Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Electronic devices with gaze detection capabilities

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100079508A1
US20100079508A1 US12242251 US24225108A US2010079508A1 US 20100079508 A1 US20100079508 A1 US 20100079508A1 US 12242251 US12242251 US 12242251 US 24225108 A US24225108 A US 24225108A US 2010079508 A1 US2010079508 A1 US 2010079508A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
device
mode
user
display
gaze
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12242251
Inventor
Andrew Hodge
Michael Rosenblatt
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Apple Inc
Original Assignee
Apple Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRICAL DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/011Arrangements for interaction with the human body, e.g. for user immersion in virtual reality
    • G06F3/013Eye tracking input arrangements
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRICAL DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F1/00Details of data-processing equipment not covered by groups G06F3/00 - G06F13/00, e.g. cooling, packaging or power supply specially adapted for computer application
    • G06F1/26Power supply means, e.g. regulation thereof
    • G06F1/32Means for saving power
    • G06F1/3203Power Management, i.e. event-based initiation of power-saving mode
    • G06F1/3206Monitoring a parameter, a device or an event triggering a change in power modality
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRICAL DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F1/00Details of data-processing equipment not covered by groups G06F3/00 - G06F13/00, e.g. cooling, packaging or power supply specially adapted for computer application
    • G06F1/26Power supply means, e.g. regulation thereof
    • G06F1/32Means for saving power
    • G06F1/3203Power Management, i.e. event-based initiation of power-saving mode
    • G06F1/3234Action, measure or step performed to reduce power consumption
    • G06F1/325Power saving in peripheral device
    • G06F1/3265Power saving in display device
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04NPICTORIAL COMMUNICATION, e.g. TELEVISION
    • H04N21/00Selective content distribution, e.g. interactive television, VOD [Video On Demand]
    • H04N21/40Client devices specifically adapted for the reception of or interaction with content, e.g. set-top-box [STB]; Operations thereof
    • H04N21/43Processing of content or additional data, e.g. demultiplexing additional data from a digital video stream; Elementary client operations, e.g. monitoring of home network, synchronizing decoder's clock; Client middleware
    • H04N21/443OS processes, e.g. booting an STB, implementing a Java virtual machine in an STB, power management in an STB
    • H04N21/4436Power management, e.g. shutting down unused components of the receiver
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09GARRANGEMENTS OR CIRCUITS FOR CONTROL OF INDICATING DEVICES USING STATIC MEANS TO PRESENT VARIABLE INFORMATION
    • G09G2330/00Aspects of power supply; Aspects of display protection and defect management
    • G09G2330/02Details of power systems and of start or stop of display operation
    • G09G2330/021Power management, e.g. power saving
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/02Power saving arrangements
    • H04W52/0209Power saving arrangements in terminal devices
    • H04W52/0261Power saving arrangements in terminal devices managing power supply demand, e.g. depending on battery level
    • H04W52/0267Power saving arrangements in terminal devices managing power supply demand, e.g. depending on battery level by controlling user interface components
    • H04W52/027Power saving arrangements in terminal devices managing power supply demand, e.g. depending on battery level by controlling user interface components by controlling a display operation or backlight unit
    • Y02D10/153
    • Y02D70/00
    • Y02D70/12
    • Y02D70/122
    • Y02D70/142
    • Y02D70/144
    • Y02D70/164
    • Y02D70/23
    • Y02D70/26

Abstract

An electronic device may have gaze detection capabilities that allow the device to detect when a user is looking at the device. The electronic device may implement a power management scheme using the results of gaze detection operations. When the device detects that the user has looked away from the device, the device may dim a display screen and may perform other suitable actions. The device may pause a video playback operation when the device detects that the user has looked away from the device. The device may resume the video playback operation when the device detects that the user is looking towards the device. Gaze detector circuitry may be powered down when sensor data indicates that gazed detection readings will not be reliable or are not needed.

Description

    BACKGROUND
  • [0001]
    This invention relates generally to electronic devices, and more particularly, to electronic devices such as portable electronic devices that have gaze detection capabilities.
  • [0002]
    Electronic devices such as portable electronic devices are becoming increasingly popular. Examples of portable devices include handheld computers, cellular telephones, media players, and hybrid devices that include the functionality of multiple devices of this type. Popular portable electronic devices that are somewhat larger than traditional handheld electronic devices include laptop computers and tablet computers.
  • [0003]
    To satisfy consumer demand for small form factor portable electronic devices, manufacturers are continually striving to reduce the size of components that are used in these devices. For example, manufacturers have made attempts to miniaturize the batteries used in portable electronic devices.
  • [0004]
    An electronic device with a small battery has limited battery capacity. Unless care is taken to consume power wisely, an electronic device with a small battery may exhibit unacceptably short battery life. Techniques for reducing power consumption may be particularly important in wireless devices that support cellular telephone communications, because users of cellular telephone devices often demand long “talk” times.
  • [0005]
    Conventional portable electronic devices use various techniques for reducing their power consumption. Because display screens in electronic devices can consume relatively large amounts of power, power conservation techniques in portable electronic devices with display screens typically involve turning off the display screens at particular times. Unfortunately, conventional power conservation techniques may turn off display screens at inappropriate times, thereby interfering with a user's ability to interact with a device. Conventional techniques may also leave display screens on at inappropriate times, wasting valuable battery power.
  • [0006]
    It would therefore be desirable to be able to provide improved ways in which to conserve power in electronic devices.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0007]
    An electronic device is provided that may have gaze detection capabilities. One or more gaze detection sensors such as a camera may be used by the electronic device to determine whether a user's gaze is directed towards the electronic device (e.g., whether the user of the electronic device is looking at the electronic device). In particular, the electronic device may use gaze detection sensors to determine whether or not the user is looking at a display portion of the electronic device.
  • [0008]
    In an illustrative embodiment, the electronic device may have power management capabilities that are used to help conserve power. The electronic device may operate in two or more operating modes. One operation mode may be used to optimize performance. Another operating mode may help to extend battery life. The electronic device may use results from gaze detection operations to determine an appropriate mode in which to operate the electronic device.
  • [0009]
    For example, the electronic device may operate in an active mode when the electronic device determines, using gaze detection sensors, that the user's gaze is directed towards the electronic device and may operate in one or more standby modes when the device determines that the user's gaze is not directed towards the electronic device. When the electronic device is operating in one of the standby modes, circuitry and components such as a display screen, touch screen components, gaze detection components, and a central processing unit or CPU in the electronic device may be powered down or operated in a low-power mode to minimize power consumption in the electronic device.
  • [0010]
    With one suitable arrangement, when the electronic device is in the active mode and detects that the user has looked away from the device, the electronic device may dim or turn off a display screen. If desired, the electronic device can dim the display screen to a standby brightness level after the device has determined that the user has looked away from the device. After a given period of time has elapsed in which no user input has been received by the electronic device, the electronic device can turn off the display screen to conserve power. When the electronic device detects that the user's gaze is directed towards the electronic device, the electronic device may enter the active mode and return the display screen to an active brightness level (e.g., turn on the display screen or brighten the display screen to the active brightness level).
  • [0011]
    If desired, the electronic device may be performing an operation, while in the active mode, that is uninterrupted when the electronic device switches to operating in one of the standby modes. For example, the electronic device may be performing a music playback operation while in the active mode and, when the electronic device detects the user's gaze is not directed towards the electronic device, the electronic device may enter one of the standby modes without interrupting the music playback operation.
  • [0012]
    With one suitable arrangement, the electronic device may interrupt an operation when the electronic device begins operating in one of the standby mode. For example, the electronic device may be performing a video playback operation while in the active mode. In this example, when the electronic device detects that the user's gaze is no longer directed towards the electronic device, the electronic device may enter one of the standby modes, dim the display screen that was being used for the video playback operation, and pause the video playback operation. If desired, the electronic device may resume the video playback operation when it detects that the user has redirected their gaze towards the electronic device (e.g., towards the video screen).
  • [0013]
    In an illustrative embodiment, the electronic device may use readings from sensors such as proximity sensors, ambient light sensors, and motion sensors such as accelerometers to determine whether or not to perform gaze detection operations. For example, the electronic device may suspend gaze detection operations whenever a proximity sensor, ambient light sensor, or accelerometer indicates that gaze detection operations are inappropriate (e.g., because of an object in close proximity with the electronic device, insufficient ambient light for gaze detection sensors to detect the user's gaze, excessive vibration which may degrade the performance of gaze detection sensors, etc.).
  • [0014]
    An advantage of powering down the display is that a powered down display can help to prevent information on the display from being viewed by an unauthorized viewer. It may therefore be helpful to turn off a display when the lack of a user's gaze indicates that the user is not present to guard the device.
  • [0015]
    Further features of the invention, its nature and various advantages will be more apparent from the accompanying drawings and the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0016]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an illustrative portable electronic device that may have gaze detection capabilities in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of an illustrative portable electronic device that may have gaze detection capabilities in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 3 is a state diagram of illustrative operating modes of an illustrative electronic device with gaze detection capabilities in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 4 is a state diagram of illustrative operating modes of an illustrative electronic device with gaze detection capabilities during a music playback operation in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 5 is a state diagram of illustrative operating modes of an illustrative electronic device with gaze detection capabilities and activity detection capabilities in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 6 is a state diagram of illustrative operating modes of an illustrative electronic device with gaze detection capabilities during a video playback operation in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 7 is a state diagram of illustrative operating modes of an illustrative electronic device with gaze detection and touch screen input capabilities in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 8 is a state diagram of illustrative operating modes of an illustrative electronic device with gaze detection capabilities in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 9 is a state diagram of illustrative operating modes of an illustrative electronic device with gaze detection capabilities and sensors such as environment sensors in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 10 is a flow chart of illustrative steps involved in reducing power to displays in an electronic device in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0026]
    The present invention relates generally to electronic devices, and more particularly, to electronic devices such as portable electronic devices that have gaze detection capabilities.
  • [0027]
    With one suitable arrangement, an electronic device with gaze detection capabilities may have the ability to determine whether a user's gaze is within a given boundary without resolving the specific location of the user's gaze within that boundary. The electronic device, as an example, may be able to detect whether a user's gaze is directed towards a display associated with the device. With another suitable arrangement, an electronic device may have gaze tracking capabilities. Gaze tracking capabilities allow the electronic device to determine not only whether or not a user's gaze is directed towards a display associated with the device but also which portion of the display the user's gaze is directed towards.
  • [0028]
    An electronic device may be used to detect a user's gaze and adjust its behavior according to whether or not the user's gaze is detected. For example, the electronic device may be able to detect whether or not the user is looking at the device and adjust power management settings accordingly. With one suitable arrangement, the electronic device may delay turning device components off (e.g., components which would otherwise be turned off as part of a power management scheme) while the user's gaze is directed towards the device and the electronic device may accelerate the shutdown of device components when the user's gaze is not detected. For example, when the user's gaze is detected, a device with a display may keep the display at normal brightness rather than dimming the display and, when the device detects the user is no longing looking at the device, the device may dim or turn off the display. This type of arrangement may be especially beneficial in situations in which the user is not actively controlling the electronic device (e.g., the user is not pressing buttons or supplying touch screen inputs) but is still interacting with the electronic device (e.g., the user is reading text on the display, watching video on the display, etc.). An advantage of turning off the display when the user is not looking at the display is this may help prevent unauthorized users from viewing information on the display, thereby enhancing device security.
  • [0029]
    Electronic devices that have gaze detection capabilities may be portable electronic devices such as laptop computers or small portable computers of the type that are sometimes referred to as ultraportables. Portable electronic devices may also be somewhat smaller devices. Examples of smaller portable electronic devices include wrist-watch devices, pendant devices, headphone and earpiece devices, and other wearable and miniature devices. With one suitable arrangement, the portable electronic devices may be wireless electronic devices.
  • [0030]
    The wireless electronic devices may be, for example, handheld wireless devices such as cellular telephones, media players with wireless communications capabilities, handheld computers (also sometimes called personal digital assistants), global positioning system (GPS) devices, and handheld gaming devices. The wireless electronic devices may also be hybrid devices that combine the functionality of multiple conventional devices. Examples of hybrid portable electronic devices include a cellular telephone that includes media player functionality, a gaming device that includes a wireless communications capability, a cellular telephone that includes game and email functions, and a portable device that receives email, supports mobile telephone calls, has music player functionality, and supports web browsing. These are merely illustrative examples.
  • [0031]
    An illustrative portable electronic device in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIG. 1. User device 10 may be any suitable electronic device such as a portable or handheld electronic device. Device 10 of FIG. 1 may be, for example, a handheld electronic device that supports 2G and/or 3G cellular telephone and data functions, global positioning system capabilities or other satellite navigation capabilities, and local wireless communications capabilities (e.g., IEEE 802.11 and Bluetooth®) and that supports handheld computing device functions such as internet browsing, email and calendar functions, games, music player functionality, etc.
  • [0032]
    Device 10 may have a housing 12. Display 16 may be attached to housing 12 using bezel 14. Display 16 may be a touch screen liquid crystal display (as an example). Display 16 may have pixels that can be controlled individually in connection with power consumption adjustments. For example, in an organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, power can be reduced by making full and/or partial brightness reductions to some or all of the pixels. Display 16 may be formed from a panel subsystem and a backlight subsystem. For example, display 16 may have a liquid crystal display (LCD) panel subsystem and a light emitting diode or fluorescent tube backlight subsystem. In backlight subsystems that contain individually controllable elements such as light emitting diodes, the brightness of the backlight elements may be selectively controlled. For example, the brightness of some of the backlight elements may be reduced while the other backlight elements remain fully powered. In backlight subsystems that contain a single backlight element, the power of the single element may be partially or fully reduced to reduce power consumption. It may also be advantageous to make power adjustments to the circuitry that drives the LCD panel subsystem.
  • [0033]
    Display screen 16 (e.g., a touch screen) is merely one example of an input-output device that may be used with electronic device 10. If desired, electronic device 10 may have other input-output devices. For example, electronic device 10 may have user input control devices such as button 19, and input-output components such as port 20 and one or more input-output jacks (e.g., for audio and/or video). Button 19 may be, for example, a menu button. Port 20 may contain a 30-pin data connector (as an example). Openings 22 and 24 may, if desired, form speaker and microphone ports. Speaker port 22 may be used when operating device 10 in speakerphone mode. Opening 23 may also form a speaker port. For example, speaker port 23 may serve as a telephone receiver that is placed adjacent to a user's ear during operation. In the example of FIG. 1, display screen 16 is shown as being mounted on the front face of handheld electronic device 10, but display screen 16 may, if desired, be mounted on the rear face of handheld electronic device 10, on a side of device 10, on a flip-up portion of device 10 that is attached to a main body portion of device 10 by a hinge (for example), or using any other suitable mounting arrangement.
  • [0034]
    A user of electronic device 10 may supply input commands using user input interface devices such as button 19 and touch screen 16. Suitable user input interface devices for electronic device 10 include buttons (e.g., alphanumeric keys, power on-off, power-on, power-off, and other specialized buttons, etc.), a touch pad, pointing stick, or other cursor control device, a microphone for supplying voice commands, or any other suitable interface for controlling device 10. Buttons such as button 19 and other user input interface devices may generally be formed on any suitable portion of electronic device 10. For example, a button such as button 19 or other user interface control may be formed on the side of electronic device 10. Buttons and other user interface controls can also be located on the top face, rear face, or other portion of device 10. If desired, device 10 can be controlled remotely (e.g., using an infrared remote control, a radio-frequency remote control such as a Bluetooth® remote control, etc.).
  • [0035]
    If desired, device 10 may contain sensors such as a proximity sensor and an ambient light sensor. A proximity sensor may be used to detect when device 10 is close to a user's head or other object. An ambient light sensor may be used to make measurements of current light levels.
  • [0036]
    Device 10 may have a camera or other optical sensor such as camera 30 that can be used for gaze detection operations. Cameras used for gaze detection may, for example, be used by device 10 to capture images of a user's face that are processed by device 10 to detect where the user's gaze is directed. Camera 30 may be integrated into housing 12. While shown as being formed on the top face of electronic device 10 in the example of FIG. 1, cameras such as camera 30 may generally be formed on any suitable portion of electronic device 10. For example, camera 30 may be mounted on a flip-up portion of device 10 that is attached to a main body portion of device 10 by a hinge or may be mounted between the flip-up portion of device 10 and the main body portion of device 10 (e.g., in the hinge region between the flip-up portion and the main body portion such that the camera can be used regardless of whether the device is flipped open or is closed). Device 10 may also have additional cameras (e.g., device 10 may have camera 30 on the top face of device 10 for gaze detection operations and another camera on the bottom face of device 10 for capturing images and video).
  • [0037]
    If desired, the gaze detection functions of camera 30 may be implemented using an optical sensor that has been optimized for gaze detection operations. For example, camera 30 may include one or more light emitting diodes (LED's) and an optical sensor capable of detecting reflections of light emitted from the LEDs off of the users' eyes when the users are gazing at device 10. The light emitting diodes may emit a modulated infrared light and the optical sensor may be synchronized to detect reflections of the modulated infrared light, as an example. In general, any suitable gaze detection image sensor and circuitry may be used for supporting gaze detection operations in device 10. The use of camera 30 is sometimes described herein as an example.
  • [0038]
    A schematic diagram of an embodiment of an illustrative portable electronic device such as a handheld electronic device is shown in FIG. 2. Portable device 10 may be a mobile telephone, a mobile telephone with media player capabilities, a handheld computer, a remote control, a game player, a global positioning system (GPS) device, a laptop computer, a tablet computer, an ultraportable computer, a hybrid device that includes the functionality of some or all of these devices, or any other suitable portable electronic device.
  • [0039]
    As shown in FIG. 2, device 10 may include storage 34. Storage 34 may include one or more different types of storage such as hard disk drive storage, nonvolatile memory (e.g., flash memory or other electrically-programmable-read-only memory), volatile memory (e.g., battery-based static or dynamic random-access-memory), etc.
  • [0040]
    Processing circuitry 36 may be used to control the operation of device 10. Processing circuitry 36 may be based on a processor such as a microprocessor and other suitable integrated circuits. With one suitable arrangement, processing circuitry 36 and storage 34 are used to run software on device 10, such as gaze detection applications, internet browsing applications, voice-over-internet-protocol (VOIP) telephone call applications, email applications, media playback applications, navigation functions, map functions, operating system functions, power management functions, etc. Processing circuitry 36 and storage 34 may be used in implementing suitable communications protocols. Communications protocols that may be implemented using processing circuitry 36 and storage 34 include internet protocols, wireless local area network protocols (e.g., IEEE 802.11 protocols—sometimes referred to as Wi-Fi®), protocols for other short-range wireless communications links such as the Bluetooth® protocol, protocols for handling 3G communications services (e.g., using wide band code division multiple access techniques), 2G cellular telephone communications protocols, etc. If desired, processing circuitry 36 may operate in a reduced power mode (e.g., circuitry 36 may be suspended or operated at a lower frequency) when device 10 enters a suitable standby mode.
  • [0041]
    Input-output devices 38 may be used to allow data to be supplied to device 10 and to allow data to be provided from device 10 to external devices. Display screen 16, camera 30, button 19, microphone port 24, speaker port 22, and dock connector port 20 are examples of input-output devices 38. In general, input-output devices 38 may include any suitable components for receiving input and/or providing output from device 10. For example, input-output devices 38 can include user input-output devices 40 such as buttons, touch screens, joysticks, click wheels, scrolling wheels, touch pads, key pads, keyboards, microphones, etc. A user can control the operation of device 10 by supplying commands through user input devices 40. Input-output device 38 may include sensors such as proximity sensors, ambient light sensors, orientation sensors, proximity sensors, and any other suitable sensors.
  • [0042]
    Input-output devices 38 may include a camera such as integrated camera 41 (e.g., a camera that is integrated into the housing of device 10) and camera 30 of FIG. 1. Cameras such as camera 41 and camera 30 may be used as part of a gaze detection system. For example, camera 41 may be used by device 10 to capture images that are processed by a gaze detection application running on processing circuitry 36 to determine whether or not a user's gaze is directed towards the device. Cameras such as camera 41 and camera 30 may, if desired, be provided with image stabilization capabilities (e.g., using feedback derived from an accelerometer, orientation sensor, or other sensor).
  • [0043]
    Display and audio devices 42 may include liquid-crystal display (LCD) screens or other screens, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and other components that present visual information and status data. Display and audio devices 42 may also include audio equipment such as speakers and other devices for creating sound. Display and audio devices 42 may contain audio-video interface equipment such as jacks and other connectors for external headphones and monitors.
  • [0044]
    Wireless communications devices 44 may include communications circuitry such as radio-frequency (RF) transceiver circuitry formed from one or more integrated circuits, power amplifier circuitry, passive RF components, antennas, and other circuitry for handling RF wireless signals. Wireless signals can also be sent using light (e.g., using infrared communications).
  • [0045]
    Device 10 can communicate with external devices such as accessories 46, computing equipment 48, and wireless network 49, as shown by paths 50 and 51. Paths 50 may include wired and wireless paths. Path 51 may be a wireless path. Accessories 46 may include headphones (e.g., a wireless cellular headset or audio headphones) and audio-video equipment (e.g., wireless speakers, a game controller, or other equipment that receives and plays audio and video content), a peripheral such as a wireless printer or camera, etc.
  • [0046]
    Computing equipment 48 may be any suitable computer. With one suitable arrangement, computing equipment 48 is a computer that has an associated wireless access point (router) or an internal or external wireless card that establishes a wireless connection with device 10. The computer may be a server (e.g., an internet server), a local area network computer with or without internet access, a user's own personal computer, a peer device (e.g., another portable electronic device 10), or any other suitable computing equipment.
  • [0047]
    Wireless network 49 may include any suitable network equipment, such as cellular telephone base stations, cellular towers, wireless data networks, computers associated with wireless networks, etc.
  • [0048]
    A device such as device 10 that has gaze detection capabilities may use gaze detector data in implementing a power management scheme. As an example, device 10 may operate in multiple modes to conserve power and may utilize gaze detection operations to assist in determining an appropriate mode in which to operate.
  • [0049]
    With one suitable arrangement, the operational modes of device 10 may include modes such as an active mode, a partial standby mode, and a full standby mode. In these and other operational modes, device 10 may adjust the brightness of display 16 and may turn display 16 on or off whenever appropriate in order to conserve power. For example, display 16 may be at an active brightness when device 10 is in the active mode, a standby brightness when device 10 is in the partial standby mode, and may be turned off when device 10 is in the full standby mode. The standby brightness may be somewhat dimmer than the active brightness. Generally, the power consumption of display 16 and therefore device 10 will be reduced when the brightness of display 16 is reduced and when display 16 is turned off.
  • [0050]
    Consider, as an example, the scenario of FIG. 3. In mode 52 of FIG. 3, device 10 is in an active mode. In general, it is generally desirable for device 10 to be in the active mode whenever a user is actively interacting with device 10. In particular, it is desirable for display 16 to be at the active brightness level whenever the user's gaze is directed towards display 16.
  • [0051]
    When device 10 is in the active mode, a display such as display 16 may be turned on and may display an appropriate screen such as an application display screen at the active brightness level. The active brightness level may be a configurable brightness level. For example, device 10 may receive input from a user to adjust the active brightness level. In general, the active brightness level may be adjusted anywhere between the maximum brightness and minimum brightness level display 16 is capable of.
  • [0052]
    If desired, device 10 may be performing a music playback operation when device 10 is in the active mode. In the example of FIG. 3, the music playback operation may be occurring in the background of the operation of device 10 (e.g., device 10 may be performing the music playback operation while display 16 and user input device 40 are used by the user to perform additional tasks such as writing an e-mail, browsing the web, etc.).
  • [0053]
    While device 10 is in the active mode, device 10 may be performing gaze detection operations. For example, when device 10 is in the active mode, device 10 may be capturing images using camera 30 or other image sensing components at regular intervals and maybe analyzing the images using gaze detection software. Based on this analysis, the device can determine whether the user's gaze is directed towards device 10 and display 16. When device 10 is performing gaze detection operations, device 10 may be capturing images used for the gaze detection operations at any suitable interval such as thirty times per second, ten times per second, twice per second, once per second, every two seconds, every five seconds, upon occurrence of non-time-based criteria, combinations of these intervals, or at any other suitable time.
  • [0054]
    As illustrated by line 54, when device 10 detects that the user has looked away, device 10 may dim display screen 16 and may enter partial standby mode 56. Device 10 may detect that the user has diverted their gaze away from device 10 and display 16 using a gaze detection sensor such as camera 30 and gaze detection software running on the hardware of device 10. If desired, gaze detection processing may be offloaded to specialized gaze detection circuitry (e.g., circuitry in a gaze detection chip or a camera controller).
  • [0055]
    In mode 56, device 10 is in a partial standby mode. In the partial standby mode, the brightness level of display 16 may be reduced from an active brightness level to a standby brightness level to reduce the power consumption of device 10. When device 10 enters a standby mode such as the partial standby mode, some operations running on device 10 may be suspended or stopped and some operations may continue running. For example, a music playback operation may continue when device 10 enters one of its standby modes while a web browsing application may be suspended. With this type of arrangement, when a user of device 10 is listening to music through the device while browsing the web on display 16, device 10 can dim display 16 to conserve power whenever the user looks away from display 16 while continuing to play back the music that the user is listening to without interruption.
  • [0056]
    As illustrated by line 58, when device 10 detects activity, device 10 may brighten display screen 16 and may enter active mode 52. Device 10 may enter active mode 52 in response to user activity such as button press activity received through a button such as button 19 and in response to other activity such as network activity (e.g., activity received through a wired or wireless communications link). In this type of arrangement, device 10 will enter the active mode whenever a user resumes interacting with device 10.
  • [0057]
    As illustrated by FIG. 4, device 10 may implement a power management scheme that turns off display 16 based on gaze detection data. In particular, device 10 may turn off display 16 when the device detects that the user is not looking at display 16 (e.g., rather than merely dimming display 16 as in the example of FIG. 3).
  • [0058]
    In mode 60, device 10 is in an active mode. While device 10 is in the active mode, device 10 may perform gaze detection operations. Because device 10 is in the active mode, display 16 may be at an active brightness level. With one suitable arrangement, when device 10 is in active mode 60, device 10 may be displaying a screen with display 16 that is of interest to the user but which does not demand the user's constant attention. For example, when device 10 is in mode 60, device 10 may be displaying a screen such as a now playing screen associated with a music playback operation or a telephone information screen associated with a telephone operation (e.g., a new incoming call, a new outgoing call, an active call, etc.). The now playing screen may, for example, include information about the music playback operation such as a track name, album name, artist name, elapsed playback time, remaining playback time, album art, etc. and may include on-screen selectable options (e.g., when display 16 is a touch-screen display) such as play, pause, fast forward, rewind, skip ahead (e.g., to another audio track), skip back, stop, etc. A telephone information screen might include information about a telephone operation such as a current call time, the telephone number associated with a telephone call, a contact name associated with the telephone call, and an image associated with the telephone call and may include on-screen selectable options such as a keypad to enter a telephone number, a call button, an end call button, a hold button, a speakerphone button, a mute button, an add call button, a contacts button, etc.
  • [0059]
    As illustrated by line 62, when device 10 detects that the user has looked away from display 16, device 10 may turn off display 16 and may enter standby mode 64. When device 10 is in standby mode 64, device 10 may continue to perform background operations such as a music playback operation that was occurring before device 10 entered standby mode 64 (e.g., before device 10 detected that the user's gaze was diverted away from display 16). Because the application screen displayed in mode 60 is of secondary importance to the user, device 10 may turn off display 16 completely when the user looks away without disrupting the user. For example, when a user is listening to an audio track and is also viewing information associated with the audio track on a now playing screen, device 10 can turn off display 16 when the user looks away, while continuing an audio playback operation. The user's primary use of device 10 (listening to music) is not interrupted, even though the secondary use of device 10 (viewing the now playing screen) has been halted.
  • [0060]
    In mode 64, device 10 is in a standby mode. In standby mode 64, display 16 may be turned off by device 10 to conserve power. When device 10 enters standby mode 64, suitable components of device 10 may be powered down (if desired). For example, in mode 64, the power consumption of processing circuitry 36 may be reduced (e.g., by operating fewer processor cores, by reducing the computing frequency of circuitry 36, etc.). With one suitable arrangement, an operation such as a music playback operation or a telephone call may continue when device 10 is in mode 64.
  • [0061]
    As illustrated by line 66, when device 10 detects activity such as user activity, device 10 may enter active mode 60 and turn on display 16. Device 10 may enter active mode 60 in response to any suitable activity such as button press activity, network activity, and gaze detection activity (e.g., when device 10 detects that the user has directed their gaze towards device 10).
  • [0062]
    As shown in the example of FIG. 5, device 10 may implement a power management scheme that is responsive to gaze detection data and other input data (e.g., user input, network input, etc.). In the power management scheme illustrated in FIG. 5, device 10 can switch between an active mode, a partial standby mode, and a standby mode. Device 10 may power down hardware components and suspend or slow down software operations depending on the mode in which device 10 is operating. For example, when device 10 is in either of the standby modes, device 10 may reduce the number of processing cores utilized by circuitry 36 and/or may reduce the processing frequency (clock rate) of circuitry such as circuitry 36. With one suitable arrangement, device 10 may turn display 16 on at an active brightness level in the active mode, dim display 16 to a standby brightness level in the partial standby mode, and turn display 16 off in the standby mode.
  • [0063]
    In mode 68, device 10 is in an active mode. While device 10 is in the active mode, device 10 may perform gaze detection operations. Display 16 may be at the active brightness level while device 10 is in active mode 68. In mode 68, device 10 may be displaying an application display screen such as a home page, a music playback application screen, a web browsing application screen, an email application screen, etc. If desired, device 10 may also be performing a music playback operation while in mode 68 (e.g., device 10 may be performing the music playback operation as a background process as device 10 displays the application display screen).
  • [0064]
    When device 10 detects that the user has looked away from display 16 (e.g., using a gaze detection sensor such as camera 30), device 10 may dim display 16 and enter partial standby mode 72, as illustrated by line 70.
  • [0065]
    In mode 72, device 10 is in a partial standby mode. In partial standby mode 72, device 10 may dim display 16 to a partial standby brightness level to conserve power and, if desired, may place other components such as processing circuitry, wireless transceiver circuitry, etc. in a standby mode to conserve power. Certain operations may continue when device 10 enters mode 72. For example, a music playback operation or a telephone call may continue uninterrupted when device 10 enters mode 72.
  • [0066]
    Device 10 may perform gaze detection operations while in mode 72. For example, device 10 may continually capture images using camera 30 at regular intervals and may analyze the captured images using gaze detection software to determine whether the user's gaze has returned to device 10 and display 16. If desired, the rate at which device 10 captures and processes images for gaze detection operations while in mode 72 may be reduced relative to the rate at which gaze detection images are captured and processed while device is in an active mode such as mode 68 (e.g., device 10 may capture images at a rate of once every 100 milliseconds, 250 milliseconds, 500 milliseconds, 1 second, etc. in mode 72 and once every 50 milliseconds, 125 milliseconds, 250 milliseconds, 500 milliseconds, etc. in mode 68).
  • [0067]
    Device 10 may switch from partial standby mode 72 to active mode 68 whenever appropriate. For example, when device 10 detects that a user's gaze is directed towards display 16, device 10 may enter an active mode such as mode 68 (e.g., as illustrated by line 75) and may brighten display 16 to the active brightness level. Device 10 may also enter active mode 68 when device 10 detects activity such as user activity received through a button such as button 19 and network activity received through a wired or wireless communications link (e.g., as illustrated by line 74). In general, device 10 will enter active mode 68 whenever a user resumes interacting with device 10 or device 10 needs to respond to network activity. Because device 10 enters active mode 68 when device 10 detects that the user's gaze is directed towards display 16 (e.g., as illustrated by line 75), the user of device 10 need not press a button or provide other input to awaken device 10 from the partial standby state. Instead, device 10 can automatically awaken (e.g., switch to active mode 68) when device 10 detects that the user has directed their gaze towards display 16.
  • [0068]
    If desired, device 10 may operate in a standby mode such as standby mode 76 in which display 16 is turned off. For example, when device 10 is operating in partial standby mode 72 and no user activity is detected for a given period of time (e.g., within a period of time such as one second, two seconds, . . . , ten seconds, twenty seconds, thirty seconds, etc.), device 10 may enter standby mode 76 and turn off display 16. Device 10 may enter standby mode 76, as illustrated by line 79, after device 10 detects that the user has looked away (e.g., as illustrated by line 70) and after a given period of user inactivity has elapsed following the device's detection that the user looked away.
  • [0069]
    In standby mode 76, device 10 may operate with display 16 turned off. Device 10 may place suitable components into standby. For example, device 10 may turn wireless transceiver circuitry off, reduce the power consumption of processing circuitry such as circuitry 36 (e.g., by turning off selected processing cores or lowering clock rates), turn off sensors such as proximity sensors, ambient light sensors, and accelerometers, and may suspend or power down any other suitable components. If desired, certain operations may continue when device 10 enters and operates in standby mode 76. For example, a music playback operation or a telephone call may continue uninterrupted when device 10 enters mode 76.
  • [0070]
    With the arrangement of FIG. 5, as long as device 10 detects that the user's gaze is directed at the device (e.g., the user is looking at display 16), device 10 may remain in active mode 68. Device 10 may remain in active mode 68 even when no other user activity is received (e.g., when the user is not pressing a button such as button 19 or providing user input through a touch screen such as touch screen display 16). This type of arrangement may be beneficial when a user is utilizing device 10 without providing user input and would be inconvenienced by device 10 implementing power management techniques. Device 10 can override power management schemes such as dimming a display screen based on results of gaze detection operations. For example, when device 10 detects a user's gaze and is presenting the user with text or video through display 16, device 10 may override power management instructions that could otherwise reduce the power of display 16 to ensure that display 16 is not dimmed or turned off even though the user has not provided direct user input.
  • [0071]
    If desired, device 10 may continue to perform gaze detection operations when operating in standby mode 76. As illustrated by dashed line 77, device 10 may switch from standby mode 76 to active mode 68 whenever device 10 detects that a user's gaze is once again directed towards display 16.
  • [0072]
    As illustrated by line 78, when device 10 detects activity, device 10 may switch from mode 76 to active mode 68 (e.g., device 10 may turn on display 16 to the active brightness level). As an example, device 10 may enter active mode 68 in response to user activity such as button press activity received through a button such as button 19 and in response to other activity such as network activity (e.g., activity received through a wired or wireless communications link).
  • [0073]
    As illustrated in FIG. 6, device 10 may implement a power management scheme that utilizes gaze detection capabilities while executing a video playback operation (e.g., while playing video for a user). In the scheme illustrated by FIG. 6, device 10 can operate in an active mode (mode 80), a pause standby mode (e.g., a partial standby mode such as mode 84), and a standby mode (mode 90). With one suitable arrangement, device 10 may be performing a video playback operation for a user when the device is in the active mode, device 10 may pause the video playback operation and dim an associated display screen when the user looks away from the device and the device enters the pause standby mode, and device 10 may turn off the display screen (e.g., the screen used for the video playback operation) if the user does not look back towards the device within a given period of time and no other user activity is detected.
  • [0074]
    In active mode 80, device 10 is active. While device 10 is in the active mode, device 10 may perform gaze detection operations (e.g., using camera 30 and processing circuitry 36 to detect whether or not a user is gazing at display 16). While in mode 80, device 10 may perform a video playback operation. For example, device 10 may display video on display 16 and may play audio associated with the video through a speaker such as speaker 22 or through a headphone accessory such as accessory 46. Display 16 may display the video at an active brightness level (e.g., display 16 may be at a relatively bright display level).
  • [0075]
    When device 10 detects that the user has looked away from display 16 (e.g., using a gaze detection sensor such as camera 30), device 10 may dim display 16 and enter pause standby mode 84 as illustrated by line 82. As part of entering pause standby mode 84, device 10 may pause the video playback operation of mode 80. Generally, when device 10 pauses the video playback operation, device 10 will also pause an accompanying audio playback associated with the video playback operation. The user may, if desired, configure whether device 10 pauses the audio.
  • [0076]
    In mode 84, device 10 is in a pause standby mode. In pause standby mode 84, device 10 may dim display 16 to a pause standby brightness level (e.g., a partial standby brightness level) to conserve power. The video playback operation of mode 80 may be paused while device 10 is in mode 84. If desired, device 10 may place components such as processing circuitry and wireless transceiver circuitry in a standby mode while device 10 is in mode 84 (e.g., by turning off unused CPU cores or reducing clock rates).
  • [0077]
    With one suitable arrangement, device 10 may be performing gaze detection operations while in pause standby mode 84. For example, device 10 may capture images using camera 30 at regular intervals and may analyze the images using gaze detection software to continually monitor whether the user's gaze has returned to device 10 and display 16.
  • [0078]
    Device 10 may switch from pause standby mode 84 to mode 80 whenever appropriate. For example, whenever device 10 detects that a user's gaze is once again directed towards display 16, device 10 may enter an active mode such as mode 80 (e.g., as illustrated by line 86), brighten display 16 to the active brightness level, and resume the video playback operation. Device 10 may also enter mode 80 when device 10 detects activity such as user activity received through a button such as button 19 or network activity received through a wired or wireless communications link (e.g., as illustrated by dashed line 87). In general, device 10 will enter mode 80 whenever a user resumes interacting with device 10.
  • [0079]
    Because device 10 enters mode 80 when it detects that the user's gaze is directed towards display 16 (e.g., as illustrated by line 86), the user of device 10 need not press a button or provide other input to awaken device 10 from the pause standby state and resume the video playback operation of mode 80. Instead, device 10 can automatically awaken itself (e.g., switch to mode 80) and resume the video playback operation when the user directs their gaze towards display 16.
  • [0080]
    If desired, device 10 may operate in a standby mode such as standby mode 90 in which display 16 is turned off. For example, when device 10 is operating in pause standby mode 84 and no user activity is detected for a given period of time (e.g., within a period of time such as one second, two seconds, . . . , ten seconds, twenty seconds, thirty seconds, etc.), device 10 may enter standby mode 90 and turn off display 16. Because standby mode 90 involves a lower power state for device 10 then pause standby mode 84, mode 90 may sometimes referred to as full standby mode. As illustrated by line 88 in FIG. 6, device 10 may enter full standby mode 90 after device 10 detects that the user has looked away (e.g., as illustrated by line 82) and after a given period of user inactivity has elapsed following the device's detection that the user looked away.
  • [0081]
    In standby mode 90, device 10 may operate with display 16 turned off. Device 10 may also place other suitable components into standby (e.g., wireless circuitry, etc.).
  • [0082]
    With the arrangement of FIG. 6, as long as device 10 detects that the user's gaze is directed at the device (e.g., the user is looking at display 16), device 10 may remain in active mode 80 and video playback operation can continue (e.g., until the video is completed or the operation is stopped). Device 10 may remain in mode 80 even when no other user activity is being received (e.g., when the user is not pressing a button such as button 19 or providing user input through a touch screen such as touch screen display 16). This type of arrangement may be beneficial when a user is viewing a video on display 16 of device 10 without providing user input and would be inconvenienced if device 10 were to attempt to conserve power by dimming the video screen. Device 10 can pause the video playback operation when the user temporarily looks away and can then resume operation when the user returns their gaze to device 10. This allows the user of device 10 to automatically pause a video without having to provide direct user input (e.g., without selecting a pause button). The video can be paused simply by looking away from a video display such as display 16.
  • [0083]
    If desired, device 10 may continue to perform gaze detection operations when operating in standby mode 90. As illustrated by dashed line 93, device 10 may switch from standby mode 90 to active mode 80 and resume the video playback operation of mode 80 when device 10 detects that a user's gaze is again directed towards display 16.
  • [0084]
    As illustrated by line 92, when device 10 detects activity, device 10 may switch from mode 90 to active mode 80 (e.g., device 10 may turn on display 16 to the active brightness level). As an example, device 10 may enter active mode 80 in response to user activity such as button press activity received through a button such as button 19 and in response to other activity such as network activity (e.g., activity received through a wired or wireless communications link).
  • [0085]
    If desired, device 10 may automatically resume a video playback operation when the device switches to active mode 80 from a standby mode such as pause standby mode 84 or full standby mode 90. With another suitable arrangement, device 10 may present the user with an option such as an on-screen selectable option to resume the video playback operation when the device switches to active mode 80.
  • [0086]
    Device 10 may have touch screen capabilities and may implement a power management scheme using gaze detection capabilities to control the device's touch screen capabilities. With this type of scheme, which is illustrated by FIG. 7, device 10 can switch between an active mode, a partial standby mode, and a standby mode.
  • [0087]
    Touch screen functions can be adjusted to conserve power. For example, display 16 may be a touch screen display that can operate at varying speeds (e.g., a fast speed and a slow speed) or with varying levels of functionality (e.g., general touch sensitivity, localized touch sensitivity, and gesture-capable touch sensitivity). These features can be adjusted based on gaze detection data.
  • [0088]
    With one suitable arrangement, touch screen display 16 may operate at a first frequency (e.g., at a relatively high speed) when device 10 is in active mode 94 and a second frequency (e.g., a relatively low speed) when device 10 is in standby mode 104. The frequency of touch screen display 16 may be the frequency at which the touch screen scans for user input (e.g., once every 10 milliseconds, 50 milliseconds, 100 milliseconds, 200 milliseconds, etc.).
  • [0089]
    If desired, touch screen display 16 may operate at a first level of functionality when device 10 is in mode 94 and at a second level of functionality when device 10 is in mode 104. For example, when device 10 is in active mode 94, touch screen display 16 may be configured to sense the location of user input within the area of display 16. Device 10 may also be configured to sense user inputs such as multi-touch user inputs and gestures such as swipe gestures and swipe and hold gestures while in mode 94. In contrast, when device 10 is in standby mode 104, touch screen display 16 may be configured such that display 16 can sense general user input such as the presence or absence of contact without being able to resolve the location of the input. The power consumption of display 16 may be reduced when display 16 is configured in this way.
  • [0090]
    In mode 94, device 10 is in an active mode. While device 10 is in the active mode, device 10 may perform gaze detection operations. Touch screen display 16 may be operating at a relatively high frequency (e.g., in the high power mode) while device 10 is in active mode 94. With another suitable arrangement, touch screen display 16 may be operating at or near its maximum capability (e.g., touch screen display 16 may be configured to sense the location of user inputs and to sense user inputs such as multi-touch inputs and gestures). Display 16 may also be displaying an application display screen (e.g., a home page, a telephone application information page, a media player screen, etc.) at an active brightness level.
  • [0091]
    When device 10 detects that the user has looked away from display 16 (e.g., using a gaze detection sensor such as camera 30), device 10 may dim display 16 and enter partial standby mode 98, as illustrated by line 96.
  • [0092]
    In mode 98, device 10 is in a partial standby mode. In partial standby mode 98, device 10 may dim display 16 to a partial standby brightness level to conserve power and may retain the touch screen capabilities of display 16. (Alternatively, touch screen capabilities can be reduced in mode 98.)
  • [0093]
    Device 10 may switch from partial standby mode 98 to active mode 94 whenever appropriate. For example, when device 10 detects that a user's gaze is directed towards display 16, device 10 may enter an active mode such as mode 94 (e.g., as illustrated by line 100) and may brighten display 16 to the active brightness level. Device 10 may also enter active mode 94 when device 10 detects user activity (e.g., as illustrated by dashed line 99). In arrangements in which the touch screen capabilities of display 16 remain at the active mode level when device 10 is in mode 98, display 16 may be able to receive location specific user inputs (e.g., inputs specific to a particular portion of display 16) while device 10 is in mode 98.
  • [0094]
    If desired, device 10 may operate in a full standby mode such as standby mode 104 in which display 16 is turned off and the touch screen capabilities of display 16 are reduced. As an example, when device 10 is operating in partial standby mode 98 and no user activity is detected for a given period of time, device 10 may enter standby mode 104. Device 10 may enter standby mode 104 as illustrated by line 102 after device 10 detects that the user has looked away (e.g., as illustrated by line 96) and after a given period of user inactivity has elapsed following the device's detection that the user has looked away.
  • [0095]
    With another suitable arrangement, device 10 may enter standby mode 104 directly from active mode 94 when no user activity is detected for a configurable period of time (e.g., as illustrated by dashed line 108). Device 10 may enter standby mode 104 even when device 10 detects that a user's gaze is directed towards display 16. If desired, the time period of user inactivity required before device 10 enters mode 104 directly from mode 94 (e.g., when a user's gaze is still directed towards device 10) may be longer than the time period of user inactivity required before device 10 enters mode 104 from mode 98 (e.g., when the user's gaze is not directed towards device 10). For example, the inactivity period associated with the mode transition of line 108 may be one minute or more while the inactivity period associated with the mode transition of line 102 may be thirty seconds or less.
  • [0096]
    In standby mode 104, device 10 may operate with a display portion of display 16 turned off. The display portion of display 16 and a touch screen portion of display 16 may be powered and configured independently. In mode 104, device 10 may reduce the touch screen capabilities of the touch screen portion of display 16 (e.g., by reducing the frequency at which touch screen display 16 scans for user input, by configuring display 16 such that user inputs can only be sensed generally, by disabling the touch screen capabilities of display 16, etc.).
  • [0097]
    If desired, device 10 may continue to perform gaze detection operations when operating in standby mode 104. As illustrated by dashed line 105, device 10 may switch from standby mode 104 to active mode 94 when device 10 detects that a user's gaze is directed towards display 16.
  • [0098]
    As illustrated by line 106, device 10 may also switch from mode 104 to active mode 94 when activity is detected (e.g., device 10 may turn on display 16 to the active brightness level and restore the touch screen capabilities of display 16 to the active capability level).
  • [0099]
    If desired, power can be further conserved by reducing the power consumption of components such as a processor, wireless communications circuitry, etc. while in full standby mode 104 and/or partial standby mode 98. For example, when device 10 is placed in full standby mode 104 or partial standby mode 98, the clock frequency for the clock that is used to operate processing circuitry 36 (e.g., a microprocessor) may be reduced. The number of processor cores that are active in processing circuitry 36 may also be reduced. Some or all of wireless communications circuitry 44 may be placed in a low-power state or turned off. The amount of additional circuitry that is powered down when device 10 enters modes 98 and 104 may be the same or, if desired, relatively more circuitry may be powered down in full standby mode 104 than in partial standby mode 98.
  • [0100]
    In configurations in which device 10 has additional components, some or all of these components can be selectively powered down. Device 10 may have additional power down modes in which different numbers of these components have been placed in low-power states. Any suitable criteria may be used to determine when to switch device 10 between these modes. For example, gaze detection data, user input data, and/or sensor data may be used to determine an appropriate mode in which to operate device 10. Components that may be powered down in this way include proximity sensors, light sensors such as an ambient light sensor, cameras, motions sensors such as accelerometers, audio circuits, radio-frequency transceiver circuitry, radio-frequency amplifiers, audio amplifiers, serial and parallel port communications circuits, thermal sensors, touch-screen input devices, etc.
  • [0101]
    As illustrated by FIG. 8, device 10 can implement a power management scheme in which gaze detection circuitry is turned on or off or is otherwise adjusted in real time. In the scheme illustrated by FIG. 8, device 10 can switch between an active mode, a partial standby mode, and a standby mode.
  • [0102]
    The gaze detection capabilities of device 10 can be adjusted to conserve power depending on the mode in which device 10 is operating. For example, device 10 may perform gaze detection operations by taking images using camera 30 or other imaging circuitry at a first rate while in an active mode and at a second rate that is less than the first rate while in a standby mode. If desired, device 10 may suspend gaze detection operations while in standby. When the gaze detection operations of device 10 are slowed down (e.g., performed at the second rate) or suspended, device 10 may consume a reduced amount of power.
  • [0103]
    In mode 110, device 10 is in an active mode. While device 10 is in the active mode, device 10 may perform gaze detection operations. For example, device 10 may perform gaze detection operations by taking images at a given rate to search for a user's gaze (e.g., once every 100 milliseconds, 200 milliseconds, 250 milliseconds, 500 milliseconds, 1 second, 2 seconds, etc.). These images may then be analyzed to determine whether the user of device 10 is looking at device 10. Display 16 may simultaneously display an application display screen (e.g., a home page, a telephone application information page, a media player screen, etc.) at an active brightness level.
  • [0104]
    When device 10 detects that the user has looked away from display 16 (e.g., using a gaze detection sensor such as camera 30), device 10 may dim display 16 and enter partial standby mode 114 as illustrated by line 112.
  • [0105]
    In mode 114, device 10 is in a partial standby mode. In partial standby mode 114, device 10 may dim display 16 to a partial standby brightness level to conserve power. If desired, device 10 may also reduce the speed at which images are captured for gaze detection operations in device 10 (e.g., to a lower multiple of the rate at which gaze detection images were captured in mode 110 such as one-half, one-quarter, etc. of the rate in mode 110).
  • [0106]
    Device 10 may switch from partial standby mode 114 to active mode 110 whenever appropriate. For example, when device 10 detects that a user's gaze is directed towards display 16, device 10 may enter an active mode such as mode 110 (e.g., as illustrated by line 116) and may brighten display 16 to the active brightness level. Device 10 may also enter active mode 110 when device 10 detects user activity (e.g., as illustrated by line 118).
  • [0107]
    If desired, device 10 may operate in a full standby mode such as standby mode 122 in which display 16 is turned off and the gaze detection capabilities of device 10 are also turned off (e.g., camera 30 is turned off). As an example, when device 10 is operating in partial standby mode 114 and no user activity is detected for a given period of time, device 10 may enter standby mode 122. Device 10 may enter standby mode 122 as illustrated by line 120 after device 10 detects that the user has looked away (e.g., as illustrated by line 116) and after a given period of user inactivity has elapsed following the device's detection that the user has looked away.
  • [0108]
    In standby mode 122, device 10 may operate with display 16 turned off and with gaze detection disabled (e.g., turned off). Other circuitry may also be placed in a low-power standby mode (e.g., processing circuitry).
  • [0109]
    As illustrated by dashed line 124, when device 10 detects activity, device 10 may switch from mode 122 to active mode 110 (e.g., device 10 may turn on display 16 to the active brightness level and turn on gaze detection capabilities to determine is a user's gaze is directed towards display 16).
  • [0110]
    With one suitable arrangement, when device 10 detects activity such as user activity, the period of user inactivity detected by device 10 and associated with the mode transition of line 120 may be reset. For example, when device 10 switches from mode 122 to active mode 110 and determines that the user's gaze is not directed towards display 16, device 10 may switch to mode 114 and the given period of user inactivity associated with the mode transition of line 120 may begin anew.
  • [0111]
    The motion of device 10 can be indicative of whether device 10 is being used by a user. If desired, device 10 may use data from an accelerometer or other motion sensor in selecting its mode of operation. For example, when device 10 detects motion above a threshold level with an accelerometer, device 10 may activate gaze detection operations to determine if a user is looking at the device. Device 10 may turn on gaze detection circuitry or may temporarily activate gaze detection operations for a given period of time (e.g., one second, five seconds, etc.) whenever a motion sensor such as an accelerometer detects that a user is shaking device 10 or device 10 is otherwise in motion. With this type of arrangement, device 10 may be in standby mode. When device 10 is picked up by a user, device 10 may detect that the device is in motion using the accelerometer. Device 10 may then activate gaze detection operations and, if the user's gaze is properly detected, may switch to an active mode such as mode 68 in which display 16 is turned on.
  • [0112]
    Device 10 may also suspend gaze detection operations when appropriate. For example, when device 10 is receiving user input through an input-output device 38 (e.g., when a user is providing user input through one or more user input devices) or when device 10 has recently received user input, gaze detection operations may be suspended (e.g., camera 30 may be turned off and the execution of gaze detection software may be stopped). In this situation, the presence of user interface activity makes it unnecessary to expend extra power operating the gaze detection circuitry.
  • [0113]
    As illustrated by FIG. 9, device 10 may also use information from environmental sensors such as proximity sensors and ambient light sensors to determine whether or not to perform gaze detection operations. Environmental sensors such as these may, if desired, be used in conjunction with an environmental sensor such as an accelerometer that detects device motion.
  • [0114]
    When device 10 is performing gaze detection operations (e.g., when device 10 is operating in a mode such as mode 126), device 10 may suspend gaze detection operations whenever a sensor in device 10 indicates that gaze detection operations are inappropriate or not needed (e.g., as illustrated by line 128). With one suitable arrangement, device 10 may be able to detect when gaze detection sensors such as camera 30 would be incapable of detecting a user's gaze due to excessive vibration detected by an accelerometer. For example, device 10 may suspend gaze detection operations (e.g., device 10 may switch to operating in mode 130) in response to signals from the accelerometer in device 10 that indicate the device is shaking or otherwise moving rapidly. In this example, device 10 may switch to mode 130 when the accelerometer detects that the acceleration of device 10 exceeds a given threshold level. In another example, device 10 may be able to detect, using a proximity sensor, that gaze detection operations are inappropriate because an object is in close proximity to device 10 and is blocking the device's gaze detection sensors (e.g., such as when a user places device 10 against their ear and thereby blocks camera 30). If desired, device 10 may suspend gaze detection operations when an ambient light sensor detects that there is insufficient light in the environment around device 10 for a camera such as camera 30 to capture images in which a user's gaze could be detected. Device 10 may also deactivate a camera associated with gaze detection operations and suspend a gaze detection application running on circuitry 36 when data from one or more sensors in device 10 indicate that gaze detection operations are inappropriate or wasteful of power.
  • [0115]
    When device 10 detects that gaze detection operations may be appropriate (e.g., after the sensors no longer indicate that gaze detection operations are inappropriate), device 10 may resume gaze detection operations in mode 126, as illustrated by line 132. This type of arrangement may help device 10 to avoid performing gaze detection operations at inappropriate times, while ensuring that the power conserving functionality of the gaze detection circuitry is retained during normal device operation.
  • [0116]
    The gaze detection capabilities of device 10 may, if desired, include visual user identification capabilities (e.g., face recognition). In this type of arrangement, device 10 may distinguish between authorized users and unauthorized users based on image sensor data. For example, device 10 may recognize an authorized user and may unlock itself whenever the authorized user is detected by the device's gaze detection circuitry (e.g., camera 30). If desired, when device 10 detects that the authorized user's gaze has been diverted from device 10, device 10 may lock itself to prevent unauthorized users from using device 10. This type of user-specific gaze detection functionality may be used for all gaze detection operations if desired. By making gaze detection specific to particular users, device 10 will not inadvertently transition from standby mode to active mode if a person in the user's vicinity happens to glance at the user's device.
  • [0117]
    FIG. 10 shows steps involved in processing a command to reduce the power consumption of display 16. Power reduction commands may be processed by device 10 based on gaze detection data or any other suitable data.
  • [0118]
    As show by step 134, processing may begin with reception of a power reduction command by the processing circuitry of device 10.
  • [0119]
    Display 16 may be an OLED display or other display that has pixels that may be controlled individually. As shown by box 136, in this type of situation, device 10 may make partial or full power reduction to some or all of the pixels of display 16 in response to the received power reduction command.
  • [0120]
    Display 16 may also be formed from a panel subsystem and a backlight subsystem. For example, display 16 may have a liquid crystal display (LCD) panel subsystem and a light emitting diode or fluorescent tube backlight subsystem. In backlight subsystems that contain individually controllable elements such as light emitting diodes, the brightness of the backlight elements may be selectively controlled. For example, as shown in step 138, the brightness of some of the backlight elements may be reduced while the other backlight elements remain fully powered.
  • [0121]
    In backlight subsystems that contain a single backlight element, the power of the single element may be partially or fully reduced to reduce power consumption (step 140).
  • [0122]
    During the operations of steps 138 and 140, further power reductions may be made by adjusting circuitry that controls the LCD panel subsystem.
  • [0123]
    The foregoing is merely illustrative of the principles of this invention and various modifications can be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

Claims (33)

1. A method for minimizing power consumption in a portable electronic device that has a display and gaze detection circuitry, the method comprising:
performing a video playback operation in which video is displayed on the display;
with the gaze detection circuitry, determining whether a user's gaze is directed towards the portable electronic device; and
when it is determined that the user's gaze is not directed towards the portable electronic device, pausing the video playback operation.
2. The method defined in claim 1 wherein determining whether the user's gaze is directed towards the portable electronic device comprises determining whether the user's gaze is directed towards the display.
3. The method defined in claim 1 further comprising:
after it has been determined that the user's gaze is not directed towards the portable electronic device, determining whether the user's gaze has returned to the portable electronic device; and
when it has been determined that the user's gaze has returned to the portable electronic device, resuming the video playback operation.
4. The method defined in claim 1 further comprising:
after it has been determined that the user's gaze is not directed towards the portable electronic device, determining whether the user's gaze has returned to the portable electronic device; and
when it has been determined that the user's gaze has returned to the portable electronic device, presenting an on-screen selectable option to resume the video playback operation.
5. The method defined in claim 1 further comprising:
when it has been determined that the user's gaze is not directed towards the portable electronic device, placing the display in an operating mode that reduces power consumption by the display.
6. The method defined in claim 5 wherein the display is at a first brightness level during the video playback operation and wherein placing the display in the operating mode comprises reducing the brightness of the display to a second brightness level.
7. The method defined in claim 6 further comprising:
after it has been determined that the user's gaze is not directed towards the portable electronic device, determining whether the user's gaze has returned to the portable electronic device; and
when it has been determined that the user's gaze has returned to the portable electronic device, increasing the brightness of the display to the first brightness level.
8. The method defined in claim 5 wherein placing the display in the operating mode that reduces power consumption comprises turning off the display.
9. A method for using a portable electronic device having an accelerometer and gaze detection circuitry, the method comprising:
with the accelerometer, determining whether a measured acceleration level for the portable electronic device has exceeded a given threshold value; and
when it has been determined that the acceleration level of the portable electronic device has exceeded the given threshold value, disabling the gaze detection circuitry.
10. The method defined in claim 9 further comprising:
after it has been determined that the acceleration level of the portable electronic device has exceeded the given threshold value, determining whether the acceleration level of the portable electronic device has dropped below a second threshold value; and
when it has been determined that the acceleration level of the portable electronic device has dropped below the second threshold value, enabling the gaze detection circuitry.
11. The method defined in claim 9 wherein the gaze detection circuitry comprises a camera that is used to determine whether the user's gaze is directed towards the portable electronic device and wherein disabling the gaze detection circuitry comprises turning off the camera.
12. A portable electronic device comprising:
an image sensor that captures images of a user; and
circuitry that processes the captured images to determine whether the user is looking at the portable electronic device, wherein the circuitry is configured to suspend captured image processing operations when user activity with the portable electronic device is detected.
13. The portable electronic device defined in claim 12 wherein the circuitry comprises at least one button and wherein the user activity comprises presses of the button by the user.
14. The portable electronic device defined in claim 12 wherein the user activity includes movement of the portable electronic device and wherein the circuitry comprises a sensor that detects the movement of the portable electronic device.
15. The portable electronic device defined in claim 12 further comprising:
a proximity sensor that detects whether any objects are within a given distance of the portable electronic device, wherein the circuitry is configured to suspend captured image processing operations when the proximity sensor detects an object within the given distance.
16. The portable electronic device defined in claim 12 further comprising:
a light sensor that measures a brightness level of ambient light, wherein the circuitry is configured to suspend captured image processing operations when the measured brightness level of ambient light is less than a given brightness level.
17. A portable electronic device comprising:
a display;
an image sensor that captures images of a user;
a user input device that receives input from the user; and
circuitry that processes the captured images to determine whether the user is looking at the portable electronic device, wherein the circuitry is configured to:
power the display at a first brightness level when it is determined that the user is looking at the portable electronic device; and
turn off the display after a given period of time has elapsed in which no input has been received from the user by the user input device, wherein the given period of time begins when it is determined that the user has looked away from the portable electronic device.
18. The portable electronic device defined in claim 17 wherein the circuitry is configured to reduce power to the display so that the display is at a second brightness level during the given period of time in which no input has been received from the user by the user input device.
19. The portable electronic device defined in claim 17 wherein the circuitry is configured to once again power the display at the first brightness level when the user input device receives input from the user.
20. The portable electronic device defined in claim 17 wherein the user input device comprises at least one button and wherein the input from the user comprises presses of the button by the user.
21. The portable electronic device defined in claim 17 wherein the circuitry is configured to suspend captured image processing operations after the given period of time has elapsed.
22. The portable electronic device defined in claim 21 wherein the circuitry is configured to resume captured image processing operations when the user input device receives input from the user.
23. A method for using a portable electronic device having a display, a user input device, and gaze detection circuitry, the method comprising:
with the gaze detection circuitry, determining whether a user's gaze is directed towards the portable electronic device;
when it is determined that the user's gaze is not directed towards the portable electronic device, reducing power to the display; and
when the user input device receives input from a user and power to the display has been reduced, increasing power to the display so that the display is at a first brightness level.
24. The method defined in claim 23 wherein reducing power to the display comprises reducing power to the display so that the display is at a second brightness level that is less than the first brightness level.
25. The method defined in claim 23 wherein reducing power to the display comprises turning off the display.
26. The method defined in claim 23 wherein reducing power to the display comprises reducing power to the display so that the display is at a second brightness level that is less than the first brightness level, the method further comprising:
after a given period of time has elapsed in which no input has been received by the user input device, turning off the display.
27. A portable electronic device comprising:
a display;
an image sensor that captures images of a user; and
circuitry that processes the captured images to determine whether the user is looking at the portable electronic device, wherein the portable electronic device is configured to operate in:
an active mode in which the display is powered at a first brightness level;
a partial standby mode in which the display is powered at a second brightness level that is less than the first brightness level; and
a full standby mode in which the display screen and at least part of the circuitry that processes the captured images are powered down.
28. The portable electronic device defined in claim 27 wherein the portable electronic device is further configured to switch from operating in the active mode to operating in the partial standby mode when the circuitry determines that the user has looked away from the portable electronic device.
29. The portable electronic device defined in claim 27 wherein the portable electronic device is further configured to switch from operating in the partial standby mode to operating in the full standby mode after a given period of time has elapsed in which no input has been received from the user by the user input device.
29. A portable electronic device comprising:
a display;
an image sensor that captures images of a user;
a processor; and
circuitry that processes the captured images to determine whether the user is looking at the portable electronic device, wherein the portable electronic device is configured to operate in:
a first mode in which the display is powered at a first brightness level; and
a second mode in which power to the display and the processor is reduced.
30. The portable electronic device defined in claim 29 wherein the first mode is an active mode, wherein the second mode is a full standby mode in the display is powered down, and wherein the portable electronic device is further configured to operate in a partial standby mode in which the display is powered at a second brightness level that is less than the first brightness level.
31. The portable electronic device defined in claim 29 wherein the processor includes a given number of processing cores, wherein, in the first mode, the processor is configured to operate using the given number of the processing cores, and wherein, in the second mode, the processor is configured to operate using fewer than the given number of the processing cores.
32. The portable electronic device defined in claim 29 wherein the processor is configured to receive a first clock in the first mode and a second clock in the second mode and wherein the first clock has a frequency that is greater than the second clock.
US12242251 2008-09-30 2008-09-30 Electronic devices with gaze detection capabilities Abandoned US20100079508A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12242251 US20100079508A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2008-09-30 Electronic devices with gaze detection capabilities

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12242251 US20100079508A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2008-09-30 Electronic devices with gaze detection capabilities
US13750877 US20130135198A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2013-01-25 Electronic Devices With Gaze Detection Capabilities
US14157909 US20140132508A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2014-01-17 Electronic Devices With Gaze Detection Capabilities

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13750877 Division US20130135198A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2013-01-25 Electronic Devices With Gaze Detection Capabilities

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100079508A1 true true US20100079508A1 (en) 2010-04-01

Family

ID=42056955

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12242251 Abandoned US20100079508A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2008-09-30 Electronic devices with gaze detection capabilities
US13750877 Abandoned US20130135198A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2013-01-25 Electronic Devices With Gaze Detection Capabilities
US14157909 Pending US20140132508A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2014-01-17 Electronic Devices With Gaze Detection Capabilities

Family Applications After (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13750877 Abandoned US20130135198A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2013-01-25 Electronic Devices With Gaze Detection Capabilities
US14157909 Pending US20140132508A1 (en) 2008-09-30 2014-01-17 Electronic Devices With Gaze Detection Capabilities

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US20100079508A1 (en)

Cited By (169)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090141895A1 (en) * 2007-11-29 2009-06-04 Oculis Labs, Inc Method and apparatus for secure display of visual content
US20090195497A1 (en) * 2008-02-01 2009-08-06 Pillar Ventures, Llc Gesture-based power management of a wearable portable electronic device with display
US20090218957A1 (en) * 2008-02-29 2009-09-03 Nokia Corporation Methods, apparatuses, and computer program products for conserving power in mobile devices
US20100134434A1 (en) * 2008-11-28 2010-06-03 Inventec Corporation Communication device and electricity saving method thereof
US20100271384A1 (en) * 2009-04-28 2010-10-28 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. Intelligent digital photo frame
US20100295839A1 (en) * 2009-05-19 2010-11-25 Hitachi Consumer Electronics Co., Ltd. Image Display Device
US20110006997A1 (en) * 2009-07-09 2011-01-13 Gunjan Porwal Luminous power control of a light source of a multimedia processing system
US20110138208A1 (en) * 2009-12-04 2011-06-09 Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. Method and apparatus for reducing power consumption in digital living network alliance network
US20110141220A1 (en) * 2008-08-28 2011-06-16 Kyocera Corporation Communication device
US20110234617A1 (en) * 2010-03-25 2011-09-29 Kyocera Corporation Mobile electronic device
US20110234543A1 (en) * 2010-03-25 2011-09-29 User Interfaces In Sweden Ab System and method for gesture detection and feedback
US20110304541A1 (en) * 2010-06-11 2011-12-15 Navneet Dalal Method and system for detecting gestures
US20110317917A1 (en) * 2010-06-29 2011-12-29 Apple Inc. Skin-tone Filtering
WO2012008827A1 (en) 2010-06-11 2012-01-19 Universiteit Van Amsterdam System and method for detecting a person's direction of interest, such as a person's gaze direction
US20120019447A1 (en) * 2009-10-02 2012-01-26 Hanes David H Digital display device
US20120032894A1 (en) * 2010-08-06 2012-02-09 Nima Parivar Intelligent management for an electronic device
US20120038541A1 (en) * 2010-08-13 2012-02-16 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal, display device and controlling method thereof
US20120274839A1 (en) * 2011-04-26 2012-11-01 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Electronic device and control method thereof
US8326001B2 (en) 2010-06-29 2012-12-04 Apple Inc. Low threshold face recognition
US20120306942A1 (en) * 2010-02-24 2012-12-06 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Illumination device, display device, data generation method, data generation program and recording medium
US20120324256A1 (en) * 2011-06-14 2012-12-20 International Business Machines Corporation Display management for multi-screen computing environments
US20130021308A1 (en) * 2011-07-20 2013-01-24 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Electronic device and method for adjusting backlight brightness
US20130083344A1 (en) * 2011-10-04 2013-04-04 Konica Minolta Business Technologies, Inc. , Image forming apparatus
DE102011084186A1 (en) * 2011-10-09 2013-04-11 XS Embedded GmbH Display device for visual representation of information using power-saving mode, has display and intensity control circuit for controlling brightness of display
EP2587341A1 (en) * 2011-10-27 2013-05-01 Tobii Technology AB Power management in an eye-tracking system
US20130120535A1 (en) * 2011-11-11 2013-05-16 Hongrae Cha Three-dimensional image processing apparatus and electric power control method of the same
US20130135196A1 (en) * 2011-11-29 2013-05-30 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method for operating user functions based on eye tracking and mobile device adapted thereto
US20130176208A1 (en) * 2012-01-06 2013-07-11 Kyocera Corporation Electronic equipment
US20130176250A1 (en) * 2012-01-06 2013-07-11 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal and control method thereof
US20130187863A1 (en) * 2012-01-23 2013-07-25 Research In Motion Limited Electronic device and method of controlling a display
EP2629177A1 (en) * 2012-02-16 2013-08-21 Research In Motion Limited Portable electronic device and method
US20130215250A1 (en) * 2012-02-16 2013-08-22 Research In Motion Limited Portable electronic device and method
US20130222270A1 (en) * 2012-02-28 2013-08-29 Motorola Mobility, Inc. Wearable display device, corresponding systems, and method for presenting output on the same
US20130229337A1 (en) * 2012-03-02 2013-09-05 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic device, electronic device controlling method, computer program product
US20130229442A1 (en) * 2011-11-29 2013-09-05 Huawei Device Co., Ltd. Method for controlling screen state of mobile device and related mobile device
WO2013130203A2 (en) 2012-02-28 2013-09-06 Motorola Mobility Llc Methods and apparatuses for operating a display in an electronic device
US20130268316A1 (en) * 2012-04-05 2013-10-10 Invue Security Products Inc. Merchandise user tracking system and method
CN103379222A (en) * 2012-04-27 2013-10-30 富士通株式会社 Terminal apparatus and backlight control method
WO2013172848A1 (en) * 2012-05-18 2013-11-21 Siemens Enterprise Communications Gmbh & Co. Kg Method, device, and system for reducing bandwidth usage during a communication session
US20130321312A1 (en) * 2012-05-29 2013-12-05 Haruomi HIGASHI Information processing apparatus, information display system and information display method
US20130342672A1 (en) * 2012-06-25 2013-12-26 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Using gaze determination with device input
US20140002352A1 (en) * 2012-05-09 2014-01-02 Michal Jacob Eye tracking based selective accentuation of portions of a display
US8639297B2 (en) 2010-09-13 2014-01-28 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal and operation control method thereof
CN103576857A (en) * 2012-08-09 2014-02-12 托比技术股份公司 Fast wake-up in gaze tracking system
CN103576834A (en) * 2012-08-07 2014-02-12 三星电子株式会社 Power saving control method and electronic device supporting the same
US8659433B2 (en) * 2011-09-21 2014-02-25 Google Inc. Locking mechanism based on unnatural movement of head-mounted display
US20140055387A1 (en) * 2012-08-24 2014-02-27 Wistron Corp. Portable electronic device and automatic unlocking method thereof
US20140080550A1 (en) * 2012-09-19 2014-03-20 Sony Mobile Communications, Inc. Mobile client device, operation method, and recording medium
WO2014046390A1 (en) 2012-09-24 2014-03-27 Lg Electronics Inc. Portable device and control method thereof
US20140094224A1 (en) * 2012-10-02 2014-04-03 Yury LOZOVOY Screen brightness control for mobile device
US20140095994A1 (en) * 2012-09-28 2014-04-03 Lg Electronics Inc. Portable device and control method thereof
US8749651B2 (en) * 2011-02-17 2014-06-10 Blackberry Limited Apparatus, and associated method, for selecting information delivery manner using facial recognition
US20140160019A1 (en) * 2012-12-07 2014-06-12 Nvidia Corporation Methods for enhancing user interaction with mobile devices
US20140171037A1 (en) * 2012-12-18 2014-06-19 Hyundai Motor Company Method for controlling call termination based on gaze, and mobile communication terminal therefor
US20140191939A1 (en) * 2013-01-09 2014-07-10 Microsoft Corporation Using nonverbal communication in determining actions
US20140204014A1 (en) * 2012-03-30 2014-07-24 Sony Mobile Communications Ab Optimizing selection of a media object type in which to present content to a user of a device
WO2014116167A1 (en) * 2013-01-22 2014-07-31 Crunchfish Ab Iimproved tracking of an object for controlling a touchless user interface
US20140232638A1 (en) * 2013-02-21 2014-08-21 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for user interface using gaze interaction
WO2014124663A1 (en) * 2013-02-13 2014-08-21 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Mobile electronic device with display state control
US20140244190A1 (en) * 2013-02-28 2014-08-28 Cellco Partnership D/B/A Verizon Wireless Power usage analysis
US20140240245A1 (en) * 2013-02-28 2014-08-28 Lg Electronics Inc. Display device for selectively outputting tactile feedback and visual feedback and method for controlling the same
US20140247208A1 (en) * 2013-03-01 2014-09-04 Tobii Technology Ab Invoking and waking a computing device from stand-by mode based on gaze detection
US8843346B2 (en) 2011-05-13 2014-09-23 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Using spatial information with device interaction
WO2014146168A1 (en) * 2013-03-19 2014-09-25 National Ict Australia Limited Automatic detection of task transition
EP2787423A1 (en) * 2012-03-22 2014-10-08 Huawei Device Co., Ltd. Standby operation control method and device
US20140313127A1 (en) * 2012-06-21 2014-10-23 Huawei Device Co., Ltd. Method for Calling Application Object and Mobile Terminal
US20140320688A1 (en) * 2013-04-29 2014-10-30 Tobii Technology Ab Power Efficient Image Sensing Apparatus, Method of Operating the Same and Eye/Gaze Tracking System
US20140329214A1 (en) * 2013-03-16 2014-11-06 Marc Jim Bitoun Physiological Indicator Monitoring For Identifying Stress Triggers and Certain Health Problems
CN104145230A (en) * 2011-12-23 2014-11-12 汤姆逊许可公司 Computer device with power-consumption management and method for managing power-consumption of computer device
US20140340317A1 (en) * 2013-05-14 2014-11-20 Sony Corporation Button with capacitive touch in a metal body of a user device and power-saving touch key control of information to display
WO2014183529A1 (en) * 2013-12-02 2014-11-20 中兴通讯股份有限公司 Mobile terminal talk mode switching method, device and storage medium
US8913004B1 (en) * 2010-03-05 2014-12-16 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Action based device control
US20140368423A1 (en) * 2013-06-17 2014-12-18 Nvidia Corporation Method and system for low power gesture recognition for waking up mobile devices
US20140379341A1 (en) * 2013-06-20 2014-12-25 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Mobile terminal and method for detecting a gesture to control functions
US20140380230A1 (en) * 2013-06-25 2014-12-25 Morgan Kolya Venable Selecting user interface elements via position signal
US8922480B1 (en) * 2010-03-05 2014-12-30 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Viewer-based device control
WO2014130238A3 (en) * 2013-02-21 2015-01-08 Intel Corporation Call routing among personal devices based on visual clues
US20150015688A1 (en) * 2013-07-09 2015-01-15 HTC Corportion Facial unlock mechanism using light level determining module
US8947323B1 (en) 2012-03-20 2015-02-03 Hayes Solos Raffle Content display methods
US20150035776A1 (en) * 2012-03-23 2015-02-05 Ntt Docomo, Inc. Information terminal, method for controlling input acceptance, and program for controlling input acceptance
CN104349009A (en) * 2013-08-06 2015-02-11 柯尼卡美能达株式会社 Display device, non-transitory computer-readable recording medium and image processing apparatus
US8957847B1 (en) * 2010-12-28 2015-02-17 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Low distraction interfaces
WO2015026203A1 (en) * 2013-08-23 2015-02-26 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Mode switching method and apparatus of terminal
US20150061989A1 (en) * 2013-08-29 2015-03-05 Sony Computer Entertainment America Llc Attention-based rendering and fidelity
US20150067377A1 (en) * 2013-08-28 2015-03-05 Qualcomm Incorporated Method, Devices and Systems for Dynamic Multimedia Data Flow Control for Thermal Power Budgeting
US20150061504A1 (en) * 2013-08-30 2015-03-05 Universal Display Corporation Intelligent dimming lighting
US8976110B2 (en) 2011-10-27 2015-03-10 Tobii Technology Ab Power management in an eye-tracking system
WO2015042034A1 (en) * 2013-09-17 2015-03-26 Nokia Corporation Display of a visual event notification
EP2737467B1 (en) 2011-07-25 2015-04-01 Robert Bosch GmbH Procedure to assist the driver of a vehicle
EP2827226A3 (en) * 2013-07-18 2015-04-08 LG Electronics, Inc. Watch type mobile terminal
US20150119108A1 (en) * 2013-10-24 2015-04-30 Cellco Partnership D/B/A Verizon Wireless Mobile device mode of operation for visually impaired users
US20150154001A1 (en) * 2013-12-03 2015-06-04 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Initiating personal assistant application based on eye tracking and gestures
WO2015089011A1 (en) * 2013-12-09 2015-06-18 Agco Corporation Method and apparatus for improving user interface visibility in agricultural machines
US20150169047A1 (en) * 2013-12-16 2015-06-18 Nokia Corporation Method and apparatus for causation of capture of visual information indicative of a part of an environment
US20150169048A1 (en) * 2013-12-18 2015-06-18 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Systems and methods to present information on device based on eye tracking
EP2889718A1 (en) * 2013-12-30 2015-07-01 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd A natural input based virtual ui system for electronic devices
US9075435B1 (en) * 2013-04-22 2015-07-07 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Context-aware notifications
US20150213725A1 (en) * 2012-09-07 2015-07-30 Tractus Corporation Method, apparatus, and system for viewing multiple-slice medical images
US9098069B2 (en) 2011-11-16 2015-08-04 Google Technology Holdings LLC Display device, corresponding systems, and methods for orienting output on a display
WO2015123062A1 (en) * 2014-02-11 2015-08-20 Google Inc. Navigation directions specific to device state
US9122249B2 (en) 2012-04-13 2015-09-01 Nokia Technologies Oy Multi-segment wearable accessory
EP2759906A4 (en) * 2011-09-21 2015-09-09 Nec Corp Portable terminal device and program
WO2015138203A1 (en) * 2014-03-11 2015-09-17 Google Technology Holdings LLC Display viewing detection
US9152209B2 (en) 2011-08-30 2015-10-06 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for controlling an operation mode of a mobile terminal
US20150334808A1 (en) * 2014-05-15 2015-11-19 Universal Display Corporation Biosensing Electronic Devices
US9213659B2 (en) 2013-12-03 2015-12-15 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Devices and methods to receive input at a first device and present output in response on a second device different from the first device
US20150370307A1 (en) * 2012-05-31 2015-12-24 At&T Intellectual Property I, Lp Managing power consumption state of electronic devices responsive to predicting future demand
US9256071B1 (en) 2012-01-09 2016-02-09 Google Inc. User interface
US9307396B2 (en) 2011-10-19 2016-04-05 Firstface Co., Ltd. System, method and mobile communication terminal for displaying advertisement upon activation of mobile communication terminal
US9304621B1 (en) 2012-05-25 2016-04-05 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Communication via pressure input
US20160105638A1 (en) * 2012-08-14 2016-04-14 Avaya Inc. Protecting privacy of a customer and an agent using face recognition in a video contact center environment
US20160109943A1 (en) * 2014-10-21 2016-04-21 Honeywell International Inc. System and method for controlling visibility of a proximity display
US20160133201A1 (en) * 2014-11-07 2016-05-12 Osterhout Group, Inc. Power management for head worn computing
FR3029307A1 (en) * 2014-11-27 2016-06-03 Oberthur Tech electronic device system comprising such a device, CONTROL METHOD of such a device and display control method a system comprising such a device
EP3037915A1 (en) * 2014-12-23 2016-06-29 Nokia Technologies OY Virtual reality content control
US9390649B2 (en) 2013-11-27 2016-07-12 Universal Display Corporation Ruggedized wearable display
US9406103B1 (en) 2012-09-26 2016-08-02 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Inline message alert
US9406211B2 (en) * 2014-11-19 2016-08-02 Medical Wearable Solutions Ltd. Wearable posture regulation system and method to regulate posture
US9436006B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-09-06 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US20160292525A1 (en) * 2015-03-31 2016-10-06 Fujitsu Limited Image analyzing apparatus and image analyzing method
US9471275B1 (en) 2015-05-14 2016-10-18 International Business Machines Corporation Reading device usability
US9474022B2 (en) 2012-11-30 2016-10-18 Nvidia Corporation Saving power in a mobile terminal
US9494800B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-11-15 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9523856B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-12-20 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US20160373645A1 (en) * 2012-07-20 2016-12-22 Pixart Imaging Inc. Image system with eye protection
US9529192B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-12-27 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9529195B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-12-27 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9535497B2 (en) 2014-11-20 2017-01-03 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Presentation of data on an at least partially transparent display based on user focus
EP3012828A4 (en) * 2013-06-19 2017-01-04 Yulong Computer Telecommunication Scient (Shenzhen) Co Ltd Smart watch and display method for smart watch
US9547465B2 (en) 2014-02-14 2017-01-17 Osterhout Group, Inc. Object shadowing in head worn computing
WO2017018732A1 (en) * 2015-07-24 2017-02-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Electronic device and method for providing content
US9575321B2 (en) 2014-06-09 2017-02-21 Osterhout Group, Inc. Content presentation in head worn computing
US9578224B2 (en) 2012-09-10 2017-02-21 Nvidia Corporation System and method for enhanced monoimaging
EP3014604A4 (en) * 2013-06-28 2017-03-01 Nokia Technologies Oy Supporting activation of function of device
US9612656B2 (en) 2012-11-27 2017-04-04 Facebook, Inc. Systems and methods of eye tracking control on mobile device
US9619020B2 (en) 2013-03-01 2017-04-11 Tobii Ab Delay warp gaze interaction
US9615742B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-04-11 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9633252B2 (en) 2013-12-20 2017-04-25 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Real-time detection of user intention based on kinematics analysis of movement-oriented biometric data
US9651787B2 (en) 2014-04-25 2017-05-16 Osterhout Group, Inc. Speaker assembly for headworn computer
US9651784B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-05-16 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9672210B2 (en) 2014-04-25 2017-06-06 Osterhout Group, Inc. Language translation with head-worn computing
US9671613B2 (en) 2014-09-26 2017-06-06 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9684172B2 (en) 2014-12-03 2017-06-20 Osterhout Group, Inc. Head worn computer display systems
US20170177088A1 (en) * 2015-12-21 2017-06-22 Sap Se Two-step gesture recognition for fine-grain control of wearable applications
US9709708B2 (en) 2013-12-09 2017-07-18 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Adjustable display optics
USD792400S1 (en) 2014-12-31 2017-07-18 Osterhout Group, Inc. Computer glasses
US9715112B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-07-25 Osterhout Group, Inc. Suppression of stray light in head worn computing
US9720234B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-08-01 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
EP3065623A4 (en) * 2013-11-09 2017-08-09 Shenzhen Huiding Technology Co Optical eye tracking
USD794637S1 (en) 2015-01-05 2017-08-15 Osterhout Group, Inc. Air mouse
US9740280B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-08-22 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9746686B2 (en) 2014-05-19 2017-08-29 Osterhout Group, Inc. Content position calibration in head worn computing
US9753288B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-09-05 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9760150B2 (en) 2012-11-27 2017-09-12 Nvidia Corporation Low-power states for a computer system with integrated baseband
US9766463B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-09-19 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
EP3087533A4 (en) * 2013-12-23 2017-09-20 Eyelock Llc Methods and apparatus for power-efficient iris recognition
US9778829B2 (en) 2012-02-17 2017-10-03 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Magnification based on eye input
US9784973B2 (en) 2014-02-11 2017-10-10 Osterhout Group, Inc. Micro doppler presentations in head worn computing
WO2017185728A1 (en) * 2016-04-25 2017-11-02 中兴通讯股份有限公司 Method and device for identifying key operation
US9811095B2 (en) 2014-08-06 2017-11-07 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Glasses with fluid-fillable membrane for adjusting focal length of one or more lenses of the glasses
US9810906B2 (en) 2014-06-17 2017-11-07 Osterhout Group, Inc. External user interface for head worn computing
US9811152B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-11-07 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9823728B2 (en) 2013-09-04 2017-11-21 Nvidia Corporation Method and system for reduced rate touch scanning on an electronic device
US9829707B2 (en) 2014-08-12 2017-11-28 Osterhout Group, Inc. Measuring content brightness in head worn computing
US9836122B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-12-05 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye glint imaging in see-through computer display systems
US9836649B2 (en) 2014-11-05 2017-12-05 Osterhot Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9841599B2 (en) 2014-06-05 2017-12-12 Osterhout Group, Inc. Optical configurations for head-worn see-through displays
US9843093B2 (en) 2014-02-11 2017-12-12 Osterhout Group, Inc. Spatial location presentation in head worn computing
US9864498B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2018-01-09 Tobii Ab Automatic scrolling based on gaze detection

Families Citing this family (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP5278461B2 (en) * 2011-02-03 2013-09-04 株式会社デンソー Line-of-sight detection apparatus and a line-of-sight detection method
US8836777B2 (en) 2011-02-25 2014-09-16 DigitalOptics Corporation Europe Limited Automatic detection of vertical gaze using an embedded imaging device
JP5434971B2 (en) * 2011-06-24 2014-03-05 コニカミノルタ株式会社 Image forming apparatus
US20130057573A1 (en) * 2011-09-02 2013-03-07 DigitalOptics Corporation Europe Limited Smart Display with Dynamic Face-Based User Preference Settings
US9094539B1 (en) * 2011-09-22 2015-07-28 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Dynamic device adjustments based on determined user sleep state
US20170371420A1 (en) * 2011-11-04 2017-12-28 Tobii Ab Portable device
US8937591B2 (en) 2012-04-06 2015-01-20 Apple Inc. Systems and methods for counteracting a perceptual fading of a movable indicator
US9104467B2 (en) * 2012-10-14 2015-08-11 Ari M Frank Utilizing eye tracking to reduce power consumption involved in measuring affective response
KR20140089183A (en) * 2013-01-04 2014-07-14 삼성전자주식회사 Method and apparatus for prividing control service using head tracking in an electronic device
KR101766435B1 (en) * 2013-06-14 2017-08-08 인텔 코포레이션 Methods and apparatus to provide power to devices
US8985461B2 (en) * 2013-06-28 2015-03-24 Hand Held Products, Inc. Mobile device having an improved user interface for reading code symbols
CN104427087A (en) * 2013-08-21 2015-03-18 腾讯科技(深圳)有限公司 Method for realizing dynamic wallpaper of mobile terminal, and mobile terminal
KR20150049942A (en) * 2013-10-31 2015-05-08 삼성전자주식회사 Method, apparatus and computer readable recording medium for controlling on an electronic device
US9111076B2 (en) * 2013-11-20 2015-08-18 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal and control method thereof
WO2015104644A3 (en) 2014-01-10 2015-11-12 The Eye Tribe Aps Light modulation in eye tracking devices
US20150277120A1 (en) 2014-01-21 2015-10-01 Osterhout Group, Inc. Optical configurations for head worn computing
US9310610B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-04-12 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US20150205111A1 (en) 2014-01-21 2015-07-23 Osterhout Group, Inc. Optical configurations for head worn computing
US9400390B2 (en) 2014-01-24 2016-07-26 Osterhout Group, Inc. Peripheral lighting for head worn computing
US9852545B2 (en) 2014-02-11 2017-12-26 Osterhout Group, Inc. Spatial location presentation in head worn computing
US20150228119A1 (en) 2014-02-11 2015-08-13 Osterhout Group, Inc. Spatial location presentation in head worn computing
US20150277118A1 (en) 2014-03-28 2015-10-01 Osterhout Group, Inc. Sensor dependent content position in head worn computing
EP3137968A4 (en) * 2014-04-29 2017-09-13 Hewlett-Packard Dev Company L P Gaze detector using reference frames in media
US9454699B2 (en) 2014-04-29 2016-09-27 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Handling glare in eye tracking
US9366867B2 (en) 2014-07-08 2016-06-14 Osterhout Group, Inc. Optical systems for see-through displays
US9423842B2 (en) 2014-09-18 2016-08-23 Osterhout Group, Inc. Thermal management for head-worn computer
US9366868B2 (en) 2014-09-26 2016-06-14 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9448409B2 (en) 2014-11-26 2016-09-20 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
USD743963S1 (en) 2014-12-22 2015-11-24 Osterhout Group, Inc. Air mouse
KR20170104516A (en) * 2015-01-07 2017-09-15 페이스북, 인크. Dynamic camera or light action
WO2016191404A1 (en) * 2015-05-26 2016-12-01 Invue Security Products Inc. Merchandise display including sensor for detecting the presence of a customer
US20160364030A1 (en) * 2015-06-11 2016-12-15 Dell Products L.P. Touch user interface at a display edge
US20170097677A1 (en) * 2015-10-05 2017-04-06 International Business Machines Corporation Gaze-aware control of multi-screen experience
US20170187982A1 (en) * 2015-12-29 2017-06-29 Le Holdings (Beijing) Co., Ltd. Method and terminal for playing control based on face recognition

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5583795A (en) * 1995-03-17 1996-12-10 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Apparatus for measuring eye gaze and fixation duration, and method therefor
US20020180799A1 (en) * 2001-05-29 2002-12-05 Peck Charles C. Eye gaze control of dynamic information presentation
US6526159B1 (en) * 1998-12-31 2003-02-25 Intel Corporation Eye tracking for resource and power management
US6661907B2 (en) * 1998-06-10 2003-12-09 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Face detection in digital images
US6734845B1 (en) * 1996-05-30 2004-05-11 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Eyetrack-driven illumination and information display
US20040175020A1 (en) * 2003-03-05 2004-09-09 Bradski Gary R. Method and apparatus for monitoring human attention in dynamic power management
US6956564B1 (en) * 1997-10-28 2005-10-18 British Telecommunications Public Limited Company Portable computers
US6970723B2 (en) * 2000-03-27 2005-11-29 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Mobile-type electronic apparatus and method for controlling the same
US7091471B2 (en) * 2004-03-15 2006-08-15 Agilent Technologies, Inc. Using eye detection for providing control and power management of electronic devices
US20070024579A1 (en) * 2005-07-28 2007-02-01 Outland Research, Llc Gaze discriminating electronic control apparatus, system, method and computer program product
US20070078552A1 (en) * 2006-01-13 2007-04-05 Outland Research, Llc Gaze-based power conservation for portable media players
US20070132734A1 (en) * 2005-12-09 2007-06-14 Jong-Taek Kwak Optical navigation device and method of operating the same

Family Cites Families (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5214466A (en) * 1990-04-11 1993-05-25 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Camera having visual axis detecting apparatus
US5239337A (en) * 1990-08-20 1993-08-24 Nikon Corporation Apparatus for ordering to phototake with eye-detection
JPH0981309A (en) * 1995-09-13 1997-03-28 Toshiba Corp Input device
US5990872A (en) * 1996-10-31 1999-11-23 Gateway 2000, Inc. Keyboard control of a pointing device of a computer
US6665805B1 (en) * 1999-12-27 2003-12-16 Intel Corporation Method and apparatus for real time monitoring of user presence to prolong a portable computer battery operation time
US20020173344A1 (en) * 2001-03-16 2002-11-21 Cupps Bryan T. Novel personal electronics device
US7009638B2 (en) * 2001-05-04 2006-03-07 Vexcel Imaging Gmbh Self-calibrating, digital, large format camera with single or multiple detector arrays and single or multiple optical systems
US20030038754A1 (en) * 2001-08-22 2003-02-27 Mikael Goldstein Method and apparatus for gaze responsive text presentation in RSVP display
US7251350B2 (en) * 2002-10-23 2007-07-31 Intel Corporation Method and apparatus for adaptive realtime system power state control
FI20030213A0 (en) * 2003-02-12 2003-02-12 Nokia Corp Selection of operational modes of an electronic device
US8292433B2 (en) * 2003-03-21 2012-10-23 Queen's University At Kingston Method and apparatus for communication between humans and devices
US7117380B2 (en) * 2003-09-30 2006-10-03 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus, system, and method for autonomic power adjustment in an electronic device
EP1691670B1 (en) * 2003-11-14 2014-07-16 Queen's University At Kingston Method and apparatus for calibration-free eye tracking
US20050236488A1 (en) * 2004-04-26 2005-10-27 Kricorissian Gregg R Motion induced blur minimization in a portable image reader
US7302089B1 (en) * 2004-04-29 2007-11-27 National Semiconductor Corporation Autonomous optical wake-up intelligent sensor circuit
US20050289363A1 (en) * 2004-06-28 2005-12-29 Tsirkel Aaron M Method and apparatus for automatic realtime power management
US7633076B2 (en) * 2005-09-30 2009-12-15 Apple Inc. Automated response to and sensing of user activity in portable devices
DE602004024322D1 (en) * 2004-12-15 2010-01-07 St Microelectronics Res & Dev A device for detection of computer users
WO2007003195A1 (en) * 2005-07-04 2007-01-11 Bang & Olufsen A/S A unit, an assembly and a method for controlling in a dynamic egocentric interactive space
US20090066722A1 (en) * 2005-08-29 2009-03-12 Kriger Joshua F System, Device, and Method for Conveying Information Using Enhanced Rapid Serial Presentation
US7505784B2 (en) * 2005-09-26 2009-03-17 Barbera Melvin A Safety features for portable electronic device
JP4800163B2 (en) * 2006-09-29 2011-10-26 株式会社トプコン Position measuring device and method
US7957762B2 (en) * 2007-01-07 2011-06-07 Apple Inc. Using ambient light sensor to augment proximity sensor output
US8077915B2 (en) * 2007-10-12 2011-12-13 Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications Ab Obtaining information by tracking a user
US20090219224A1 (en) * 2008-02-28 2009-09-03 Johannes Elg Head tracking for enhanced 3d experience using face detection

Patent Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5583795A (en) * 1995-03-17 1996-12-10 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Apparatus for measuring eye gaze and fixation duration, and method therefor
US6734845B1 (en) * 1996-05-30 2004-05-11 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Eyetrack-driven illumination and information display
US6956564B1 (en) * 1997-10-28 2005-10-18 British Telecommunications Public Limited Company Portable computers
US6661907B2 (en) * 1998-06-10 2003-12-09 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Face detection in digital images
US6526159B1 (en) * 1998-12-31 2003-02-25 Intel Corporation Eye tracking for resource and power management
US6970723B2 (en) * 2000-03-27 2005-11-29 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Mobile-type electronic apparatus and method for controlling the same
US20020180799A1 (en) * 2001-05-29 2002-12-05 Peck Charles C. Eye gaze control of dynamic information presentation
US20040175020A1 (en) * 2003-03-05 2004-09-09 Bradski Gary R. Method and apparatus for monitoring human attention in dynamic power management
US7379560B2 (en) * 2003-03-05 2008-05-27 Intel Corporation Method and apparatus for monitoring human attention in dynamic power management
US7091471B2 (en) * 2004-03-15 2006-08-15 Agilent Technologies, Inc. Using eye detection for providing control and power management of electronic devices
US20070024579A1 (en) * 2005-07-28 2007-02-01 Outland Research, Llc Gaze discriminating electronic control apparatus, system, method and computer program product
US20070132734A1 (en) * 2005-12-09 2007-06-14 Jong-Taek Kwak Optical navigation device and method of operating the same
US20070078552A1 (en) * 2006-01-13 2007-04-05 Outland Research, Llc Gaze-based power conservation for portable media players

Cited By (284)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090141895A1 (en) * 2007-11-29 2009-06-04 Oculis Labs, Inc Method and apparatus for secure display of visual content
US8462949B2 (en) * 2007-11-29 2013-06-11 Oculis Labs, Inc. Method and apparatus for secure display of visual content
US8344998B2 (en) 2008-02-01 2013-01-01 Wimm Labs, Inc. Gesture-based power management of a wearable portable electronic device with display
US20090195497A1 (en) * 2008-02-01 2009-08-06 Pillar Ventures, Llc Gesture-based power management of a wearable portable electronic device with display
US20090218957A1 (en) * 2008-02-29 2009-09-03 Nokia Corporation Methods, apparatuses, and computer program products for conserving power in mobile devices
US9277173B2 (en) * 2008-08-28 2016-03-01 Kyocera Corporation Communication device
US20110141220A1 (en) * 2008-08-28 2011-06-16 Kyocera Corporation Communication device
US20100134434A1 (en) * 2008-11-28 2010-06-03 Inventec Corporation Communication device and electricity saving method thereof
US20100271384A1 (en) * 2009-04-28 2010-10-28 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. Intelligent digital photo frame
US20100295839A1 (en) * 2009-05-19 2010-11-25 Hitachi Consumer Electronics Co., Ltd. Image Display Device
US20110006997A1 (en) * 2009-07-09 2011-01-13 Gunjan Porwal Luminous power control of a light source of a multimedia processing system
US8508520B2 (en) * 2009-07-09 2013-08-13 Nvidia Corporation Luminous power control of a light source of a multimedia processing system
US20120019447A1 (en) * 2009-10-02 2012-01-26 Hanes David H Digital display device
US9317099B2 (en) 2009-12-04 2016-04-19 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for reducing power consumption in digital living network alliance network
US20110138208A1 (en) * 2009-12-04 2011-06-09 Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. Method and apparatus for reducing power consumption in digital living network alliance network
US8639957B2 (en) * 2009-12-04 2014-01-28 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for reducing power consumption in digital living network alliance network
US20120306942A1 (en) * 2010-02-24 2012-12-06 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Illumination device, display device, data generation method, data generation program and recording medium
US9324279B2 (en) * 2010-02-24 2016-04-26 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Illumination device, display device, data generation method, non-transitory computer readable recording medium including data generation program for generating light amount adjustment data based on temperature
US9405918B2 (en) 2010-03-05 2016-08-02 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Viewer-based device control
US8922480B1 (en) * 2010-03-05 2014-12-30 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Viewer-based device control
US8913004B1 (en) * 2010-03-05 2014-12-16 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Action based device control
US20150169053A1 (en) * 2010-03-05 2015-06-18 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Controlling Power Consumption Based on User Gaze
US20110234543A1 (en) * 2010-03-25 2011-09-29 User Interfaces In Sweden Ab System and method for gesture detection and feedback
US20110234617A1 (en) * 2010-03-25 2011-09-29 Kyocera Corporation Mobile electronic device
US9218119B2 (en) * 2010-03-25 2015-12-22 Blackberry Limited System and method for gesture detection and feedback
US20110304541A1 (en) * 2010-06-11 2011-12-15 Navneet Dalal Method and system for detecting gestures
WO2012008827A1 (en) 2010-06-11 2012-01-19 Universiteit Van Amsterdam System and method for detecting a person's direction of interest, such as a person's gaze direction
US8326001B2 (en) 2010-06-29 2012-12-04 Apple Inc. Low threshold face recognition
US8824747B2 (en) * 2010-06-29 2014-09-02 Apple Inc. Skin-tone filtering
US9076029B2 (en) 2010-06-29 2015-07-07 Apple Inc. Low threshold face recognition
US20110317917A1 (en) * 2010-06-29 2011-12-29 Apple Inc. Skin-tone Filtering
US20120032894A1 (en) * 2010-08-06 2012-02-09 Nima Parivar Intelligent management for an electronic device
US9740268B2 (en) 2010-08-06 2017-08-22 Apple Inc. Intelligent management for an electronic device
US20120038541A1 (en) * 2010-08-13 2012-02-16 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal, display device and controlling method thereof
US8787986B2 (en) 2010-09-13 2014-07-22 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal and operation control method thereof
US8639297B2 (en) 2010-09-13 2014-01-28 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal and operation control method thereof
US9049600B2 (en) 2010-09-13 2015-06-02 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal and operation control method thereof
US8831688B2 (en) 2010-09-13 2014-09-09 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal and operation control method thereof
US9645642B2 (en) 2010-12-28 2017-05-09 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Low distraction interfaces
US8957847B1 (en) * 2010-12-28 2015-02-17 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Low distraction interfaces
US8749651B2 (en) * 2011-02-17 2014-06-10 Blackberry Limited Apparatus, and associated method, for selecting information delivery manner using facial recognition
US8643771B2 (en) * 2011-04-26 2014-02-04 Fu Tai Hua Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. Electronic device and control method for controlling powering-saving state of electronic device
US20120274839A1 (en) * 2011-04-26 2012-11-01 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Electronic device and control method thereof
US8843346B2 (en) 2011-05-13 2014-09-23 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Using spatial information with device interaction
US8806235B2 (en) * 2011-06-14 2014-08-12 International Business Machines Corporation Display management for multi-screen computing environments
US20120324256A1 (en) * 2011-06-14 2012-12-20 International Business Machines Corporation Display management for multi-screen computing environments
US20130021308A1 (en) * 2011-07-20 2013-01-24 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Electronic device and method for adjusting backlight brightness
EP2737467B1 (en) 2011-07-25 2015-04-01 Robert Bosch GmbH Procedure to assist the driver of a vehicle
US9152209B2 (en) 2011-08-30 2015-10-06 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for controlling an operation mode of a mobile terminal
US8659433B2 (en) * 2011-09-21 2014-02-25 Google Inc. Locking mechanism based on unnatural movement of head-mounted display
EP2759906A4 (en) * 2011-09-21 2015-09-09 Nec Corp Portable terminal device and program
US9436306B2 (en) 2011-09-21 2016-09-06 Nec Corporation Portable terminal device and program
US9179015B2 (en) * 2011-10-04 2015-11-03 Konica Minolta Business Technologies, Inc. Image forming apparatus
US20130083344A1 (en) * 2011-10-04 2013-04-04 Konica Minolta Business Technologies, Inc. , Image forming apparatus
DE102011084186A1 (en) * 2011-10-09 2013-04-11 XS Embedded GmbH Display device for visual representation of information using power-saving mode, has display and intensity control circuit for controlling brightness of display
US9639859B2 (en) 2011-10-19 2017-05-02 Firstface Co., Ltd. System, method and mobile communication terminal for displaying advertisement upon activation of mobile communication terminal
US9779419B2 (en) 2011-10-19 2017-10-03 Firstface Co., Ltd. Activating display and performing user authentication in mobile terminal with one-time user input
US9307396B2 (en) 2011-10-19 2016-04-05 Firstface Co., Ltd. System, method and mobile communication terminal for displaying advertisement upon activation of mobile communication terminal
US9633373B2 (en) 2011-10-19 2017-04-25 Firstface Co., Ltd. Activating display and performing additional function in mobile terminal with one-time user input
EP2587341A1 (en) * 2011-10-27 2013-05-01 Tobii Technology AB Power management in an eye-tracking system
US8976110B2 (en) 2011-10-27 2015-03-10 Tobii Technology Ab Power management in an eye-tracking system
EP3200046A1 (en) * 2011-10-27 2017-08-02 Tobii Technology AB Power management in an eye-tracking system
WO2013060826A1 (en) 2011-10-27 2013-05-02 Tobii Technology Ab Intelligent user mode selection in an eye-tracking system
US9866754B2 (en) 2011-10-27 2018-01-09 Tobii Ab Power management in an eye-tracking system
US9791912B2 (en) 2011-10-27 2017-10-17 Tobii Ab Intelligent user mode selection in an eye-tracking system
US9442566B2 (en) 2011-10-27 2016-09-13 Tobii Ab Power management in an eye-tracking system
US20130120535A1 (en) * 2011-11-11 2013-05-16 Hongrae Cha Three-dimensional image processing apparatus and electric power control method of the same
US9098069B2 (en) 2011-11-16 2015-08-04 Google Technology Holdings LLC Display device, corresponding systems, and methods for orienting output on a display
US20130229442A1 (en) * 2011-11-29 2013-09-05 Huawei Device Co., Ltd. Method for controlling screen state of mobile device and related mobile device
EP2600220A3 (en) * 2011-11-29 2015-05-27 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd Method for operating user functions based on eye tracking and mobile device adapted thereto
US20130135196A1 (en) * 2011-11-29 2013-05-30 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method for operating user functions based on eye tracking and mobile device adapted thereto
JP2013114691A (en) * 2011-11-29 2013-06-10 Samsung Electronics Co Ltd User function operation method based on visual line tracking and terminal equipment for supporting the same method
CN103135762A (en) * 2011-11-29 2013-06-05 三星电子株式会社 Method for operating user functions based on eye tracking and mobile device adapted thereto
US9092051B2 (en) * 2011-11-29 2015-07-28 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method for operating user functions based on eye tracking and mobile device adapted thereto
US9654768B2 (en) * 2011-12-23 2017-05-16 Thomson Licensing Computer device with power-consumption management and method for managing power consumption of computer device
EP2795425A4 (en) * 2011-12-23 2015-08-26 Thomson Licensing Computer device with power-consumption management and method for managing power-consumption of computer device
CN104145230A (en) * 2011-12-23 2014-11-12 汤姆逊许可公司 Computer device with power-consumption management and method for managing power-consumption of computer device
US20140347454A1 (en) * 2011-12-23 2014-11-27 Thomson Licensing Computer device with power-consumption management and method for managing power-consumption of computer device
US20130176208A1 (en) * 2012-01-06 2013-07-11 Kyocera Corporation Electronic equipment
US20130176250A1 (en) * 2012-01-06 2013-07-11 Lg Electronics Inc. Mobile terminal and control method thereof
US9256071B1 (en) 2012-01-09 2016-02-09 Google Inc. User interface
US20130187863A1 (en) * 2012-01-23 2013-07-25 Research In Motion Limited Electronic device and method of controlling a display
US9058168B2 (en) * 2012-01-23 2015-06-16 Blackberry Limited Electronic device and method of controlling a display
EP2629177A1 (en) * 2012-02-16 2013-08-21 Research In Motion Limited Portable electronic device and method
US20130215250A1 (en) * 2012-02-16 2013-08-22 Research In Motion Limited Portable electronic device and method
US9778829B2 (en) 2012-02-17 2017-10-03 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Magnification based on eye input
WO2013130202A2 (en) 2012-02-28 2013-09-06 Motorola Mobility Llc Methods and apparatuses for operating a display in an electronic device
WO2013130203A2 (en) 2012-02-28 2013-09-06 Motorola Mobility Llc Methods and apparatuses for operating a display in an electronic device
US8947382B2 (en) * 2012-02-28 2015-02-03 Motorola Mobility Llc Wearable display device, corresponding systems, and method for presenting output on the same
US20130222270A1 (en) * 2012-02-28 2013-08-29 Motorola Mobility, Inc. Wearable display device, corresponding systems, and method for presenting output on the same
US8988349B2 (en) 2012-02-28 2015-03-24 Google Technology Holdings LLC Methods and apparatuses for operating a display in an electronic device
US20130229337A1 (en) * 2012-03-02 2013-09-05 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Electronic device, electronic device controlling method, computer program product
US8947323B1 (en) 2012-03-20 2015-02-03 Hayes Solos Raffle Content display methods
EP2787423A1 (en) * 2012-03-22 2014-10-08 Huawei Device Co., Ltd. Standby operation control method and device
JP2015510633A (en) * 2012-03-22 2015-04-09 ▲華▼▲為▼▲終▼端有限公司 Method and apparatus for controlling a standby operation
EP2787423A4 (en) * 2012-03-22 2015-02-11 Huawei Device Co Ltd Standby operation control method and device
US20150035776A1 (en) * 2012-03-23 2015-02-05 Ntt Docomo, Inc. Information terminal, method for controlling input acceptance, and program for controlling input acceptance
US20140204014A1 (en) * 2012-03-30 2014-07-24 Sony Mobile Communications Ab Optimizing selection of a media object type in which to present content to a user of a device
US20130268316A1 (en) * 2012-04-05 2013-10-10 Invue Security Products Inc. Merchandise user tracking system and method
US9122249B2 (en) 2012-04-13 2015-09-01 Nokia Technologies Oy Multi-segment wearable accessory
US9696690B2 (en) 2012-04-13 2017-07-04 Nokia Technologies Oy Multi-segment wearable accessory
CN103379222A (en) * 2012-04-27 2013-10-30 富士通株式会社 Terminal apparatus and backlight control method
EP2658224A3 (en) * 2012-04-27 2014-03-19 Fujitsu Limited Terminal apparatus, backlight control method, and backlight control program
US9179525B2 (en) 2012-04-27 2015-11-03 Fujitsu Limited Terminal apparatus, backlight control method, and backlight control program
US20140002352A1 (en) * 2012-05-09 2014-01-02 Michal Jacob Eye tracking based selective accentuation of portions of a display
US20150097919A1 (en) * 2012-05-18 2015-04-09 Unify Gmbh & Co. Kg Method, Device, and System for Reducing Bandwidth Usage During a Communication Session
US9294720B2 (en) * 2012-05-18 2016-03-22 Unify Gmbh & Co. Kg Method, device, and system for reducing bandwidth usage during a communication session
WO2013172848A1 (en) * 2012-05-18 2013-11-21 Siemens Enterprise Communications Gmbh & Co. Kg Method, device, and system for reducing bandwidth usage during a communication session
US9712782B2 (en) 2012-05-18 2017-07-18 Unify Gmbh & Co. Kg Method, device, and system for reducing bandwidth usage during a communication session
US9304621B1 (en) 2012-05-25 2016-04-05 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Communication via pressure input
US20130321312A1 (en) * 2012-05-29 2013-12-05 Haruomi HIGASHI Information processing apparatus, information display system and information display method
US9285906B2 (en) * 2012-05-29 2016-03-15 Ricoh Company, Limited Information processing apparatus, information display system and information display method
US9671852B2 (en) * 2012-05-31 2017-06-06 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Managing power consumption state of electronic devices responsive to predicting future demand
US20150370307A1 (en) * 2012-05-31 2015-12-24 At&T Intellectual Property I, Lp Managing power consumption state of electronic devices responsive to predicting future demand
US20140313127A1 (en) * 2012-06-21 2014-10-23 Huawei Device Co., Ltd. Method for Calling Application Object and Mobile Terminal
WO2014004584A3 (en) * 2012-06-25 2014-04-03 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Using gaze determination with device input
WO2014004584A2 (en) 2012-06-25 2014-01-03 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Using gaze determination with device input
CN104662600A (en) * 2012-06-25 2015-05-27 亚马逊技术公司 Using gaze determination with device input
US20130342672A1 (en) * 2012-06-25 2013-12-26 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Using gaze determination with device input
JP2015525918A (en) * 2012-06-25 2015-09-07 アマゾン・テクノロジーズ、インコーポレイテッド The use of the gaze determination and the device input
EP2864978A4 (en) * 2012-06-25 2016-02-24 Amazon Tech Inc Using gaze determination with device input
US9854159B2 (en) * 2012-07-20 2017-12-26 Pixart Imaging Inc. Image system with eye protection
US20160373645A1 (en) * 2012-07-20 2016-12-22 Pixart Imaging Inc. Image system with eye protection
CN103576834A (en) * 2012-08-07 2014-02-12 三星电子株式会社 Power saving control method and electronic device supporting the same
US20140043498A1 (en) * 2012-08-07 2014-02-13 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Power saving control method and electronic device supporting the same
EP2696572A3 (en) * 2012-08-07 2016-11-16 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Power saving control method and electronic device supporting the same
US9264608B2 (en) * 2012-08-07 2016-02-16 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Power saving control method and electronic device supporting the same
US9860440B2 (en) 2012-08-07 2018-01-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Power saving control method and electronic device supporting the same
EP2696259A1 (en) * 2012-08-09 2014-02-12 Tobii Technology AB Fast wake-up in a gaze tracking system
CN103576857A (en) * 2012-08-09 2014-02-12 托比技术股份公司 Fast wake-up in gaze tracking system
US9766699B2 (en) * 2012-08-09 2017-09-19 Tobii Ab Fast wake-up in a gaze tracking system
US20140043227A1 (en) * 2012-08-09 2014-02-13 Tobii Technology Ab Fast wake-up in a gaze tracking system
US9848165B2 (en) * 2012-08-14 2017-12-19 Avaya Inc. Protecting privacy of a customer and an agent using face recognition in a video contact center environment
US20160105638A1 (en) * 2012-08-14 2016-04-14 Avaya Inc. Protecting privacy of a customer and an agent using face recognition in a video contact center environment
US20140055387A1 (en) * 2012-08-24 2014-02-27 Wistron Corp. Portable electronic device and automatic unlocking method thereof
US20150213725A1 (en) * 2012-09-07 2015-07-30 Tractus Corporation Method, apparatus, and system for viewing multiple-slice medical images
US9578224B2 (en) 2012-09-10 2017-02-21 Nvidia Corporation System and method for enhanced monoimaging
US20140080550A1 (en) * 2012-09-19 2014-03-20 Sony Mobile Communications, Inc. Mobile client device, operation method, and recording medium
US9323310B2 (en) * 2012-09-19 2016-04-26 Sony Corporation Mobile client device, operation method, and recording medium
US9600056B2 (en) 2012-09-19 2017-03-21 Sony Corporation Mobile client device, operation method, and recording medium
EP2898394A4 (en) * 2012-09-24 2016-04-20 Lg Electronics Inc Portable device and control method thereof
US20140085221A1 (en) * 2012-09-24 2014-03-27 Lg Electronics Inc. Portable device and control method thereof
WO2014046390A1 (en) 2012-09-24 2014-03-27 Lg Electronics Inc. Portable device and control method thereof
US9406103B1 (en) 2012-09-26 2016-08-02 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Inline message alert
US20140095994A1 (en) * 2012-09-28 2014-04-03 Lg Electronics Inc. Portable device and control method thereof
EP2717551A3 (en) * 2012-10-02 2016-12-14 LG Electronics, Inc. Screen brightness control for mobile device
US20140094224A1 (en) * 2012-10-02 2014-04-03 Yury LOZOVOY Screen brightness control for mobile device
US9182801B2 (en) * 2012-10-02 2015-11-10 Lg Electronics Inc. Screen brightness control for mobile device
US9589512B2 (en) 2012-10-02 2017-03-07 Lg Electronics Inc. Screen brightness control for mobile device
US9760150B2 (en) 2012-11-27 2017-09-12 Nvidia Corporation Low-power states for a computer system with integrated baseband
US9612656B2 (en) 2012-11-27 2017-04-04 Facebook, Inc. Systems and methods of eye tracking control on mobile device
US9474022B2 (en) 2012-11-30 2016-10-18 Nvidia Corporation Saving power in a mobile terminal
US20140160019A1 (en) * 2012-12-07 2014-06-12 Nvidia Corporation Methods for enhancing user interaction with mobile devices
US20140171037A1 (en) * 2012-12-18 2014-06-19 Hyundai Motor Company Method for controlling call termination based on gaze, and mobile communication terminal therefor
US9277380B2 (en) * 2012-12-18 2016-03-01 Hyundi Motor Company Method for controlling call termination based on gaze, and mobile communication terminal therefor
CN105144027A (en) * 2013-01-09 2015-12-09 微软技术许可有限责任公司 Using nonverbal communication in determining actions
US20140191939A1 (en) * 2013-01-09 2014-07-10 Microsoft Corporation Using nonverbal communication in determining actions
WO2014116167A1 (en) * 2013-01-22 2014-07-31 Crunchfish Ab Iimproved tracking of an object for controlling a touchless user interface
WO2014124663A1 (en) * 2013-02-13 2014-08-21 Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. Mobile electronic device with display state control
CN104115485A (en) * 2013-02-13 2014-10-22 华为技术有限公司 Mobile electronic device with display state control
US20140232638A1 (en) * 2013-02-21 2014-08-21 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for user interface using gaze interaction
WO2014130238A3 (en) * 2013-02-21 2015-01-08 Intel Corporation Call routing among personal devices based on visual clues
US9395816B2 (en) * 2013-02-28 2016-07-19 Lg Electronics Inc. Display device for selectively outputting tactile feedback and visual feedback and method for controlling the same
US20140244190A1 (en) * 2013-02-28 2014-08-28 Cellco Partnership D/B/A Verizon Wireless Power usage analysis
US20140240245A1 (en) * 2013-02-28 2014-08-28 Lg Electronics Inc. Display device for selectively outputting tactile feedback and visual feedback and method for controlling the same
US20140247208A1 (en) * 2013-03-01 2014-09-04 Tobii Technology Ab Invoking and waking a computing device from stand-by mode based on gaze detection
US9619020B2 (en) 2013-03-01 2017-04-11 Tobii Ab Delay warp gaze interaction
US9864498B2 (en) 2013-03-13 2018-01-09 Tobii Ab Automatic scrolling based on gaze detection
US20140329214A1 (en) * 2013-03-16 2014-11-06 Marc Jim Bitoun Physiological Indicator Monitoring For Identifying Stress Triggers and Certain Health Problems
US9842374B2 (en) * 2013-03-16 2017-12-12 Marc Jim Bitoun Physiological indicator monitoring for identifying stress triggers and certain health problems
WO2014146168A1 (en) * 2013-03-19 2014-09-25 National Ict Australia Limited Automatic detection of task transition
US9747072B2 (en) 2013-04-22 2017-08-29 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Context-aware notifications
US9075435B1 (en) * 2013-04-22 2015-07-07 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Context-aware notifications
US9471141B1 (en) 2013-04-22 2016-10-18 Amazon Technologies, Inc. Context-aware notifications
US20170045940A1 (en) * 2013-04-29 2017-02-16 Tobii Ab Power efficient image sensing apparatus, method of operating the same and eye/gaze tracking system
EP2804074A2 (en) 2013-04-29 2014-11-19 Tobii Technology AB Power Efficient Image Sensing Apparatus, Method of Operating the Same and Eye/Gaze Tracking System
US9846481B2 (en) * 2013-04-29 2017-12-19 Tobii Ab Power efficient image sensing apparatus, method of operating the same and eye/gaze tracking system
US9509910B2 (en) * 2013-04-29 2016-11-29 Tobii Ab Power efficient image sensing apparatus, method of operating the same and eye/gaze tracking system
US20140320688A1 (en) * 2013-04-29 2014-10-30 Tobii Technology Ab Power Efficient Image Sensing Apparatus, Method of Operating the Same and Eye/Gaze Tracking System
US20140340317A1 (en) * 2013-05-14 2014-11-20 Sony Corporation Button with capacitive touch in a metal body of a user device and power-saving touch key control of information to display
US20140368423A1 (en) * 2013-06-17 2014-12-18 Nvidia Corporation Method and system for low power gesture recognition for waking up mobile devices
EP3012828A4 (en) * 2013-06-19 2017-01-04 Yulong Computer Telecommunication Scient (Shenzhen) Co Ltd Smart watch and display method for smart watch
US20140379341A1 (en) * 2013-06-20 2014-12-25 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Mobile terminal and method for detecting a gesture to control functions
US20140380230A1 (en) * 2013-06-25 2014-12-25 Morgan Kolya Venable Selecting user interface elements via position signal
EP3014604A4 (en) * 2013-06-28 2017-03-01 Nokia Technologies Oy Supporting activation of function of device
US20150015688A1 (en) * 2013-07-09 2015-01-15 HTC Corportion Facial unlock mechanism using light level determining module
EP2827226A3 (en) * 2013-07-18 2015-04-08 LG Electronics, Inc. Watch type mobile terminal
JP2015032255A (en) * 2013-08-06 2015-02-16 コニカミノルタ株式会社 Display device, display program and image processor
CN104349009A (en) * 2013-08-06 2015-02-11 柯尼卡美能达株式会社 Display device, non-transitory computer-readable recording medium and image processing apparatus
WO2015026203A1 (en) * 2013-08-23 2015-02-26 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Mode switching method and apparatus of terminal
US9652024B2 (en) * 2013-08-23 2017-05-16 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Mode switching method and apparatus of terminal
US20150058649A1 (en) * 2013-08-23 2015-02-26 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Mode switching method and apparatus of terminal
US20150067377A1 (en) * 2013-08-28 2015-03-05 Qualcomm Incorporated Method, Devices and Systems for Dynamic Multimedia Data Flow Control for Thermal Power Budgeting
US9703355B2 (en) * 2013-08-28 2017-07-11 Qualcomm Incorporated Method, devices and systems for dynamic multimedia data flow control for thermal power budgeting
US9715266B2 (en) * 2013-08-29 2017-07-25 Sony Interactive Entertainment America Llc Attention-based rendering and fidelity
US20150061989A1 (en) * 2013-08-29 2015-03-05 Sony Computer Entertainment America Llc Attention-based rendering and fidelity
US9367117B2 (en) * 2013-08-29 2016-06-14 Sony Interactive Entertainment America Llc Attention-based rendering and fidelity
US9374872B2 (en) * 2013-08-30 2016-06-21 Universal Display Corporation Intelligent dimming lighting
US20150061504A1 (en) * 2013-08-30 2015-03-05 Universal Display Corporation Intelligent dimming lighting
US9823728B2 (en) 2013-09-04 2017-11-21 Nvidia Corporation Method and system for reduced rate touch scanning on an electronic device
WO2015042034A1 (en) * 2013-09-17 2015-03-26 Nokia Corporation Display of a visual event notification
US9398144B2 (en) * 2013-10-24 2016-07-19 Cellco Partnership Mobile device mode of operation for visually impaired users
US20150119108A1 (en) * 2013-10-24 2015-04-30 Cellco Partnership D/B/A Verizon Wireless Mobile device mode of operation for visually impaired users
EP3065623A4 (en) * 2013-11-09 2017-08-09 Shenzhen Huiding Technology Co Optical eye tracking
US9390649B2 (en) 2013-11-27 2016-07-12 Universal Display Corporation Ruggedized wearable display
WO2014183529A1 (en) * 2013-12-02 2014-11-20 中兴通讯股份有限公司 Mobile terminal talk mode switching method, device and storage medium
US9110635B2 (en) * 2013-12-03 2015-08-18 Lenova (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Initiating personal assistant application based on eye tracking and gestures
US20150154001A1 (en) * 2013-12-03 2015-06-04 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Initiating personal assistant application based on eye tracking and gestures
US9213659B2 (en) 2013-12-03 2015-12-15 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Devices and methods to receive input at a first device and present output in response on a second device different from the first device
WO2015089011A1 (en) * 2013-12-09 2015-06-18 Agco Corporation Method and apparatus for improving user interface visibility in agricultural machines
US9709708B2 (en) 2013-12-09 2017-07-18 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Adjustable display optics
US20150169047A1 (en) * 2013-12-16 2015-06-18 Nokia Corporation Method and apparatus for causation of capture of visual information indicative of a part of an environment
US20150169048A1 (en) * 2013-12-18 2015-06-18 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Systems and methods to present information on device based on eye tracking
US9633252B2 (en) 2013-12-20 2017-04-25 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Real-time detection of user intention based on kinematics analysis of movement-oriented biometric data
EP3087533A4 (en) * 2013-12-23 2017-09-20 Eyelock Llc Methods and apparatus for power-efficient iris recognition
EP2889718A1 (en) * 2013-12-30 2015-07-01 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd A natural input based virtual ui system for electronic devices
US9772492B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-09-26 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9766463B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-09-19 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9615742B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-04-11 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9651783B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-05-16 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9651789B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-05-16 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-Through computer display systems
US9594246B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-03-14 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9651788B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-05-16 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9658457B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-05-23 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9658458B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-05-23 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9811159B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-11-07 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9829703B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-11-28 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9836122B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-12-05 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye glint imaging in see-through computer display systems
US9753288B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-09-05 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9684165B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-06-20 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9684171B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-06-20 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9746676B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-08-29 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9740012B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-08-22 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9651784B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-05-16 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9529195B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-12-27 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9811152B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-11-07 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9529192B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-12-27 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9523856B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-12-20 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9715112B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-07-25 Osterhout Group, Inc. Suppression of stray light in head worn computing
US9720234B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-08-01 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9720227B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-08-01 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9494800B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-11-15 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9720235B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-08-01 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9436006B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-09-06 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9740280B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2017-08-22 Osterhout Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US9529199B2 (en) 2014-01-21 2016-12-27 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US9784973B2 (en) 2014-02-11 2017-10-10 Osterhout Group, Inc. Micro doppler presentations in head worn computing
US9841602B2 (en) 2014-02-11 2017-12-12 Osterhout Group, Inc. Location indicating avatar in head worn computing
US9542844B2 (en) 2014-02-11 2017-01-10 Google Inc. Providing navigation directions in view of device orientation relative to user
WO2015123062A1 (en) * 2014-02-11 2015-08-20 Google Inc. Navigation directions specific to device state
US9843093B2 (en) 2014-02-11 2017-12-12 Osterhout Group, Inc. Spatial location presentation in head worn computing
US9547465B2 (en) 2014-02-14 2017-01-17 Osterhout Group, Inc. Object shadowing in head worn computing
WO2015138203A1 (en) * 2014-03-11 2015-09-17 Google Technology Holdings LLC Display viewing detection
US9651787B2 (en) 2014-04-25 2017-05-16 Osterhout Group, Inc. Speaker assembly for headworn computer
US9672210B2 (en) 2014-04-25 2017-06-06 Osterhout Group, Inc. Language translation with head-worn computing
US9572232B2 (en) * 2014-05-15 2017-02-14 Universal Display Corporation Biosensing electronic devices
US20150334808A1 (en) * 2014-05-15 2015-11-19 Universal Display Corporation Biosensing Electronic Devices
US9746686B2 (en) 2014-05-19 2017-08-29 Osterhout Group, Inc. Content position calibration in head worn computing
US9841599B2 (en) 2014-06-05 2017-12-12 Osterhout Group, Inc. Optical configurations for head-worn see-through displays
US9575321B2 (en) 2014-06-09 2017-02-21 Osterhout Group, Inc. Content presentation in head worn computing
US9720241B2 (en) 2014-06-09 2017-08-01 Osterhout Group, Inc. Content presentation in head worn computing
US9810906B2 (en) 2014-06-17 2017-11-07 Osterhout Group, Inc. External user interface for head worn computing
US9811095B2 (en) 2014-08-06 2017-11-07 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Glasses with fluid-fillable membrane for adjusting focal length of one or more lenses of the glasses
US9829707B2 (en) 2014-08-12 2017-11-28 Osterhout Group, Inc. Measuring content brightness in head worn computing
US9671613B2 (en) 2014-09-26 2017-06-06 Osterhout Group, Inc. See-through computer display systems
US20160109943A1 (en) * 2014-10-21 2016-04-21 Honeywell International Inc. System and method for controlling visibility of a proximity display
US9836649B2 (en) 2014-11-05 2017-12-05 Osterhot Group, Inc. Eye imaging in head worn computing
US20160133201A1 (en) * 2014-11-07 2016-05-12 Osterhout Group, Inc. Power management for head worn computing
US20160131911A1 (en) * 2014-11-07 2016-05-12 Osterhout Group, Inc. Power management for head worn computing
US9406211B2 (en) * 2014-11-19 2016-08-02 Medical Wearable Solutions Ltd. Wearable posture regulation system and method to regulate posture
US9535497B2 (en) 2014-11-20 2017-01-03 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Presentation of data on an at least partially transparent display based on user focus
FR3029307A1 (en) * 2014-11-27 2016-06-03 Oberthur Tech electronic device system comprising such a device, CONTROL METHOD of such a device and display control method a system comprising such a device
US9684172B2 (en) 2014-12-03 2017-06-20 Osterhout Group, Inc. Head worn computer display systems
EP3037915A1 (en) * 2014-12-23 2016-06-29 Nokia Technologies OY Virtual reality content control
WO2016102763A1 (en) * 2014-12-23 2016-06-30 Nokia Technologies Oy Virtual reality content control
USD792400S1 (en) 2014-12-31 2017-07-18 Osterhout Group, Inc. Computer glasses
USD794637S1 (en) 2015-01-05 2017-08-15 Osterhout Group, Inc. Air mouse
US20160292525A1 (en) * 2015-03-31 2016-10-06 Fujitsu Limited Image analyzing apparatus and image analyzing method
US9851940B2 (en) 2015-05-14 2017-12-26 International Business Machines Corporation Reading device usability
US9471275B1 (en) 2015-05-14 2016-10-18 International Business Machines Corporation Reading device usability
US9851939B2 (en) 2015-05-14 2017-12-26 International Business Machines Corporation Reading device usability
WO2017018732A1 (en) * 2015-07-24 2017-02-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Electronic device and method for providing content
US20170177088A1 (en) * 2015-12-21 2017-06-22 Sap Se Two-step gesture recognition for fine-grain control of wearable applications
WO2017185728A1 (en) * 2016-04-25 2017-11-02 中兴通讯股份有限公司 Method and device for identifying key operation

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20130135198A1 (en) 2013-05-30 application
US20140132508A1 (en) 2014-05-15 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US8417296B2 (en) Electronic device with proximity-based radio power control
US20050221791A1 (en) Sensor screen saver
US7728316B2 (en) Integrated proximity sensor and light sensor
US20080090617A1 (en) Display control for cellular phone
US20090138736A1 (en) Power management method for handheld electronic device
US20100167792A1 (en) Power-saving method and electrical device using the same
US20060007151A1 (en) Computer Apparatus with added functionality
US20090015425A1 (en) Camera of an electronic device used as a proximity detector
US20070297618A1 (en) System and method for controlling headphones
US20070156364A1 (en) Light activated hold switch
US7633076B2 (en) Automated response to and sensing of user activity in portable devices
US20080146289A1 (en) Automatic audio transducer adjustments based upon orientation of a mobile communication device
US20110273475A1 (en) Methods and systems for providing sensory information to devices and peripherals
US20100182270A1 (en) Electronic device with touch input assembly
WO2010141878A1 (en) Controlling power consumption of a mobile device based on gesture recognition
US20090307511A1 (en) Portable electronic devices with power management capabilities
US8006002B2 (en) Methods and systems for automatic configuration of peripherals
US20090099812A1 (en) Method and Apparatus for Position-Context Based Actions
US20130067262A1 (en) Notebook computer and cell phone assembly
US20090003620A1 (en) Dynamic routing of audio among multiple audio devices
US20040192412A1 (en) Cellular phone
US20150135080A1 (en) Mobile terminal and control method thereof
WO2000078012A1 (en) A portable electric apparatus having a liquid crystal display, and a power preservation method for such an apparatus
US20100131749A1 (en) Apparatus and method for controlling operating mode of mobile terminal
US20090303184A1 (en) Handheld electronic product and control method for automatically switching an operating mode

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: APPLE INC.,CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HODGE, ANDREW;ROSENBLATT, MICHAEL;SIGNING DATES FROM 20080928 TO 20080930;REEL/FRAME:021611/0099