US20100025442A1 - Tool retaining device - Google Patents

Tool retaining device Download PDF

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US20100025442A1
US20100025442A1 US12183951 US18395108A US2010025442A1 US 20100025442 A1 US20100025442 A1 US 20100025442A1 US 12183951 US12183951 US 12183951 US 18395108 A US18395108 A US 18395108A US 2010025442 A1 US2010025442 A1 US 2010025442A1
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plurality
material
magnetic
retaining device
sheet
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Abandoned
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US12183951
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Michael Shurm
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Tool Bandit Inc
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Tool Bandit Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F5/00Holders or carriers for hand articles; Holders or carriers for use while travelling or camping
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B25HAND TOOLS; PORTABLE POWER-DRIVEN TOOLS; MANIPULATORS
    • B25HWORKSHOP EQUIPMENT, e.g. FOR MARKING-OUT WORK; STORAGE MEANS FOR WORKSHOPS
    • B25H3/00Storage means or arrangements for workshops facilitating access to, or handling of, work tools or instruments
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F5/00Holders or carriers for hand articles; Holders or carriers for use while travelling or camping
    • A45F2005/008Hand articles fastened to the wrist or to the arm or to the leg
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F2200/00Details not otherwise provided for in A45F
    • A45F2200/05Holder or carrier for specific articles
    • A45F2200/0575Portable tools

Abstract

A tool retaining device and method of manufacture comprises an attachment area having an interior sheet of material and an exterior sheet of material. A plurality of magnetic devices is arranged into a two-dimensional pattern with each of the plurality of magnetic devices being placed into individual pockets formed between the interior sheet and the exterior sheet of material. Each of a plurality of magnetic amplifiers is arranged concentrically and in proximity to individual ones of the plurality of magnetic devices. Each of the plurality of magnetic amplifiers is shaped to control an amount of magnetic force applied laterally along a face of the external sheet of material of the tool retaining device. The plurality of magnetic devices are magnetized only after being placed into the individual pockets.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention relates generally to portable retaining devices for holding metallic tools or building materials such as screws, nails, and bolts. More particularly, the present invention relates to portable retaining devices that may be worn by a user.
  • BACKGROUND
  • When working, a builder, mechanic, or other tradesman or hobbyist prefers to have a variety of items within easy reach. The items may include both tools (such as wrenches, hammers, screwdrivers, and the like) and articles to be acted upon by the tools (such as screws, nails, bolts, nuts, washers, tacks, etc.) When working, a user of the tools and articles often requires or prefers both hands be free. Thus, any device for holding the tools and articles should preferably leave both hands free.
  • One solution to this problem is a standard utility belt. The utility belt is generally worn about the waist and typically includes a number of pockets and at least one loop. A number of devices can be carried in or on such a belt. A hammer may be inserted into the loop and the pockets may contain a number of nails, screws, or other articles used by a worker.
  • However, the standard utility belt has a number of potential drawbacks. Items placed in the tool belt pockets could fall out if the user is in a prone or inverted position, as may be the case when working, for example, under a vehicle or in a crawl space.
  • Various alternatives to the standard utility belt exist in the art. The alternatives typically employ a magnetic tool holder affixed about the wrist of a user, a single magnet mounted on a wrist band, or a wrist band made of a flexible resilient strip having a central magnetic portion for holding nails or other similar objects.
  • However, bands worn on the wrist are generally not suitable for holding tools. Instead, the wrist bands are better suited for holding small items such as washers, small screws, or nails. When using a hammer or other heavy tools, a band on the wrist moves repeatedly with a resulting significant applied force. The force could jar loose items on the band. In contrast, a band on the upper arm would be subject to much less force, as the upper arm moves much less when using most hand tools.
  • However, devices designed to fit on the upper arm suffer from a number of drawbacks as well. If a single large flat magnet is used, the magnetic surface is unable to bend, making the device less comfortable to wear. If a number of flat magnets are used (such as bar magnets), the holding power of the device suffers. Weaker magnets are generally used to prevent problems associated with very strong magnets. However, during assembly of the device, the magnets are attracted to each other and any metal objects making the device difficult to manufacture, especially if the item is sewn.
  • Another problem is a desire to hold a variety of objects. Ideally, a device with the greatest functionality would be able to hold both tools (including tools such as hammers with their accompanying mass), and objects to be used with the tools (such as nails, screws, bolts, etc.). Additionally, the surface of the tool holder is most useful if adapted to allow the nails, screws, or other similar articles to be easily graspable and removable from the surface.
  • SUMMARY
  • In an exemplary embodiment, a tool retaining device is disclosed. The tool retaining device comprises an attachment area comprising an interior sheet of material and an exterior sheet of material. A plurality of magnetic devices is arranged into a two-dimensional pattern with each of the plurality of magnetic devices being placed into individual pockets formed between the interior sheet and the exterior sheet of material. Each of a plurality of magnetic amplifiers is arranged concentrically and in proximity to individual ones of the plurality of magnetic devices. Each of the plurality of magnetic amplifiers is shaped to control an amount of magnetic force applied laterally along a face of the external sheet of material of the tool retaining device.
  • In another exemplary embodiment, a tool retaining device to hold tools and other metallic articles to a limb of a worker is disclosed. The tool retaining device comprises an attachment area comprising an interior sheet of material and an exterior sheet of material. A pair of adjustable straps is coupled to opposing edges of the attachment area with the pair of adjustable straps being of sufficient length to attach the tool retaining device to the limb of the worker. A plurality of magnetic devices is arranged into a two-dimensional pattern with each of the plurality of magnetic devices being placed into individual pockets formed between the interior sheet and the exterior sheet of material. Each of a plurality of magnetic amplifiers is arranged concentrically and in proximity to individual ones of the plurality of magnetic devices with each of the plurality of magnetic amplifiers being shaped with a concave surface facing the individual ones of the plurality of magnetic devices and configured to control an amount of magnetic force applied laterally along a face of the external sheet of material of the tool retaining device.
  • In another exemplary embodiment, a method of fabricating a tool retaining device is disclosed. The method comprises positioning a plurality of metallic discs in a two-dimensional array between an interior and an exterior sheet of thin material, placing individual ones of a plurality of magnetic amplifiers in proximity to both a lower face of each of the plurality of metallic discs and the interior sheet of thin material, forming pockets around each of the plurality of metallic discs and the plurality of magnetic amplifiers by fastening portions of the interior and exterior sheets of thin material together, and magnetizing the plurality of metallic discs after the step of forming pockets.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Various ones of the appended drawings merely illustrate exemplary embodiments of the present invention and must not be considered as limiting its scope.
  • FIG. 1 is a top view of an exemplary tool retaining device in accord with various embodiments of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is an exemplary cross-sectional view of section A-A of the tool retaining device of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3A is a top view of an exemplary embodiment of a magnetic disc and accompanying magnetic amplifier used in the exemplary tool retaining device of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3B is a cross-sectional view section B-B of the magnetic disc and accompanying magnetic amplifier of FIG. 3A.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • With reference to FIG. 1, an exemplary tool retaining device 100 includes an attachment area 119 coupled between a pair of adjustable cinch straps 115. In a specific exemplary embodiment, the pair of adjustable cinch straps 115 are configured to hold the exemplary tool retaining device 100 around, for example, a worker's upper arm, forearm, calf, or thigh and the attachment area 119 is configured to hold small tools and parts such as wrenches, screwdrivers, bolts, screws, nuts, and the like (not shown).
  • The pair of adjustable cinch straps 115 each includes a central area 111 coupled on a first end to an elastic portion 103 and a cinch ring 101, and on an opposing end to a fastening material 117. The one or more elastic straps 105 provide a location to hold small non-magnetic objects such as pencils or pens.
  • The central area 111 may be comprised of a hook type material designed to interlock with loops located on the fastening material 117 once one material is pressed in contact with the other. The central area 111 and the fastening material 117 may each be fabricated from a material such as nylon or polyester. In other embodiments, the central area 111 is comprised of loops and the fastening material 117 is comprised of hooks. In a specific exemplary embodiment, the central area 111 and the fastening material 117 are each fabricated from opposing portions of a Velcro® brand hook and loop fastener. (Velcro® is headquartered in Manchester, N.H., USA.) In another specific exemplary embodiment, the central area 111 and the fastening material 117 are each fabricated from opposing portions of 3M™ brand Scotchmate™ or Dual Lock™ Reclosable Fasteners. (3M™ is headquartered in Saint Paul, Minn., USA.)
  • The pair of adjustable cinch straps 115 may be sewn onto the attachment area 119 of the exemplary tool retaining device 100 or affixed with adhesive or any other fixing means known independently in the art. In a specific exemplary embodiment, each of the pair of adjustable cinch straps 115 is about 460 mm (i.e., approximately 18 inches) in length. Each of the pair of adjustable cinch straps 115 is independently adjustable to allow for a proper fit. In another specific exemplary embodiment, the elastic portion 103 is about 19 mm (i.e., approximately 0.75 inches) in length, the central area 111 is about 370 mm (i.e., approximately 14.5 inches) in length, and the fastening material 117 section is about 70 mm (i.e., approximately 2.75 inches) in length.
  • The cinch ring 101 allows the fastening material 117 to be inserted and folded back to interlock with the central area 111 once the exemplary tool retaining device 100 is placed over, for example, a worker's upper arm (not shown). The elastic portion 103 may be of various lengths along each of the pair of adjustable cinch straps 115 and provides a degree of flexibility (accommodating, for example, when a user's flexed arm) in the exemplary tool retaining device 100. The elastic portion 103 is thus adaptable to any change in diameter of the user's limbs while ensuring a snug fit and preventing the exemplary tool retaining device 100 from sliding.
  • The pair of adjustable cinch straps 115 may be stored affixed together. The user may then simply slide one arm or leg into the exemplary tool retaining device 100 and cinch to tighten as needed. The pair of adjustable cinch straps 115 allows a form fit on, for example, the upper, middle, or lower arm and fits a range of arm sizes. Additionally, the exemplary tool retaining device 100 could be used on the user's thigh or lower leg.
  • The attachment area 119 includes a plurality of magnetic discs 107A and a plurality of magnetic amplifiers 107B arranged in a two-dimensional grid and located under an exterior sheet of pliable material 113. The two-dimensional grid arrangement allows the exemplary tool retaining device 100 to flex in both dimensions thus allowing bending, twisting, and flexing motions. These motions would be overly-restrained in at least one-dimension if a single rigid magnet or bar-type magnets were employed.
  • The plurality of magnetic discs 107A and magnetic amplifiers 107B are described in additional detail, below. Each of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A and magnetic amplifiers 107B is held in place by a stitched grid 109 sewn through the exterior sheet of pliable material 113. As will be recognizable to a skilled artisan, the stitched grid 109 may be readily replaced by pockets sewn into the exterior sheet of pliable material 113, glued locations on the exterior sheet of pliable material 113, or a variety of other fastening means known independently in the art.
  • The exterior sheet of pliable material 113 may be comprised of a number of different materials and is selected depending upon expected conditions for use. The exterior sheet of pliable material 113 on the outward facing surface of the exemplary tool retaining device 100 is typically selected to be comprised of a durable material which would not be damaged by tools or other articles adhered to the surface. Further, the exterior sheet of pliable material 113 should be resistant to tearing or ripping by, for example, nails or screws. In a specific exemplary embodiment, the exterior sheet of pliable material 113 is comprised of a polyvinylchloride (PVC) coated poly-knit fabric.
  • Another possible material choice is a two-sided material including an inside knit polyester with an outside rough non-skid neoprene layer. The neoprene layer is waterproof and potentially suitable for marine use. The outward facing surface may also be highly textured to reduce sliding and rolling. One type of material possessing these properties is Toughtek® fabric (manufactured by Harrison Technologies, Inc., Broadalbin, N.Y., USA). Toughtek® fabric is a PVC co-polymer material with an abrasion-resistant grip, polyester knit mesh, and coated with a 0.8 mm (i.e., approximately 1/32 inch) thick textured co-polymer.
  • Referring now to FIG. 2, a cross-sectional view 200 A-A of FIG. 1 provides additional structural detail on the exemplary tool retaining device 100. An upper 201A and a lower 201B interior material layer each provide a strong and flexible layer to increase durability of the exemplary tool retaining device 100. The upper 201A and lower 201B interior material layers may each be comprised of a material such as, for example, rolled nylon mesh and other suitable materials. Additionally, the upper 201A and lower 201B interior material layers may each be comprised of different materials. For example, the lower interior material 201B may be formed from a rigid backbone material, such as a lightweight semi-rigid plastic material.
  • The rigid backbone material may be selected to be sufficiently stiff such that the exemplary tool retaining device 100 retains an essentially linear surface even when not being worn. In a specific exemplary embodiment, the rigid backbone material is fabricated from a strong nylon mesh rolled in polyvinyl chloride (PVC). In another specific exemplary embodiment, the rigid backbone material may be formed from a 0.5 mm (i.e., approximately 20 mil) polycarbonate sheet or other similarly stiff material. A rigid backbone material may enhance assembly, storage, and packaging of the device if shape retention of the exemplary tool retaining device 100 is a goal.
  • An inside layer 203 may be formed from various materials such as knit polyester, nylon, canvas, leather, or any other material that is comfortable for a user to wear. In another embodiment (not shown), the top sheet of pliable material 113 and the inside layer 203 may be used separately without using the upper 201A and lower 201B interior material layer. Alternatively, the lower interior material 201B may be joined to the inside layer 203 to form a single sheet. The two layers may be joined by an adhesive layer (not shown), sewing, or other techniques known independently in the art.
  • Referring again to FIG. 1, the plurality of magnetic discs 107A may be formed into permanent magnets (by techniques known independently in the art) after being positioned and sewn or otherwise placed or held into the attachment area 119. This post-placement magnetization procedure prevents the plurality of magnetic discs 107A from sticking to one another during manufacture of the exemplary tool retaining device 100. If the device is sewn, the plurality of magnetic discs 107A may stick to each other and also to the sewing machine needles or other sewing equipment.
  • In a specific exemplary embodiment for forming the plurality of magnetic discs 107A into permanent magnets, a magnetic field of approximately 40 kilogauss is employed to achieve full saturation. The resulting permanent magnets would have a surface reading of 1370 Gauss. The plurality of magnetic amplifiers 107B, arranged as shown and described herein, increases the surface reading approximately 20% to about 1630 Gauss.
  • In a specific exemplary embodiment of assembly, various layers of material are assembled by first sewing a single seam lengthwise along an edge of the attachment area 119. Then a plurality of additional seams, each perpendicular to the first, is sewn. After the perpendicular seams are sewn, each of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A is inserted in the resulting channels. Once the magnets are inserted in the channels, another seam is sewn lengthwise across the attachment area 119 with various ones of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A placed between the lengthwise seams. The process is repeated until each of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A is encased within an individual compartment in the various layers of materials. The pair of adjustable cinch straps 115 is sewn to the attachment area 119. The exemplary tool retaining device 100 is then placed into a magnetization system to form each of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A into a permanent magnet.
  • With reference now to FIG. 3A, a top view of one of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A is shown as being concentric with one of the plurality of magnetic amplifiers 107B. FIG. 3B shows section B-B of FIG. 3A better indicating an exemplary shape of each of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A and magnetic amplifiers 107B. When each of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A is placed into or near a corresponding magnetic amplifier 107B, magnetic energy that might otherwise be directed or bled out the sides of the magnetic discs 107A is redirected out an uppermost portion of the magnet, thus increasing a magnetic attractive force at a top edge of each of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A and a decreased magnetic force laterally out the sides and near the edges of the magnets. The resulting magnetic strength is sufficient such that an array of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A can support relatively massive tools, such as a framing hammer, even during rigorous arm motions.
  • Another design criterion a skilled artisan will consider is an ability of the exemplary tool retaining device 100 to hold small metallic parts that are not placed directly on top of a magnet. For example, if a screw or bolt is placed quickly on the exemplary tool retaining device 100, the user should not need to place the item directly on top of one of the magnets to ensure a secure hold. Thus, some magnetic bleed can be readily designed-in such that not all of the magnetic strength is concentrated in the forward direction. For example, in a specific exemplary embodiment, approximately 30% of the magnetic attractive force of each of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A is allowed to bleed laterally while 70% of the force is directed forward (i.e., perpendicular to a face of the attachment area 119) by one of the plurality of magnetic amplifiers 107B to optimize a direct and off-center holding ability of the exemplary tool retaining device 100. Relative sizes of each of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A and magnetic amplifiers 107B may be chosen judiciously to obtain a balance required. Further, a distance or spacing, “d,” between the plurality of magnetic discs 107A and magnetic amplifiers 107B may also be selected to obtain the balance required.
  • In a specific exemplary embodiment, each of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A is 23 mm (approximately 0.91 inch) in diameter and 2.5 mm (approximately 0.10 inch) thick. The plurality of magnetic amplifiers 107B may each be formed from, for example, a shaped sheet metal (e.g., steel) or machined cup having a concave interior surface with internal dimensions of 23.5 mm (approximately 0.93 inches) by 2.2 mm (approximately 0.087 inches) and external dimensions of 24.9 mm (approximately 0.98 inches) by 2.7 mm (approximately 0.11 inches). A skilled artisan will recognize that these dimensions are exemplary only and may readily be varied depending upon the strength of the magnetic material chosen, the concavity of the cup, the mass of tools being held, and so on.
  • In another exemplary embodiment (not shown but readily understandable to a skilled artisan), a sheet of spacer material may be placed between each of the plurality of magnetic discs 107A and a corresponding one of the plurality of magnetic amplifiers 107B. The sheet of spacer material may be varied in thickness, or permeability, or both, to affect a balance between magnetic attractive force directed forward and force allowed to bleed laterally.
  • The plurality of magnetic discs 107A may be fabricated from a number of permanent magnetic materials, known individually in the art. For example, neodymium magnets are a very strong commercially available magnet. Commercially available magnets include rare earth magnets composed primarily of neodymium (Nd), iron (Fe), and boron (B). In a specific configuration known independently in the art, neodymium magnets (Nd2Fe14B) are employed although other magnetic materials such as samarium-cobalt (SmCo5), Alnico (primarily various alloys of Aluminum (Al), nickel (Ni), and cobalt), and others known in the art may be employed.
  • The plurality of magnetic discs 107A may be selected from a variety of either magnetic materials or materials capable of being magnetized, such as those listed immediately above. Also, a neodymium magnet, grade N40, has been used successfully. Further, materials for the plurality of magnetic discs 107A may be coated (e.g., with a nickel, ceramic paint coating, epoxy coating, or zinc (Zn) coated) to prevent iron oxidation and to strengthen any brittle magnetic materials. Alternatively, the plurality of magnetic discs 107A may be formed into permanent magnets after assembly of the exemplary tool retaining device is nearly completed, as described above.
  • The present invention is described above with reference to specific embodiments thereof. It will, however, be evident to a skilled artisan that various modifications and changes can be made thereto without departing from the broader spirit and scope of the present invention as set forth in the appended claims. For example, particular embodiments show a grid-like pattern of magnets. A skilled artisan will recognize that the arrangement, dimensions, and numbers of magnets shown herein are for exemplary purposes only. Additionally, a skilled artisan will recognize that various types and shapes of magnets and magnetic amplifiers may be used concurrently in different locations on the tool holding device for various applications. These and various other embodiments are all within a scope of the present invention. The specification and drawings are, accordingly, to be regarded in an illustrative rather than a restrictive sense.

Claims (21)

  1. 1. A tool retaining device, comprising:
    an attachment area comprising:
    an interior sheet of material; and
    an exterior sheet of material;
    a plurality of magnetic devices arranged into a two-dimensional pattern, each of the plurality of magnetic devices being placed into individual pockets formed between the interior sheet and the exterior sheet of material; and
    a plurality of magnetic amplifiers, each of the plurality of magnetic amplifiers arranged concentrically and in proximity to individual ones of the plurality of magnetic devices, each of the plurality of magnetic amplifiers being shaped to control an amount of magnetic force applied laterally along a face of the exterior sheet of material of the tool retaining device.
  2. 2. The tool retaining device of claim 1 further comprising a pair of adjustable straps coupled to opposing edges of the attachment area, the pair of adjustable straps being of sufficient length to attach the tool retaining device to a limb of a user.
  3. 3. The tool retaining device of claim 1 wherein the individual pockets are formed by a stitching pattern adhering the interior sheet to the exterior sheet of material.
  4. 4. The tool retaining device of claim 1 wherein each of the plurality of magnetic amplifiers is shaped with a concave face in proximity to the individual ones of the plurality of magnetic devices.
  5. 5. The tool retaining device of claim 1 wherein the amount of magnetic force applied laterally along the face of the exterior sheet of material is about 30% of a total magnetic force available from each of the plurality of magnetic devices.
  6. 6. The tool retaining device of claim 1 wherein the amount of magnetic force applied perpendicular to the face of the exterior sheet of material is about 70% of a total magnetic force available from each of the plurality of magnetic devices.
  7. 7. The tool retaining device of claim 1 wherein at least one of the interior sheet of material and the exterior sheet of material in the attachment area is formed from a semi-rigid material.
  8. 8. The tool retaining device of claim 1 further comprising a sheet of spacer material formed between the plurality of magnetic devices and the plurality of magnetic amplifiers.
  9. 9. A tool retaining device to hold tools and other metallic articles to a limb of a worker, the tool retaining device comprising:
    an attachment area comprising:
    an interior sheet of material; and
    an exterior sheet of material;
    a pair of adjustable straps coupled to opposing edges of the attachment area, the pair of adjustable straps being of sufficient length to attach the tool retaining device to the limb of the worker;
    a plurality of magnetic devices arranged into a two-dimensional pattern, each of the plurality of magnetic devices being placed into individual pockets formed between the interior sheet and the exterior sheet of material; and
    a plurality of magnetic amplifiers, each of the plurality of magnetic amplifiers arranged concentrically and in proximity to individual ones of the plurality of magnetic devices, each of the plurality of magnetic amplifiers being shaped with a concave surface facing the individual ones of the plurality of magnetic devices and configured to control an amount of magnetic force applied laterally along a face of the exterior sheet of material of the tool retaining device.
  10. 10. The tool retaining device of claim 9 wherein the individual pockets are formed by a stitching pattern adhering the interior sheet to the exterior sheet of material.
  11. 11. The tool retaining device of claim 9 wherein the amount of magnetic force applied laterally along the face of the exterior sheet of material is about 30% of a total magnetic force available from each of the plurality of magnetic devices.
  12. 12. The tool retaining device of claim 9 wherein the amount of magnetic force applied perpendicular to the face of the exterior sheet of material is about 70% of a total magnetic force available from each of the plurality of magnetic devices.
  13. 13. The tool retaining device of claim 9 wherein at least one of the interior sheet of material and the exterior sheet of material in the attachment area is formed from a semi-rigid material.
  14. 14. The tool retaining device of claim 9 further comprising a sheet of spacer material formed between the plurality of magnetic devices and the plurality of magnetic amplifiers.
  15. 15. A method of fabricating a tool retaining device, the method comprising:
    positioning a plurality of metallic discs in a two-dimensional array between an interior sheet of thin material and an exterior sheet of thin material;
    placing individual ones of a plurality of magnetic amplifiers in proximity to both a lower face of each of the plurality of metallic discs and the interior sheet of thin material;
    forming a pocket around each of the plurality of metallic discs and the plurality of magnetic amplifiers by fastening portions of the interior and the exterior sheets of thin material together; and
    magnetizing the plurality of metallic discs after the step of forming the pocket.
  16. 16. The method of claim 15 further comprising adjusting a spacing between the plurality of metallic discs and the plurality of magnetic amplifiers such that a magnetic force applied laterally along a face of the exterior sheet of thin material is about 30% of a total magnetic force available from each of the plurality of metallic discs once magnetized.
  17. 17. The method of claim 15 further comprising adjusting a spacing between the plurality of metallic discs and the plurality of magnetic amplifiers such that a magnetic force applied perpendicularly along a face of the exterior sheet of thin material is about 70% of a total magnetic force available from each of the plurality of metallic discs once magnetized.
  18. 18. The method of claim 15 further comprising selecting at least one of the interior sheet of thin material and the exterior sheet of thin material to be formed from a semi-rigid material.
  19. 19. The method of claim 15 further comprising placing a sheet of spacer material between the plurality of metallic discs and the plurality of magnetic amplifiers.
  20. 20. The method of claim 15 wherein the pocket is formed by fastening portions of the interior and the exterior sheets of thin material by sewing.
  21. 21. The method of claim 15 further comprising:
    selecting a pair of adjustable straps to be of sufficient length to attach the tool retaining device to a limb of a user; and
    attaching the pair of adjustable straps to opposing edges of the interior and the exterior sheets of thin material.
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US20140259552A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Miguel Angel Macias Magnetic Bands
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US20170007008A1 (en) * 2015-07-10 2017-01-12 Steven Patrick Pascale Forearm clipboard
US20170182951A1 (en) * 2015-12-28 2017-06-29 Denise Shepherd Magnetic Attachment Panel
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US9963267B2 (en) * 2015-11-11 2018-05-08 Steven L. Karas Elastomeric band for removably attaching a bottle to a vertical surface

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US20140026297A1 (en) * 2012-07-24 2014-01-30 Maria E. Enes Fishing Accessory or Garment
US20140259552A1 (en) * 2013-03-15 2014-09-18 Miguel Angel Macias Magnetic Bands
US9789590B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2017-10-17 Miguel Angel Macias Magnetic bands
US9333641B2 (en) * 2013-03-15 2016-05-10 Miguel Angel Macias Magnetic bands
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US9585506B2 (en) * 2013-11-14 2017-03-07 Peg Casey-Mederios Bra hanger
US9763510B1 (en) 2015-03-23 2017-09-19 Mag-Vest, LLC Magnetic harness for receiving tools
US20170007008A1 (en) * 2015-07-10 2017-01-12 Steven Patrick Pascale Forearm clipboard
US9963267B2 (en) * 2015-11-11 2018-05-08 Steven L. Karas Elastomeric band for removably attaching a bottle to a vertical surface
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