US20100038501A1 - Low Profile Tilt Mount - Google Patents

Low Profile Tilt Mount Download PDF

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Publication number
US20100038501A1
US20100038501A1 US12/543,502 US54350209A US2010038501A1 US 20100038501 A1 US20100038501 A1 US 20100038501A1 US 54350209 A US54350209 A US 54350209A US 2010038501 A1 US2010038501 A1 US 2010038501A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
pivot axis
mount system
monitor
bar
panel mounting
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US12/543,502
Inventor
Sung I. Oh
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CLO Systems LLC
Original Assignee
CLO Systems LLC
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Publication date
Priority to US8957508P priority Critical
Priority to US14289909P priority
Application filed by CLO Systems LLC filed Critical CLO Systems LLC
Priority to US12/543,502 priority patent/US20100038501A1/en
Assigned to CLO SYSTEMS, LLC reassignment CLO SYSTEMS, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: OH, SUNG I
Publication of US20100038501A1 publication Critical patent/US20100038501A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16MFRAMES, CASINGS, OR BEDS OF ENGINES OR OTHER MACHINES OR APPARATUS NOT SPECIFIC TO AN ENGINE, MACHINE, OR APPARATUS PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; STANDS OR SUPPORTS
    • F16M13/00Other supports for positioning apparatus or articles; Means for steadying hand-held apparatus or articles
    • F16M13/02Other supports for positioning apparatus or articles; Means for steadying hand-held apparatus or articles for supporting on, or attaching to, an object, e.g. tree, gate, window-frame, cycle
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16MFRAMES, CASINGS, OR BEDS OF ENGINES OR OTHER MACHINES OR APPARATUS NOT SPECIFIC TO AN ENGINE, MACHINE, OR APPARATUS PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; STANDS OR SUPPORTS
    • F16M11/00Stands or trestles as supports for apparatus or articles placed thereon Stands for scientific apparatus such as gravitational force meters
    • F16M11/02Heads
    • F16M11/04Means for attachment of apparatus; Means allowing adjustment of the apparatus relatively to the stand
    • F16M11/06Means for attachment of apparatus; Means allowing adjustment of the apparatus relatively to the stand allowing pivoting
    • F16M11/10Means for attachment of apparatus; Means allowing adjustment of the apparatus relatively to the stand allowing pivoting around a horizontal axis
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16MFRAMES, CASINGS, OR BEDS OF ENGINES OR OTHER MACHINES OR APPARATUS NOT SPECIFIC TO AN ENGINE, MACHINE, OR APPARATUS PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE; STANDS OR SUPPORTS
    • F16M11/00Stands or trestles as supports for apparatus or articles placed thereon Stands for scientific apparatus such as gravitational force meters
    • F16M11/20Undercarriages with or without wheels
    • F16M11/24Undercarriages with or without wheels changeable in height or length of legs, also for transport only, e.g. by means of tubes screwed into each other
    • F16M11/38Undercarriages with or without wheels changeable in height or length of legs, also for transport only, e.g. by means of tubes screwed into each other by folding, e.g. pivoting or scissors tong mechanisms

Abstract

A mount system for a monitor tilts the monitor between a retracted position and an extended position. The mount system includes a first anchoring bracket adapted to couple to the supporting surface, and a first panel mounting bracket adapted to couple to a rear side of the monitor. The mount system also includes first and second bars between the first anchoring bracket and the first panel mounting bracket. The first and second bars are arranged in such a way that the weight of the monitor is substantially balanced against the natural tendency of the monitor to lend down so that a user may move the monitor between the extended and retracted position with ease.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. Nos. (1) 61/142,899, filed Jan. 7, 2009; and (2) 61/089,575, filed Aug. 18, 2008, which are both hereby incorporated by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention is directed to a mount system that is adapted to couple to a back side of a monitor and reposition the viewing angle of the monitor, and in particular, to tilt the monitor.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Flat panel monitors such as computer monitors, LCD, plasma, slim televisions, and the like (collectively referred to as “monitor(s)”) are becoming popular because they can be mounted onto a wall to save floor space and for their aesthetically pleasing appearance. Moreover, the recent trend is to make the flat screen monitors slim as possible. For instance, some monitors are now about 1.5 inches in thickness. And with such slim monitors, it is desirable to mount the monitor close to the wall as possible.
  • Mounting the monitor close to the wall, however, has a number of dis-advantages with current mounting solutions. First, when mounting a monitor to a wall, it is often desirable to tilt the monitor facing down so that viewers can more comfortably view the monitor. With current mounting solutions, however, the monitor needs to be some distance away from the wall. Otherwise, the bottom of the monitor will hit the wall, thereby preventing the monitor form tilting down. As such, closer the monitor is mounted to the wall, smaller the tilt angle that can be provided on the monitor. Second, closer the monitor is to the wall, it is more difficult to have access to the back of the monitor. During the installation process, rear access of the monitor is often needed to connect the cables and wires to the back side of the monitor. Accordingly, there is a need for a low profile tilt mount without the above-mentioned dis-advantages of current mounting solutions.
  • Once the monitor is mounted to a wall, in order to reposition the monitor, the viewer needs to walk over to the monitor and physically remove the monitor to a new viewing angle. Repositioning a monitor, however, is not always feasible because of the weight of the monitor makes it difficult to move or the monitor may be located high above the floor so that the viewer may not be able to reach it without a ladder for example. Accordingly, there is a need to be able to reposition the monitor more easily.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A mount system includes is adapted to tilt a monitor between a retracted position and an extended position. The mount system includes: a first anchoring bracket adapted to couple to the supporting surface; a first panel mounting bracket adapted to couple to a rear side of the monitor, the first panel mounting bracket adapted to extend and retract relative to the first anchoring bracket; a first bar having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the first bar pivotably coupled to the first anchoring bracket about a first pivot axis, the distal end of the first bar pivotably coupled to the first panel mounting bracket about a second pivot axis, a first vector defined from the first pivot axis to the second pivot axis, and when the mount system is in use, the second pivot axis is located below the first pivot axis, and a first angle between the first vector and a vertical axis; and the mount system also includes a second bar having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the second bar pivotably coupled to the first anchoring bracket about a third pivot axis, the distal end of the second bar pivotably coupled to the first panel mounting bracket about a fourth pivot axis, a second vector defined from the third pivot axis to the fourth pivot axis, and when the mount system is in use, the third pivot axis is located below the first pivot axis, the fourth pivot axis is located below the third pivot axis, a second angle between the second vector and the vertical axis, and the second angle is greater than the first angle.
  • The first bar has a first length between the first and second pivot axes, the second bar has a second length between the third and fourth pivot axes, and the distance between the first pivot axis and the third pivot axis may be equal to about a sum of the first and second lengths.
  • With the first and second bars arranged as mentioned above, the overall depth of the mount system may be minimized so that the rear side of the monitor is substantially flush with the mounting surface such as the wall. Moreover, the moving mechanism such as the first and second bars may be located on the bottom half portion of the monitor so that the top portion behind the monitor is substantially clear of the mechanism to give the mount system a clean look.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a mount system.
  • FIG. 2 is a side view of the mount system in a retracted position.
  • FIG. 3 is a side view of the mount system in an extended position.
  • FIG. 4 is a side view of the mount system in an extended position with a locking mechanism.
  • FIG. 5 is a side view of the mount system in a tilt up position.
  • FIG. 6 is a side view of the mount system with an adjustment feature.
  • FIG. 7 is a side view of the mount system in a retracted position with a motorized actuator.
  • FIG. 8 is a side view of the mount system of FIG. 7 in an extended position.
  • FIG. 9 is a side view of another mount system in a retracted position.
  • FIG. 10 is a side view of the mount system of FIG. 9 in an extended position.
  • FIG. 11 is a front view of the mount system of FIG. 9 in a retracted position.
  • FIG. 12 is a perspective view of yet another mount system in a retracted position.
  • FIG. 13 is a disassembled perspective view of one of the brackets of the mount system of FIG. 12.
  • FIG. 14 is a side view of the bracket of FIG. 13 in a retracted position.
  • FIG. 15 is a side view of the bracket of FIG. 13 in an extended position.
  • FIG. 16 is a perspective view of the bracket of FIG. 13 in an extended position.
  • FIG. 17 is a side view of still another embodiment of a bracket with a tilt up feature in an extended position.
  • FIG. 18 is a side view of the bracket of FIG. 17 in a tilt up position.
  • FIG. 19 is a perspective view of another bracket.
  • FIG. 20 is a perspective view of the bracket of FIG. 19 in a tilt up position.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of a mount system 10 in a retracted position adapted to pivot a monitor 12 about an X-axis or about YZ plane. The monitor 12 may have a center of gravity 14 about its center and the direction of the gravitational force may be generally along the negative (−) Y-axis. It is, however, within the scope of this invention to have the gravitational force in other directions. The mount system 10 may include an attachment bracket 16 adapted to couple the mount system 10 and to a supporting surface such as a wall 18. The mount system 10 may also include a first mount bracket 20 and a second mount bracket 22 adapted to couple to the rear side 24 of the monitor 12. The first and second mount brackets may be substantially similar to each other so for purpose of this description the first mount bracket 20 will be described in detail below.
  • The first mounting bracket 20 includes a first panel mounting bracket 26 and a first anchoring bracket 28. The first panel mounting bracket 26 may have a base 30 with a plurality of hole patterns 32 adapted to receive one or more screws to attach to the rear side 24 of the monitor 12. The first panel mounting bracket 26 may also have side walls 34 such that the first panel mounting bracket 26 may form a U-shaped configuration. The anchoring bracket 28 may have a base 36 and side walls 38 forming a U-shaped configuration. The anchoring bracket 28 may have a first hook 40 adapted to latch onto a first rail 42 of the attachment bracket 16, and a second hook 44 adapted to latch onto a second rail 46 of the attachment bracket 16. The first mounting bracket 20 may include a first bar 48 and a second bar 50 located between the first panel mounting bracket 26 and the first anchoring bracket 28.
  • FIG. 2 shows a side view of the mount system 10 in a retracted position. The first bar 48 has a proximate end 52 and a distal end 54. The proximate end 52 may be adapted to pivotably couple to the anchoring bracket 28 about a first pivot axis 56; and the distal end 54 may be adapted to pivotably couple to the panel mounting bracket 26 about a second pivot axis 58. The second bar 50 has a proximate end 60 and a distal end 62. The proximate end 60 may be adapted to pivotably couple to the anchoring bracket 28 about a third pivot axis 64; and the distal end 62 may be adapted to pivotably couple to the panel mounting bracket 26 about a fourth pivot axis 66.
  • In reference to the YZ coordinates, the second pivot axis 58 may be located +Z and −Y direction relative to the first pivot axis 56 such that a first vector 53 from the first pivot axis 56 to the second pivot axis 58 of the first bar 48 forms a first angle θ1 between the first vector 53 and the vertical axis or the Y-axis. The fourth pivot axis 66 may be located +Z and −Y direction relative to the third pivot axis 64 such that a second vector 65 from the third pivot axis 64 to the fourth pivot axis 66 of the second bar 50 forms a second angle θ2 between the second vector 65 and the vertical axis or the Y-axis.
  • The first bar 48 may be longer than the second bar 50 such that the distance Y1 between the first and third axes 56 and 64 is longer than the distance Y2 between the second and fourth axes 58 and 66. The panel mounting bracket 26 may be adapted to couple to the monitor 12 such that the second axis 58 on the panel mounting bracket 26 may be located −Z and −Y direction relative to the center of gravity 14 of the monitor 12 such that the center of gravity 14 may be offset relative to the second pivot axis 58. A gap 68 may or may not be provided between the panel mounting bracket 26 and the anchoring bracket 28. The gap 68 may be eliminated to further reduce the profile of the mount system 10.
  • A first distance D1 or first vector 53 may define the distance between the first and second pivot axes of the first bar, and a second distance D2 or second vector 65 may define the distance between the third and fourth pivot axes of the second bar 50. The distance between the first and third pivot axes 56 and 64 may be equal to about the sum of the first and second distances D1+D2.
  • FIG. 3 shows the mount system 10 in an extended position where the panel mounting bracket 26 is tilted having a third angle θ3 relative to the Y-axis. As the mount system 10 moves from the retracted position to the extended position, the first and second angles θ1 and θ2 increase. As such, the second and fourth pivot axes 58 and 66 move in an arcing manner toward the positive Y and Z axes; thereby causing the center of gravity 14 (the dotted lines representing the center of gravity in the retracted position) of the monitor 12 to shift towards the positive Y and Z axes. As the mount system 10 extends or tilts, the bottom rear corner 70 of the monitor 12 substantially maintains a gap with the wall 18 so that the wall does not interfere with the tilting of the monitor 12. Moreover, in the top portion of the monitor 12, a substantial gap is formed between the monitor and the wall so that the rear side of the monitor is readily accessible for servicing and installing the cables and wires to the rear side of the monitor.
  • In this example, the gravitational force “g” may be in the −Y direction. With the center of gravity 14 of the monitor 12 being offset in the +Y and +Z direction relative to the second pivot axis 58, the panel mounting bracket 26 has a tendency to extend or tilt down due to the moment of inertia applied by the weight of the monitor being offset. With the first and second bars 48 and 50 arranged as discussed above, in order for the panel mounting bracket 26 to extend or tilt, the second and fourth pivot axes 58 and 66 need to move in the +Y direction or be lifted against the direction of the gravitational force “g”. At the same time, the weight of the monitor applies downward force on the second and fourth pivot axes 58 and 66 to resist against extending or tilting the panel mounting bracket 26. As such, the moment of inertia, due to the weight of the monitor being offset, is substantially counter balanced by its own weight of the monitor. Accordingly, the monitor 12 can be moved between the retracted position and the extended position with a nominal force applied to the monitor 12 or the panel mounting bracket 26. And, once the monitor has been moved, the monitor may be maintained at that position with little or no resistive force.
  • A number of factors may determine the equilibrium position of the mount system 10 due to the moment of inertial and the weight of the monitor. For instance, if the mount system 10 is free to rest at an equilibrium position, the mount system 10 may have a slight tilt angle θ3. To maintain the panel mounting bracket 26 at a predetermined position, a locking lever 72 may be provide at the second pivot axis 72 or at any other pivot axes 56, 64, and/or 66. Once the monitor 12 or the panel mounting bracket 26 has been moved to a desired position, the mount system 10 may be maintained at that position by locking the lever 72 to substantially prevent the second pivot axis 58 from rotating. Alternatively, friction type, bearings, washers, and the like may be incorporated at the pivot axes 56, 58, 64, and 66 to maintain the panel mounting bracket 26 at a desired position once it has been moved.
  • FIG. 4 shows that a rod 72 may be incorporated to couple the first bar 48 to the second bar 50. The rod 72 may have a proximate end 74 that is pivotably coupled to the second bar 50 about a fifth pivot axis 76. A sleeve 78 may be pivotably coupled to the first bar 48 about a sixth pivot axis 80. The sleeve 78 may be adapted to receive the rod 72 such that the rod 72 may slide through the sleeve 78 as the panel mounting bracket 26 is moved between the retracted and extended position. Friction may be applied between the sleeve 78 and the rod 72 so that the panel mounting bracket 26 may be maintained at a desired position once it has been moved and released.
  • FIG. 5 shows a side view of the mount system 10 where the location of the fourth pivot axis 66 may be adjusted along a longitudinal axis of the panel mounting bracket 26. The panel mounting bracket 26 may have an elongated opening 82 so that the location of the fourth pivot axis 66 can be adjusted within the elongated opening 82 and locked in that position. In this example, the location of the fourth pivot axis 66 may be positioned so that the panel mounting bracket 26 has a positive angle θ4 in the clockwise direction in reference to the YZ coordinates without the monitor being attached to the panel mounting bracket 26.
  • FIG. 6 shows that once the monitor 12 is attached to the panel mounting bracket 26, the moment of inertia due to the weight of the monitor being offset causes the panel mounting bracket 26 to move in a counter-clockwise direction so that the angle θ4 is near zero. This allows the monitor to be in an upright position in the retracted position. There are a number of factors that may cause the retracted position of the monitor 12 to vary, such as the location of the center of gravity 14 for a particular monitor, weight and size of the monitor, whether the wall is upright, and how the monitor is attached in relation of the panel mounting bracket. As such, once the monitor is attached to the panel mounting bracket 26, the location of the fourth pivot axis 66 may be adjusted in the +Y direction to tilt the monitor in the counter-clockwise direction (positive angle θ4) or vice versa to compensate for the variances so that the retracted position of the monitor 12 can be adjusted to a desired position. And once the location of the fourth pivot axis 66 has been adjusted, the fourth pivot axis 66 may be locked in place so that it does not move within the elongated opening 82. Besides the fourth pivot axis 66, the elongated opening may be provided with the other pivot axes 56, 58, and/or 64 to adjust the upright position of the monitor. Moreover, the opening 82 may be orientated traverse to the longitudinal axis of the panel mounting bracket 26 so that the elongated opening is along the Z-axis.
  • FIG. 7 shows that the mount system 10 may include a motorized actuator 84. The motorized actuator may be provided with one or both of the first and second mounting brackets 20 and/or 22. The motorized actuator has a proximate end 86 and a distal end 88. The proximate end 86 may be pivotably coupled to the anchoring bracket 28 about a seventh pivot axis 90. The seventh pivot axis 90 may be aligned with the third pivot axis 64. The distal end 88 may be pivotably coupled to the panel mounting bracket 27 about an eight pivot axis 92. Based on a control signal, the motorized actuator 84 may extend and retract the distal end 92 relative to the proximate end 90.
  • FIG. 8 shows that as the distal end 88 extends relative to the proximate end 86, the panel mounting bracket 26 extends as well and vice versa to move the panel mounting bracket 26 through a motorized action.
  • FIG. 9 shows a side view of a mount bracket 100 having the pivot axes 56, 58, 64, and 66 substantially along the Y-axis in a retracted position to minimize the profile distance “P” of the mount bracket 100. FIG. 10 shows the mount bracket 100 in an extended position where the panel mounting bracket 102 is extended relative to the anchoring bracket 104. FIG. 11 shows a front view of the mount bracket 100 with the first and second bars 48 and 50 between the panel mounting bracket 102 and the anchoring bracket 104.
  • FIG. 12 shows a perspective view of a mount system 200 similar to the mount system 10 described above. The mount system 200 may include a wall bracket 102 supporting a first tilt bracket 104 and a second tilt bracket 106. The brackets 104 and 106 may be substantially similar to each other.
  • FIG. 13 shows an exploded perspective view of the first tilt bracket 104. The bracket 104 may include a panel mounting bracket 108 having a plurality of holes along a longitudinal axis 112 of the base 114 of the panel mounting bracket adapted to receive one more bolts to couple to the rear side of the monitor 12. The panel mounting bracket 108 may have two side walls 116 and 118 having a first hole 120 and a second hole 122. The base 114 may also have an opening 124 adapted to receive a distal end 126 of the first bar 128; and the base 114 may have an opening 130 adapted to receive a distal end 132 of the second bar 134. The distal ends 126 and 132 of the two bars 128 and 134 may be partially inserted into the openings 124 and 130, respectively, the minimize the depth of the bracket 104, which in tern minimizes the distance between the rear side of the monitor and the wall, when the monitor is mounted onto the wall.
  • The first and second bars 128 and 134 may be between a first anchoring brace 136 and a second anchoring brace 138. The two braces 136 and 138 may be substantially similar to each other such that detail description of the brace 136 is discussed detail below, which applicable to the brace 138. The brace 136 may have a first hole 140 and a second hole 142. The brace 136 may also have a first arc opening 144 with the focal point being the first hole 140; and the brace 136 may have a second arc opening 146 with the focal point being the second hole 142. The first bar 128 may have a first hole 148 near a proximal end 150 of the first bar 128, and a second hole 152 near the distal end 126 of the first bar 128. In addition, the first bar 128 may have a third hole 154 between the two holes 148 and 152. The second bar 134 may have a first hole 156 near a proximal end 158 of the second bar 134, and a second hole 160 near the distal end 132 of the second bar 134. In addition, the second bar 134 may have a third hole 162 between the two holes 156 and 160.
  • The first and second bars 128 and 134 may be positioned between a first anchoring brace 136 and a second anchoring brace 138, and a first pin 164 may be used to pivotably couple the first hole 148 of the first bar 128 to the two holes 140 of the first and second braces 138. A second pin 166 may be used to pivotably couple the first hole 156 of the second bar 134 to the two holes 142 of the first and second braces 138. The two distal ends 126 and 132 of the first and second bars 128 and 134, respectively, may be positioned between the side walls 116 and 118; and a third pin 168 may be used to pivotably couple the second hole 152 of the first bar 128 to the first hole 120 of the panel mounting bracket. A fourth pin 170 may be used to pivotably couple the second hole 160 of the second bar 134 to the second hole 122 of the panel mounting bracket.
  • A first screw 172 may pass through the arc opening 144 and the third hole 154 of the first bar 128, and as the first bar pivots about the first pin 162, the first screw 172 may move along the arc opening 144. The first screw 172 may have a distal end 174 with a threaded end adapted to receive a threaded cap 176 to tighten the two braces 136 and 138 together so that a certain amount of friction may be applied between outside surfaces 178 of the two braces and the two washers 180. In addition, the first bar 128 may have surface area 182 around the third opening 154 so that a certain amount of friction may be applied between the inner surfaces 182 of the two braces to resist the movement of the first bar 128 about the first pin 164. Likewise, a second screw 184 may pass through the second arc opening 146 and third opening 162 of the second bar 134 to resist the movement of the second bar 134 about the second pin 166.
  • A bracket 186 and a spacer 188 may be provided between the first and second braces 136 and 138 to maintain a predetermined distance between the two braces.
  • FIG. 14 shows a side view of the tilt bracket 104 in a retracted position where the panel mounting bracket is substantially along the Z-axis. In this position, the first angle θ1 between a line defined by two holes 140 and 120 of the first bar 128 and the vertical axis Z may be about 30°; and the second angle θ2 between the line between the two holes 142 and 122 of the second bar 134 and the vertical axis Z may be about 45°.
  • FIG. 15 shows a side view of the tilt bracket 104 in a fully extended position. In this position, the first angle θ1 between a line defined by two holes 140 and 120 of the first bar 128 and the vertical axis Z may be about 50°; and the second angle θ2 between the line between the two holes 142 and 122 of the second bar 134 and the vertical axis Z may be about 90°.
  • FIG. 16 shows a perspective view of the tilt bracket 104 in a fully tilted down position.
  • FIG. 17 shows an alternative tilt bracket 300 similar to the bracket 104 described above. The tilt bracket 300 includes a bracket 302 between the brace 136 and the panel mounting bracket 304. The panel mounting bracket 304 may be adapted to pivotably couple to the racket 302 about a pivot axis 306. The panel mounting bracket 304 and the bracket 302 may each have a hole 308 that align together so that a pin 310 may be inserted through the two holes 308 and 309 so that the panel mounting bracket 304 may be locked in place relative to the bracket 302.
  • FIG. 18 shows that with the pin 310 removed, the panel mounting bracket 304 may pivot in the counter-clock direction 312 lifting the bottom side 314 of the monitor 12 so that a user can have easy access to the input jacks on the rear bottom of the monitor. And once the cables and wires have been connected, the panel mounting bracket 304 may be returned to the position shown in FIG. 21.
  • FIG. 19 shows a tilt bracket 400 where the panel mounting bracket 404 may be pivotably coupled to the second pivot axis 120 to form an angle ø3 between the panel mounting bracket 404 and a brace 402. The brace 402 may couple the second pivot axis 120 and the fourth pivot axis 122 together. FIG. 20 shows that a hinge 406 may be provide to pivot about the fourth pivot axis to hold the panel mounting bracket in the tilted up position to substantially maintain the third angle ø3.
  • While various embodiments of the invention have been described, it will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that many more embodiments and implementations are possible within the scope of this invention. For instance, a variety of different types of motorized actuators may be used to extend and retract the panel mounting bracket relative to the anchoring bracket. For example, scissors type motorized jack or miniature version of a scissor jack commonly used to lift an automobile that is motorized may be used. Another alternative motorized actuator that may be used is type of actuators commonly used to move power automobile seats. Moreover, a motorized actuator, such as a linear actuator, may be incorporated into a manual tilt mount that has an arc cutout that pivots a monitor substantially about its center of gravity to tilt the monitor. Accordingly, the invention is not to be restricted except in light of the attached claims and their equivalents.

Claims (9)

1. A mount system adapted to attach a monitor to a supporting surface, the mount system comprising:
a first anchoring bracket adapted to couple to the supporting surface;
a first panel mounting bracket adapted to couple to a rear side of the monitor, the first panel mounting bracket adapted to extend and retract relative to the first anchoring bracket;
a first bar having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the first bar pivotably coupled to the first anchoring bracket about a first pivot axis, the distal end of the first bar pivotably coupled to the first panel mounting bracket about a second pivot axis, a first vector defined from the first pivot axis to the second pivot axis, and when the mount system is in use,
the second pivot axis is located below the first pivot axis, and
a first angle between the first vector and a vertical axis; and
a second bar having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the second bar pivotably coupled to the first anchoring bracket about a third pivot axis, the distal end of the second bar pivotably coupled to the first panel mounting bracket about a fourth pivot axis, a second vector defined from the third pivot axis to the fourth pivot axis, and when the mount system is in use,
the third pivot axis is located below the first pivot axis,
the fourth pivot axis is located below the third pivot axis,
a second angle between the second vector and the vertical axis, and
the second angle is greater than the first angle.
2. The mount system according to claim 1, including a wall bracket adapted to couple to a wall.
3. The mount system according to claim 1, where the first bar is longer than the second bar.
4. The mount system according to claim 1, where the first bar is about twice as long as the second bar.
5. The mount system according to claim 1, where the first bar has a first length between the first and second pivot axes, the second bar has a second length between the third and fourth pivot axes, and the distance between the first pivot axis and the third pivot axis is equal to about a sum of the first and second lengths.
6. The mount system according to claim 1, where when the mount system is in use, the first and third axes are substantially along the vertical axis.
7. The mount system according to claim 1, where when the mount system is in the retracted position, the second angle is between about 40° and 50°.
8. The mount system according to claim 1, where when the mount system is in the retracted position, the first angle is about 30° and the second angle is about 45°.
9. The mount system according to claim 1, where a distance between the first and second pivot axis is about 4 inches, and a distance between the third and fourth pivot axes is about 2 inches.
US12/543,502 2008-08-18 2009-08-18 Low Profile Tilt Mount Abandoned US20100038501A1 (en)

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US8957508P true 2008-08-18 2008-08-18
US14289909P true 2009-01-07 2009-01-07
US12/543,502 US20100038501A1 (en) 2008-08-18 2009-08-18 Low Profile Tilt Mount

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US12/543,502 US20100038501A1 (en) 2008-08-18 2009-08-18 Low Profile Tilt Mount

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Cited By (6)

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US20120305740A1 (en) * 2011-05-31 2012-12-06 Chih-Hsiung Chen Adjusting mechanism for a display and related mounting system
US20140048664A1 (en) * 2012-08-14 2014-02-20 Aopen Inc. Monitor supporting module
US20140158647A1 (en) * 2012-12-06 2014-06-12 William F. Geier Security wall rack and television mount combination
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