution of electrolytes.
  • Day 9: Intravenous administration of 1×250 ml of 2% Taurolidine within 2 hours; Discharge.
  • Treatment Summary:
  • In total, 25×250 ml of 2% taurolidine (125 g taurolidine) were administered without side effects. Electrolytes and fluid were substituted according to the results of the blood samples.
  • Chief complaints on discharge: Headache improved, no urinary incontinence, vision improved, gait disturbance improved, motor aphasia slightly improved, impaired memory.
  • Neurological examination on discharge: Awake, alert, vision improved, motor aphasia slightly improved, gait disturbance improved, apraxia slightly improved, no urinary incontinence, severe mnesic and concentration deficits
  • Karnofsky index on discharge: 40-50
  • In view of the dramatic improvement observed in the patient's condition after a single treatment cycle, it is expected that an infusion regime of at least two cycles will provide the desired therapeutic effect.
  • EXAMPLE 11 Treatment of Severe Glioblastoma Multiforme Grade IV
  • Prior to treatment the patient exhibited severe glioblastoma multiforme grade IV, left temporal lobe affected. The tumor was prominent in computer tomography pictures of the patient's cranium, prior to treatment. The patient's cranium was imaged in a T2-weighted picture sequence in axial, sagittal and coronary layer orientation as well as T1-weighted picture sequence in axial layer orientation natively and in axial, coronary and sagittal layer orientation after contrast medium application as well as MR spectroscopy.
  • The patient was treated with four treatment cycles each consisting of a seven-day infusion phase of a daily dose of 20 g taurolidine (4×250 ml 2% taurolidine solution) and a two-day rest phase. After the four cycles, the patient underwent an additional two-day infusion phase. Regular computer tomography images of the patient's cranium were taken during treatment.
  • By the end of the second treatment cycle (200 g taurolidine administered), brain edema was noticeably reduced. By the end of third treatment cycle (300 g taurolidine administered), tumor growth had stopped. After the completion of the entire course of treatment (600 g taurolidine administered), the tumor was shown by computer tomography to be almost completely disintegrated. Little or no necrosis was observed during the course of treatment, indicating that the tumor reduction was the result of apoptosis.
  • EXAMPLE 12 Treatment of Brain Tumors with Direct Application of Taurolidine/Taurultam
  • The methylol transfer agent is applied directly to the tumor cavity using taurolidine/taurultam containing tubes consisting of several segments with semipermeable membrane.
  • Following total or partial tumor removal, a special tube is implanted in the tumor cavity, so that the end of this tube lies subgaleal. The tube includes various segments of semipermeable material, which contains taurolidine/taurultam and can be refilled via a subgaleal port.
  • EXAMPLE 13 Treatment of Inoperable Glioblastoma Infiltration of Basal Ganglia
  • A forty year old male patient with inoperable glioblastoma infiltration in the basal ganglia was treated with a regimen of 6 dosing cycles, each with administration phases of 5 days, with each administration phase separated by a non-administration phase of 2 days. During each day of administration, 250 ml of taurolidine 2% solution was intravenously administered to the patient 4 times daily. This regimen surprisingly and unexpectedly resulted in a marked size-reduction of the tumor, and disappearance of perifocal edema.

Claims (19)

  1. 1. A method of inhibiting growth of a tumor cell in a mammal comprising:
    A) Administering to said mammal a first solution comprising a tumor-inhibiting methylol-containing compound, said first solution further comprising a first combination comprising a plurality of physiologically acceptable electrolytes or a second combination comprising at least one amino acid in combination with at least one physiologically acceptable electrolyte; or
    B) administering to said mammal another solution containing said tumor-inhibiting methylol-containing compound, and concurrently administering to said mammal a further solution comprising said first combination comprising said plurality of physiologically acceptable electrolytes or said second combination comprising at least one said amino acid in combination with at least one said physiologically acceptable electrolyte.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1 wherein said methylol-containing compound is taurolidine, taurultam or a mixture thereof, and wherein, when said first solution is administered, said first solution contains said first combination or said second combination at a concentration sufficient to render said first solution substantially isotonic, and when said another solution is administered, prior to administration to said mammal, said another solution is blended with said further solution so as to form a mixed solution which is substantially isotonic.
  3. 3. The method of claim 2 wherein said electrolyte or electrolytes provide ions selected from the group consisting of Na+, K+, Mg++, Cl, H2PO4 , Acetate, HCO3 , and mixtures thereof.
  4. 4. The method of claim 2 wherein said electrolyte or electrolytes are selected from the group consisting of NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, NaHCO3, and mixtures thereof.
  5. 5. The method of claim 2 wherein said first solution or said another solution contains about 1.7-2.3% by weight taurolidine.
  6. 6. The method of claim 2 wherein said first solution or said another solution contains about 1.8-2.2% by weight taurolidine.
  7. 7. The method of claim 2 wherein said first solution or said another solution contains about 1.9-2.1% by weight taurolidine.
  8. 8. The method of claim 2 wherein said first solution or said another solution contains about 2% by weight taurolidine.
  9. 9. The method composition of claim 2 wherein said first solution or said another solution further contains an amount of a colloid effective to render said solution substantially iso-oncotic.
  10. 10. The method of claim 9 wherein said colloid is present in said first solution or said another solution in an amount of about 1-10% by weight.
  11. 11. The method of claim 10 wherein said colloid is PVP having an average molecular weight of about 1,000-15,000.
  12. 12. The method of claim 11 wherein said average molecular weight is about 9,000.
  13. 13. The method of claim 2 wherein said first solution or said further solution further includes about 0.1-3% by weight of at least one amino acid.
  14. 14. The method of claim 13 wherein said at least one amino acid is taurine.
  15. 15. The method of claim 14 wherein said first solution or said further solution contains about 0.3-1% by weight taurine.
  16. 16. The method of claim 15 wherein said first solution or said further solution contains about 0.4-0.6% by weight taurine.
  17. 17. The method of claim 16 wherein said first solution or said further solution contains about 0.5% by weight taurine.
  18. 18. The method of claim 2 wherein said first solution or said further solution includes about 0.1-1% by weight taurultam.
  19. 19. The composition of claim 18, wherein said first solution or said further solution includes about 0.2-0.5% by weight taurultam.
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US18220000 true 2000-02-14 2000-02-14
US09583902 US6479481B1 (en) 1999-06-04 2000-06-01 Methods and compositions for treating primary and secondary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS)
US28074801 true 2001-04-03 2001-04-03
US28171101 true 2001-04-06 2001-04-06
US28171001 true 2001-04-06 2001-04-06
US28171301 true 2001-04-06 2001-04-06
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US28493401 true 2001-04-20 2001-04-20
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US10109058 US20030027818A1 (en) 2001-04-03 2002-03-29 Treatment of cancers
US10253907 US6821968B2 (en) 2001-09-26 2002-09-25 Stable taurolidine electrolyte solutions
US10281138 US6815441B2 (en) 1999-06-04 2002-10-28 Reaction products of taurultam and glucose
US10424102 US7638511B2 (en) 1999-06-04 2003-04-28 Methods and compositions for treating primary and secondary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS)
US10934474 US20050124608A1 (en) 2001-04-03 2004-09-07 Treatment of cancers
US10950672 US20050096314A1 (en) 2001-04-03 2004-09-28 Treatment of cancers with methylol-containing compounds and at least one electrolyte
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